25 Burst results for "writer and editor"

Women Share Why They Fight For Reproductive Justice

Ordinary Equality

05:40 min | 2 weeks ago

Women Share Why They Fight For Reproductive Justice

"Welcome back to ordinary equality. I'm jimmy wilson a writer editor and feminist activist. And i'm kate. Kelly human rights attorney and feminist activist. Today we're talking about an issue that has been undercurrent of a lot of what we've covered so far reproductive justice it's a framework created by black women to center our needs in the midst of a movement that has ignored us for far too long. This episode we're going to discuss some of the reproductive injustice. That continued post emancipation. And how it spurred the founding of a movement bill to address the inequity and the mistrust caused by centuries of reproductive oppression at the end of the episode will learn white folks myself included can do to better center marginalized and underrepresented voices in this conversation. And what organizations are doing on the ground to ensure reproductive justice the slave breeding industry we discussed in episode three left a painful and persistent legacy in this country. Professor jennifer morgan talked about how the historic commodification of black bodies set the stage for ongoing mistreatment of folks embedding generational trauma that persists today that shamas sits beneath much more recent oppression of reproductive rights throughout most of the twentieth century. Eugenics campaigns flourished in the united states quickly becoming the dominant scientific view. The goal was to exterminate all so-called undesirable qualities in society through often-forced selective breeding and sterilization mental illnesses criminal records unwanted racial traits low intelligence levels and even poverty were considered undesirable indicators leading scientists. Believed that all these traits could and should be selectively bred out of the human population by any means necessary as we now know all of these ideas have since been proven to be as false as they are immoral. Time and time again. In the heyday of eugenics thirty-three states allowed involuntary sterilization on groups lawmakers claimed were unfit have children in california mental institutions. Alone about twenty thousand for sterilizations between nineteen o nine and nineteen seventy-nine unsurprisingly. People of color in immigrants were far more likely to be selected as an undesirable group worthy for sterilization mainstream. Scientists pushed these views. As fact margaret sanger the founder of planned. Parenthood got involved in the eugenics movement as she tried to promote reproductive rights. On october sixteenth. Nine hundred sixteen sanger opened the first birth control clinic in the united states. In order to push the idea of birth control rights forward. She consorted with leaders in the ever growing eugenics movement. She even personally advocated for selective breeding herself in one thousand nine hundred ninety one article. She wrote quote. The most urgent problem. Today is how to limit and discourage the over fertility of the mentally and physically defective as damning as that is. There's more to the story. Here's loretta ross. A professor at smith college and former national coordinator of sister song women of color reproductive justice collective on sanger's legacy her involvement in movement. But i also contextualized wbz devos was vaulted with the jenex movement. And so because it was a popular pseudoscience at that time a lot of people were involved in it. And so to single out margaret sanger as the demon is trying to eliminate the black race is just bad historical research because in fact. She was far ahead of her time. Even i called in a sectional list one day because in nineteen teams retired nineteen sixteen. She about poverty. She wrote about racism she wrote about all the inner sexual issues. We're talking about now. One hundred years later she was so ahead of her time and so she was an accident. Early intersection analyst. Who made some mistakes. But then everybody i know. Who's a human being makes. Mistakes if i wanted to do an analysis of everything dr martin luther king junior it wrong. It's an attention. But maybe they demonize him as they do margaret sanger. Many anti-choice advocates claim. That singer sought to eliminate black people from america altogether. That couldn't be less true. She focused the spread of birth control on poor communities many of which were largely populated with people of color. But it's because they were more likely to be susceptible to unwanted pregnancies and she wrote in one thousand nine fourteen enforced. Motherhood is the most complete denial of women's right to life and liberty. It's definitely disturbing to read about many of sanger's eugenic spaced beliefs. Today though she later repudiated everything. About the idea of selective breeding we still have to contend with the damage her involvement in the movement when a well known figure participates in such a harmful ideology it may provide others the justification to do the same. Her language may also have sowed increased wariness and communities of color after atrocities committed by nazi germany on earth. The terror born from the disgusting ideology of eugenics the vocal public support for the movement fizzled and most sleep died in the united states. But for sterilization continued behind the scenes for decades and still takes place today as we'll discuss later in the

Jimmy Wilson Jennifer Morgan Shamas Margaret Sanger Sanger Loretta Ross America Sister Song Women Of Color Rep Wbz Devos Kate Kelly Dr Martin Luther King Smith College California Germany
"writer editor" Discussed on Ali on the Run Show

Ali on the Run Show

07:10 min | Last month

"writer editor" Discussed on Ali on the Run Show

"This conversation is at least a year and a half in the making. We've been emailing about making this happen for so long and here. We are amelia. Beden thank you so much for being here and welcome to the alley on the run. Show thank you so much for having me. I don't know a whole lot of people realize this that you and i go way back because i'm one of the. Og elliott on the run blogs ends. Well also we worked in the same building. Yeah remember and but we never saw each other. Like how crazy is that cardi kind of had my foot out the door at and also up two thousand ten like people weren't making friends on the internet. Thought it would be weird to like lunch an awesome because like my lunch options around that area. I never wanted to go too far. I used to go to g g cafe a lot and it always made me very sick. But i went there because it was my habit so i could've used you like you probably could have found better places than gee-gee cafe at i mean probably couldn't afford to go anywhere hold lay the papyrus next door and then we used to wander around the the whole foods because that was right wing. Katie holmes had moved into that building and so there were all these paparazzi outside that whole foods and we always thought we were going to see katie holmes and never did yeah. I feel like a header. Celebrities like in the wild when i lived in new york. You know at events like shows in stuff like that but go that building that you and i both worked at three three three seven. Th avenue Al sharpton worked in that building. I used to see him in the that very long elevator. Line all the time. It'd be like that's all sharpen cool if that counts talk. Maybe not as exciting appropriate katie holmes. Well before we get to into our like all that we're going to talk about today and bond over we do need to start you off with a warm up. Which is when you tell everyone who you are where you're from and what you do. My name is amelia benton. I'm a freelance writer and editor primarily focusing on health and fitness and also an avid runner in live in my hometown of houston texas with my husband omar in boston terrier rescue astro. What is astro- doing right now. He is penned up in the kitchen behind his baby because he would otherwise probably the running around making toys such a good boy high. So we're going to go back in time and talk all about your career and how you got to where you are today but i wanna go right to the present day. What are you working on right now. What's exciting and what deadlines do you have on tap. Well i worked. I just work on a piece. That was really exciting for me. I'm not sure. I should say who i interviewed because it hasn't been published yet but i just interviewed a certain elite runner who is most likely going to represent mexico on the tokyo exciting marathoner. Yes okay. I can guess who it is. I think party. And who is that foreign and is it a profile. What's it about was awesome. It's runners very cool. Okay so let's let's hear about a day in the life of amelia. People don't understand about what it means to be a freelance journalist. So what does a typical day in the life of amelia. Look like okay. My probably not typical compared to most freelance writers Most days for me start super early because my husband he works in oiling. Ask the street and he his workday start super early. He's usually his first alarm usually goes off before five. Am and. I usually can't go back to sleep once that's happening. So usually get up with him and have some coffee with him and just like lounge around like catch up on the news. Maybe listen to podcasts. Until it gets light out in around seven. I usually go out for myron and you know. Get back walking feet astro in. I usually start my day around nine. And usually i usually have the today show on in the background. My curse you hours of the day usually aren't very productive. I'm usually just answering emails setting up interviews etc and around eleven. When i turned the tv off as one eight usually get more productive than actually start writing and usually end my day around five pm. Usually one of our gets home just because you can't really concentrate when he's home and he's trying to talk to me and i want to be able to talk to him in here about his day so i love hearing about this because i think i mean i think most people in the past year have been working from home whether they still are or they were periodically for freelancers. This is kind of always been the deal. So i had to laugh last year. When are the all the articles. Were coming out like how how to maximize working from home. I'm like a and all the articles like make sure you get dressed. You get dressed everyday. Do you wear jeans. I never get an leggings. Are the best leggings are life. Likings are life. That on. A t shirt leggings i also. I don't think i've worn jeans. I traveled to atlanta for the olympic trials and have no intention of putting jeans on any times know why constrict that sounds horrible. Yeah so do it. Sounds like you do give yourself a hard stop at the end of the day which i think can be challenging especially with when your job is to be interviewing people and i imagine mostly working around their schedules are pretty good about setting boundaries for yourself Honestly not really i. I haven't taken a vacation. This whole time let On and i probably should have. I mean like everybody else has like. I should be able to take a week off but i just know that i'm ever going to be able to not answer my emails. You know like if somebody tells me with a good opportunity of course. I'm going to respond. So yeah tell me about an email. What comes to mind as you look back on your career. Are there certain emails. You've gotten that have been so exciting whether it was someone saying yes to an interview or an editor reaching out accepting a pitch or saying. Hey we'd like you to write for us. Do any emails come to mind. That made you kind of stop in your tracks and feel really excited. Yeah actually you know for twenty twenty. One already had three new to me. Clients that all of them were editors who reached out to me just Just cold like they have read something. I wrote in another publication and then they want me to write for them which which is really i mean. Really flattering because you know just two or three years ago. I was at the point where i felt like i was constantly emailing everyone in eight often. Not getting any kind of response and for the first year. so that i was freelancing. I really wasn't sure this is gonna work out for me. Yeah let's talk about that because you're not shy about the fact that being a freelance journalist is way better more fulfilling more financially desirable in many than working full time at a publication so before we hear the full story of how you made it happen. Can you talk a little bit about that. About why for you. Being freelance has been such a better fit than where you were in the past.

amelia benton amelia new york atlanta katie holmes Katie holmes two last year today houston texas three years ago eight two thousand One past year olympic trials twenty twenty boston Beden both
Harmful, false posts about people online

Clark Howard Show

05:34 min | 2 months ago

Harmful, false posts about people online

"Today's episode. I want to start out with something. Be pretty scary. For all of us the info that's out there about us on the web and then later i got some great news about a solution for another scary thing rhyme. There's a new security system that will protect both you and your wallet. I wanna tell you about something that is really upsetting to me. And it's something that affects everyday people in greater and greater numbers costing people their jobs causing relationships. You name it and that is false postings about you on the internet is someone who's been in the public eye for decades. It's part of the The drill for me. That i know there are going to be things posted about me. Just flat out aren't true. But there's so much out there about me that people will make their own judgments whether something they see about me. That's just not true. Is the real story or what over time they felt was who you think i am and so for me. No big deal. But what about for somebody who's regular private citizen and they're applying for a job and they never get called back or they have a really promising interview and they never got back with you. Free their second or job offer or you meet somebody you really like to go out with and they go and google you or any search engine and they find out that your this scary monster but it's really not what you are who you are. Here's what's happening. There are people you've heard of revenge porn. I don't know what the name this is. But it's where people were taking out revenge on you purposely post false stuff about you to mess up your life and it is just a brutal thing and i saw a story about this whole problem in the new york times where the new york times writer was contacting people who had been identified as people that were using internet searches a way to take revenge against people posting fake stuff saying people were molesters and all this terrible stuff and the individual. The the new york times contacted took out revenge against that writer and that writers editor and posted all kinds of fake stuff about them. Who's just ugly stuff and there's no easy procedure how to take that stuff down. There was a website. I don't wanna give any publicity to. It's a well known website but not not a household word but a well known website that to me is engaging and extortion that if you find a profile about you on that site and you have proof that none of those things are true they charge you a ransom of a few thousand dollars to pull down the information about you. There was fake in the first place. I mean this is. This is hideous. I mean not only. Should it be a crime when somebody falsely post stuff about you clearly not true that you committed a crime or whatever but the sites that are profiting from this ransoming your reputation back to you. They should be looked at as extortionists and the owners should be facing criminal actions as well but those are should in the meantime. What do you do. This is hard so there are techniques that people will do where they will go around posting a lot of stuff about themselves so they then pushed the fate. Negative stuff down when somebody does a search and that's an imperfect thing and you have to have some decent computer skills to do that but the other thing you may have to do is the best defense. Maybe a good offense. You may have to tell a potential employer. Hey if you do background search on me. There's somebody i don't know who they are. They're taking revenge shots against me and they're posting false stuff about me and you're going to see things about me that aren't true at all

New York Times Google
Hope Springs - Growing Flowers From Seed, Clare Foster

Cultivating Place

06:54 min | 5 months ago

Hope Springs - Growing Flowers From Seed, Clare Foster

"Welcome back to our conversation with clear Foster Gardiner writer editor sharing with us about her garden life journey especially, as it relates to growing flowers from seed were back to hear more about the different kinds of flowers to grow from seed including annuals by annuals, grasses, herbs, perennials, and more. When I look at the. The table of contents and see. How that flows? What criteria did you to set for your contents and the flowers you would include which aren't always traditional flowers. They are also flowering herbs, flowering grasses, It's a, it's a lovely wide range. Will thank you. Yeah. It's it wasn't encyclopedic in any way we didn't want it to be really we we wanted to include the plants and the flowers that we will really growing and that we knew worked really for people. So, cutting flowers and as well as herbs and the the more the edible side of things Yeah. So we really focused on on the plants that the that we were we were growing and that we could recommend first hand. and and I think again because Sabina was working for children seeds and had access to different varieties we were quite Specific in varieties that we were recommending even though those change all the time I mean this quite a few. Varieties now of a certain flowers that we would have put in and they've the because they they just changed the the whole time and find new things. New Exciting colors. So yes. So just just the the the plants, the that we recommend ourselves I think was the the main criteria. And the publishers wanted us to do the be friendly section which I think was a very good idea actually because I think there's a loss of interest in. Oversee ecology and biodiversity biodiversity at the moment and insects in particular. Yeah and I I. Really. This is one of the things that resonated with me about the book when it first came across my desk was the way it is you know it's a pretty straightforward book. It's about growing flowering plants from seed to fill out your your garden over the course of the season. on one level, and then when as I was reading, I kept sort of making little ticks along the margins or underlining because he does get to a lot of universal cultural conversations. The gardening world is having is grappling with right now that I think are all important and you know among those would be Ecological and Seed bio-diversity. So you know just the fact that of trying to grow from seed opens up for almost any Gardner a whole range of plants you would never find at the local garden center and it also then as you are seeing, as C. J. changes changes with the trends if you are growing from seed in that seat is able to come true from seed that you know it reproduces for itself. You are also protecting the biodiversity in A. City of seed so it gets to cede sovereignty and. And I think that is a I'm not sure what it's like in the UK. But that is a very big topic of conversation here for heritage varieties for culturally significant varieties among different groups of people. The indigenous seed keepers network comes to mind immediately the seeds of the African diaspora here in the US is it's a big part of that garden communities, conversation and then you know you, you mentioned the fact and it's clear if you ever grow from seed, it's much more. Economical you spend a lot less money. You create a lot less plastic waste in the world because you don't come home with your you know ten I'm not sure what the equivalent would be in the UK. But you're fourteen dollar one gallon pots using a lot of soil that comes from somewhere and water and and whatever chemicals might have been put on it at the nursery you bypass all of that which I think is an important thing to point out and Made me laugh when I saw comment on one of your instagram posts claire from Genie Blom who said you know annuals are going to save the world and Which is, which is true. But you you never you never preach these things in the book they come up as a result of what you're what you're. Educating people about and sharing with people because you never get far from the fun and the color and the joy. So. As you were working on the book with Sabina were some of these bigger cultural conversations sort of. At the forefront for you. Yes. Yeah I think so. the trouble is with with the book of of of this sort of this size. Is. You're limited with your word count. Quite the lot of text was cut, which is, which is a bit of a shame in a way but but yes, absolutely, I mean these things it is the subtext for the for the whole book. Ready. But more than anything I think an keeping that content that the simplicity simplicity of the framework. Was Key because I just want to encourage people to try to try doing it. And and Yes for the fun of it and the Colorado Avalanche in the garden. And and and. For The expense lack of expense that you can create your own garden so cheaply and so quickly I mean I've just you know I haven't had to ask by any annuals for my pots this year I've grown from seed and and And it so satisfying I, mean just just the whole process of it I I didn't think I can kind of do without it now it's something that.

Sabina UK Foster Gardiner Colorado Instagram United States Writer A. City Genie Blom Gardner Editor C. J.
COVID-19 Travel News

The World Nomads Podcast

08:01 min | 11 months ago

COVID-19 Travel News

"In these episodes the travel journalists stranded by border closures in a bungalow in rural Thailand and the band expats rescuing hungry dogs affected by in. Nineteen matter. Podcast we'll be keeping you up to date trouble alerts information about coroner buyers answering some uplifting news views to inspire you and keep them smiling high it is common and fill and we'll hear. Olivia story shortly but fill their MORE COUNTRIES ACROSS EUROPE. Easing lock damages. Belgium is to reopen to international tourist spot fifteen to June minority by the time. Listen this but it's good news for us while in. Great Sport is our to reopen to international travelers on July the first at the earliest the US Canada border will luckily remained closed throughout June. For Non Essential Travel and this has been hinted at fool but as vacation season ramp up in the. Us travel industry experts. Say The Americans will flip about flying in favor of road trips. The National Park Service is planning to increase recreational access and services on a park by park basis so stained with them and haven't listened to that we have heard that having waited. People will favor road trips absolutely well. Not much choice really. I love a right trip can we? Can we ask people for their road trip stories? What do you reckon she that I will give you permission fail? You can do what you like. Eighty dollars podcast at will know meds dot com with your favorite road trip story. It'd be really cool to share them. Show nights create a bit of a go to four now. Living is a freelance travel writer. She's infectious journalist. She has a passion for adventure and ECO. Travel which is just as well because when has started to shut down to Judah Coverage. She found herself happily stranded in a bungalow in rural Thailand. Yes so I was actually traveling with my boyfriend. Slash unofficial photographer Jonathan. We put our apartment up for after wrench for the majority of spring. He took a hiatus from works to finish his master's program. I'm a travel writer editor for my work. So we were basically had no plans and we're just kind of bopping around and and seeing where felt right so we were actually in India. We are in Delhi win. I The Danish borders were shutting in mere hours. Of course Jonathan could get back but his girlfriend's in American could not that came right before at the American borders shots and I could get back. Jonathan could not so with with literally five hours at in India to choose. We found a cheap flight from Delhi to Bangkok. And we said you know what will be together. This is. There's Kobe it can't destroy a beautiful weather and Delicious Pad Thai at we will will take easy here and just see what comes next. So that's what originally brought me back to Thailand so you all with Jonathan. It's not some long distance relationship livelihood in other episodes and fortunately he is an officer on a Danish oil-tanker so as soon as the flights to Europe started dwindling down in Thailand. He knew he knew that he had to get home or he risked losing his job so about a month ago he he left me Could've defend myself but obviously we we chat every day. This is the first time in my life where I've really had to make every decision For myself and and really every decision wasn't important. One so he is. He will be there at the end of this. I'm I'm really hoping that at some point in the near or distant future either Denmark opens again the US Open's again. Thailand opens again. But until now we we are very much the long distance relationship with him in the middle of the ocean. What are you doing? You was there. Jonathan's going back to today mark. He's going back to work. Your tribal rod is not a lot of commissioning going on. So what have you been doing? Well I'm the kind of person that always needs to keep myself busy. And just in order to stay sane also because I really do love what I do. So as a travel writer and editor. I've pivoted a lot of my messages to stay home but in the future blank blank would be the optimal you know post pandemic vacation so I helped launch L. A. Style magazines travel sector which has been a lot of learning. Seo on the back end and kind of looking for new talent new writers at the same time I also am the executive producer. A PBS show so public television show that's streaming across all the United States. It's funny I don't even have a TV here in my bungalow. But I'm getting all of these pictures of friends who are saying. Hey live is not your shown that I see when I turn on the television. So yes it is hand. It's been a lot of fun. You kind of show people that the idea of friendship connection when travelling which is what the message of fly brother. The show is about Still remains true even during a global worldwide pandemic so it in fact it's been it's been more meaningful than ever because it just shows us the importance of the people that we meet when we travel not just the place as a little bit of a pivot from my normal everyday because those things are are a little bit in line with you know my career and might suggest. I've met a really wonderful group of experts from all over the world theory We joke that were a bit of United Nations of of Thailand at and we of course in in a socially distant manner have this rocketed to really help the street dogs and the elephants year in in crabby because at the street dogs really rely on the scraps of the hotels and the restaurants tourist just leaving McDonald's hamburger in a garbage near the beach but with legitimately notorious. These dogs are are starving and in Near Jack. So what we do. Is We go on our on our motorbikes early in the mornings I'm we collect food. We have you know a donation site available or use our own funds And then we have about eighty five street dogs in different packs that we ride our bikes to which is a new phenomenon for me. Because I've I've never been exactly the most graceful human being so Doing that on a motorbike is is definitely stepping out of comfort zone. I never had thought really how much a pandemic would affect you know with this chain of events how it would affect the animals and in turn affects the humans because now a lot of times people like culturally are are more frightened of the street dogs but if the dogs aren't having to you know come up in bag and really show their show their strength in order to just survive if they can be fed and we feed them food. We feed them vitamins. We've gotten We've taken some to the vets just to make sure they're all right you know they're manged there for Then everyone kind of lives in harmony so that people generally have been very very open and welcoming to to the group of ex stats riding around in helping the the dogs.

Thailand Jonathan United States Europe India Writer National Park Service Olivia Belgium Writer And Editor Near Jack United Nations Canada Delhi Judah Coverage Denmark Executive Producer
How Studio 360 Got Started

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

07:38 min | 1 year ago

How Studio 360 Got Started

"Hosting studio three sixty Kurt. Anderson Co founded. Spy magazine was a writer editor. Columnist design and architecture critic and playwright. He'd also just written a novel turn of the century which came out in nineteen ninety nine. The Britain plays. He worked for television. I mean he just was a renaissance person in the arts and in journalism and that was exactly the kind of person we were looking for. That's Melinda Ward the former chief content officer for Public Radio International and creative studio three sixty. And here's Julie Bursting again. I remember that lunch that I had with him when I was interviewing for the job. And he said you know. I've been working with a vocal coach to try to get me to not sound like I grew up in Omaha. That didn't work. Well I said to him. We're firing that person because you need to sound like you if you sound like just yet. Another announcer with a announcer voice. This show is GonNa fail so you gotta sound like yourself. Good Morning. I have realized over the years that I am always. I think much better at this. If I've worked out for Sunday off my super villain name. I speak Spanish. I'M CISCO I need. This is a child to crew. I had a forty five this record in. Oh this is the end and I'm curt Anderson. Thanks very much for listening so for me I was. I would always record Kurt in his sessions and I was in some of his first sessions. And you know he was brand new at doing it. He wasn't sure what P popping was. He didn't know how close to sit to the microphone. He didn't know what a pickup was. It was fun to help someone figure all that stuff out in the interviews. I felt like it took them awhile. Loosen up I'm just GONNA say that. Pairing Him with interesting people felt like the best way to use him so in those early days we just looked for really cool funny interesting people for him to sit down with and that got him excited to come into the office and into the studio and do that and I still remember the day that season Santana came in people do feel a turned off or or indifferent. two images of horror and and war and suffering that they see in that they feel indignant about I think it's comes not because they're blase but because they feel impotent or powerless and I think that's perfectly understandable reaction and I saw Kurt in our conference room and the look on his face of sort of terror was really powerful but I knew he would do a great job but I could see that. This was like the first person we've ever had in the studio that he was a bit in awe of it was just this powerful show about how artists have looked at war since homer and she was phenomenal and he did a great job. Do you feel okay about the new. Whatever you say okay. We show him how current into a lot of different situations that require lots of different levels of sort of being alert to possibilities. We just through so much stuff at him and you know it's a different kind of show in that. He didn't generate ideas but he would rarely say no. I remember doing this segment on sky. Come up with this talk show within the video game halo and we had. Kurt like go and be like an Avatar in the game. They're shooting I'm trying to defend us here. Your need to move faster Kurt. I'm sorry I mean it seems funny to think about it now but like at the time it was super crazy and cutting edge at this guy had figured out how. Sorta hack the game and had this whole virtual reality six months after Katrina. We planned a trip to go to New Orleans. Really figuring out how they were going to try to solve this problem of of how to. Kinda rebuild the city and what the design questions were around at all. The water is gone now of course but the wreckage. That remains is absolutely shocking. Presumably the people in this neighborhood are among those who a great many of them majority perhaps didn't have that's right. They didn't have a choice. I think that's one of the great travesties of Katrina went on a trip to New Orleans for a few days to kind of produce it and get all the different voices together. But you know he's always been really passionate about design and kind of see him step up and really tap into the the human element of what was going on there. It wasn't just like an architecture is it was about people's homes and lives. It was really interesting to see him in that element because so often he is just in a studio and actually one of a favorite memories of working with them in the studio was a program that we did In two thousand fourteen and it was our nineteen fourteen episode and we produce the whole thing as though we had been on the air in nineteen fourteen and today's program we present to you through the medium of radio some singular developments taking place in the arts today in literature drama music and the media. Moving pictures new technologies and new ideas are changing. What we the American people create and how we are entertained. He delivered it in the crazy. Old Timey Voice. That people use stood us for broadcast announcing and our technical director at that time. John Galore. Who brought in a megaphone? Like a troll off Warne and had Kurt record threw it into the mic to compress everything down. I mean I've seen Kurt Geek out on many wonderful occasions but I have never seen him geek out that joyfully. It may not be too old to speculate that later. Generations will look back upon nineteen fourteen as a remarkable year perhaps as a year in which the twentieth century cruelly began. This week on the PODCASTS. Were looking back at the early years of studio three sixty which is drawing to a close after two decades of covering arts and culture on the radio after the first year on the air the show was finding its groove and its audience but then in the fall of two thousand one. The unthinkable happened. There has been an explosion at the World Trade Center in Lower Manhattan. The upper floors of northern tower at the World Trade Center has experienced an explosion studio three sixties original offices were at wnyc in the municipal building at the base of the Brooklyn Bridge just blocks away from the World Trade Center. I remember coming into work in. Minneapolis and hearing on the radio about the the hit on the towers and then coming into PRI and of course the WNYC studios were right under. The twin towers are right next to them and the that a lot of people took came up under the twin tower so we were horrified and terrified didn't terribly worried about a whole. Wnyc staff and studio three sixty staff you know found out later that Julia Burstein had been in the office and she had had she'd left. Wnyc had to walk all the way up the west side of Manhattan to think it was her brother's apartment or something to call day and coughing and choking and nobody knew what was going on.

Kurt New Orleans World Trade Center Wnyc Public Radio International Anderson Co Britain Curt Anderson Spy Magazine Melinda Ward Julie Bursting Chief Content Officer Omaha Julia Burstein Manhattan Cisco Writer Santana
An Interview With Academy Award Winning Editor: Paul Hirsch

Monday Morning Critic Podcast

09:44 min | 1 year ago

An Interview With Academy Award Winning Editor: Paul Hirsch

"Next guest is an Academy Award winning editor his book a long long time ago and cutting room far far away. My fifty years of editing in Hollywood hits Star Wars Kerry Buehler's Day off mission impossible so many more I can go on ray planes trains and we'll deals. Please welcome Paul Hurst. I Paul thanks for coming on the podcast today. Hope Your Day as well my pleasure so I mean there's the history you have. It's amazing. I mean I'm going through some of the people. Oh you've worked for John Hughes. Brian Depalma George Lucas. Is it fair to say that Brian Depalma is your mentor. I mean I've heard you say on occasion is is that a fair as a statement to make absolutely yes. Yeah and and there's so much here Chris I don't want to jump too far ahead of myself but you know just going through your filmography and you know there's tons that I've mentioned but there's also work that you've had I haven't heard it interviews but you've I think you've contributor on like World War Z.. The Great Gatsby life of Pi. How does that work? Paul you just have a little bit of an influence. You do some work in that film and you're not like the leading editor. Hugs that work. Why why aren't you credited for the same way you weren't some of your other works right? Well h film is an individual case so but usually it's. It's a picture that the studio for whatever reason has some concerns about and They they say would you mind either looking at it and giving US notes and would you mind coming in for a few weeks or it's phrased you know differently but there comes a point where frequently that's On a picture even working for many months at the director and the editor and maybe even the studio executives the producers sort of what I call snow. Snow blind no not sure what they're looking at anymore because it's been working on it so long. They don't have objected to take on. What's there and any light to bring it? Excuse me like bring in what they called fresh eyes and sometimes just watching picture giving notes and sometimes sometimes it's actually sitting down and doing a version So that's how you know And then I find that Not taking credit is a way to make my suggestions more tolerable eligible that. I'm not trying to hog credit from someone yet. It makes sense to me. Yeah you know so that. The suggestions go down uneasily could easily because they're often as genuine efforts to help. I have a question down the road that steps on this topic. But I'll ask you now because it's just it's it's appropriate at this point. Do you find that studio executives as time goes by our. I don't WanNa say the word meddling because that's has a negative connotation to it but you find that their involvement is more were. The work should probably be left to those in the creative process. Director writer editor is is it. Is it more intrusive as time goes by Paul Well I'll say this that the most successful films that I've worked on. I've been the product of my collaboration with the director. Essentially just the two of us Making decisions incisions about the cat. Now that's well said and and you know I wanNA talk a little bit about your early life so you grew up in Paris. How many years were you in Paris for Paul? I was in Paris as a child for about four years. Now are you do you still can you. Are you fluent in French. Can you still speak it as something. You influence fluence. My accent is very good. I'm fluid to the degree washing. Sam Fluent I. I always impress french-speakers but equality. My accent hurry I hasten to tell them that might calculator is very small and and I don't have a real facility. Use it sound them. But I'm sure if I went over there and spent two or three Munson Johnson total immersion. I'd I'd get back to where I had been. You know when I was eight years old so I have the vocabulary of an eight year old child but you know I think I think if I stayed there pick it up you know. Yeah that's certainly flew in my book and then you were at your dad's a painter and I have to believe you get some of his his eye for things in art history major. You're the second art history major I've had and I think what two weeks which ages which is telling because I feel history major. Paul she was. She's a costume designer urine editor. I feel like history majoring in history. GIVES YOU LA. This supreme I for details. Is that kind of going overboard or do you think there's something to that. I really don't know One way or the other. I'm an art. I was an art history. Major not major distinction there right as she the average she she was also an art history major so it was like yeah she go ahead. I'm sorry but in my case as an art history major you spend a lot of times looking and yet projected images in dark rooms and critiquing them so I was sort of being prepared for a lifetime of work. Doing just that although I wound up doing moving images instead of still ones but I think my background is was useful in terms of developing an aesthetic about the elements of life of a style in visual arts. And there are many qualities that you you know you you try to achieve whether it's you know Symmetry your balance or a brace or certain a set of qualities that he strived for that are not necessarily only in visual arts. To 'cause I majored in music in high school I went to High School of Music and art and so my work in film. I find that very closely tied to my feelings about music for for me. Music is an essential elements of my work in terms of making presentations whether it's to the director to the public or whatever music than essential ingredient in what I'm doing yes well said you know. People that are listening to this. podcast cast many see editors and they think they know what it editor's job is but many times it's a teen involvement many times. You're working claburn as you mentioned with a director. How would you? What's your cliff notes? Version of what editor is for those listening in probably aren't sure exactly what it is. How would you define an editor's job? Well I can read to you from the introduction to my book which is essentially a chapter devoted to answering exactly that question but No I I have to say I have ordered on Amazon and I did read an excerpt I think it was on entertainment magazine. Entertainment Weekly Weekly. It was a really beautiful excerpt they printed and people said some really nice things anymore. Campbell talkie movies are made in the editing room and so much of your book I want to get into. It's really an amazing. It's an amazing story. Your life is there's been so much to it you are our consensually. What the editor is doing is putting together? The experience that the audience is GonNa have and everything that's done on a film the writers the actors cinematographers the production designers. The costume designers the makeup people. Here people everything the all their work is Toward one end an s to provide the editor with raw materials. Everything they do do is in service of the cut and the editor takes everything that they have done and uses it to bill. It'll be experienced the audiences. Yeah and do you find as you because you've been so effective for so long. I mean that's a testament to your abilities. Do you find that much of your. Your work is is is with the directors. You find that a lot of it is I know George had faith in you clearly Brian has yes. I had faith you clearly. Do you find that typical or is it. Not Typical of of the job varies as much as human beings very Taylor. Is there ever a time. Where director says you know what I completely trust? You have at it and and do what you have to do or as a director always kind of in some way have to monitor the process like I said everyone's different Are Comfortable having having any drive in some of the likely take the real themselves you know so it varies from person to

Editor Paul Hurst Director Brian Depalma George Lucas Brian Depalma Academy Award John Hughes Paris Kerry Buehler Hollywood United States High School Of Music Chris Entertainment Weekly Weekly Munson Johnson SAM Taylor French Amazon
"writer editor" Discussed on Side Hustle School

Side Hustle School

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"writer editor" Discussed on Side Hustle School

"<SpeakerChange> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> all <Advertisement> right so <Speech_Music_Male> three lessons. <Speech_Music_Male> Every service <Advertisement> provider <Speech_Male> eventually learns <Speech_Male> which essentially <Speech_Male> correlates to three <Speech_Male> mistakes six most <Speech_Male> service providers make. <Speech_Male> This is <Speech_Male> very common first. One <Speech_Male> is pricing <Speech_Male> usually <Speech_Male> priced too low in the beginning. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And sometimes it's okay. <Speech_Male> You know when you're getting started <Speech_Male> to start off <Speech_Male> with a low price or <Speech_Male> even do some work for free <Speech_Male> but you really don't <Speech_Male> want to remain at that point for very <Speech_Male> long. Okay because <Speech_Male> in the long <Speech_Male> term you just GonNa get <Speech_Male> out going to attract the <Speech_Male> wrong kind of clients <Speech_Male> and that's why Liam <Speech_Male> fortunately realized in his <Speech_Male> first doing this <Speech_Male> that he needed to raise his <Speech_Male> prices just to <Speech_Male> be fair to everyone including <Speech_Male> himself <Speech_Male> number two <Speech_Male> specialization. <Speech_Male> Most service providers <Speech_Male> usually usually try to <Speech_Male> do too much usually <Speech_Male> try to too many things. <Speech_Male> Doing <Speech_Male> something really specific <Speech_Male> being at a trip <Speech_Male> for Romance novels <Speech_Male> being <Speech_Male> the editor for something <Speech_Male> else writing the wedding <Speech_Male> vows. That <Speech_Male> kind of stuff is great because <Speech_Male> it is so specialized <Speech_Male> right. So don't <Speech_Male> try to do too much actually <Speech_Male> going to become more of <Speech_Male> an authority by <Speech_Male> being intentional and specific <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> then number three delegation <Speech_Music_Male> lot <Speech_Male> of news service providers <Speech_Male> tried everything themselves. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> you often might <Speech_Male> have to do everything yourself <Speech_Male> in the very beginning <Speech_Male> but ultimately <Speech_Male> if you're truly going <Speech_Male> to create that freedom <Speech_Male> the Independence Indi- <Speech_Male> if that is what you <Speech_Male> crave ultimately <Speech_Male> you need to get <Speech_Male> some help of some kind <Speech_Male> doesn't mean you need <Speech_Male> to go out and hire a bunch <Speech_Male> of employees doesn't <Speech_Male> mean you need to go out and <Speech_Male> go into debt <Speech_Male> often with a service <Speech_Male> business you can do it <Speech_Male> by working with <Speech_Male> contractors <Speech_Male> who are only paid when <Speech_Male> there's work that comes in <Speech_Male> and is assigned <Advertisement> to them and <Speech_Male> then completed. So <Speech_Male> you don't have to worry about a recurring <Speech_Male> payroll <Speech_Male> if business the slows down. <Speech_Male> Or if it's a seasonal thing <Speech_Male> or something you don't <Speech_Male> have to worry about always paying <Speech_Male> the same amount <SpeakerChange> of bills <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> pricing specialization <Speech_Male> and delegation. <Speech_Male> If you think about <Speech_Male> those things in the beginning it will <Speech_Male> help you as as you go along <Speech_Male> and by the way <Speech_Male> inspiration has <Speech_Male> guy but inspiration with <Speech_Male> action is better. <Speech_Music_Male> Thank you so much for <Speech_Music_Male> listening my friends. <Speech_Male> Today's show notes <Speech_Male> including links to invisible <Speech_Male> ink editing. <Speech_Male> Anything else as I mentioned <Speech_Male> are at <Speech_Male> school dot com <Speech_Male> slash one <Speech_Male> zero four three <Speech_Male> episode <Speech_Male> of one thousand and <Speech_Male> forty

Introducing "What Goes Up," A New Show From Bloomberg

Odd Lots

01:58 min | 2 years ago

Introducing "What Goes Up," A New Show From Bloomberg

"Mike, sometimes financial markets can get confusing told me about its equity longshore performance over the counter derivative products. And that's why on what those up a new podcast from Bloomberg. We'll help you break down the ins and outs of the forces driving global markets. I'm Sarah Pontiac, a reporter on across SSD Regan, a senior editor and writer for the markets each week. We'll talk to some of Bloomberg smartest writers editors and strategists. And we'll bring in some of the biggest names on Wall Street. We'll explore what's moving not just stocks. But also bonds currencies and commodities, and there may be the occasional dead you occasional possibly frequent de jokes. Do you even care about Brexit? I mean, it should US investors befallen this or is it is it like premier soccer, you know, on less. Yeah. I just can't believe that people trade these, you know, and it's all computers now, I think computers are going to become human because they will develop the emotion of shame from trading U S China trade headlines, they have a ton of analogies for this. And I think the cleanest study showed is the one that I would like to time on because it's really a horrible one. That's how they referred to me downstairs. From central banks to economic data to earnings trade and whatever else may come. If it moves market what goes out? We'll be on it. What goes up debuts on April twenty six on apple podcasts Spotify or wherever you get your podcasts. Indepth analysis concise reporting need to know, global business news around the world and across the markets. Bloomberg connect the dots. Decision-makers subscribe today to the global standard for business reporting. Get it all at Bloomberg dot com slash subscribe.

Bloomberg Regan Mike Brexit Sarah Pontiac Soccer Senior Editor Reporter U S China Spotify Apple Writer
"writer editor" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

06:58 min | 2 years ago

"writer editor" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Welcome back. This is the Ben Shapiro show. The media having agenda the agenda is America is a racist. Terrible place. The proof is that President Trump is president. And they were willing to back that narrative, no matter what it costs. So even if they bought your story, they'll pretend they didn't watch the story. The real story is evil Republicans as always they say the real story here. Republicans pouncing that the story was weaponized Brian seltzer on reliable sources. Remember, he's supposed to be sort of the journalistic ombudsman of CNN calling to account journalistic journalistic crappy nece? Instead, he says, no, no, we all did a great job. The real problem is weaponization Republicans pouncing pouncing as I pointed out over the last six weeks whenever there's an increase in Republicans pal stories. It means the media are not doing their jobs. It means the left are terrible Adair jobs. That's why Republicans are reacting. The reaction of Republicans is never story is never an actual story. The actual story is the media screwing it up. Here's brain Stelter, defending the media. And then saying the real problem here are the folks. The right. High quality. Very careful only a bit. DMZ? Jack. Clump supporting. Imitation pours in some day one. And what you're looking at those sites. Can you can end up? Was able to be weaponized in many different ways port three. Okay. It was weaponized in many different ways. The right was weaponising the story. Okay. Let's let's go through how the media actually covered. This thing from the beginning. Because now we are getting gasoline. Now, the media covered this thing uncritically and other wanna tell us. No, no, we are very careful in our coverage. Here's the montage of members of the media reporting the story. Suffice it to say they were not critical in their coverage of the story. Empire's star jussie smollet was the victim of a vicious racist and homophobic attacks his attackers hurled racial, and how a folks learn people yelled racist, and homophobic, racial and homophobic slurs. We're talking about racism. We're talking I'll sharpen she would steroids. They're looking for two suspects who were apparently wearing make America. Great again. NBC offenders uttered this mega country. Absolutely despicable horrible term for. This is a horrible story. Story. Is horrific and unacceptable. This is America in twenty nine hundred nine okay. It's courtesy of gravy. And and that would be Brooke Baldwin on CNN saying this is America in twenty nine hundred twenty nine thousand the media uncritically reporting a completely implausible story. And then when caught in their own garbage coverage immediately turning around and say, we didn't do anything wrong is isn't the white the right people the people on the right? They keep weaponized pouncing. Caleb. How great peace over immediate pointing out. Newsweek writers the senior reporter at the Daily Beast. Kevin fallon. We're talking about writer for bling bling writer in Philadelphia magazine. Vibe magazine producers for Nightline ABC contributor to Forbes and slate and editor at the LA times a BuzzFeed writer, a Reuters reporter writers for teen vogue in Washington. Post. Freelance contributors for cosmopolitan underwriters at Rolling Stone ABC ABC NBC news writers, and producer writer and producer. Huffpost writer editor at Washington Post Vanity Fair. So we're supposed to believe that the media didn't Trump on the story. Of course, they jumped on the story. Of course, they did it supported their narrative. Not only did they jump on the story. So did the entire left because the media and the left wanted this story to be true. They desperately wanted the story to be true. And so funny folks on the left will say things like the entire right? Bought into pizza gate or the entire right? Bought into the Barack Obama birtherism hoax that first of all that is not true, but the entire left or at least huge swaths of left, but fully. Into not only the Justice Mel story, but into the near that was president from salt. So Ellen page went on TV with Stephen Colbert. And she suggested it was Mike Pence's fault that a crime that never happened actually happened is she going to walk this back. This thing has twenty million views twenty million views Ellen page last relevant when she was playing the dole person in inception. Now, she's coming forward and saying that it was Mike Pence. This thing has twenty million views when did she walk back? What does she held accountable for this lie? Never. The vice president of America wishes. I didn't have the love with my wife. He is hurt LGBTQ people's so badly as the government of Indiana. And I think the thing we need to know. And I hope my show gay -cation did this in terms of connecting the dots. In terms of what happened the other day to just say, I don't know him personally. I saw I sent all of my love if you're in a position of power, and you hate people. And you wanna cause suffering to them? You go through the trouble you spend your career trying to cause suffering. What do you think is gonna happen? Kids are going to be abused. And they're going to kill themselves and people are gonna be beaten on the street. Okay. She's just it's sorry. This is disgusting. You're taking a fake crime. And you're putting it on Mike Pence. And then you're blaming Mike Pence for problems across the country for which Mike Pence has no responsibility, and people are uncritically cheering you because this is the world in which fake information can travel quickly. You hear about fake news all the time from the media are the scourge of fake news, the scourge false narrative and President Trump complains the media are complicit in fake news and false narrative. You know, why this is the case? The reasons is the case is because human beings have a natural tendency to believe stories that back there play and right now people have narratives about America that are not true on a lot of different sides. And they're willing to believe stories that back those narratives, no matter how untrue. They are is a fascinating piece in the Washington Post today by a person named Nana f Lewis Mumford who's executive systems, the Washington Post editorial board the title of the. Pieces. I doubted jussie smollet it breaks, my heart that I might be right. Why would it break your heart? When it turns out that I hate crime is false that you make you happy. It means that a hate crime did not occur. Why does it break your heart? When it turns out that accusations that America is deeply racist. And homophobic are not backed by implausible story that make you happy. I give it turned out that somebody accused somebody anti Jewish hate crime. And it turned out not to be true. I feel great because America's not anti semitic country. But for folks on the left if the story backs their play, and it turns out the story is false. That's really bad because then it doesn't back there. Play coming up. We'll get into this Washington Post columnist who says she's very sad that the Justice mallet case was hoax. She says she wishes it had been real why? Because now that it's a hoax. Maybe she'll have to reexamine some proprietors which would be terrible like thinking, America's not a terrible. This is the bench appear show. Diet dot com studios. Seventy seven. Forty two degrees and cloudy..

America Mike Pence Washington Post President Trump writer CNN president Ben Shapiro reporter Brian seltzer Kevin fallon jussie smollet Barack Obama Brooke Baldwin Newsweek Indiana NBC vice president Vibe magazine
"writer editor" Discussed on Food 4 Thot

Food 4 Thot

05:07 min | 2 years ago

"writer editor" Discussed on Food 4 Thot

"This is accurate. I'm fran. I'm a writer editor and last night. I puked behind a Wendy's. Oh, LA looks good on you, babe. I know I'm acclimating. Wow. Wow. Well, I am Joseph Osmundsen scientists nonfiction writer and my favorite place in the world. It's a bath house steam room because in there. No one can see crimes. I don't know that that's entirely true because they're gonna you're crying. Anyway, I'm Dennis north the second reader, a writer of former figure skater and my goal for the next year is to give myself a whole lot more self care and Toshiba's. No, you don't even more. Maybe you're the only person in the world who doesn't I disagree? I'm guy brenham. I'm a writer a comedian of Scorpio, and I'd like to know which Wendy. Fair enough. At this time. Today, as you all know subbing in for teams is guy Verana the goddess, Sal. No you did. I was just introducing that's fair. Geise writer thought leader spelled T H O T, unfortunately, a comedian which case when we have people that are funnier than us in the studio. Co host of the podcast pop rock and author of one of my favorite books that came out last year. My life has goddess go go by it's available wherever books are sold. That's correct. First thing this nice thing, of course, and this week on our delicious little menu. We play a scrumptious game of swipe rents laugh. We have a delectable impure thought story from a one guy for our main discussion, we have some issues of the bodily variety. And our desert is like what we think is the author. Contender there out. How? I'm feeling a little package. So let's start the top of the show the way any good top should with a little tease. A little something to wet your pallets. It's our amuse Bouche. And today, we're going to amuse Bouche is with a little little little little little game of swipe rights swipe laugh. If you've never played before if you've never been on Tinder before guy, I'm swipe rights why swiping right? Inciting laughed is like good things and bad thing or understand the human being. Twenty nine. People in the studio before that we're like hi this. Been living in a vacuum. Anyways. What we do is. We all is some cultural phenomenons, and we as a group will or you know, or divide a about whether we would swipe writer, so her on them swipe ROY swipe left face tattoos. I could not swipe anymore hard right on this. I think they're so sexy, and I want one so bad, but I wouldn't get fired. So quickly from my job. I mean, I I also swiped right? Because I love man that looks unemployable. One of my my tease. Hi, I'm swipe hard left hard left for next time. She was one thing. But on the face. Okay. I'm an old, man. I will always be very swipe left on face. It's like sue. You're just like this is a person who's going to make decisions with no sense of consequences. The good thing is yellow like a number idea. Mechta chewed does seem like, oh, he real dumb like to so frequently goes along with the truly amazing body and just like a narrowed worldview, but faced too that's a little far for me. Yeah. Fair. Swipe right swipe left t mobile. Timothy Shalam is Tim O Tae of shoe. I also I swipe right? He's those guys swipe rate. He's adorable. I liked that. We now have him and Lucas hedges just to be all of our emotionally needy. Gabe, boys and films actors ever needs to be employed, fats, Lincoln, just work out and have fun. Now hard left on demo-. Why? Wow. You know? There's something I didn't like the harness Golden Globes. A kind of. And I was like why are you doing this? I just didn't understand according to Louis Vuitton is an embroidered bib. And I was like sure it. Well, you know, what I there's maybe that's more proprio do what they need the bed swipe rights wipe left bird box. I don't know her. Okay. I'm swiping left. The reason why I'm Siping left is because as much as I loved tramonte roads. I was not interested in seeing a movie where the one like black person who has a major role it just constantly opened the door for opening the door for white people. That's specifically I was like, Nope. By like to go from moonlight to that loud about you guy left. I only read the Wikipedia entry for horror films..

writer Bouche Wendy Timothy Shalam Joseph Osmundsen Louis Vuitton Mechta Golden Globes Toshiba editor Verana Gabe Sal Lucas hedges ROY
"writer editor" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

02:52 min | 2 years ago

"writer editor" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"I mean, I thought marriage is kinda pledge in your life to someone and the sickness and health and right now this will be a different situation. If before she has Alzheimer's day was like, hey, we're in open relationship. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. And he was like, you know, what my wife gets it. You know, we've had overlays Schiff. I'm like like, I'm more understanding to that. But it don't sound like that arrangement was made. She got sick. And he was like, oh now, I'm open up the relationship. You don't know how she feels about that. Because he can't tell you. He basically said. She came remember this. So why not? So he got upset, you know, and with the Facebook where he originally shared this information to clarify and clapback at his haters. Did you create it because you know, what? You could have said that's why I was going with this. I was going to read the whole thing. But one point was wouldn't nobody on like. So there's this thing where it's like something is your business, and we can go that's our business. We trying to stay out of it. You know, happens all the time, you have a friend. They got a problem with another friend. Hey, you ain't got tell me all this onto totally business. I didn't ask prime, you know. But sometimes people just don't don't take. No for answers. Like, I'm gonna tell you the shit. Anyway, didn't kind of that to me. Where is hey, I'll need to know. How me whatever you're doing with your life. That's your life. And he's over there. Like, I got to tell my business. So he will reply newsflash to the nickel and dime. Pay pal. Thought troll main that the two European cities believe b be lived in and all of us have traveled to extensively. Who could he be talking about European cities? I have no idea. I don't know who that is. All right to the writer editor of the Nick Grio. That's good. That's really good. Is that at agree on the Negra real that's free to good? That's not that's not like a dish who gened up controversy by covert spewing fewer races innuendo to the bloggers wallo win the mud and filth of lies to the idiots and Ingrid people call for my arrest and saying is or has ever been abused. I only wish someone in your immediate family had Alzheimer's. So you can see feel and experience the pain.

Schiff Alzheimer sickness Facebook Ingrid Nick Grio writer editor
"writer editor" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"writer editor" Discussed on WTVN

"You're listening to coast to coast AM George now. As Marty Stuart and his fabulous superlatives. The song is called way out west. I thought it set a nice five where we're heading next Ken lane is a talented writer editor publisher and host of his own podcast that focuses on among other things. Strange tales singing, sand dunes, artists and aliens authors and oddballs ghost towns, and modern legends musicians, mystics, scorpions, etc. That you find in the area around Joshua tree. California can is the desert oracle that's the name of his publication. Also, the radio show that he hosts been wanting to get him onto the show for the longtime. He and I have narrowly missed meeting each other in person a couple of times, we share a friend or two in common as well as our mutual interests and fondness for the desert and its strange inhabitants. He's followed a long and winding trail through various media incarnations. To end up in Joshua tree and the aptly named desert outpost. That's a magnet for adventurous, and like minded souls hermits and assorted characters and then a moment we get to hear some of the tall tales that can has followed over the years. We'll be right back here on coast to coast AM. Feeling overwhelmed by the start of the new year. And all those resolutions you've made we'll get SuperBeets by human..

Joshua tree Ken lane Marty Stuart California writer publisher editor
"writer editor" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"writer editor" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Room and text. Bill colder. Had him. A circus tent? The Golden State. They hired me on as a high wire. You understand? The news. Making big old curtains. The pill. Fell down. Spin. Around. You're listening to coast to coast AM George now. Marty Stuart and his fabulous superlatives. The song is called way out west. I thought set a nice vibe where we're heading next Ken lane is a talented writer editor publisher and host of his own podcast that focuses on among other things. Strange tales singing, sand dunes, artists and aliens authors and oddballs ghost towns and modern legends musicians. Mystics scorpions at cetera that you find in the area around. Joshua tree. California Ken is the desert oracle, that's the name of his publication. And also the radio show that he hosts I've been wanting to get him onto the show for the time. He and I have narrowly missed meeting each other in person a couple of times, we share a friend or two in common as well as our mutual interests and fondness for the desert and its strange inhabitants. He's followed a long and winding trail through various media incarnations. To end up in Joshua tree and the appleans named desert outpost. That's a magnet for adventurous, and like minded souls hermits and assorted characters and then a moment we get to hear some of the tall tales that can has followed over the years. We'll be right back here on coast to coast AM..

Joshua tree Ken lane Marty Stuart Golden State Bill California writer publisher editor
"writer editor" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"writer editor" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Nance getting tight out there. If you work in the news business newspaper business, I should say, but the newspaper industry struggles to stem, the declines in revenue the Dallas Morning News today, laid off forty three employees. Forty three in its newsroom. That's unbelievable. The cuts include twenty writers editors Tigers newsroom support personnel. The overall staff-reduction represents about four percent of the nine hundred seventy eight employees working for the news parent company. Man. Oh, man. Hear about bender. You're you're a professor of journalism do here which direction this has gone. Yeah. I mean, it's it's the the idea of convergence. The last. Gosh, ten years or so give or take the idea that you can't just be print or TV or radio. Or internet digital? If you will you have it has to be all of it. You have to be able to do all of it. If you're in TV, you have to also be able to write. Print style AP style because you're going to be asked to put your story online. And anybody who's looking at being able to do just one thing. Right. They are. Severely seriously limiting themselves. See their ability to get hired. I think the future of television is. I just blanked on his name. What's the guy that does it all for KTLA? Oh, chip yo Yos down. Our pal joke Klein also is a one woman band. Yes. But.

Dallas Morning News Nance Klein KTLA professor of journalism AP four percent ten years
"writer editor" Discussed on NFL: The Dave Dameshek Football Program

NFL: The Dave Dameshek Football Program

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"writer editor" Discussed on NFL: The Dave Dameshek Football Program

"You say you have more respect for writers editors now, do you? Now think that it's silly. When actors are serious about the cra- when they talk about the craft and get. I he gives Bob deniro's great because he gives me space to to take some chances, or is that silliness, and you just go out there and do the lines. No. I think I think acting is is one of the most disrespected, oh, you do because so many people have like basically who weren't actors have gone on and done a good job. And usually they're just playing themselves. Every anybody can do anybody sitting. It's like you're not doing what Daniel day Lewis is doing you're not doing what Anthony Hopkins is doing like these Philip Seymour Hoffman rest his soul. What those those guys? Like like what they're doing is angle outside and throw a football. I can throw it to you. And you catch Ed Byun the NFL. No, you couldn't you couldn't. So I mean, I think I think if you're going to act and just play yourself if you have an ability to be relaxed in make the words sound natural. You can come in. Of course, you got great director in the music's there, and they the pacing because that's the big thing too. Because they make you look great. Day can make you look like you know, what you're doing. But then to actually, you know, I always bring up. This example, my buddy to Rosa saw Travolta one time talking about all his characters and he was like Vinnie Bob arena, walks like this guy from Get Shorty walks. Like this Vincent Vega walks. Like, he does the walks. I never thought to do that. It's just like everybody should walk differently. You played somebody different anybody. I've ever done has walked like me and had a Boston accent? Well, listen, I sorry for taking up so much of your time. Or appreciate appreciate you. Come in here again Bill Burr dot com. Make sure you go there because like I say coming up from John we have a big audience in Europe as a matter. On the plane watched arsenal versus Man United. And I enjoyed it as stupid, yank, I gotta go. I gotta go see Premier League game at some point too. So check that out. Make sure you check out f- for family again on net. Flicks the front runner along with Hugh Jackman and all things comedy marvelous stuff going on there. The great Bill Burr everybody..

"writer editor" Discussed on World News Analysis

World News Analysis

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"writer editor" Discussed on World News Analysis

"Online commons. Some Cummins had dogs are humans friends compared with other raising like to chase certain animal or animals fighting all host raising that is quite different from dog racing. How do you assess this kind of comment? Yeah. No. I mean, I I've Asli it's man's best friend. I mean, the whole reason why people get dogs is to be loved. I mean unconditionally, and no matter how you're treated or what happens that, you know. So there there's this whole. I mean in dog lovers in the movement has become just a, you know, huge. It's and and some are saying, I know is is. Incredible ascent. But there's they're saying that there might be legislation like it went from slavery to taking care of animals in the same way that the court decisions that made those those decisions. But I mean, it's it it's just to wrap your arms around where it takes place in the United States. We've got Florida we talked about as being banned. It's an Alabama. It's in the state of Kansas. It's an Iowa. And it's in west for Ginny. Well, no, no, no. I mean, those are those states. Stanley poorer poorer states with lower class. Chockablock my home states out there. But they could it's just right on the verge. But yeah. So I mean, well in the the question was where would it be going that has live racing those legal, and in some plants some other places they have simulcasts that actually wind up doing the bedding. But yeah, this would go back into this. I d that it it is man's best friend. But I also do believe that the tendency is going to be to eliminate this eventually in in the United States interesting. You don't see any out west at all. It's just it's in the south and West Virginia is and I was the only one in the midwest Arkansas over there in the south of, but so I the these places and the other thing I think is that they there isn't a real projector with retirement with regards to to the dog. After they're they're treated. So I think that that's part of the problem too. It's never been a positive kind of situation for them. Well, I just know have talked about him in the US almost seventy percent of Wolters decided to bent dog racing in Florida. And now, let's turn to our final topic. Stan Lee, the marvel comics legend Stanley was an American comic book writer editor in publisher. And he was the editor in chief of marvel comics later, it's publisher and chairman leading is expansion from small division of publishing house to a large multi media corporation. He co create fiction no characters including Spiderman the hulk. Doctor strange the fantastic four the X men, and what his brother Cole writer. Larry the characters and men are men and four. Okay. First of all when you think of then Lee, where do you thoughts, take you? What is your favorite character for? I think we grew up in the same generation where there wasn't a lot of we they didn't have the internet. And so, you know, we sort of got our entertainment by reading comic books what what Stanley did was actually to create an entire realm of Mathon. Policy because that's what cultures need and they need new ones all the time. And he came at the right time to do that at the time. The comic books were were quite popular. But they've sort of lacked something in that was sort of human quality. There was mostly about science fiction and awesome superpowers there. No human interests in it, and he didn't in self exactly create this. But he created an atmosphere moaning his artists and creative people in which he made the the characters sort of identifiably human finding how identified well. For example, if you are a superhero, and like Spiderman, and you are a young guy that goes going to college, and you're fighting crime at night, you're gonna have a lot of personal problems in your own life because you won't be like, you're staying up all night, fighting criminals, and you can't get your grades up. So you have to stay up all night to finish your homework, and you're gonna be tired of the next day. And if you try to make dates with women than your they're going to suddenly. Even suddenly bad guys going to appear. You're gonna have to go off and fight them..

United States Stanley Spiderman Stan Lee Florida Cummins West Virginia Alabama Kansas Iowa Ginny Arkansas Mathon writer Larry Cole Wolters editor in chief publisher chairman
"writer editor" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

WAFS Biz 1190

04:38 min | 2 years ago

"writer editor" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

"Big stories on the daybreak writer, editor Christine Burke, joins us around the table. So Trump's now waiting Don Kavanagh's, Trump had a ninety minute press conference at the rose garden yesterday and the subject of Brett Kavanagh's drinking habits, and whether or not he misled or even lied to a Senate panel last week when he downplayed his alcohol use that came into question, and what Trump had to say was that look Kavanagh's testimony shows that yes, he has had a little bit of trouble with alcohol, but he noted that he believes that Cavanaugh has been unusually forthcoming and talking about his issues. Now, the president did completely dodge a question about whether or not concerns about alcohol abuse will play a factor in a bright Kavanagh's nomination to the supreme court bench. But I think the bigger issue here is that the concerns around cabinet nomination. I mean, of course, people are concerned about the sexual allegations of sexual assault again. Against him. But the wider issue is now becoming whether or not Kavanagh's actually, a truthful man, and whether or not he's a credible candidate to hold. The supreme court bench was almost like day after day we take a new direction can we pivot to banks which is the core of what we do. Standard Chartered take a pasting in the London market. Yes. The close the fine could be much bigger than we thought overrun. And that's what's earth the market. Yes. So people familiar have said that initial assessment showed that standard could face a penalty of one point five billion dollars from the US over violations of Iran sanctions now, these are really into violations from at least five years ago in are specifically related at least, according to one person familiar to whether Standard Chartered allowed Iranian-linked entities to move money through Dubai unit. Nausea said that one point five billion much larger than was expected and Instagram has a new boss has the void been filled them. Well, this new boss. His name is Adam Assyrian. He is a longtime Facebook veteran. He's been with the company something like ten years. He's known to be Zuckerberg ally he will take over as the head of Instagram after the original founders left. Remember that was a story that emerged last week. These founders were just reportedly experiencing some tension was October over the future of Instagram. So we have a Facebook veteran now in the post. Okay. Thank you very much Christine. With the very latest on daybreak agenda. Why be talking about the pilots spike briefly after Bloomberg reported that the UK Prime Minister Theresa may is prepared to offer an important you've Brexit concession two windy with the European Union. Sources inside the government tell us that it covers the so-called backstop to ensure an open border and Edwards joins us not from the conservative party conference in Birmingham. So this is the backstop. This could potentially be the unlocking of the difference between Theresa May's checkers proposal and the EU. What do we know? Yeah. Good morning Seamount in Yousef. He hasn't seen. This is all around the backs off the story that we reported yesterday moved to pound and gilt markets, but we'll have the support of a very crucial part of the government's infrastructure. If you like, and that is the dean or partners to the government because the UP essentially props up, the UK conservative party. It's UK conservative parties conference that I'm out here in Birmingham. And we're going to be speaking to only foster a little bit later on that. She leads the dean will she go for this? Because this potentially puts in place in further checks over the North Sea something that she is. So we in the past she is not going to tolerate so we'll see whether why is it. That's reason would see this is not breaking up the UK. But owning take a different view. We will get to that. We'll also be hearing Boris Johnson later on. It's decision time for him. Does he want to lead the party the former foreign secretary he speaks at around one o'clock today at a fringe event. He's not invited to speak on the main stage. We had a cabinet minister of cabinet minister yesterday defending Theresa May and defending her. Brexit. The Boris Johnson will be trying to rally the troops around his vision of break says is he going to manage to do that? Or is his start fading as perhaps the window of opportunity to lead the party closes as we get closer to March of next year. That's going to be a big focus for us. We're going to be speaking on that subject to here's to the man who succeeded him as foreign secretary. And that is Jeremy hunt's he will be joining us a little bit later. Later on this morning. He said. I'm not to look forward to as always. Thank you very much for that analyst chicken quickly on what's happening with these markets in Asia Equity session, that's under pressure. You have shortsellers reloading in Hong Kong stocks and currencies there slumping that was the key gap. But also Chinese stocks. They are not online. So some liquidity missing in that broader picture US equity futures call it a little bit lower. Keep an eye on the Indonesian repeat breaking the lows of nine.

UK Kavanagh Theresa May Instagram Brett Kavanagh Trump Facebook Standard Chartered Boris Johnson Christine Burke US Birmingham secretary assault Don Kavanagh European Union Senate president Hong Kong North Sea
Meghan Markle's family 'banned' from top reality TV shows

Bill Leff and Wendy Snyder

06:58 min | 2 years ago

Meghan Markle's family 'banned' from top reality TV shows

"Talking TV Talk. About eight should? Also, watch it we've got Alexander's Alvin? On from the. Decider decided common. Great great website the affair is coming to an end is that right Alex, what do you know about this that is correct we. Don't know ton of information is currently running a season. Four that ends about mid August but. Decided to end the show on their own terms they're gonna do one more season after. This season five? And then that's, it for the shell we don't necessarily know how. Many episodes or what's it going to be on this plane what is this I'm sorry the I've never Yeah it's been? A big hit for oh Oh Attorney is really. Love More attorneys, the actress in it right from turning west Ruth, Wilson and Josh Jackson aka pac- from Dawson's creek Say they're going to wrap it up after another season which is, a very, nice for the actors, very nice for fans of the show to habit, and on its own terms Over at HBO they've got a hit on their hands with this Amy Adams show sharp objects haven't seen it yet, here great things about it people were hoping, there'd be more but it looks like maybe one season an app for this Yeah one of our great writer editors Megan keys it's actually currently out at the TCI which at the, television, critics association tour where there's ton of panel's going. On so she has a lot of coverage going. Up about it and one. Thing that happened was Casey. Is the head of. HBO and the very first panel, came out and said Nope new season two for sharp objects You know it's it's, interesting when, you look. At that compared to save big little lies both of them were based on books nobody really expected to, be a second season of big little? Lies, because there's no other books beyond, that but. According to him all of the actors on big allies were super into doing more they really wanted to pursue it. So they ended up doing on the other hand sharp objects. Very dark it's really hard character for Amy Adams to play with story is going to be done after one season, so, no season two for the show This is a story? That I, read, the sporting Alex and I didn't clear it with you I don't know. If you're aware of it but I. I'd love your comment on it Megan Markle the new Princess there in England there's now been a ban. On British television saying, that her family you know she has an extended family with a. Half brother and a half sister. I happy and say beat up the half brother, it gets, it gets. A little crazy they say that no member of Meghan Markle's fat family is allowed to appear on a. British reality show did you hear this No I haven't heard about that they say that damaging to, the reputation, of the royals so they've put out an edict saying in America if. You wanna do that, because I think her half. Sister is up for some American reality. Show but they say as far as great British television is concerned they won't have it good for I. Mean listen that's okay Not everybody needs to be on a reality. Show right I think ultimately. There right get something that. Megan Markle do and she. Was getting into royalty is, that her tire life would. Change forever and ultimately it is, going, to change your family's forever, and, it's it's kind of, nice that the other. Folks well just, profit offset. And, drag you know potentially dragged. Her name through the mud as things off it happened. With reality show so I'm all for that I'm still watching big brother I don't care about Julie ten less moon Vizor anything and I just have, to say please if if you like, fun television maybe a, little violent but I love preacher. I love, it, love it That. Show is absolutely bananas. Insane and it's only got crazier I was talking. To? Some folks most recent episode? Which opened up a pretty much, opens up with about five to ten minutes it takes place in one room. And honestly they have some of the best staged fights. On television it's all mostly one take the camera just. Kind, of zips around the room, has four, different characters are fighting it's funny it's exciting I love. It and three words crazy. Betty Buckley I mean I'm. Telling you Betty Buckley for. Betas enough but he is, Madam Lansdale and she is. She is a main Maine woman, wow, she's really a great actor, I, didn't know she had, that inner that's excellent. Right I'm watching. For that Do this story for me Carlton chooses is one of the guys who I created. Lost and I know he did some work with net. Flicks on a, show called locking key that I don't really know too much about but there's been some news about it what do we need to know there yeah so this is actually based on one of my favorite. Comic books of all time it's, written by Joe hill Stephen. King's son the art is by fantastic artist named Gabriel Rodriguez at some dancing around development for a really long time there was. A initially going to be a series on, FOX they shot a pilot which if you can track. Down to spend tastic that never got, picked up then they were going to do a series of movie is. Those never, got picked. Up the shot another pilot for, Hulu. Which also. Didn't get, picked up and now finally after years networks, has officially picked it out with Caulton cues. And Joe hill working together as. Show. Runners for the show they're. Gonna do to ten episodes in skimpy. On at. Some. Point in the future And. In general pitch, for the, weird house up north has a bunch of magical keys that each do different things a family moves into the house and battles a dark entity who wants possession of all the keys sounds good Yes it's. Fantastic at a little bit of a little bit? Of a spoiler full disclosure I actually make, a small appearance in the book every. Really, yeah really so fingers crossed I'm going. To be on the. Show oh that's so exciting what are. They going to, have a lost reunion because I would like a reboot. Of loss so then they can finish it properly they they've talked about that quite, a bit Linda Lavin, collagen cues they've. Said, they. Are done. With it they're completely lost but they expect because it was such a popular property it's only a matter of time. Until ABC or somebody else does her boss reboot but when they do they're not involved oh interesting. All right Keep our eyes open for that Alex great to talk to. You, thanks. So much and hope you have a great weekend yeah. You, too thanks as. Always having me on this Alex Alexander's Alvin he? Is the managing editor over at decider dot, com a really good website decider dot. Com, we'll take a quick break and then. More show it's Bill. And Wendy in WGN business stuff that. Matters I'm Steve, Bertrand on the next wintrust business lunch still have cable. Thirty three million people will cut cable this year so what's.

Alex Alexander Megan Markle Betty Buckley HBO Amy Adams Joe Hill Meghan Markle Attorney Maine Linda Lavin Casey WGN America Madam Lansdale TCI Managing Editor ABC FOX Julie Wendy
"writer editor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"writer editor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Magazine in one thousand nine hundred ninety five they made a rare move in a male dominated industry they sought to hire women writers. Editors illustrators and cartoonists originally founded as a humor magazine the New Yorker has since developed a reputation for winning journalism and fiction but cartoons in the New Yorker. Still define it as a source of wit cultural commentary and intervene source of laughs in. Our contemporary media landscape and throughout its history the women. Who've John cartoons for the magazine have shaped its voice and tone as much as anyone a new exhibit at the society of illustrators, on east sixty third street in Manhattan. Is celebrating the role and contributions of women cartoonists staff the magazine it's called funny ladies at the New Yorker. Cartoonists then and now it was curated by LIZA Donnelly who is drawn cartoons for the magazine for For over three decades she's joining us. Now with felony yorker cartoonists the think and Carolina Johnson who all have work in the exhibition there's also, an event tonight that will tell you that in a. Minute welcome all of you to WNYC today thank you and let me just dive right. Into an example of one of the cartoons in the exhibit and then, we'll pull back and talk about the larger context a cartoon by Ethel Plummer from the very first issue of the New Yorker from nineteen twenty five it shows a. Man and a woman looking at a sign that says the wages of sin with a drawing of a woman in a provocative position on it and the dialogue. As they look at the sign the wages of sin uncle poor girls so few get. Their wages flapper so few get their sin dynamic so. Lies it tell us a little on you're not gonna ask me to analyze the cartoon Well just put it in. The context of the time of nineteen twenty four yeah Ethel was the, first cartoonist as a woman for the magazine and I guess it was a very modern, era for women nineteen in the nineteen twenties you, now they just got, in, the vote. In nineteen twenty and there were. Women coming out and getting jobs, if they could and and being sort of. Free flapper like. And I think this woman's comment Militates that and so we'll sample a few more? Cartoons, as we go but lies I'll stay. With, you you've noted that a big challenge that women cartoonists have to face. In. The early days of the New Yorker and in other publications, in the early twentieth century was having to open up a discussion in a male dominated industry proving they quote had a sense of humor sometimes still say women aren't funny could you talk about this dynamic in the historical context of the New Yorker oh I. Hope they still don't say that Well I think that cultural taboo was that women didn't have a. Sense of humor and they were supposed to laugh at at men's jokes so I think it was very forward thinking, of held roster bringing he was looking for the best talent, the city has. To offer and some of those artists were were women and I think he? Just, brought in who he thought was good Yeah Carolina Eliana have, you had to, encounter you know some form of this societal. Notion, that, women aren't funny having to prove it in a different way than a male in your field Kelly yeah I remember an editor telling. Me that all my cartoons were relationship cartoons which I didn't think was true at all like night actually told them I said no. All the cartoons that you buy from me. Our relationship cartoons I submit quite a lot of different subjects so Right I found that as. Well Same same thing oh I think that humor was. In Was invented by man not like shaped by Matt chicken, defined by men. And. Pop culture sensibilities of, humor yeah and there are different maybe different things that someone who's had the life experience, of a woman would find funny and those things haven't been accepted into the culture..

humor magazine Ethel Plummer society of illustrators LIZA Donnelly Manhattan Carolina Johnson Matt chicken Kelly editor three decades
"writer editor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:29 min | 2 years ago

"writer editor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Sally leaves Louis and Justin quirk writer editor and cultural strategist sully one of your main jobs at new risk on those preparing companies for a a. Risk of some sort of security or worse what? Kind, of work specifically do, do with companies yes for for many years and it's very interesting because We, work with conferences and, other groups around the world To bring together senior Organizers of companies might be chief executives of security information security to see how prepared they are for. Breakdowns in their operations and of course cyber the dependence on cyber now means I'm looking to see where the people can even run degraded operations because we are seeing around the world what we call hybrid warfare cyber is highly denial by. Countries that are hostile and there's a lot of. Probing a critical infrastructure a lot of looking at trying to cut off energy interfere with water interfere. With belief in government all this is happening and the, company's ready for it and I am not, finding around the world a flexibility of the companies to look at what systems they have that are going to. Survive serious nationwide attacks we've seen. Tastes of these attacks most of the people around the world aged twenty or over think, they've got private Dr but most of. That data's already gone so what should a company be doing That most of them are not at the moment to try and counter that unfortunately they're not identifying the significant dependence on connection to the internet or they significant dependence on. Energy those two things are the critical things they. Don't have backup plans they don't have systems that are unconnected that they can bring in they don't. Look at other companies to help service and even from, other countries there's no contingency that the very, severe losses that all of our government security agencies no can happen so it means companies are not able to. Look after the populations and their. Stakeholders and supply chains that are other vulnerable parts because as the companies have got stronger, and paying billions for the computer security. The supply chains are now being attacked Justin we start we talked at the start of the, program about one book project of yours I want to look at. Another one and this is called nothing but a good time a cultural history of heavy metal how much fun is that to. Research is an enormous waste essentially just picking through March next huge exercise in cultural style jazz so so the starting. Point for the book was. This. Was the. Dominant form of the eighties eighty three to ninety one is very tightly bookended And then it completely collapsed under his home whites and it appears to be the one form. Of music which is completely immune to any sort of serious critical rehabilitation and nobody will go back and look seriously. At you know van Halen Oh And that was the starting point of the. Book is that, well why? Not because we take pretty much every other genre is capable of things of reassessed and looked at seriously in this. Way and so sent you the idea that you could tell the story of America's cultural decade through this form of music and retell that. Story you mentioned def Leppard because there may well be doubters. Listening so let's have a listen to def Leppard remote and see if they're. Converted here we. Go.

Justin quirk Leppard Sally van Halen writer editor America Louis
"writer editor" Discussed on Women Worldwide

Women Worldwide

03:59 min | 3 years ago

"writer editor" Discussed on Women Worldwide

"Really that kind of perseverance mental toughness stick to of nece drive there are just like you said so many ups and downs so many really challenging times really low down moments and you really need just kind of that that belief in yourself and just that grit and perseverance to be able to get through those times keep going and i think that's something that my parents really raised me with that of whether you can or you think you can't you're right and that was something that i try to keep in mind through anything that i'm trying to overcome in life whatever that challenge may be but i think having that kind of attitude of approaching things as okay whatever is put in front of me whatever goal whatever challenge never obstacle you know i'm gonna get through it because that's who i am i'm someone who never gives up doesn't quit who can just make it through anything and i think you have to kind of think of yourself in that way in really kind of like flex that muscle over time whether it's you know doing something like train for marathon or whatever it may be the kind of forces you to really push through a really challenging moments and that gives you the confidence to know that you're gonna be able to do that again and again no matter what is facing you in your pass yeah you know just how you mentioned that you can kinda rise up get through anything you're flexing your muscle what part of that also you know you mentioned your parents and thinking there has to be a support balance so when challenges happen in even though you have the perseverance in you're gonna tackle it do you ever rely on a close support system do you know do ask for help i think you know the my support system first and foremost is really my cofounders windsor anything that's a huge reason at least nar mind why it's really important to start a business with cofounders because there are gonna be those really hard trying gays where you're really down but what's nice is that you know if i might be really gone about something one day hopefully on that same day the two that media aren't having such a tough day or vice balance out now yeah so i think that is really helpful from kind of morale perspective to have other people there to keep you going because chances are you're not all going to be having a really bad day on same day maybe you are so these going really wrong but hopefully in any given day people can kind of balance each other out many think beyond them really leaning on you know by parents especially in the earlier per campus in now my husband is well to kind of help put things in perspective be that kind of outside voice where you know i'll say to my husband we're having this really big issue i think this is worse than really this is worse than anything that's happened before this is really bad like i'm really not sure how we're gonna get through this he's like use like he's like every you know few months or year you have something come up and you feel this in it always ends up working out in a mike also alice above right but so it's nice to have that kind of outside perspective in my parents have always been my biggest cheerleaders for sure on you know always pushing me you know reminding me that i can do anything set my mind to really kind of raised me and my brother to kind of approach the world that way and so they're they're kind of always in my corner which is nice is nice is there anything that you've learned about yourself it's almost surprising you've been growing your business that maybe you can share something that's prising like i know i could do that or our really stepped up to the plate on that one right to sink on why didn't you know i really never never growing up so myself as someone in business let alone in entrepreneur i always thought i was going to be a writer editor journalists when i grew up so it's been really interesting to see i guess the evolution of what i'm interested in what i find kind of selling in meaningful to do in my work today and now this many years in i.

one day
"writer editor" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"writer editor" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"A deficit hawk when the national debt was a few trillion dollars now speaker of the house paul ryan says he will not seek reelection in november after helping push through the major tax reform package signed into law by president trump bob costantini asked ryan about the other half the equation and what ryan thinks should be done about it and grateful that we have unified government the president with his victory gave us tops on the accomplishments list for paul ryan tax cuts for corporations and individuals or not sticking around for its biggest consequence trillion dollar deficits as far as the congressional budget office i can see yeah so entitlement reform is that the one other great thing that i've spent most of my career working on normalizing entitlement reform pushing the cause of internal reform in the house passing reform i'm very proud of that fact democrats often sound the alarm about entitlement reform meaning cuts to social security medicare and medicaid bob costantini capitol hill at chicago city hall bill cameron says mayor emanuel is joining police superintendent eddie johnson in denouncing chicago magazine for publishing a story containing interviews with both the suspect and the widow in the case of the police commander paul bauer marama scrolling this piece morally repugnant and to have a moral plane as if commander bauer and a thug with a record that is longer than warren piece as morally equivalent i wouldn't use that article in my fireplaces kinley andy took this shot at the writers editors to those journalists needs to go see your religious leader because you need some education about what is moral leadership versus what is moral bankruptcy that's all i got to sing at city hall bill cameron wls am eight hundred new man has been charged with soliciting to fifteen year old girls for sex last month near lane tech high school on.

warren paul bauer commander superintendent chicago city hall paul ryan president trump bob costantini lane tech high school chicago magazine eddie johnson mayor emanuel bill cameron president trillion dollars trillion dollar fifteen year
"writer editor" Discussed on Safe For Work

Safe For Work

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"writer editor" Discussed on Safe For Work

"I think you already yes i think you're hearing yeah yeah you know thank you guys very much and you should not get drunk together at the christmas party that's fine the best advice you've got okay good luck eric thank you guys that was the greek call i thought it was so interesting you were talking about working with family members and that you actually got to a point with your siblings that you accepted their professional growth i'd love to hear and it wasn't always easy i remember one time that we had been doing a radio show together for several years and then we got a book contract so it was five of us together contributing to a book and my youngest sister leeann is a novelist columnist a professional writer so she was the one naturally in charge of this project and it was weird to have your little sister be your boss and i gotta say some of us did a better job with that then others i had a similar situation by younger sister she's a boss that's every role that she's had so i did a freelance project for her and i was like she just riding me because i'm brother and then i you know but i did realize the flip side of and he's like no she's a really efficient effective and yeah her style was hands on and i was like whoa yeah okay no it was it was really great for us in that particular situation to have one of us be a skilled writer editor columnist and it was natural that she should be in charge just every once in a while you're like wow she's yeah she's got skill so the skill when you were in a professional environment skills are really what you want.

leeann writer editor
"writer editor" Discussed on Ross Tucker Football Podcast

Ross Tucker Football Podcast

01:52 min | 4 years ago

"writer editor" Discussed on Ross Tucker Football Podcast

"Yeah i also saw um it was interesting just email him back and forth you a little bit just some of the categories and some of the things that you came up with before we dive into some of the the most interesting nuggets in the book and some of the categories i thought were the most interesting what what's your background guy i know you you write for cold hard football facts but i always like you know i i know a lot of my listeners they'd love to get a job parttime fulltime in football if it could ever come up or i'm sure some of them have had ideas for football books themselves as well so i guess i'm just curious what was your background grown up you know where are you from and then how did you kinda get you know the funding or the ability to to put a pool together like this well i grew up in maine as a son of a football coach and so i guess it was sort of in the blood to to love football and always hoped that i could incorporate it into my career in some capacity winter university of hampshire got a degree in english and then working sports radio made some contact there um but have largely but just been a freelance writer editor in recent years working for called our football facts as we mentioned and then as far as the book itself it it certainly was something that i always wanted to do and it took a lot longer to come to fruition than i expected it's a tough business to crack as far as getting your first book published because like you say a lot of people love sports in love to write about it and if you're not unknown name which i probably not yet then you know you you don't come with the following and.

football maine editor university of hampshire writer