36 Burst results for "writer"

Fresh update on "writer" discussed on Bill Cunningham

Bill Cunningham

01:13 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "writer" discussed on Bill Cunningham

"About twelve years ago, she heard about the difficulties in Haiti with the earthquake etc and she said I can't do everything. But dammit, I can do something but I'm not sure she would have said Damn. So she adopted a black girl and a black boy from Port au Prince Haiti to raise them and Upper Indiana in the Midwest and now she's being attacked for cultural misappropriation. That is, is she racing those Haitian children as Haitians? Are you kidding me then another labor writer said that this was a this was a shield. That the master always undertook so that later in life when she got to the US Supreme Court she could say look I'm not a racist I, a black kids from Haiti, but she had no idea to four years ago. This is going to be the Ark of her life. There was a White House attorney for years ago working for trump and trump said, can you find me some conservative judges in the mode of Antony Scalia we'll do our best and him rummaged around Harvard and Yale and Columbia and said, you know what? There's this woman in South Bend Indiana named Amy Coney Barrett who's a law professor Make a call to her and see if she would be interested in sitting on the seventh circuit. Court of Appeals in Chicago. She said I'm humbled and honored to get this call. Let me think about it. She spoke to her husband. She had lots of other responsibilities going on and she says I think I would consider it. That's how it began. How could she see eight to twelve years ago that she of data kids in port-au-prince that would be used as a shield to keep the Democrats from attacking her, and lastly before I take your calls plus I want to set up tonight's great show in preparation for Tuesday, night presidential debate. Judge Amy Coney. Barrett. What happened if the Democrats did not allowed? The Democrats are the ones who pave the way for Judge Amy Coney Barrett to be on the US Supreme. Court but for the Democrats especially Harry.

Judge Amy Coney Barrett Haiti Us Supreme Court Port Au Prince Haiti Amy Coney Court Of Appeals Donald Trump Antony Scalia Port-Au-Prince South Bend Indiana Upper Indiana United States Misappropriation Midwest Writer White House Yale Harry Chicago
Belichick reaches milestone as Patriots top Raiders 36-20

Vegas Nation - Raiders Football

04:59 min | 4 hrs ago

Belichick reaches milestone as Patriots top Raiders 36-20

"Everyone is time for the bonus episode postgame recap for Vegas Nation podcast. I'm your host Heidi Fang and I'm joined with our readers writers, Ed Greenie, Adam. Hill we're going to break down what happened here in the Raiders Lost Thirty six to twenty against the New England Patriots here Gillette Stadium in Foxborough at an ir up in the press box Adam back in Vegas a from my vantage point it was. A lot of mistakes made by the raiders, which is something you can't do against the bill belichick coach team. So we're GONNA get all into that here but I I want to remind everybody that we are brought to you by Salmon Ash, indeed visa and also favor. So make sure to subscribe wherever you're listening and what was your first take on what you saw out in the field today with the raiders. You're right. They did everything you can't do and win on the road or anywhere turn the ball over three times. Once rent on. Didn't protect car when they were driving. Me fumbled the Fumble Alina Game Matter Games already overby fumbled the end zone. In the second half, they just wore down defensively I actually done the first thirty minutes be interested at him. I think thought the first thirty minutes they played. As good. A defense as they haven't a while let's be honest. Thirteen points here cam help them a lot. He wasn't any third, but they were down on the second Apple Sikhism Derek. Carr in the offense couldn't stand field. He gave up two hundred and fifty yards total rushing late Sony Michelle when expert in its players per talking, you know these of League so they were down and they just couldn't match. Match up. So a bad game they printed everything you can do and what on the road so Adam how much in fact that these running bags like just through the defense offered their game because I don't think they were looking to contain the likes of three different running backs in this one I think they prepared to contain Cam Newton? What was your thoughts on the running game? I think I was definitely a part of it and I think there was definitely adjustments made. By the Patriots coaching staff because as as ED put out for the first half of the, Patriots were able to run the ball somewhat. But I thought a it wasn't. There wasn't those explosive plays. There wasn't those big plays downfield and it was a kind of picking up some yards here. They're moving the ball effectively but not really gashing the raiders defense and then. They figured out something in the run game after halftime and I'll be interested to find out the later in the week. Interested to get the the all twenty two film comes out like Tuesday. Look a little what happened but I think just at first glance without really looking into what they were doing on the line maybe differently. They definitely started to go to some more cutback plays where they I thought really were able to take advantage of some over pursuit of the writer side in particular from Jonathan Abram, who you know, we know what he can do. In terms just flying around offensively and having people would kind of sending a message for that defense but at the same time. You can use that aggression against him and I think the Patriots kind of figure that out a little bit and it really hit him with a big plays on a place where he got into the gap, he was near the bulk area but just couldn't make up Adams exactly right and and they're going to have to here's the thing about a player John Neighbor might think they love is aggressiveness in his hitting all that he's got a swagger Jim and I. Hate to say this, but sometimes, you just have to you have to balance that it's hard to tell a guy like that. Don't play this way but Adams wait we should for resod against Christian McCaffrey, over pursues too much when you take the battling new pursue Sunny Michelle Christian McCaffrey, they're gonNA come back will go so Yeah. They just didn't play the run wellness second atoms right they adjusted and you have to give Michelle credit like I said when you go For, an average of thirteen yards of Kerry and I don't know if he's ever average per carry more than seven in a games and you also have saved in job I am. But they did they didn't play offensively were out of rhythm Waller. We'll talk about that I know atoms writing thoughts. Darren WELLM was non factor when you get a lot of good at the bill Belgium at he talked about. How good daring waller as well. Guess what he must have died because they ran every defense coverage double team run in stem and stopped him. So atom I know you you wrote about this mean, what did you hear the game to her? How they? You know bottle up there wall I thought it was a group effort I. think that's what of expected to hear from the Patriots Bill. Belichick obviously didn't go into detail about what he did. I think it was just a lot of deception what they were doing offensively disguising it and Bella check pointed out. Hey, it wasn't somebody covering him necessarily a lot of zone. We played a lot of you know bracket coverage a lot of. Men under there was a lot of different things. Defensively. On Waller but I think it was more just about the looks of they're giving up the line and never letting the raiders. No. Before the play what kind of coverage is GonNa be on Waller? Want Credit Anybody I. Think mccourty would be the one that you would like added. Say. Devin mccourty that Dinnie. Tremendous job on him but it was a little bit of everybody kind of in the mixer.

Raiders Patriots Bill Belichick Waller Adam Michelle Christian Mccaffrey New England Patriots Gillette Stadium Heidi Fang Foxborough Devin Mccourty Ed Greenie Cam Newton Hill Vegas Adams Carr Sony Apple Writer
Interview with Crime Writer Tom Vater: S. 6, Ep. 7 - burst 1

The Crime Cafe

03:52 min | 1 d ago

Interview with Crime Writer Tom Vater: S. 6, Ep. 7 - burst 1

"My assumption is that you started with journalism in went into crime writing, but that beaker. Well actually. So happened hand in hand because. The first Arctic rival road for newspaper wasn't one, thousand, nine, hundred, Ninety, seven. A paper in in Nepal and while I was there. I started thinking about rising my first novel, the Devil's Road to cap on do which then eventually came out in two thousand four. So it kind of happened at the same time but. But I I would say that you know between the pieces of fiction I right there along gaps for professional reasons and so Leap. Most of the time I have a day job. I do journalism and when I have some months often I can sit down and write a novel. So you're primarily a journalist who also does crime rate. Yeah you could say that I also own a a small publishing. House. crimewave press, which is a crime fiction imprint based in Hong Kong, which does mostly e books published about thirty two titles by. All sorts of oldest many of them from the US. So that's that's my Gig. So I, I kind of do three different things. I'm a crime fiction writer I I'm a very small press publisher with just one Papa and For crime, fiction novels in a bunch of short stories. And interested in the fact that you do so much stuff Most interested in in in the notion of of journalists going into this sort of thing because it tradition of journalists going into to fiction writing is historically something I've always been kind of intrigued by which is why I majored in journalism actually because of my interest in writing and in fiction general What made you choose crime fiction in particular as genre. There's probably several things. One is Zora fiction kind of makes it easy to because it's got many established rules and tropes and. Conventions and and so in that sense, it's it's quite conservative. You as a writer, there's another things to hold onto when you're writing your first novel because it has to go away. If you're GONNA follow crime fiction conventions if you write literary fiction, it's it seems at least to me when I was in my twenties, it seemed much disorienting and I didn't know how Radia how I would do that character development always stuff. But in in crime fiction, you know you have set in stock characters and set. Ways the plots develop and and and end in the end. So so I felt seventy with my best novel, the Devil's role to Kathmandu that I wanted to just ride to a sort of. Conventional Adventure story you know with. it's it's the story of four young guys who in nineteen, seventy five hit the hippie trail between between London Kathmandu and drive a van from London to come do an on the way they they. They make a drug deal that goes horribly wrong. And Is Disappears with the money. Mail saying how? Do and get your shouts the money. So that it's it's like a classic kind of adventure story that I wanted to create an I just how that. All Crime Fiction Travel Zara which would be the easiest way of turning that into a reality.

Devil Writer Kathmandu Arctic Hong Kong United States Zora Nepal Publisher London
Trump To Select Amy Coney Barrett as Supreme Court Nominee

Weekend Edition Saturday

04:23 min | 1 d ago

Trump To Select Amy Coney Barrett as Supreme Court Nominee

"This edition from NPR News. I'm Scott's time and we are expecting President Trump to announce Amy Cockney Barrett as his nominated. He was Supreme Court this afternoon. Judge Barrett sits on the seventh Circuit Court of Appeals. Ah, in in Chicago, although she's in Indiana and served his clerk to just Saturnian, Scalia. She, of course, would fill the vacancy left by Ruth Bader Ginsburg, whose life and career were honored at the court in the capital this week, and you will be buried next week at Arlington National Cemetery. Let's now welcome Michael McConnell of Stanford University law professor and former federal appeals court judge. Thanks very much for being with us, sir. It's a pleasure. I gather, you know, Amy Cockney Barrett. What's your estimation on her apparent nomination? What kind of justice you might be? Well, I do. Ah. She was a professor at Notre Dame Law School for about 15 years and then Now that capacity I knew her fairly well, she is. We're not personal friends, but I'm in admirers of both her academic work and her performance on the On the seventh circuit. Uh, she's I think a completely unsurprising nominee. Even her opponents recognized that she's extremely qualified, highly and intelligent, hardworking. What are personal Friends knows what in it. Fantastically warm, kind, considerate human being she is and she's I think she'll be an inspiration, especially toe working mothers like like my two daughters, because, and it's just seven Children, including Two adopted Children from Haiti. One right in the wake of the terrible earthquake and on almost everybody who knows of Amy has a story about just how and how she She is so kind and does just considerate things in ways that no one whatever I know about not publicly, but just on a cz, a wonderful warm human being. Let me ask you about some of the public stuff, though, because you're a former U. S appeals court judge and, um I wonder if you've taken note of any particular rulings that she's had the chance to make in her time on the bench. And not quite three years as an appellate judge. He's written 100 opinions, which Dad and itself is pretty impressive. That's Andi. They are. You know, I've not read all of them, but I've read quite a few of them and they're consistently Love of a kind of restrained, very lawyerly of fashion sheep. She clerked for Justice Scalia, who was a brilliant writer, she doesn't write like Scalia. I'm You know, for better or worse. Her opinions are not very rhetorical. There. Ah, rigorous. They are much more low key. Er than that on DH. You know her, and they're just they're consistently conservative, but mainstream conservative. I don't think There's not an extremist bone in her body does does she have opinions? That might surprise some of her supporters every now and then? Ah, every now and then. Ah! Of course, no one really knows where any judge is going to come out on every and maybe we should remind ourselves calling someone a conservative jurist doesn't mean they will always vote a certain way, right? That's right. And the modern legal conservative movement is little different from conservative politics because the conservative legal movement is really mostly about having a more restrained Roll for judges that they ought to read the Constitution modestly with humility, not reading their own preferences into it, And that generally means leaving legislatures and the Congress to make most Democratic choices rather than having the court be like a super Legislature. Stanford law Professor Michael McConnell. Thanks so much for being with us, sir. Thank you.

Amy Cockney Barrett Supreme Court Justice Scalia Circuit Court Of Appeals Michael Mcconnell Npr News Ruth Bader Ginsburg Chicago Indiana Notre Dame Law School Stanford University Scott President Trump Haiti Congress Saturnian Professor Arlington National Cemetery Writer
Draisaitl of Oilers wins Hart Trophy as NHL MVP

KCBS Radio Weekend News

01:08 min | 1 d ago

Draisaitl of Oilers wins Hart Trophy as NHL MVP

"The NHL's postseason awards peaked on Monday night with Edmund Tinsley on Dry Sidle, being named winner of the Heart trophy, is the league's MVP. After he led the league in scoring with 101 points in 71 games. I'm very honored to huge honor to me. All I can say is huge. Thank you to you know my family friends, obviously the Edmonton Oilers, the fans, the city of evidence, and without those people, this would never happen. Dry Sidle with 43 goals and 67 assists both career highs despite the regular season, having been cut short. Because of the pandemic. He's the second German to win M V P honors in one of North America's four major sports following the NBA's Dirk Novitski. Hopefully, this will somehow give little kids maybe some more joy of playing hockey and starting talking instead of other stores, So if I could help with that and anyway than I'd love to do that the Hart Trophy for M V P has voted on by members of the Professional Hockey Writers Association. Your eyesight will also won the Lindsay Trophy as the player's choice for most outstanding player

Dry Sidle Professional Hockey Writers As Edmund Tinsley Edmonton Oilers MVP NHL Hockey Dirk Novitski North America NBA
Places to Fly Fish

Travel with Rick Steves

03:51 min | 2 d ago

Places to Fly Fish

"Desportivo fly-fishing has become a favorite way for many urbanites to decompress. And that's how Chris Santillo started his fifty places recreation guides. He now also writes about places to paddle bicycle golf end snowboard, but his number one passion is fly fishing Chris thanks for joining US great to be here, Rick. Thanks what is it about fly fishing that those who know it and love it or so passionate about I've thought about this a lot oftentimes when I'm out on the river and I think that people come at it from a lot of different directions I. I think there's the chance to be out in nature in a quiet and beautiful place. There's an old saying that's trout don't live in ugly places and neither do bone Fisher Tarp in Atlantic Salmon. So you're usually in pretty pristine places that can support these fish species. About especially, if you're river fishing about being in the water, I don't mean to sound cliche but there is something about the oneness of being with the river in that sense of flow I drive a lot over mountains and past beautiful rivers in Europe and the United States and I see a lot of people with hip Bhutan standing deepen in the river and there is something. Special about that I would imagine you have there is a feeling of being. In the moment and in the flow of life of the rivers as a metaphor for flow of life and time passing, and it's never the same water that you're standing in and I think there is something profound rap subliminal about that that has an appeal There is an analytic. A fly fishing I think it has appealed to people the whole idea of trying to determine what the Fisher eating at a given time, and then trying to either look in your fly box and find the the right fly that seems to match the kind of bugs at the trout might eating or I know some friends will bring a fly tying vice in some feathers and hair and hooks to the side of a stream, and if they don't have what the right bug is at the time or the right fly, they will go and tie it. Up on the spot and hope that they're going to make that match matching the hatches, the term that writer named Ernie Schreiber came up with years ago the hatch being the kind of insect that is occurring on the river at that time but just having the arsenal and matching the flame with the others that are being eaten that's probably integral to being successful fly, Fisher and very important, and you'll find some anglers that are you know better equipped than others I've been out with some friends who will have literally five hundred or a thousand flies. I usually have one or two boxes and and hope that what I have. Oh, cover things ninety percent of the time, but there's always ten percent that doesn't work and one blanket work. Great. This morning in another flight would work great in the same hole this afternoon exactly because what happens on many river systems as you will have different sorts of insects emerging coming out of river or settling down upon the river at different times of the day you might have may flies that are. Popping up from the bottom of the river as Nymphs, and then turning into adult bugs and being on the surface in the morning, and that might be a white insect, the size of your Pinky Nail, and then in the afternoon as it gets warmer, the grasshoppers might become active and the wind may be him into the river and they are green and yellow, and they're the size of your thumb. It's sort of a a battle going on what are the it is it's man versus nature. Chris and Taylor has written a dozen best selling books about outdoor adventures in his fifty places series. One of his titles collects the thoughts of Passionate Anglers Y. I, fly fish and their favorite fishing places are covered in fifty more places to fly fish before you die you'll also see Chris's byline and major sport fishing publications.

Chris Santillo United States Desportivo Atlantic Salmon Europe Ernie Schreiber Bhutan Fisher Writer Rick Taylor
The Boys is worth watching and it's getting a college spinoff

/Film Daily

03:48 min | 2 d ago

The Boys is worth watching and it's getting a college spinoff

"AM talking about the boys season two yet on this podcast I think boy season two is terrific. It is. It captures what made the best of the in one work for me hit the ground running every episode of Season Two's been as the best season one. I know this is a controversial show this podcast because. Chris. Disagree very strongly about the show in a way that maybe the most of his group with him about anything. In our time to work in slash film. I think season two of the boys is the kind of angry vicious funny satiric wildness that we need right now is targeting all the right targets and using a superheroes to stand in for. Alva grievances against, Celebrity Government Military Corporate Corporation. A blended all in a way that makes the matic censor feels modern. And some who read a lot of the comic before it was. Before I decided Nah stop because it was bad mesh of start in the first place it makes me smart adaptation choices like For example, as a character in the comic who's literally a beefy German goths on his chest he was a Nazi superhero in this one that connected to be. A young attractive woman with a cool haircut whose social social media savvy and. Hides her white supremacists. Breads permits leanings in the idea rallying against pc culture and it's really chilling villain in a in a show of characters. She is very upsetting to watch and wait until modern can't wait for the show to take her down as it does all it's great villains. So that's the boy season to it airs. Or arrives every new episode and Friday it's over halfway through the season now I, can't believe it's almost like he's just come to episodes left now and I be watching it tonight and his podcast finish work in her watch the boys. Jacob Real quick. Would you call the boys an ugly show not from a visual perspective, but just like its worldview is, is this a show that will make you feel like scum after watching it? This is this is where Chris I disagree Chris. Chris can jump in if he wants to the first season, may Chris feel bad. He's talked about this before in the show in his review on the site. And he's not watching these for that reason. But for me I think. The show is about people in a bad world trying to escape that bad world trying to throw the battery. And I, leave the show each week feeling angry but ready to fight supposedly Brung down and brought down by I mean people are completely out different reaction to it but I I never feel like if you take a shower after watching, it's bloody has as a can because it is incredibly violent show. If of Nastiness I, it's always funny enough and always just hopeful enough to a key character is to keep the light shining. Christie have no interest in an checking out seasons you. Know I I can't say I do it's just. It's not it's not for me and that's fine. You know that has to be for me for sure Jacob are excited about the spinoff that they just announced of the boys know it sounds like the worst part of the boys. The. Comic is the worst part. The comic is that. Garth Ennis writer whose work I have liked before. Lean very heavily on warfare superheroes, but perverts leaned on that all the time whereas the TV show leans on that maybe once or twice every so often and Setting up spinoff where it's a bunch of young sixty pros in college with hijinks sounds like the worst parts of that comic being brought to life. You know whether superheroes and they're gonNA have sex all the time. No superheroes in the show are very much. Representations is wrong with you know the world and the people who are fighting against that. So I don't think I need to watch the show about those

Chris I Jacob Celebrity Government Military Garth Ennis Christie Alva Writer
C.I.A. Operatives in the Early Years of the Cold War

The Book Review

05:41 min | 2 d ago

C.I.A. Operatives in the Early Years of the Cold War

"Scott Anderson joins us now from the catskills. He is a contributing writer for the New York, Times magazine, and the author of many books. His latest is called the quiet Americans four CIA spies. Of the Cold War tragedy in three acts, Scott Welcome back to the podcast. Thanks much nice to be here. So you are allowed on the podcast to talk about your previous book Lawrence in Arabia which came out in twenty thirteen hand, which of course feels like now centuries ago which makes it clear to our listeners are longtime listeners that this is not your first. Book. Involving spies I'm curious what what's the draw for you but I think Speiser inherently fascinating in not just to an awful lot of people and of thought about what is I think it's the the allure of having a secret life. I think that I think that for an awful lot of people this idea that you have a whole separate identity is really fascinating New People. What I was drawn to in both the Lawrence and with in the quite America's the foresee a officers I follow is that in both cases, this was at a time when individuals out in the field had a tremendous freedom of action. So it wasn't. People sitting behind desks following policy that they're actually out in the field doing crazy stuff. You also have a personal connection to the story right in terms of what your father did for living you talk a little bit about that. Sure. My father was agricultural adviser for the Agency for International Development, which was a branch of the State Department. I grew up in. East. Asia in in Korea and Taiwan as Indonesia. and. So this was the nineteen fifties, nineteen sixties when I came along American government workers abroad often in those sorts of countries often were two hats whatever their official job was my father's job as agriculture adviser but it was also part of this great anti Communist crusade was happening around the world. So the upfront hearts and minds, soft power aspect of my father's work was working on agrarian reform in line with countries like these countries were were the land was was had been controlled infra centuries by all darkies. But the the more hard power in the darker side of what my father was doing was was setting up rural vigilante squads, home guard militias to watch over the local populace and to make sure that they weren't being swayed by the communist in certainly in countries like Taiwan or South Korea. If you were exposed or accused of being a leftist, your life was not going to go. Well, you know I'm now getting a sense of why one of the four characters in your previous book was an agronomist perhaps. That's right. Yeah it's well It's it's an interesting thing because. It just for national development was often used by the CIA as a cover because. Are Out, in the field, they're not, they're not saying, I'm destined to capitol there often out among the local population and probably have a better sense of what's happening. Outside what you one thing I'll say I've noticed over time in different countries. I've been almost invariably the ex Patriot community that knows best what's happening in the country are tend to be the people are out in the field in often the Middle East is the oil guys. They have a sense much more than than people sitting around in the capital. Let's start with frank wizner. The first person you mentioned, and this is not the the first book to be written at least in part about wisner who was he and what made him. So central to the story wizards amazing Turkey was a corporate lawyer who was working at a Wall Street firm when even before World War Two broke out and he quit his law firm to join the navy, he ended up being an operative for the office to teacher services, which is the the wartime intelligence agency of the of the army that they owe asset kind of the precursor to the CIA. That's right. That's right and he ends up being A. Kind of the first American to to to witness. The Soviet takeover of country in Eastern Europe, and this was in Romanian to summer of nineteen forty. Four So full year before the war ended and a wizard was on the ground as a as an oasis operative and just watch the strong arm tactics did really a matter of weeks led the Soviets to take control the country he and he was sending cables back to Washington telling telling them what are so good allies doing he sees the say he has the same experience in eastern Germany at the end of. The war in watching the way the Soviets for taking over, he goes back to his law from for couple of years for the complete unhappy, and then when the CIA starts up in nineteen forty seven, they have this idea that they wanna start a covert operations branch of of the CIA called the Office of Policy Coordination and frank listeners chosen to head that the name was deliberately chosen to be really boring. That's right and in fact, the name itself, the Office of policy coordination was was so top secret that even you can't even say the name out loud for twenty five years. So in that role wizner e created, what what he called the mighty world, which was this vast covert operations umbrella of a operating throughout the world and everything from hard power aspects of it like dropping dropping partisans behind the iron curtain to everything to cultural stuff voice. Of America. Radio Free Europe that was all came out of the Office of Policy Coordination.

CIA Office Of Policy Coordination Lawrence Frank Wizner Office Of Policy America Taiwan Scott Anderson Times Magazine New York Agency For International Devel Writer Middle East Washington Radio Free Europe Asia State Department Germany
Structuring Your Novel by K.M. Weiland

The Rookie Writer Show

05:11 min | 2 d ago

Structuring Your Novel by K.M. Weiland

"Hi Welcome to season two, episode thirty, two of the rookie rider show I'm your host Air Brown and today we're GONNA be talking about structuring your novel by Cam Weiland. A little about Cam Weiland I'm going to quote her author page here. Km, wiling lives in make believe world's talks to imaginary friends and survive primarily on chocolate truffles and espresso. She is the award winning and internationally published author of the Acclaimed Writing Guides, outlining your novel, stretching your novel and creating character Arcs when she's not making things up she's busy mentoring other authors on her award winning blog she makes her home in Western Nebraska. And Also on the website, she says that you can call her Katie you visitor site and sign up for the newsletter list. You can download a free writing craft book entitled Five Secrets Of Story Structure How to read a novel stands out. In that book while in says, you will learn and again here I'm quoting. Why the inciting incident isn't what you've always thought it is what your key event is and how stop putting it in the wrong seen. How do identify your pinch points and why they can make the middle of your book easier to write and how to ace your stories climactic moment every single time end quote. If you haven't already, I would also urge you to check out wildlands podcast helping writers become authors. Which incidentally is also the inver website, the website itself is very easy to use and chock full of free resources like the aforementioned book. No surprise that has been listed on writers digest one a one best websites for writers every year since two, thousand, fourteen finally for today's Title I would suggest that you consider checking out the accompanying workbook for what it's worth I got the digital version of the book and the physical copy of the workbook. So I could easily job. Thought at them but you do you. Okay. Down to business. Here are my three things number one. Two halves of the same hole wildland reminds us that beginnings and endings are the true heart of your story and that satisfying beginnings and endings mirror each other in some way. Boiling it down to its most essential. She says, quote, the beginning asks a question and the ending answers it and quote, and the ending must answer that specific question or according to island. The whole book will feel, okay number two, the two big types of questions. While you will have a specific question that you need to answer, there are two main types of questions, plot questions and theme questions. I'M GONNA. Use examples from Wilde's book to illustrate the difference between these two types. Okay. Question example this is quoting your book will margie stop her self destructive lifestyle of drugs and liquor before she loses her soul mate Tom Forever, and that's a question, the question and I'm GONNA use the same scenario the example would be will margie. Find self worth or piece. Okay. A couple of notes here. I novels often have both a plot and Athene question. In fact, I would say they almost always do secondly, no matter what type of question it is while end advises that should be a question that can be answered with yes or no by the okay. A dare note if you write more literary works and ending that leaves people debating whether it was a yes or no can be a huge win. Examples of this include doubt by John Patrick Shanley and state of wonder by an Patchett. But for most books, you want people to have a clear idea about the answer to the question. Yes or no so I think she's right there. Okay. Number three, the end. Despite, the fact that while end isn't enthusiastic plotter planner. And strongly advises outlines obviously, she still writes several endings. This leads us directly to today's quote this her quote thanks to the ever important outline. I never begin a novel without knowing how I want it to end and yet I almost always write three or four endings before I find the correct one stories even intricately outlined ones evolve as we create them the nuanced ending we have in mind at the beginning might no longer be appropriate once we reach it and quote while offer strategies for coming up with different endings, things like using Beta readers setting aside temporarily. But she also reminds you and here comes a bonus quote quote in many ways endings are one of the most fun parts of the process by then all the puzzle pieces are available to play with. You know your characters inside out and you've got a pile of one hundred pages or more to prove that you can do this. So enjoy yourself if more than one ending is necessary have fun playing with the options and take advantage of the opportunity to rebel and your story world just a little bit longer and quote that's cantwell it. Okay today's hack. Is it ever too early while and advises us to put in our question early ideally setting up that question remember a yes. No question whether it's the plot or both from the very first scene doesn't have to be entirely in the first but start that process. From the GECKO okay I hope this was

KM Cam Weiland Wilde Air Brown Nebraska John Patrick Shanley Cantwell Margie Athene Tom Forever
The relationship between Justice Scalia and RBG

Fox News Rundown

10:42 min | 2 d ago

The relationship between Justice Scalia and RBG

"Lies in state in the Capitol today, the first woman ever given that honor in the first Supreme Court justice since William Howard Taft and he'd also been the president. Justice. Ginsburg's casket was at the court for two days for people to pay their respects, including President Trump, and the first lady booed when they got there. The president has had nice things to say about Justice Ginsburg since her death, you may agree. You may not disagree with her, but he was an inspiration to a tremendous number of people. I say all Americans, and now, he says, it's his job to fill that seat on the court. I think it's very important that we have nine justices. And I think the system is going to go very quickly. The president plans to announce his nominee tomorrow. Joe Biden, and a lot of other Democrats say he should fill that seat if he wins the election in light of Republicans blocking President Obama from filling a seat in an election year, the seat President Obama would have filled incident. Scalia's went to Neil Gorsuch instead of Merrick Garland. For all the fighting. There's been over Justices Scalia and Ginsburg in life. They were very good friends. People always find it surprising that they were such good friends, Christopher Scully's the Eighth of Incident. Scalia's nine Children. There's a new collection published of his father's writing called The Essential Scalia. Their friendship went back. Really to the early eighties, when they were judges together on the D C circuit Court of Appeals, which is kind of like the second most important court in the country, and they they had a good working relationship that which really started back then they would help each other revised their drafts and their opinions. Apparently, the other judges on that court really didn't like getting advice about their writing and how to improve the clarity of what they're writing in the force of their arguments. But Justice Ginsburg liked getting and receiving that kind of advice, and so did my dad, and they formed what he called a mutual improvement society during their time on the court there. And And they had other things in common. They were they had similar backgrounds and that they were both New Yorkers grew up in New York around the same time, different boroughs but around the same time and shared a love of opera. Good wine eating good food. Both of their thousands were excellent cooks. Marty Ginsburg, in particular, is kind of a legendary cook, who would put together wonderful meals every New Year's Eve and they would celebrate New Year's Every every year is well. So you know, despite all their differences, and all the many things they disagreed about, including a number of opinions in this collection. They had a wonderful friendship were able to kind of focus on the things they had in common. Your dad in Justice Ginsburg, I don't know the statistics on how often they concurred or dissented on cases. But I imagine that they disagreed. Maybe as much as any two Recent justices have my right. Yeah, I think that that sounds right. I don't know the statistics, either. I think people would be surprised by how often they agreed with each other. But on the real hot button cultural cases, they often disagreed one of her most important, most famous opinions. Was Virginia Military Institute case from the mid nineties. And my My father wrote a dissent to that case, which is in this collection, the essentials, Scalia and it was hey actually gave her the draft of that descent a little bit earlier than one usually does just so that she would have more time to kind of Deal with it and grapple grapple with his arguments. And and, yeah, some of his most staying the sense we're in response to opinions. She didn't necessarily right but but joined, And I think that's probably true. Vice versa. Tell us very about the big bouquet of roses she got from him. My dad would get her roses for her birthday and I guess the Ah, I think the last time he did that. So the year before he died, one of the editors of the Essential Scalia Judge Jeffrey Sutton was visiting my father in chambers on on Justice Ginsburg's birthday. And he saw that my dad had two dozen roses for Justice Ginsburg and Judge Sutton started teasing Dad saying, You know, I haven't even gotten my wife two dozen roses over the course of our entire marriage. Why would you do this? And besides, When was the last time she cited with you on a really important 54 decision? You know, he's poking fun, You know, not not really being serious, but My dad gave a serious answer, which was some things are more important than votes. As I think I just kind of a great encapsulation of their of their relationship of their friendship they had they had Very different opinions of politics and of their jobs as a zoo judges and of what laws, men and with the Constitution, man. But, uh, how they voted wasn't the biggest factor in their relationship. It wasn't that those opinions didn't matter. And it wasn't that they compromised their beliefs for each other. But they didn't let those very strongly held beliefs undermine their very deep friendship collection of Supreme Court. Justice Antonin Scalia is writing sort of like a greatest hits album. It's opinions and other writing about the law and the Constitution again called the Essential Scalia. This is really just a collection of his greatest Legal writings, opinions, speeches, essays and they collected together give a really good sense of white. Exactly. He was such a significant Supreme Court justice on it. They're having in one collection really makes it tangible for anybody understand that we'll just as a legal reference work. You've got to think it's going to end up being bought by or four A lot of lawyers and judges know absolutely in law students. I hope you know that he he wrote. Clearly, he wrote, Hey, had so many memorable phrases and his opinions. His logic was so strong and convincing that people just kind of they often went to his opinions first. And so it's good for people to kind of have that as a resource to keep going to those opinions. Even you know, even after His passing is also besides the legal community. It's also like you said. It's very readable, even for non lawyers for just a general interest audience who might, but he was just simply a very, very good writer. Yeah, it's exactly right. He hey, wrote. For? I guess we would now call it out of transparency. You know, Even when he was writing Supreme court opinions, he understood that they should be understood themselves by everyday citizens, not just legal eagles and people with legal degrees. He kind of a recurring theme of his opinions. Is that people should know what the court courts are doing and people that the court should not usurp power that properly belongs to the people. And I think that kind of reverence for the Democratic order is is kind of manifest in his in the clarity of his writing a lot of times if he had a vote, a personal vote on how a case would turn out it may or may not a lot of times did a line with how he ruled, But sometimes it probably wouldn't have right. Yeah, I think that's true. And that's especially true in one example is when he sided with the majority in a flag burning case. The majority ruled that, um, it was constitutional sorry from burning the flag was constitutionally protected speech under the First Amendment so prohibiting that in the state law was unconstitutional. My father often explained that he did not like Three idea of flag burning. If he were a king, he would ban it. But clearly to him falls under the protection of the protection of the First Amendment, and a lot of conservatives to this day do not like that opinion. My father thought the Constitution was clear about that. There are many examples in this collection, the essential Scalia of instances in which he stands up for the rights of the accused defendant's rights. There's a famous case in here where search and seizure cases as well there a couple of those in here where he just thought, you know the police do not have authority, for example, to use Scans of houses, Tio identify Marilou who was growing marijuana without that was an illegal search examples like that s so if he could just pass a law That was one thing, but actually sorry, there couldn't be even be lost for that because they so clearly violated the Constitution, even though obviously he wouldn't have approved of those particular actions. Sure. Hey, was also notice the talker during oral arguments. He has asked a lot of questions and clearly sometimes, though, they weren't really questions. They were just arguments he was making to his fellow justices. Do you think he went into most cases with his mind made up based on the briefs, and the president is a bad thing, but not usually the case. I think that the justices, you know, I can't say for certain, but my hunch is that they often have to go in with a pretty good idea, but I think for the most part, they do ask questions, not just Not just to be heard or not just to make arguments, but because they want to really engage with the arguments that the lawyers are making in the forward to this collection, Justice Kegan first of all, very happy that she agreed to write this beautiful forward, But she she says that she says just that, you know, Dad would ask these questions because he loved argument and kind of loved mixing it up. It wasn't just kind of wasn't just for show though he did. I think you're right. He was very kind of an engaging speaker and There was some study years ago that that found he was. He was the funniest justice by the standards of he drew the most laughter from the courtroom during oral arguments, which obviously isn't the most important thing to do, but just shows how much he he enjoyed that process that love for debate. Did it? Was it a two way street was? Was he persuadable? Absolutely. That's something justice Kagan mentions in her forward. She doesn't say when she ever changed his mind, but says They change each other's minds at times. Well, Christopher Scalia, It was great to talk, Teo, The book is called The Essential Scalia on the Constitution, the courts and the rule of law. Chris Scalia. Really good to talk to you. Thanks so much, Thanks so much appreciate your time.

Justice Antonin Scalia Justice Ginsburg Supreme Court President Trump Christopher Scalia Chris Scalia Marty Ginsburg Scalia D C Circuit Court Of Appeals Barack Obama William Howard Taft Joe Biden Ginsburg Justice Kegan Virginia Military Institute Merrick Garland Christopher Scully Neil Gorsuch
Why NFTs Are Attracting Everyday People to Crypto

Unconfirmed: Insights and Analysis From the Top Minds in Crypto

07:11 min | 2 d ago

Why NFTs Are Attracting Everyday People to Crypto

"Everyone's been talking about tease or non fungible tokens this week for those in the audience, you aren't sure what those are. If you remember Crypto kitties which were unique collectable digital casn I still think they exist. That's just one example Jake. Can you define what a non fungible tokens and then we can dive into why there's so much chatter about them. Now, absolutely, I mean the simple definition of a non fungible. Is a token. That represents a unique asset work to crypto currencies where we have many units that are all worth the same like if I had one ether Laura when ether those are you know they're the same value but if I had one crypto kitty and you had another Crypto Kitty, they actually might be valued totally differently your crypto kitty might be really scarce and valuable might be resume common, and so non fungible tokens they really represent this this. This class of unique assets that's out there. Into what's been going on with them recently, why has there been so much chatter. Well. As someone who's been watching the space for for a very, very long time for from the very beginning. When Rare Pepe? Images were to be traded on counterparty with it seems like about Elian. Years ago. It's a long time ago. How is before Cryptic Eddie's? I think what's what's actually happening is that the space of non fungible assets is maturing a little bit and what we've seen is actually a little bit of interesting early conversion of digital creators are creating art and collectibles and other kinds of NFC assets, and they're starting to trade them on marketplaces in the volume on these marketplaces is going up a bit and related to that I think investors have matured a little bit in their thinking about the NFC space and they've started to position in. Make investments a venture style mostly so far? In companies that are that are in the NFC space in it's been very exciting. And there's even a little bit of the yells farming thing going on within fifteen. So I think that's another reason people are getting excited because even though the crees has died down from the fever pitch, I still see. In it But you actually wrote a really interesting blog post about an of to any you had like another definition that you gave, which is you said that NFC's liquid intellectual property for digital content. So what do you mean by that? Yes. This is exactly. What I've been sort of saying is like most people have so far rushed off the NFC spaces. People trading funny pictures on you know on blockchain's. and. If you sort of thought experiment a little bit in you in, you start to understand a little bit of a kind of financial use cases that NFC's enable. You start to realize that if you take this view of teas as strong ownership of digital contents. Things get quite interesting and the first thing to observe is that there is just like a lot of different kinds of digital contents. Certainly there's certainly there's collectibles. But there's also three d models or metaverse assets. There's also stock photography. There's also blog posts that people right and then monetize through syndication. There's music on which artists earn royalty. There's movies which get distributed on platforms like Netflix on and so forth, and if you start to count up the number of digital objects on the Internet and in the world, you actually start piling up quite an asset classes of objects, and if you start to think of NFC's is being kind of a very fitting technology to denote ownership of these objects to denote the royalty streams of these objects on the start to get away from a little bit of the speculative aspects like, Oh, I buy Crypto, Katie I'm going to. Flip it to somebody else later, and you start to get into the more fundamentally valued aspects of of non fungible assets, which is like, Hey, maybe, I'll own the revenue stream to Taylor, saw Taylor swift song or album or something like that or maybe I'll own the movie rights to certain like digital character that I'll be able to license out and when you take that view of. NFC's as liquid intellectual property. What you start to realize is that most intellectual property doesn't live on secondary markets today, it's kind of liquid and what blockchain enables is the liquidity of these markets, and so the reason that I'm super excited about NFC is as an investor is I think that we're about to unlock a whole lot of value that previously has been in these non-traded like. Paper rights, but as about to get a lot more digital. So I have so many questions about what he said. But before we can into those, I do just want to make one comment, which is I notice near blog posts that you had a chart of different kinds of content and one of them said written content. And underwritten it was like movies and videos, and I was like what about articles and e books as a writer? I just had a point that you missed. Right there because I would not call videos and movies written content and and also like even just knowing your example when you mentioned blog post. So is like their professional writers to who like a living writing But. Anyway. Okay. So we were talking you were talking about if he's from the Creator's perspective, but I wanted to ask also. So right now as a consumer I already have you know multiple libraries of music that I can tap like you know music stream from apple or spotify or Pandora Soundcloud, etc or you know I can go into these different stock photography sites or whatever. So what's in it for the end-consumer like what would get them to make a switch? Because basically democratize is the ownership in in this kind of content, right? So if if you think about of stock photography site today like getty images or shutter stock or something like that, I mean you're talking about a private business that is facilitating marketplace between stock photographers and purchasers of stock photography like designers or making websites, and so on and so forth. And this marketplace model is exactly the thing that blockchain. Technology in my opinion was really born to to disrupt and what basically wh what can happen is we can replace that proprietary provisioning of the marketplace with a decentralized smart contract based system, which is exactly what marketplaces like like recently wearable have done, and we can give the ownership and the governance of that system to the community of people who are participants in that marketplace, and that's really really powerful value proposition that blockchain's in general

NFC Blockchain Jake Pepe Laura Netflix Eddie Taylor Apple Writer Spotify Katie I
Amazon devices event 2020: What to expect

KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

00:57 sec | 3 d ago

Amazon devices event 2020: What to expect

"Tech writers like Yusa, Today's Jefferson Graham gather in Seattle to be wild by all sorts of alike, said other smart home products This year, it takes the form of a live blogged. But Graham says it'll be full of surprises nonetheless. Last year, it was 75 new products to your report was 90. I mean, it's just it's nonstop in two hours and go on virtual, Graham tells connects, the tech giant will continue capitalizing on our stay at home lifestyle. A lot of new Alexis speakers lot of new talking thing. Last year, it was The talking wall clock. It was the glasses that you talk to Alexa on you before it was two talking Michael wave. I think we'll probably see a new TV from them with built in Zoom. Of course, if you're really what I go big with your online meetings, Microsoft is introduced in 85 inch screen with built in video conferencing, the cost a mere $22,000. Rain pink. Aaah! Next 10 70 news radio. We've been telling you all morning about the closure of the 405 south in the South Bay. Because of this deadly crash

Jefferson Graham Yusa Alexa South Bay Seattle Michael Wave Microsoft
MTA Honors Man For Catching New York Subway Derailment Suspect

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:50 sec | 4 d ago

MTA Honors Man For Catching New York Subway Derailment Suspect

"A strap hanger, dubbed a hero for attempting to stop a derailment and holding the suspect for police started, like most mornings for raking Wilder. I'm a frequent writer of subway system. But this time he couldn't believe what he was seeing a man on the track bed, putting debris on the rail of a north bound a train. I felt very angry. I was disturbed A wilder cleared the track himself. But then the man police identified is Dimitrius Harbour did it again, causing a partial derailment watching him smile. Wild and watching the train wreck and the fire and the smoke. It was like being on a you know, Hollywood said. Wilder ran after and tackled Harvard holding him for police Mth era pat for he calls the 44 year old. A hero may have saved the lives of dozens of New Yorkers boy presenting with a giant MetroCard and a wallet sized version. Unlimited rides for a

Wilder Dimitrius Harbour Writer Hollywood Harvard
Interview with Amy Dresner

Addiction Unlimited Podcast | Alcoholism | 12 Steps | Living Sober | Addiction Treatment

05:13 min | 4 d ago

Interview with Amy Dresner

"I'm your host Angela Pugh we are recording in my home away from home. Sunny. Hollywood California although it's not very sunny yet it looks like. It's getting there our guest today I'm so excited about this. I just met amy she's fantastic. She's so much fun Amy Dresner. She's a former professional stand up comic and she has this fabulous book. I can't wait to read called my fair junkie a memoir of getting dirty and staying clean and that is available on audiobook to which I just found out, which is my favorite. So I will definitely be getting it as soon as we are done with this podcast. So Amy, welcome to the show. Thank you so much for being here I. Thanks for having me. I'm really awesome to meet you in person. I'm glad. Yeah Right. God. You're not glad you're here and I'm not doing this podcast by myself. So I was thinking with your personality, you should have a podcast of God. And everyone has a podcast. I'm time for a podcast You know I'm doing a lot of book promotion and a lot of podcast like yours people people other writers are like teasing me. They're like, are you on a podcast? Thirty it's embarrassing. So I actually made a meam of Colonel Puff Puff my cat going up you're on another podcast for your book please tell me more. So, what other stuff have you been doing promoting the book? Not Just Interviews readings I did a couple book fairs Best places for people to find your book. I'd say Amazon, it's Barnes and noble online. It's on target online nice but Barnes and noble in stores online everyone seems to be buying on Amazon. It's on india-bound. It's on fit? Amazon. Is probably going to own the world pretty soon. If they keep doing same day delivery like I will never leave my house to shop again. Yeah. That was the problem I think with the book. was them trying to push for a pre sales like addicts don't want deferred gratification? You know what I mean. So there I am like pushing. preorder book is like three months away and everyone's like No like they want. Order Yeah you know addicts one instant gratification me with audiobook. There you go. That's says they've never has never seen something like that. With my book, they've seen a one to one ratio of the paper of the of the hardcover audiobook. Me On a podcast and they downloaded immediately. Yes. The. Other part of it is audio. We were talking about this a little bit before we started recording audio is so easy because I can hit play on my phone and I can walk out of my house in it'll play I walk in the House it POPs up on my Bluetooth. Speaker. When I get in my car pops up on my car you're very electronically organized not I I'm I'm Ju Yeah I'm not tech people in general. Speaking for myself not other Jews. We're not that great at that's up except when I was a tweaker I had a little I had some good stuff it'll. Yeah and I was good at taking apart electric's. Fixing them just taking them apart in. Do you really need to fix them once? and. Now I'M GONNA go for a series deal based on the book, which is Super Super Exciting. Okay. What will that look like eyebrow? Oh come on as a little something. Okay. It's based on the book correct. So So based on a true story. Yeah. It's based on the book and I really want the opportunity to be involved in in the writing and I really want the opportunity to do a TV show that shows. Addiction. How it really is Not just these destructive monsters that were sensitive and needy and that we you know it's not celebrity rehab wherever was puking in garbage cans and fighting, and you know that's a part of it but it's like you I don't think there's been I've been I've been watching Patrick Melrose. I can't watch like I'm trying to watch at one of my good girlfriends. Told me about it she is hooked and I. Watch it but here it's so hard for me because of the needles like there's go to in the beginning. Yeah. When I when I started it and the first thing was a Syringe, my heart was like. Were you an IV drug user I? Well, I, was in such a chick was and I still have like of lick a visceral reaction needles and we spend maybe fifteen years since I've shot drugs right But my I have a weird sort of like it's like excitement and kind of repulsion nausea at the same time. But my body remembers I. See it my body goes crew. Is Wife's up wanting watching intervention because that's why I stopped it stopped it was to actually what triggering me freaking me out to show. She told me about that show and I started watching those are the that goes away that's beginning Kelly I can't watch this why I stopped watching out beginning it goes later it becomes more about is abusive childcare becomes. Because this is part. Don't tell me one TV show. That that really shows addiction the way it

Amy Dresner Amazon Patrick Melrose Angela Pugh Hollywood California Barnes Kelly
Antebellum's DirectorsWe Made A Slave Movie

Toure Show

04:25 min | 4 d ago

Antebellum's DirectorsWe Made A Slave Movie

"I watched the film twice because. It was compelling and I kind of had to like see it a second time after I've seen the twist and all that Sorta good stuff So a lot to talk about why this film now. Well, you know. We'd like to say that it was it was strategic but it but it wasn't about. SIX MONTHS DR moved to La for Miami I had this horrific nightmare that I think. was probably precipitated by the death of my father. Bit, less than a year prior that I was having some problems processing. And in this nightmare. This woman who was eating. was so desperate for help that it felt as though she was screaming across dimensions to reach anybody. And when I when I awoke from the nightmare. It didn't feel like anything that I had experienced before. It was within the the Brandon category of what would you call dream or nightmare, but it definitely felt like something other worldly like an ancestral visitation. And the next day Christian from I talked about it and ended up writing the short story because that's our process. And the natural writing the short story. We wrote the script that is now a antebellum. So you know for us as part of the work that we've done up to this moment, we've always felt like. All of the work that we were presenting or that we're trying to percent. Of that, there was an urgency of now and that that. The world in America has been. Careening. Toward disaster. And so yeah I mean we we never imagined in a million years that anything that we would create would be just for entertainment sake but that it is it is art. To, activate into catalyze a national dialogue around a host of issues. Not least of which is race in America. But without finger-wagging. you guys are co directors right and that's unusual to my experience and the last pair of CO directors. I remember the Hughes Brothers where there was a clear delineation of like I do this sort of stuff. I, this sort of stuff is there a division of labor or you guys kind of like one? Group. We pretty much. You know act as one onset were always together in the same space, which is super important because otherwise you know production designer or Qassams Zainur will come up to one of US nasty question we have to kind of be central in the same place but. What what helps us as a directing duo is that were also writing duo so that we kind of are able to have all of those knock down drag out. Battles on the creative in our own home. As writing the by the time we get onset we really have one vision at were were super. I mean within the duo is there a division? Is there I'm a little bit more this. I'm a little bit more that. I think. We've been together for twelve years and so we speak a telepathic shorthand. I don't know that we could be objective in saying that one is a little bit more this or that I think. I think. An outside observer would have to get you that answer as far as we're concerned we are we are. It's Qismat and we're we're we're certainly would have connected on on levels that feel we normal most writer director. duos were also a couple. So it's like everything is really on. Utilized.

America LA Hughes Brothers Qassams Zainur United States Miami Writer Director.
Rich People Problems

The Cut

04:57 min | 5 d ago

Rich People Problems

"I realized I've been using the words envy and Jealousy interchangeably when there's actually a fine but stark difference between them. Jealousy. is about fear. Jealousy is anxiety about losing what you have that nervous feeling that someone is out for your spot. Envy on the other hand is about desire. Envy is wanting what you don't yet have its daydreaming and striving and keeping up with the Joneses. But. The primary difference I would say is that these are two radically different feelings. Jealousy. Is Corrosive and painful, and it drives you absolutely up the wall. Envy on the other hand is almost. Fun. I mean I feel like what my therapist would tell you that my obsession with comparison is like not good for my life. But I also feel like it's a strong part of unfortunately my personality for writer Evie Ebert envy is a byproduct of ambition I had kind of built my life around this idea that This version of me and the president is not the real me. The real me is this like Hologram of myself that I'm pursuing where things work out the way that I want them to and I'm better and I'm smarter and I'm more successful and I'm getting there. and. Then it was sort of like the pandemic HIV extremely harsh pause button on everyone's life and it was like, no the what you have right now is all that there is there's no forward movement we had to remind ourselves to be happy to be alive and lucky if we're in good health. Grateful for what we have right where we are. Blake. That's hard to sustain. Aspiration without opportunity ferments envy. Of course, I could be much worse off but I was like green with envy about people whose homes are larger were living in better climates maybe who had outdoor pools and I had a real inclination to kind of judge myself for becoming obsessed with. Who has a better basically and so I was like, no, this is part of my self care practice is allowing myself to be annoyed by people. But then every realized that other people were probably allowing themselves to be annoyed at her. He's essay in the cut is titled Do. You hate me for my lawn. She has a law and it feels extremely luxurious like being able to open the front door and signed my four year old out I feel like marie-antoinette basically for a while felt like everything and anything was a luxury showing off your sour dough bread meant you had groceries Zoom conferences meant you had a job complaining about your kids had human contact you can't win at this. I mean, some people are having A. Hard. Time but nobody's having fun and then in the midst of pointing our fingers at each other and tossing are envy around our immediate circle. We picked our ears up. We heard sound. Horrible sound. No has been the siren song of extremely wealthy celebrities. Huge We rose up and grabbed R N D, r proverbial pitchforks, and we marched to the photographs of Drake's weirdly empty hotel lobby of mansion. We swarmed to pick apart the celebrity bookshelves on zoom. We roundly mocked the rich and famous as insistence that all in this together it was so overtly tone-deaf. Are. Envy. was almost. Delicious I'm having this resentment and you're having to and it's it's something that we're kind of sharing. I feel like it's part of the shared pandemic experienced. It was suddenly like we were truly all in this together. Freud talks about this in civilization and its discontents that cohesive society unites around a common enemy an out group. There are lots of scary an unfortunate examples of the groups America has ostracized, but the rich and famous are not among them. Because, it's so much more complicated than pure animosity if they're so awful and they're so ridiculous in there. So repugnant why? Why does Kim Kardashian have like a Zillion instagram followers molly young is the literary critic for New York magazine and she was wondering why we want to keep looking at rich people for envy or fantasy or whatever we turn to them for I mean what's interesting about the quarantine is you started seeing a lot of people turn against celebrities right like Ellen complaining that quarantining in her gigantic house made her feel like she was imprisoned or whatever, and finally people are starting. To kind of examine the purpose that these celebrities are serving in our lives need to examine why we're interested in them in the first place

Joneses Blake Kim Kardashian Ellen Freud Evie Ebert America New York Magazine A. Hard Instagram Writer Drake President Trump Molly Young Envy.
7 Tools to Grow Your Agency

Marketing School

03:23 min | 5 d ago

7 Tools to Grow Your Agency

"Super committed to your success online. We've worked with them to a special offer just remarking school listeners. All you have to do is go to dream host dot com slash marking school to learn more and get your website online today. Welcome to eight another episode of marketing. School I'm Eric Su. And I'm Neil Patel and today we are going to talk about seven tools to grow your agency. So I'll go with the first one I. One is super metrics, supermax ships to me is the best reporting tool when it comes to reporting on pay media or SEO or any of this type of stuff. So different integrations and it's just makes really cool looking reports and it's easy to understand. It's easy to use super metrics. We've been recommending it since the beginning of this podcast just great product. Number to salesforce you probably like, Hey, as the agency, what I need to use cell source is such a great tool as your crm to deal with sales new leads in also when someone comes onboard as a customer to continually have them and there, and then you can use it to up sell down. So we used cell so far agency it really is one of the key tools that we use it sadly expensive yet papers eat, but it's used from everywhere from account managers, client services, people doing the work to even sales reps. We like using able just think of it as spreadsheets that are superpower and they raised a ton of money I. think they're valued at over they've a Unicorn valuation. It's great. We use it for managing all of our content production, and before that, it was radicals all over the place we found that this is just to have an all in one solution, and then also that maps out our pillar content and all of our social content is just incredible. So just check it out you can. Use It for free to have a lot of different templates you can use just to kind of deploy immediately is just made us a lot more organized. So number four, I would use schedule once or any one of those call scheduling offers you'll get leaders the agency from your website here, and there if you use a scheduling software, you have a much higher still increase, your closing rate. So you schedule once or at any one of the alternatives number five I mean look there's a lot. Of Project management tools out there we personally use Asana you can use basecamp as well. We just WANNA have one source to everyone in what you want to have. The worst would be What I've seen in the past is agency uses all these different project management tools and there's no consistency right you wanna have consistency and you want to have people operating marching in the same direction number six google data studio, Google, data studios, a really simple tools like business intelligence until that ties in analytics. All the different data sources, Eric mentioned, super metric super metrics ties into data studios while. But the reason we love it as you can create your own custom designs in templates that when you're doing reporting fair clients, it can look and feel the way you want, and you can have different couplets based on different types of industries as you start scaling up, and then you can, of course, customize everything to each and every single account. So that way the analytics is much more actionable versus generic reports. Seven last but not least is. Zappia is workflow automation under a lot of people call Xabier. The founder will have you know that it's called Zap your workflow automation. What I mean by that, you're using a lot of different tools and so as an example, let's say we do this podcast it gets published I'll well, we want that to automatic a spreadsheet so we can happen for writers later to easily track you can do that. Using Zappia, never freedom option that you can just say, Hey, I want from RSS feed, which is as podcast to be able to push to Google sheet. You can do that, and then you can set other workflows on top of that, right I it to about

Eric Su Google Zappia Neil Patel Founder ZAP Xabier
Interview with  Glory Edim

Talking Journeys of Belonging 2 Blackness

04:42 min | Last week

Interview with Glory Edim

"Her second in policy, which we look forward to hearing more about welcome glory are you having me? Oh thank you so much for joining us in your kicking off our season two of the podcast series. So what a way to start the fall? Oh, this is incredible. I'm glad to be a guest I am a fan of your work. In addition to just enjoying the book itself, I'm a fan of what you've been able to accomplish with well red black girl particularly in the way of used the platform of of a literary network to intentionally highlight narratives that are often ignored or ones that disappear from her collective consciousness as to African descended womanhood, the beauty and diversity of our voices experiences I enjoy speaking to people like yourself and I often wonder how is this person get here? What was their journey like? Why do they do what they do? So you ready to get into it? Yes, I am. Act One call to adventure. As a writer entrepreneur, of course, there are paths that we take and processes that we engage in to get us to where we are today, and sometimes we do that. Emotionally, we have spiritual processes, intellectual ones, and so on. How did you become interested in doing the work you do today? Well, it was a long and Berry unexpected journey and I think it really started for me at Howard University by alumni really supported me feel seen in loves and space where black women aren't always valued our university boosted lifted me up. So it was there that I countered Zora Neil hurston and Tony Morrison and my Angelo, all incredible authors that allowed me to see myself more clear in allowed needs to really start to think about who I wasn't the world in the work that I wanted to do, and originally I majored in journalism and I minored in geology and I was always surrounded by just incredible people that motivated me whether it's my professors my best friends I just always had a beautiful reflection to someone saving mealy you can do this and whether it was reading pursuing journalism, I, always find courage is supported and I think that's the main takeaway from my spirit's is becoming not. Yet or do serve the festival and so many other names. It's having a support system being passionate and being able to identify what your vision is. Jahns I've been able to say without a doubt that my purpose to really be of service to other black women and help uplift them in a leary space yawns I gained so much joy from that. I didn't know that was what I was going to be doing when I was a freshman in college, but it just organically happened as I started pursuing my career. Network in meeting other people it just services evolved this beautiful way. So years later, we well red black girl but I know that seed was planted on campus our university I, like fat because and maybe this is just my own personal perspective of going to a Pwi a predominantly white institution that it's not to say that you don't have professors that encourage and cultivate you your skills, your interest but I wonder if if it's something about going to an HP, see you that it's like Hashtag black excellence all around and then you. Just really entrenched in that moment of Oh, you dig Tony Morrison to, and it's not like we have one week where we covered Tony Morrison then that's it. No, it's extends like it's like the whole life cycle like I think back when I was a freshman I taught at a school that was called the Maya Angelou Public Charter school and I don't think I could have done that anywhere else but in DC as a student at Howard University and those moments gave me again the sense of purpose of helping. Other children and working in space with other black students and working with black professors just around we twenty four, seven that I didn't have I didn't have a chance to second-guessed took away. Any doubt I had when I was at a randomly whites all as a high school student and then when I graduated I, just have the sense of I mean in. Regards like entitled to myself were that I felt like I do anything united feels token is any way because I knew

Tony Morrison Howard University Angelo Maya Angelou Public Charter Sc Zora Neil Hurston Writer PWI Berry HP
Interview with Thriller Writer Andrew Allan - burst 1

The Crime Cafe

12:28 min | 2 months ago

Interview with Thriller Writer Andrew Allan - burst 1

"Hi. Everyone may guest is the author of the wall Asher Thriller series you also right to grind house hulk. We've gotten talked about. He is an infomercial writer and director is also into wild cope movies making them I believe. And runs a website called daily. Grind House Dot. com I guess today's Andrew. Allan. Hi Andrew. Thanks for being here. It's Sure thing I love your resume I mean you're you're by it was fascinating to me because I love sill as well as books I assumed that you were infomerrcial rendered director before you started writing books. Yes. Yeah I, my career is little bit weird in the sense that I went to film school and then I, broke two commercials while I was working on developing movies and I ended up getting a job at the home shopping network, which is based here in Saint Pete Florida and. It's bizarre. Everyone presumes it is, but it was really great experience and I learned how to do a lot of things including sell on TV and that often into doing infomercials, which is selling on TV so and I have to say I love it as ridiculous as it sounds I it's great profession. Sounds. Really cool actually. What made you decide to do infomercials and what prompted you to start writing books? Money prompted me to start doing infomercials. Is You know we all need it. We all like it. But three Oris was. Like I said, I. Learned to basically sell on television when as at. and. That is a natural transition into infomercials and when I decided Lake Age San. I knew I wanted to make my writing or sorry make my living still riding in. If, directing producing commercials. In what was great about infomercials was at a Niche. So instead of just saying, Hey, I'M A. Commercial writer and there's ten thousand other people are competing with. I said been infomercial right better and maybe ten people on meeting with. So now I can like authentically say one of the top it from our show writers world and I've got a ton of experience done thousands of commercials in the ask aid and all that sort of stuff so. It's great and that's how that came to be the reason I started writing books. was because I I remember reasons when I was creatively frustrated had been making movies had been writing screenplays in. which were fun and some of them got made some of them did. But all of them required collaboration and I had reached a point where I didn't really want to collaborate anymore. At least for a while, I needed a break. And that's even on projects that I absolutely loved movie that was aching with my best friend and. Even then like we would get into arguments and about I just needed a break from that. So I wanted to do something on my own and that's when I decided to write a book had a story. Kind of kicking around that I'd never been able to turn into a script. I finally figured out how to make that work in book form, which was the first of Asher took and. Took it from there, the other the other part of that story is. I was actually reading a book by. A very famous author that we all know who I'm not GONNA name and Not to sound Eric and I thought it was terrible house like a weight. and. I actually caught myself saying I could do better. And? You know a very arrogant thing to save for someone who's never. But I decided to see if I could back up. And I think I did. unbelie speaking I didn't think I was right. Funny because a lot of writers actually do start offers those kinds of thoughts I do this. Anyway it wasn't even looking down at the writing it was in fact. The looking at the idea of being writer was more like this story is not entertaining be and. I know enough about story structure from screen plays and things like that. where I could look at this and say, really was about me thinking this guy should be doing a lot better for albig their name is and how much money. Yeah. You points for originality on coming up with a protagonist is infomercial writer. Director. But I see that you've drawn from your own background or at least I assume you have. Tell US little about wall. Ask How is it? He gets into the kinds of situations that would lead to thriller. Series. What I had to figure out. As. He is comes from my background. I did go down the road of right now and that's because. As confident as I was writing commercials in his confident as was writing movies I had no confidence whatsoever writing a book so I figured I ought to. Rely on everything that I could get off the so. And then plus the idea. Of Him being an infamous rider was intriguing. You know. I. Like all of us had written read million books about cops and lawyers and soldiers, detectives and reporters. That's great. People are probably doing it better than me. So let me try something completely different. And I worked at it worked because I think wall what I like about wall. What I like about these books is that he has to rely persuasion to kind of get by doesn't mean he's not physical. There's a lot of action in the books and But. But he is a true amateur sleuth who has nothing to do with. Justice and basically starts out he lives on the Rainbow River, which is a real. River Donnellan Florida about two hours north where I. In he's he's in the river because data's friend's house by the water and finds his friend dead on the Bank of the river. With an alligator in the process of Jim up. But it's clear that the alligator did not kill him so. One thing leads to another and the villain in the story overplays its hand. And attempts to kill. Walt. And it becomes very clear that he has to do. Something a balance it's no. A- paranoid. It's legitimate in in the Diet figuring out. took. Let's see you also, right. Does poke at the series also correct. Those books like you fun. Grind House. I I. Guess. Okay so Basically the Grind House was forty second street movie theaters in the Sixties Seventies in eight Times Square. And They Kinda just show like all the really gross horror movies the karate movies, all kinds of stuff you know movies that were generally looked down upon, but also provided extremely visceral thrill. And I love those movies I think they're A. A love cult movies, and so my grind house pulse series is basically me coming up with ideas for grind house movies, it putting them at goes. It's different than like the wall Asher stuff is war. Thriller Mystery Thriller Suspense Ryan How's Paul is pushed things over the edge a little bit more. you know there's more violence and there's You know just like you'd see in those insane movies and they're really they're. Their books of movies I would love to see. Yeah Yeah. You. Should check public domain deserves some really crazy things that you probably already know that. That's for sure. Oh my gosh. If you receive Nanos hands a fate. Badly. I had yes. Oh my God. That's all say about that. There's some movies that are just so bad. You have to see them. That's one of them. Well, that's a little part of my resume I produced Herschell, Gordon Lewis's last movie. Own Donahue Herschel is he's the guy. He was the first guy to put Gore in a move back nine hundred and sixty three in the movie blood feast. and He did other movies like wizard of Gore or girls and two thousand maniacs. E, Kinda started it all and he was. Low budget exploitation filmmaker and I had the great fortune of. Meeting him in basically getting to produce a movie for one of my heroes. While that's fantastic. That's wonderful To get back to Walt. Is there an overall story ARC in series? So the first book was really just a test to see if I write a book. Well and that feeling. Of. Really sort of rabbit story. There was a slight. Subtle hints. To where it could go beyond that story. Then after I thought about it and I liked the process and I thought the book went well and I didn't get demolished by reviews as like yeah I'll continue the so. As it exists now there's a three book. Arc. Where each is a complete story of their full length novels, but the villain is the same in the three of them. The Antagonists Casino tag is more of a secret organisation kind of thing than just one person specifically. So there's arc with that and then in between each novel. I, I wrote an Avella. And those are side stories, featuring walt and some of the same characters from the boat but not related to that big overarching story. So. Just kind of Nice it's sort of like a breather in between, but you still get to spend time with the characters. That's cool. Yeah. Most of those are. Rooted in the fact that. Waltz basically best friend up on the river where he lives. Dining digi who is actually a criminal biker. And he's into all kinds of criminal stuff but he's just Kinda like one of those Florida Good Ole boys who are fun to be around and for whatever reason he likes wall is completely not of his world. So in the NOVELLAS. Those. Tend to focus on D. G. Getting Wall to do something for digi in that usually on the danger things like that, and and that's what cell shock which giveaway book for this interview is one of those things. Lead. US

Writer Walt Director Grind House Asher Saint Pete Florida Andrew Allan United States Rainbow River ARC River Donnellan Florida Gore Lake Age San Florida Eric Donahue Herschel D. G. JIM Paul
"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

The Rookie Writer Show

03:11 min | 2 months ago

"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

"How can <Speech_Female> you streamline to <Speech_Female> preserve some of those energy <Speech_Female> pennies for <Speech_Female> more creative uses <Speech_Female> now? Now, that being said <Speech_Female> for some people <Speech_Female> playing with their order <Speech_Female> gives them energy <Speech_Female> playing <Speech_Female> with how <Speech_Female> they can surprise and <Speech_Female> delight themselves. <Speech_Female> These little ways <Speech_Female> can actually give them energy <Speech_Female> obviously <Speech_Female> for a lot <Speech_Female> of us, watching <Speech_Female> movies and shows <Speech_Female> feeds <Speech_Female> us because it's <Speech_Female> more fiction <Speech_Female> that we're just taking in. <Speech_Female> When we need brakes <Speech_Female> I liked to the <Speech_Female> news. It's <Speech_Female> a weirdly <Speech_Female> restorative thing <Speech_Female> for me because it has <Speech_Female> nothing to do <Speech_Female> with plotlines <Speech_Female> or characterization, <Speech_Female> it just <Speech_Female> is. So <Speech_Female> I like to keep up on that <Speech_Female> by being <Speech_Female> mindful of how to. <Speech_Female> Streamline <Speech_Female> these things so that they stay <Speech_Female> supportive and <Speech_Female> not draining of those <Speech_Female> energy pennies. <Speech_Female> Okay. This <Speech_Female> sort of leads beautifully <Speech_Female> to the quote. <Speech_Female> So here <Speech_Female> are words of wisdom <Speech_Female> for Belkessam. Here we go. <Speech_Female> Quote for many <Speech_Female> writers reading <Speech_Female> fills the bolt. <Speech_Female> Especially, <Speech_Female> if you have a personality <Speech_Female> tends towards <Speech_Female> consumption <Speech_Female> of resources <Speech_Female> as food <Speech_Female> for your creativity, <Speech_Female> if you are a person <Speech_Female> who needs to learn <Speech_Female> or research <Speech_Female> in order to produce <Speech_Female> then. Then, learn <Speech_Female> if you are person <Speech_Female> who needs to read <Speech_Female> fiction in order <Speech_Female> to feel immersed in <Speech_Female> new worlds. Then <Speech_Female> read if <Speech_Female> you are a person who needs <Speech_Female> to play video games <Speech_Female> in order to allow <Speech_Female> the back of your brain <Speech_Female> to be creatively <Speech_Female> inactive <Speech_Female> than do that. <Speech_Female> The things we <Speech_Female> often call procrastination <Speech_Female> are <Speech_Female> for most of us, <Speech_Female> the energy producing <Speech_Female> activities that we <Speech_Female> actually need <Speech_Female> in order to maintain <Silence> our pace <Speech_Female> and quote. <Speech_Female> So. It's a tricky <Speech_Female> thing, and this is why she <Speech_Female> wants to really dig <Speech_Female> into some of these questions. That's <Speech_Female> why I said <Speech_Female> the book is Meaty <Speech_Female> Take Your time with <Speech_Female> it short. <Speech_Female> But you need to do a <Speech_Female> lot of heavy lifting and thinking <Speech_Female> which things <Speech_Female> give the appearance <Speech_Female> of <Speech_Female> being restorative <Speech_Female> or you think that <Speech_Female> they would be. But <Speech_Female> actually our drains and <Speech_Female> which things do you think <Speech_Female> are procrastination <Speech_Female> and draining <Speech_Female> an actually kind <Speech_Female> of. These <Speech_Female> questions you have to <Speech_Female> work through there is no <Speech_Female> one size, fits <Speech_Female> all activity <Speech_Female> for every kind <Speech_Female> of writer. So I <Speech_Female> this is why like <Speech_Female> her she makes <Speech_Female> you do a little bit of heavy <Speech_Female> lifting and get to <Speech_Female> the core of it and I <Speech_Female> think if you can do that. <Speech_Female> Then <SpeakerChange> everything <Speech_Female> else kind of falls <Speech_Female> into place a little easier <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> I. Hope this was <Speech_Female> helpful <Speech_Female> and consider picking <Speech_Female> it up and seeing <Speech_Female> if from <Speech_Female> time to time like me, <Speech_Female> you can <Speech_Female> revisit it when <Speech_Female> you feel yourself <Speech_Female> sliding toward burnout. <Speech_Female> Okay. In the next <Silence> episode. <Speech_Female> August thirteenth <Speech_Female> I will <Speech_Female> be reviewing <Speech_Female> your Book Your <Speech_Female> Brand by Dana <Speech_Female> K, it's <Speech_Female> the August business <Speech_Female> episode. I. Don't know how <Speech_Female> August. Already. <Speech_Female> If you found <Speech_Female> this information <Speech_Female> useful, you might <Speech_Female> also like said, <Speech_Female> considered checking <Speech_Female> out Becca, Sims YouTube <Speech_Female> channel. There are <Speech_Female> playlist <Speech_Female> that correspond to <Speech_Female> each of her books <Speech_Female> which include <Speech_Female> deer writer <Silence> you need to quit. <Speech_Female> Dear <Silence> writer, you're doing it <Speech_Female> wrong. Dear, <Speech_Female> writer. Are you in <Speech_Female> writer's block and <Speech_Female> finally the one we <Speech_Female> today year writer? Are <Speech_Female> you in burnout? If <Speech_Female> you enjoy crime <Speech_Female> fantasy <Speech_Female> horror, <Speech_Female> literary <Speech_Female> mystery Sifi <Speech_Female> suspense, <Speech_Female> or thriller. Fiction <Speech_Female> think <Speech_Female> about, swing over and catching <Speech_Female> my unsettling <Speech_Female> reads podcast <Speech_Female> robin able <Speech_Female> and I offer spoiler <Speech_Female> free reviews <Speech_Female> of books in <Speech_Female> these genres. Last <Speech_Female> week, we <Speech_Female> reviewed the faceless <Speech_Female> old woman <Speech_Female> who secretly lives in your <Speech_Female> home, which was <Speech_Female> robbins pick it was fantastic. <Speech_Female> Goes <Speech_Female> out and see what we had <Speech_Female> to say remember spoiler <Speech_Female> free. So we just <Speech_Female> give taste <Speech_Female> if

writer Belkessam robbins Becca
"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

The Rookie Writer Show

05:52 min | 2 months ago

"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

"Hi, welcome to Season Two, episode, twenty, eight of the rookie writer show, I'm Easter Brown and I'm your host today, we're GONNA be talking about dear, writer. Are you in Burnout by Becca Sim? This is the second book reviewed by author. BECCA SIM. She is the woman behind the better. Faster Academy which classes and individual coaching for writers. In addition, she produces a writing productivity podcast and Youtube series of her own called the quick cast for the past few years. She's been co hosting a book marketing show as well. She earned a couple of Master's degrees in coaching related fields as worked with thousands of authors, many of them pulling in six and seven figure incomes. To make it clear though that she does not in any way promise that you'll reach income if you read her books, but it doesn't hurt back, it will be the first one to tell you that her communication style isn't of the blow sunshine up your Wasi variety as I said last time, but she delivers the kind of advice you probably need to hear and a clear an often. Often humorous way. She's not without empathy for your situation. She just isn't interested in letting you shine yourself on either she wants to give you the kinds of tools to start coaching your cell to the levels of productivity that are right for you. She emphatically states in her books are not meant to be full of tips and tricks to get you optimized in a certain way that. That mimic someone else's it's instead designed to get you to ask yourself deep questions, and like she says, in the blurb for this book, she says quote if you are overwhelmed tired frustrated with your career or your sales if you're stuck or stalled come, enjoy me inside these pages and we'll talk about why why is key? We've got this. It's tackle. -able. Let's just get you out. Out of the pit and quote, this is a short book. It's only a hundred and sixty six pages, but it's a medium one. So give yourself time to digest the different points that she's making in each section. I'm not going to be able to cover all of them here, but here are my three things. First recognizing bad cycles is the first step to freeing yourself from them. So. As the saying goes knowing, the source of the problem is half the battle. Many of US set ourselves up with unrealistic expectations which serve as the foundation for what Sim refers to as essential pain. When we can't bend the reality of our lives to the expectations, these unrealistic expectations that we set for ourselves. Then we feel discomfort and we're naturally moved to soothe it because he likes to feel discomfort a Lotta. Times. The approach that we take toward soothing can lead to more essential pain and there you are. There's your loop. Okay. Number two limitless is just a Bradley Cooper movie. It's not a way of life knowing is only half the battle. So that was good number one, but next you need to get smart about your resources so she urges to. To. Think about this in terms of finite units of energy or what she refers to as energy pennies. This kind of reminds me of the spoons approach. You've heard of that anyway, every time you make a decision or create something anything along those lines, you're using up these energy pennies. So it's possible to run through your natural daily supply,.

Becca Sim writer US Wasi Faster Academy Easter Brown Youtube Bradley Cooper Sim
"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

The Rookie Writer Show

04:28 min | 2 months ago

"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

"Read the one page expert from a publication step two for each point is to read the discussion around the expert where no points out specific strategy your technique that he's highlighting there and then step three, and this one is key, and while of this book is for you to try out the exercise now you do it, so knowledge also highlight the good thing about this versus. We're shopping for instances if you mess. Mess Up, no one will yell at you. It's just you this book and your story so very low pressure. He's developed these exercises and others to highlight these strategies through his many years teaching writing and reading his own stories he finds this is far more effective in helping himself and other writers uncovered their own best writing than quote, pontificating and spouting off after the writing is over and done with about the craft or the process or the art and quote my third takeaway, there are no rules fiction, but there are strategies so I think it's tempting to think that if you can just learn. Learn enough some magic set of perfect rules that you can write the perfect work, but then as soon as you learn some end, all be all rule. Someone comes along and rights of beautiful piece of work that flies directly in the face of the quote. Unquote rule were choice matters here, so strategies are different, the defines them as a plan of action or policy designed to achieve a major or overall aim. It's a plan of action. A plan of action can be tried adapted to your own situation to your own story to your own style of writing a ruling contrast suggests a certain. Certain amount of inflexibility, there's a reason that rules are often paired with regulations rules. Ask you to adapt your fiction to serve them whereas strategies to serve you to helps cover the best way to get to sharing your story, so I like that that I think all right the hack. He urges us to pay attention to the places where we skim. He believes that it's the best way to detect where the writer whether it's us or someone else. has quote stopped telling a story and is doing something else like describing setting character, plot or conflict and quote instead of using those things to. To move the story forward whereas he puts it quote, don't look for setting look for the parts where place drives the story forward where character and.

writer
"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

The Rookie Writer Show

08:04 min | 5 months ago

"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

"We're GONNA be talking about overcoming writer's block with Dave or CEELO. It's another class offered on the creative life platform. Which as you know. I love along with masterclass Kanda Class Junkie. Anyway or solo host the written spoken podcast and has authored several books including before you quit reading. Read this. He produces a free twice monthly newsletter called chronicles of the self storied life. Which you can sign up for his website. He also produces the occasional online course and does speaking of its. He describes his work. This way quote. I spend my days immersed and transformative conversations as a life coach a writing and creativity coach and as a communication strategist story consultant working with creative self starters and service minded professionals who wanNA leave legacies of love in their wake. So he's very intentional. He's very thoughtful about people getting workout. There I like that about him. There's a lot here but like usual. I'm just here to give you a taste. So here are my three things number one everything you have done everything you're doing and everything you will do are all part of you and by extension no one part of your life your past or your present or your feature represents all that you're capable of so get hung up on any of it so if you're spending a lot of time thinking about what you haven't done yet or what you're not doing right now. Don't let that be something that blocks you let it be just a piece of all that you're capable of and release that grip on attaching identity to any one of those three things because they only make up a piece number. Two fighting against your feelings will often backfire. If you try to shame yourself out of your feelings they'll only grow deeper roots. Essentially so absent writing programs like those built around word count so the ones that punish you stop writing could actually had more anxiety and set you back. Further for some people feel bad about some stuff and then you adopt one of these more punishing or strict formats. It can actually backfire and add more anxiety and three off even further so if someone else whereas by a word count or a time goal or whatever that you actually find causes you to produce less work when you use it be glad that it works for them and then ditch it basically or solo urges to always choose what supports you here and now. That's the only way to get your work done so it's working for you use. It isn't don't seems really simple. But it's amazing. How many of these things we get. Sorta we lash ourselves like the massive ship. We just lash herself to a certain like I have to write this many words a day or I have to write this many times a week or whatever it is and you just need to do what works for you to be able to get out your good work me Dave pillow. Give you permission to do what supports you here and now okay number three own the identity of being a writer but not just a writer so I love this because it hearkens all the way back to one of the first episodes of the rookie ratio where I urge all writers to practice calling themselves. Writers practice introducing themselves as authors etc. I like it takes us one step further and then says that while quote titles and labels help us relate to one another on a very simple level they never capture the full human that you are end quote. So you're a writer. Yes and you're also a friend and somebody's child and maybe somebody's soulmate. Parent boss mentor neighbor. Whatever you're not going to be killing it in every area of your life every minute of every day. Don't forget to honor all the parts of yourself and the way that you contribute to this world not just what you're contributing to literary or whatever can okay. It's just one piece but it is a peace and honor it and keep that part alive but just not putting so much pressure on can ease up. Some of the Raiders Block. Sometimes okay. Here'S THE HECK. If you're struggling to get started or finish ask yourself the following question and then see where things take you here it is. What have I been avoiding lately? So the question is what have I been avoiding lately? Maybe Journal about it. You might be surprised to learn what's actually blocking you. Why have you been avoiding that thing and not something else? What can it teach you? Are you afraid to finish? Are you afraid to start? Are you bored with what you're working on? Is it not reflective of what you want? Who knows dig around in there and see if there's some reason and if it's if it's a reason like I'm afraid this might not be very good or I'm afraid no one would like this then balance that out with the cost of you never producing it and how much worse that would be balance it out with regret of having never tried and ask yourself which is worse that maybe somebody doesn't spoiler alert. Somebody's not going to like it or that. You never did it. Think about which one of those things is actually worse. That's a little extra there hack. Okay I love these encouraging. Words from Davis. Illo here they come quote all we can do though is answer the call. Answer the call we are to. We Are Messengers carriers of ideas and stories. We are shepherds of messages. That's a really divine thing and a very special opportunity that we all possess. It doesn't mean that we're better than anyone else who isn't a writer or creative. But it means that this is a really powerful gift that we have to usher ideas from the invisible realm from the intangible plane into the physical world even if that's in the space of your own journal even if that's just your own journey of self actualization being your whole and bestself which means that everybody around you is actually gonNA benefit from it quote. Even if they don't read it they still benefit from it. Because they you become more of yourself you become a happier more full version of yourself like so many of these other courses. There's a lot more to dig into an an overview. The class tells you that you can expect to learn And this is quoting from the creative lie page. You can expect to learn from this class. How to conquer the fear guilt and shame that block your creative writing how to focus on your inner game instead of fixating on your outer game how to sidestep your tendencies toward indecision and overwhelm had a source. Your Voice from other writers creatives teachers had overcome impostor syndrome by being seen nixing self comparison and Yo- kicking into your true self. I picked up this class. As part of creative lives Nanno Raimondo. Bundle about a year ago and it goes for seventeen bucks right now. If you go straight through the lessons on this particular class it will take you about an hour and a half with most lessons. Lasting between five and ten minutes he also throws in downloadable. Pdf copy of all the slides of the presentation. I have a creative live APP on my phone. Ipad and creative live is also available anywhere. You can get a web browser. I've stream classes using all these methods and had great success. So you can pick. You can pretty much do it anywhere you might WANNA consider checking out. Some of those other books published his lead without followers platform for more on the topics of creativity productivity and flow the titles include power from within God whispers on the wind lead without followers. And I am we a book of poems you can get all these things There's links on my website both to Amazon or also to the rookie. Riders Bookshop on bookshop which benefits local bookshops which. I love anyway next week. I'll be reviewing publish and thrive by Sarah Cannon which is offered through her heart breathing's platform using the teachable platform. So something new and other dare news fellow author Robin can able and I recently posted a new episode of our new podcast. Unsettling reads come check at our spoiler free review of Megan Giddings Lakewood. It's another local BLOOMINGTON. Another debut we could not have been more excited about it anyway. Browser other reviews of books from the crime fantasy horror literary mystery.

writer Dave pillow Amazon Raiders Sarah Cannon Riders Bookshop consultant Journal Megan Giddings Robin BLOOMINGTON Nanno Raimondo Davis Lakewood
"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

The Rookie Writer Show

09:11 min | 8 months ago

"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

"On things like Query letters author websites and more an all these links are in the show notes so go look for him admittedly. I didn't read this whole book. But that's because it's so well organized the only reason you would need to read every word of this book if you're not sure yet what kind of writing you're interested in doing and you're still open to learning about all of them. In my case I know that I WANNA indie publish my novels. So I skipped the sections dealing with traditional book-publishing like queering for an agent for my book things like that and anything to do with nonfiction book publishing because I read fiction so things like submitting a book proposal. I want to submit my stories. Essays to traditional markets like literary journals and contests so I read the relevant sections there and produce a podcast which is essentially an audio blog. So I read that chapter. I plan to occasionally submit articles based on the research. I do for my novels and podcasts. So I read the sections related to publishing to trade journals and commercial magazines in March. Two talented writer friends of mine and I will be launching inkster author services and I'll be offering developmental edits and manuscript critiques. So I read the chapters related to freelance editing and freely And freelancing in general but I completely ignored the corporate media careers chapter because I know not open to that right now. Eventually I'll offer classes focused on productivity and craft for the genres in which I write so I read the chapter on teaching but I skimmed the sections that focused on teaching at the university level. Because I know that's not a good fit for me so you get the picture. This is all by way of saying that. There is a lot of good info in this book. But you probably won't need to read it. All here are my three things related to things that interest me for my writing career number one on the topic of indie versus traditional publishing. Not Too long ago. There simply wasn't a great option for taking the Indy Path in publishing but a couple of huge developments have happened in the industry to change that I print on demand or P. OD technology started producing books of quality rivals that of conventionally printed books. This means that now authors can publish their books without a huge investment for print run on the front end secondly Amazon decided to jump into the ring and like anything that Amazon decides to do it completely has ripple effects and changes everything so in the early twenty tens. They introduced the kindle direct program the Katie P program which allowed authors to directly published their books for free within a matter of hours versus the months or even years that it takes to traditionally published a novel and in turn the authors can also keep up to seventy percent of the sales price of their books. Which is a much higher royalty rate. Then again you get in the traditionally published arena So that's one at the same time. The big five traditional publishers were laying off people and there are now a huge number of experienced and talented editors and proofreaders. Who HAVE GONE FREELANCE? So in the author's can now avail themselves of the same sort of editing process that traditionally published books go through which is a good thing number two not so much has changed however when it comes to publishing your short stories and essays while there might be fewer printed journals than there once was there are more online outlets than ever and there's also more indie published. Short story anthologies. So if you're interested in publishing in this way the main thing to remember is that you are usually submitting the whole manuscript for consideration along with a cover letter. That hasn't changed and the cover letter should introduce your story. Share your relevant experiences and make the case for why you think your piece would be a good fit for this journal or contest. She includes a sampler to there are two developments worth noting in addition I the omnipresent submittal which has now become the standard for most literary journal. Submissions charges the journals for the use of their program so in turn these journals now. Charged writers a few bucks to help cover their expenses so while free. Submissions are still possible. They're not necessarily. The norm and small. Entry fee is no longer a red flag that you are submitting to a scam or Sham or journal. I should note that setting up a submittal. Count is both easy and free for writers. There is no monthly or annual subscription. Cost you'll only incur fees associated with the journals that you submit to okay. The second thing that's developed within this area of publishing to Traditionally publishing short stories and essays to literary journals like is that the days of only submitting a story to one time are mostly behind us. The lion's share of outlets now accept simultaneous submissions. Do Double Check the Journal or contest listings. Just in case you are happing upon one of them that doesn't but for the most part most journals and contests do accept simultaneous submission. So you don't have to wait to hear back on a story before sending it out somewhere else however once it is accepted somewhere. Make sure that you let the other journals no asap so that your name's not mud at that journal going forward okay. Just so that they don't get excited about it. Knife got two offers. And you don't know what to do because you've got you. You'RE GONNA have to disappoint somebody. Okay number three thing for me. The process for submitting articles to magazines and trade journals has probably changed. The least the process remains more or less the same as it's always been so unless you're assigned articles by a particular editor publication that you've developed a relationship with you'll pitch articles with the pitch process. You don't submit the manuscript for consideration but instead outlined the idea usually in an e mail Friedman recommends that your pitch reflect the style of the publication. You're targeting and in addition. She says it's important to leave with a strong short hook. Twenty five words or less demonstrate that you've done some of the key research or at least have access to it highlight any writing credentials. You have and list any expenses you expect will need to be covered for the To create story if any then prepare yourself for inevitable rejections because they are a normal part of freelance life even for in demand freelancers as soon as you get a rejection rework pitch and send it back out to another outlet again reflecting the vibe of that publication. Okay for your hack. I'm sure there was a million little tricks But I decided to go with more of a conceptual hack this time. So it is. I wanted to give you a succinct definition of platform. Because that's really what a lot of this comes to and so here's how she defines. It platform is an ability to secure paid writing opportunities or sell books products and services because of who you are or who you reach more thoughts on that. Here's another quote from. Her platform does not develop overnight. You aren't going to finish reading this book. Follow a three step formula and Presto have platform and be done not raiders platforms are developed in the same way or have exactly the same components. Think of your platform as a fingerprint. Your background education and Network Effect. What your platform looks like. In the beginning luck is also going to play a role but for most writers platform is an organic result of building visibility in their community and developing readership for their work. And that takes time. Okay the book is a very standard three hundred and twenty pages and packed packed full of detailed information on just about every type of writing stream or pursuit that you could think of. I've given you a mostly top view of three things that caught my attention for my career. But she's rate about walking you through the process of getting out there and just about every Writing Arena it's also great about including concrete examples of things like contracts query letters Pitch letters things like that. The thing I like about this week's book is that it gives you a lot to think about in terms of the directions. You WanNa go just putting together. This episode helped me fine tuned and be able to say in sync ways the types of writing interested in and the types that. I'm not the type I WANNA do right now and the types that I'll do later and that includes other products and services like editing or teaching classes and things like that. It's a great book one hundred percent recommended. I don't think you'll be sorry if you love Jane. Friedman another way that you can go is to obviously sign up for her free newsletter. You should absolutely do that. Think about signing up for the hot sheet. She also has a class on great courses called how to publish your book. Which again if you keep an eye on great courses. They have sales on things. If don't pay the full price that would be crazy. I hope this was helpful to you. Come back next week and here my three things and a hack and a quote from Lisa Crumbs how to nail the first pages which is a class on live so until then happy rating people..

Friedman Amazon Katie P inkster writer Lisa Crumbs editor Presto
"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

The Rookie Writer Show

12:38 min | 9 months ago

"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

"Hey everybody welcome to the rookie writer show. I am changing things up on you a little bit. We are starting season two today. I've started a new challenge for myself where I am going to be reading. Fifty two writing books this year one for every week of the year and then in turn I will be sharing some of the highlights from those books in each episode. You can expect the format follow very much like this one will be. which is that that she will get an introduction to the author? So you have some idea who's offering you their advice and expertise a brief overview. What kind of book you're dealing with as an is it looking at productivity or craft or business aspects of writing there will be a maximum of three and only three major suggestions or points that they make in the the book and one tip that I gleaned from it so beyond that? It'll be up to you to decide whether or not the book sounds like something you'd like to delve into further. So that is the intro for the new season. So welcome to season two episode. One enough for the INTRO. Let's get into it. So Oh for my inaugural book. I chose I loved it. It was called dear writer. You need to quit. It's written by. Becca Sim and published in twenty. Nine thousand nine. It's actually part of a three part series and I have a feeling I'm going to be reading the other two because I very much enjoyed this one but before we get into the other two. Oh let's follow the format so I I'm going to introduce a little bit about the author. She is the woman behind the better faster academy which offers classes and individual coaching for writers. She also keeps pretty busy. Doing a writing productivity podcast of her own That shows shows up on Youtube as well as on most podcast carriers. It's called the quit. CAST for the past few years. She's also been co hosting a book. Marketing podcast called Smarty Pants Book Marketing. Believe and she'll soon be launching dear BECA which is a weekly coaching column. She's under a couple of Master's degrees in coaching related fields and she's worked with thousands of authors many of them pulling in six and seven figure annual incomes so impressive. She seems like she might be somebody who knows what she's talking about. Let let me be clear. She does not in any way. Promise that you will reach the income of some of her clients. In fact I would say that Becca might be the first person to tell you. Communication style isn't one of below sunshine up your zoo She delivers the kind of advice. You probably need to hear in a clear but humorous way off. She is I would say she's not without empathy for your situation but she just kind of isn't interested in letting you shine yourself on either. She's really was reluctant to write the book honestly because she thinks of herself as a coach I she has been an author before she spent on that road. She has written fiction So she does understand where you're coming from. She was a little bit reluctant to write this book because she thinks that each person is so unique and that actually one coaching or small group. Coaching is the best way to get someone where they WANNA go. But that obviously limits number of people she can work with so instead what this book tries to do is to capture a lot of the approaches that she used when she's working with clients in hopes that you can glean enough from it to help coach yourself if you like Lisa Kron approached applauding. If if you've ever read any of her books you're probably GonNa like this Book it dips into brain science a little bit Becca dips into it gives you a hint of what is behind the theories but doesn't really get into it very deeply in fact. This is a pretty lean book. I'll reference that later. She she would emphatically state dozen her book that this is not a book of tips and tricks. It's a book designed to get you to ask yourself deep and hard questions about about which writing path best suits your strengths and interests. She's not interested in offering a prescriptive one-size-fits-all despite her own experiences. In fact she views anybody who does do that with a or those programs with a little bit of a wary eye as she mentioned the book she does not buy into a silver bullet solution to anyone's reading woes. Because no matter what worked for someone else it may or may not work for you because you are your own individual blend of environment personality writing platform the resources that you have hand and your existing tendencies habits and patterns earns so her approach again is born out of the fact that she's first and foremost a coach and she really wants you to start thinking about a couple of Questions and that's sort of how the structure mostly this book is asking you to quit things and you can pick this up from the chapter. Titles The table able contents things like quick thinking in a vacuum or quit focusing on your weaknesses or quit ignoring the past quick-thinking facebook is your friend acquitting knowing reality things like this But I would say that if there was something that ran through it as a single core or notion that jumped out to me. It was this and this is one of the three things I she really wants you to question the premise OR CUTE EP. She likes to refer to it She uses the throughout the book. Going back to like a touchstone. If you've been listening to the rookie writer show I'd say it's fairly analogous analogous to my get Meta and what's going on there with the key T. p.. She's really asking you to slow down long enough to actually ask the right questions of your situation to poke and prod your sumptious a little so that you don't run around trying to solve the wrong problems or even create problems. That aren't even they're so cutie. Pie questioned the premise. The second big thing that jumped out at me. That was sort of an overarching thing. I took away with it. Is that she. You believe there are four steps to transformation. That's kind of what she focused on her graduate studies. So would that she sees this as four steps and she uses a really great example in the book which I will not reveal because I wanted to be nice price for you She believes that knowledge is half the battle and it is certainly step one of any transformation part of getting getting the right knowledge is going back to that. Cute EP questioning the premise. To make sure you're actually getting the best information that you have there the second step in the transformation according to her is that you get your support around you get your crew around you. You're going to need it. And the third part of transformation is making a plan plan for when things get tough. Because they're going to get tough. How are you going to deal with rejection? How are you gonNA deal with on we? How are you going to deal with writer's block? How are you going to deal with money worries or being overwhelmed? How are you going to deal with being able to sit in a chair for a while every day? Just finding those ways to do the things that you need to do making a plan for it and then finally executing it pulling the trigger in fact. That's her last chapter is urging you to quit preparing an actually. Just pull the trigger so the third of the three things that I'm GonNA highlight from this book is that transformation is really really hard. That's why only a small percentage of efforts to change behaviors or successful according to them. You're fighting against a lot of patterns of behavior that worn grooves in your brain. You're fighting a lot of established circuitry in your brain. But I love what she says about the occasional difficulty of writing here comes. It's a great quote because resistance is conflict which causes tension strife frustration. Consternation we see it in our books all the the time the differences as storytellers. We know how to make conflict productive yet in our own lives we reject conflict instead of embracing it for what it can offer for us learning what we can releasing our emotions and getting the work done. Now it's really understandable if you are trying to avoid difficulty if you're trying trying to feel like things should not be painful or uncomfortable that's just your lizard brain kind of looking out for you but if you want to be yeah writer. There's going to be times that this is going to be a little tough. She's given you a lot of ways to look at the issues that are holding you back Jack. Having you probe if things that you might need to quit before you can move forward to jettison from your writing habits and approaches I one hundred percent recommend men this one. It's a slim book. It's only two hundred eight pages and I picked it up on Amazon kindle for I think less than five dollars because it was on sale but it packs a good good punch and I'm so excited to discover that BECA SAM has so many other offerings of already caught one of her quick cast episodes on Youtube while I was making dinner the other night and it was also totally worthwhile. Okay one tip. I picked up from her book. Despite her aversion to offering sort of things is this considered setting up a time trekker because remember knowledge is half the battle right. So I've done time tracking before using just downloaded sheet from another Time management expert and while it's useful to write down what you've done every day and you know obviously that's include the things that where you're not on your computer but if you set up a time tracker on your devices It runs automated while you're doing your work in the background. And then generates Anna rates reports of how and where you spent your digital time. which is your work time which may answer a lot of questions about why you're not getting more work done? So she recommended one called Green Tomatoes with a T. O. M. A. T. S.. I actually had trouble getting that one to work very well. I found an article reviewing time. Trekker Trekker APPS for Twenty Twenty Lincoln show notes and after reading those. I chose rescue time. I've been using it for about a week and I really really like it. It's taught me a lot about how I'm actually using my time versus how I think I'm using my time and that is only going to help me build the kinds of habits I wanted i. I want to develop when the thing rescue time. If you go that route someone kind of cool thing about it. Works across my devices with one account. It's a free forever free account and and So I don't see what I'm doing on my computer. I see what I'm doing on my phone my ipad as well so that's kind of cool because I can't kind of cheat which I've done before with other kinds of trackers and blockers by using another device at the same time I know it's shameful anyway later in the year. I'll probably be reading her other two books. The series I've included them in the show notes as well in case. You can't stand the suspense. They are dear writer. Are you in burnout and derived or you're doing it wrong. I hope this was. It's helpful to you. I started this podcast initially because I wanted to put out there something that would have been useful to me when I was starting wording out. I've been messing around with writing in one way or another for about two decades and I don't see any reason that it should take you two decades to learn what I've learned so far so I'm always going to be learning. I'm super excited about this NEW SEASON I'm super excited about this challenge. I will say say that every once in a while I may throw in a class instead of a book. So it's fifty two books or classes because I have a tendency to do both I'm always gonNA keep learning always gonNA trying to get better. I hope that this has been fun and useful for you. If you have any suggestions for books that you are Thinking would be good ones to review semi an email addresses info at the rookie writer dot net or the rookie writer show. Oh on Djamil. Next week I'm going to be applying the same approach to real artists. Don't starve by JEFF COINS SO I hope you'll come back. Thanks for listening until next time heavier adding people..

writer Becca Sim Youtube Lisa Kron Twenty Twenty Lincoln facebook Amazon Pie Anna O. M. A. T. S
"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

The Rookie Writer Show

07:50 min | 9 months ago

"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

"Today. We're going to be talking about balancing the big and small pictures in your writing life. We are at the cusp of the Star brand new decade. And it's tough for me to get my head around. I would say that it's Kinda snuck up on me. In fact I think the in the past I would have made a bigger deal about this benchmark It would've felt like a fortuitous start. I've always been a real big fan of stuff like that. I love New Year's resolutions lines and birthday check INS and the start of school years and even the starter semesters I'm a sucker for all those sorts of benchmarks and beginnings. I love that feeling of pulling back enough to examine my circumstances any upcoming decisions that I may be facing checking with. Your work is only useful. If you're chugging along in the direction action you actually want to go right so for a long time. I've had the dream of applying the kind of work I used to do for nonprofits things like facilitating strategic planning efforts. Parts to writing so I wanted to convert that process of things like strategic planning into a tool that would be useful for writers and so I started started with the things I knew about strategic planning for organizations and then I filled up an entire file cabinet and bookshelf with resources that it involves some aspect of strategic thinking for writers. It's how I started thinking of topics in terms of breaking it into the five W. H. Approach which as a reminder asks who are you as a writer what do you want to rate. When are you going to do that writing? Where are you going to do that? Writing and using what tools. Why are you inspired to do that? Specific type of writing what motivates in sustains you and how are you going to maintain your health and well being throughout the process us so eventually putting together a course and writing retreats to help walk people through this process but for now. Let me recommend someone else's efforts to help writers in much the same way. I've mentioned it before and here it comes again Syra. Cannon is my virtual mentor and experienced an accomplished writer. She's generous generous. And engaging as a writing coach even a virtual reading coach. She's not actually my reading coach her. HP Ninety system and her publishing thrive programs have both really helped me mentally as a bedrock of her system she advises quarterly planning and given my predilection for these sorts of events that I talked about the New Year's Eve birthdays and the beginnings of decades and things like that become a real. Dot Of this approach myself this quarterly. Planning it just gives me four times as many opportunities to do what I like to do anyway. So while it all sounds really dry and businesses quarterly planning and seemingly at odds with creativity. I've found the following benefits. Basically get four times. As many years eves as I used as to and a lot of ways I was always trying to create those opportunities to systematically check in with myself and the path that I'm taking quarterly planning just gives you those four chances to make sure you're still oh working on the things that matter and it also makes it so that you only have to worry about the stuff that you've decided to work on. This quarter knowing that other quarters will be coming with new projects. New things that you're going to focus on so it helps me. Keep my mind on the big picture of the general directions. I WANNA go but minds minds the smaller details of the things. I've signed to myself for this quarter so they don't spend my time worrying about my whole career every single day. If that makes any sense this quarterly planning also house else. We keep an eye on the details. My husband always says that we're a team because I'm good about getting Meta and thinking about if what we're doing is supportive of our dreams and goals and he's really great at keeping an and I on the details and day to day routines because that latter skill doesn't come as naturally to me. I find the quarterly. Planning is a useful and supportive tool to reinforce skills that I do have an only bolsters my attempts to pay attention to those daily day to day routines. I also get four times as many chances to check in with myself and celebrate what have accomplished over a three month period and so I have a tendency to think in terms of what I didn't do rather than in terms of what I did and I also have a tendency to think that I should be able to do everything right now in fact today in fact yesterday so patients isn't always one of my strong suits and it's one of the best things I can do for myself as to have these quarterly check INS. That remind me even though I didn't get everything anything I wanted to do. Done a lot of work done in areas that matter to me and I know that it's the things that matter to me because I took some time at the beginning of each quarter to stop and reflect act on where I wanted to go and what I thought I could reasonably get done over the next three months so in summary for balancing the big picture and the day to day details of your reading dating life. I heartily endorse the following strategies. I consider giving Syra cannons. HP Ninety Program. Look and see if that's something that can be helpful to you. She does these these boot camps. Every quarter can walk you through how she comes at this quarterly planning. If that's not something that's available to you than she does have a planner planner available on Nazi that includes as part of it. The quarterly program worksheets. That will walk you through a lot of that thinking. And that's how I started started. I loved it and then I ended up signing up for one of our BOOT camps. which once you do you have lifetime access to that course and the community that she meet there that are also going through it? So that's Kinda cool. 'cause more raiders. Whether or not you do Syra cannons. HP Ninety program do strongly encourage you to try out quarterly planning that basically involves at the beginning of every three months give yourself at the minimum and our and ideally a little longer to stop and think about what big things you hope to accomplish -CCOMPLISH over the next season basically. And how you think you're going to be able to do it like looking realistically at your time and the resources that you have to dedicate to it right now. Now give yourself doable goals for just that quarter and then think about the sorts of tasks that would be required to get you across that line. Then once you've done that Matt Make yourself a realistic list. Give that quarterly. Planning a try and then trust yourself throughout the throughout those three months to know that the person who thought through these things was probably thinking of the whole picture more than you might be in that day today. Situation the third thing I would suggest so. The first was considered trying out. Sarah's program program. The second is trying out quarterly. Planning whether or not it's with her and the third thing is try out different ways of tracking your day-to-day efforts. If you don't like super structured approaches she's no worries trial bullet journaling. There's a class by Lisa Khandan on creative live. Show walk you through one way to come at. It is a little less structured if you are more comfortable with a more structured method than there are a number of writing planners on Oetzi. I have a list of ones that I've tried out and then used to create my own version and I've listed those links are there. Some of the names are the HP ninety method which have already recommended the author monthly planner by espe planner the ultimate authorship shit planner by audrey principles and the ultimate business planner by my life plans. I took all of these and a couple of things and then some of the research that I mentioned before I put them all together. I reorganized things. I tried some things out. I tested it with some other writers. I made some revisions and the result. Zolt is I have the second edition of the rookie writer. Playbook which is a writers planner organizer and that's also available on the links on my website if you go directly to at sea it's under the ricky writer shop so give some of these tactics to try see if they can help you to keep an eye on the horizon and what's right in front of you in January. We're going to be looking at the editing process. This should be extra useful if you have a rough or maybe not so rough draft something. You've been working on for a while. I hope you'll come back until then happy writing people..

writer HP Syra W. H. Approach Cannon Oetzi Zolt Lisa Khandan Matt Sarah
"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

The Rookie Writer Show

07:10 min | 1 year ago

"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

"I don't know if i've ever rewarded myself. My reward is the thrill of getting to getting to work on it. <hes> you know the i will say that my twitter bio says writing to avoid burnout since two thousand seven and and you know there's a certain truth to that i am better at what i do during the day because of what i get to do in those stolen moments you know it's almost like a it's almost like a tryst with a lover. You know you you get you get to you get to spend time with us and you get to create and for people who love to control their environment like people in my profession due to be able to actually control the environment is a fun thing i i like all the outcomes can come out just the way you wanted them to exactly or more importantly the outcomes to come out in a way that should make sense right you know because i wanted to write a superhero book. You know but i didn't want but i wanted to have a little psychological depth to it. You know oh carl. Carl jung meets superman. You know i mean it you know what are the psychological consequences you know. Would you heal the world if you knew you destroyed yourself in the process and you know and it was it was a mental challenge in you know i became. I became this person about ten years ago. That said i'm tired of living my life to acquire do things and to do this. I want to evolve. I wanna make myself better and writing allows me to do that. I can visibly see myself getting better and that's a gift in and of itself. I don't you know i don't i've never been one to dangle carrots carrots in front of myself i just i just can't do it to <hes> <hes> the the the writing is its own reward in my opinion my last question in is this have you brought in thought about bringing in reinforcements in terms of like a critique partner or a developmental editor or a book coach or anything along those lines to help you will. It's it's interesting you ask. It's interesting you ask that because you know i i think there's a possibility ability of you know critique groups in the future for me because i want to get out there a little bit but interestingly enough the the couple who bater at the the rough draft the first draft <hes> go to church with a gal who was in publishing and editing so so i have so i have a little bit of a resource resources there that i'm going to reach out to and say hey maybe you can help my query pop a little bit you know and i remember the time when i thought author writing a book was hard and most people would say boy. I bet writing a book as hard and i said not near as hard as the business of getting it out there. You know you know it's it's funny. I said i told more than one person. The hardest part is the next step. <hes> you know you think oh my god. This was so hard you know like and revising this thing is hard and then i was like no revising things not so hard querying an agent hard and i'm sure if an agent offers is to represent me. I'm going to find out that getting. This book pitched publishers as hard and then if i get a book deal then i'm going to find out that dealing with an editor hard hard or you know having to write the ending twenty three times like a teacher in one of my classes had to do in her novels coming out next year. I ah i make no bones about the fact that the hardest part is the next step underneath and then the next time you go to write something. He won't be nearly as afraid yeah. I think that that's really insightful and i just i just hope that i never lose the enthusiasm for creating a world and do in doing things with it. You know maybe i'm i don't wanna change the world with my writing. I'd just wanna bring some smiles at some people's faces and you know allow them to escape apor world. That can sometimes be a little overwhelming if you had to offer one piece of advice to somebody like you. Maybe a few years ago the you that the u minus three to five years. What would you say. There's a lot of power in first steps the boy how do i how do i articulate this putting yourself <music> out there as the single greatest thing you can do for yourself. You know i'm a you. Gotta believe that the great thing can happen. Maybe you know and yea the time's going to pass anyway. You know don't don't live your life with regrets. I guess that's the biggest bit of advice would do because we all say we're gonna do things all the time and the people that they ride stories about are the people that actually do thank you so much for that. Thank you so much for being willing to do this. I i think that <hes> i know that if i had heard this interview a few years ago it would have been immensely helpful to me. Just your you have a lot of experience and insight on this process in this journey and i think that <hes> i think until you actually get a chance to hear other writers especially writers at the beginning talking about some of the same fears or the same hurdles or whatever you know struggles that you have they they feel unique to you and they feel lake. Sometimes that makes them feel. More insurmountable feels like there's something wrong with you. You are meant to be a writer or you. Don't have the stuff to be writer or whatever but i think that the more you talk to other people. Who have you know and they're getting it done. You're placing contests. You're getting good feedback. You know it the more emboldened people to take that first step which like you said is one of the most powerful things you can do for yourself. I'm just so grateful to to you for doing this. Absolutely absolutely it was it was fun to do. Hey i hope you enjoyed the interview with eric. If you'd like to be a guest on the rookie writer the show shoot me an email at info at the rookie writer dot net or if you'd like to connect with eric his story whether as a critique partner a beta reader or any interstate agents reach out to info at the rookie writer dot net and i will put you in touch. Thanks so much for listening as always come. Check out the website w._w._w. The rookie ready dot net. It'll be chock full of show notes links to other resources the whole shebang come back next week when we will be digging into all the different links of fiction the different outlets available to them the different strategies that you might take when approaching them everything from micro fiction to epic novels and series but between now and then whatever you do happy reading people..

writer twitter partner editor Carl jung eric five years ten years
"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

The Rookie Writer Show

10:22 min | 1 year ago

"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

"Hi guys welcome to episode sixteen of the rookie writer show today. We're gonna be talking about the value of fearless about being fearless making career lists recently. I feel like everywhere i go. I'm seeing references to stoicism and tim ferriss has a really <hes> a really really good one on youtube a ted talk on this called why you should define your fears instead of your goals. He actually has a bunch of oman stoicism but that wants my favorite <hes> he's a really big fan of stoicism and says that it's a comprehensive system for doing many many things. I'm not sure what all the many many other things are but i do very much like this feature of stoicism that lends itself to this topic what it does is it helps you to train train yourself to separate what you can control and what you can't control and then to focus on what you can't control and it sounds really really simple. I'm so simple just do that just that just you know work on the things you can control super easy right. It's not and i get that and he gets that and everyone gets that but here's the thing making dedicated effort to consciously think about which things you can control which things you can't is half the battle. It's really so one of the things that you can do to help with this is to create these lists that help you to break down. What is actually keeping you from thinking about what you can in control and what you can't control what you have any agency over at all and that's fear so fear makes you focus on what it wants whether or not you can actually do anything about it so what he does whenever he is facing situation is he creates these three pages of fearless to help them work through those feelings that he has about it so the first thing he he does is he says what if i i and then he plugs in whatever it is he's afraid to do worried about doing and then he makes a conscious effort to list all of the things about that all of the fears ears that that raise their ugly little heads any listen he suggests going as many as ten or twenty. I mean something like that. I made a <hes> a worksheet. That's available on the website for download for free that has maybe five slots for like five things but in any case he lists those out and then he has another column where he lists out what he could do to prevent those situations from happening so then your brain is sort sort of now having to focus on what it is you can do to avoid whatever it is that made you so afraid that you didn't wanna do the thing because you were just basically frozen right. That's a very different part of your brain doing very different kinds of work. The third column he goes through and he for each one of those fears lists what he would do or could would do if that thing he's afraid of where to come to pass like what could he do to remedy the situation and again a different part of your brain is working in there. You're focusing on what you can control act. It's it's very action. Oriented thought process then for his second page he takes a very conservative approach approach to what he could how could benefit again sort of leading fears have the most control over the situation not a pie in the sky kind of situation but but instead like if he were to do the thing these afraid of what kind of moderate benefits could potentially happen again. I've made a sheet that that mimics this this inspired by this that allows you to go through and put down a few things that could happen. If you were to tackle it you know if you were to even just give it a shot and maybe some fallout could happen for that but good follow like rambo. You know things that could happen on the words of her bad ramifications but the the good effects rex of any of the action you're taking even if it wasn't the the dream and then the third thing he does is he has a sheet where he goes through and forces himself to think about what will happen if he does nothing around this topic and so then he forces himself to think about about almost a almost shift the fears and a lot of ways to what it will cost him personally economically spiritually whatever if he he doesn't even try to do whatever it is he's afraid to do and he breaks out for a different time periods and again using this as inspiration nation. I have a sheet for you it. Actually they're all in one file that has each of these three sheets that where you can go through and walk yourself through some some of these sorts of questions so that you can start pushing yourself when you get that that fear push back on something you want to try to do with your writing which are afraid of the outcome also on the same page on the same show notes page. I do have a linked to sage coen's fear worksheets. Her sheets called rewriting my relationship with fear. She is the author of the productive writer and a writing coach. Her website is sage cohen dot com. She's fantastic her free worksheet which is the link as well. <hes> has you go through and take it back another step and kind of getting to know your fear and trying to see what it is that your fear is trying to protect you from so that you can you can get to the bottom of why it has raised its ugly head in the first place like what is it trying to protect you from. It's sorta like the way that the inner critic things. It's protecting you because it just wants to prevent any bad feelings so it. It keeps convincing you you that you don't need to send that submission in or do that reading or enter that contest or whatever it is because it it just wants to convince you you know it's just better not try because then you'll get hurt. It's sorta like that. What what is your fear trying to protect you from and is it something that actually you i need protecting from or are you actually more than well equipped to handle any of the situations. That would come from you doing whatever it is. You're free to do so. Let's go with an example say that you've been waiting to get a response from an agent or journal that has your work under review and you're really hoping this is going to be a game changer. It is super easy to get locked up while you wait and to let your fears and your hopes kind of mixed together together run around and make you immobilized from doing any other work so you can. You'll end up obsessively checking your email to see if you've heard from them or or you'll spend lots of time analyzing your bella writer friends which you think the length of time could mean in terms of why they've had it this long you get the idea but if you ply stoicism awesome the stoic approach to this then you realize that once they have in their hands you have no control over how long review process will take or whether or not they i choose to accept it at all but you do have control over what you do with your writing time so you could be sending it out to other outlets or agents or you could. We'll be starting a new peace altogether so the understandably emotional response. It's stalls you but the more stoic one helps you to keep doing the work that moves you forward now. If you're anything like me then in that last example you heard once. They have it in their hands but so you're thinking okay but that's once. They have it in their hands. What about the many things that i could do before i send it. What about all the things. I need to know or do all the classes. I need to take all the reviews i need to do so can be perfect and therefore my work can be impervious to rejection of any kind like you know that's not realistic at what i do love about the about fear is that when it plays dress up its favorite costume is perfectionism because it seems so virtuous right. I just want to get it right. I just wanted to produce quality work work. That's professionalism. Professionalism is about creating creating quality work about doing your best. It's not about perfection perfection. Shen and professionalism are not the same thing fear itself up as professionalism. Only perfectionism can never be right enough because if it can be read enough then you can be protected from everything in every circumstance all the time and of course that's not gonna happen. You can write the most professional thing that you will ever right in your life that anyone will ever rate in any of their lives and it will still be criticized by somebody it will still get rejected by somebody and the rejection episode that i did recently should be at least a little bit of evidence of that all right you already know. I'm going to say so. I'm going to say it anyway. Please please please don't let your fear stop you from working king or from submitting your work use the tools bust out these tools that i have on the website look for others that might work for you use them and face them head on because in my life i have definitely found that when you let your fears go unexamined they take on the size and shape in your mind of a great and mighty monster like that little noise. You're hearing in the distance starts to take on. You know sasquatch proportions. It's just a beast but the truth piz when you actually turn and look at it. It's usually like a mouse. It's usually not nearly as scary is whatever it is. You thought you heard over there about attack you. You just have turn have the courage to turn and look at them because you're tougher than this. You're a writer. This is what you were meant to do and you are not about to let these fears go unexamined examined and run ram shot over your writing career use the tool see what they how they do for you. Get back to me and let me know what was useful full and what wasn't there's also links again to sage cohen's <hes> sheet and to tim ferris's talk on stoicism and until next week happy.

writer tim ferriss youtube sage cohen ted tim ferris coen Shen
"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

The Rookie Writer Show

04:46 min | 1 year ago

"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

"As simple as a three ring binder or as complicated as keeping track of your own wiki or your own database but the the idea is that if you have a series of books that will be coming out over time. You can bet that your fans are going to notice if in book one this character had ed green is in in book three. They've got brown eyes or that. The distance between two cities seems to have expanded to one hundred miles when it was only only twenty five miles apart before whatever it is the gist is that you probably won't remember all these details as you're going further and further into the series and it's super helpful to have a series bible bible where everything is already in place okay so to recap the top five essential systems that every writer needs you. He got track your time in your work number. One set up those goals track. Those word counts do a little bit of art and business every day and make sure you just pick a system that works for you. There is no one way to do it number to keep track of your ideas and research put them in one place. It'll save maybe a lot of frustration. It will save you a lot of sadness. It'll make you a more efficient writer. If you don't have to go searching all over the house to remember where where it is that you put that slip of paper that was like the perfect solution for this problem. You've got or the that perfect quote that you heard that just really make this scene sing whatever it is his make sure it all goes in one place all those ideas and research little nuggets that you generate or come across the only go into one spot whatever kind of system that is for you whether it's analog digital or a combination number three figure out a way to organize. Your drafts got a manager drafts. You're gonna have more than one. Everybody has more than one draft of everything right. Save yourself the agony of discovering that a draft that you really really wish you still had access to his gone or that. You've been spending a lotta time polishing an earlier draft. That isn't going to be going anywhere number four. You're you're going to need track. Your submissions getting your workout into the world means that you have to be a little organized about who you want to send your work to whether it's agents or contests or literary journals or whatever outlet you're looking to to publish on or in or through you gotta keep track track of the places you wanna send things and the places you've already sent things. That's basically what you're doing and then finally you want to track your marketing and your sales tells you want to see how your work selling. If you're a freelance writer then you obviously have to track who owes you money for something you've done or if you're ghostwriter or something like that that if you're trying to sell books as an indie author or even as traditional author you're going to want to know how they're selling your if you're doing things to to market those and promote those you're going to want to pay attention to what kinds of effects your efforts are. Having you know where waste your time on stuff. That's not working and you also also wanna make connections with people because you want to help them. They're going to want to help you and it's tough to do if you can't remember where you put that person's number the bonus systems we talked about were tracking. You're reading when you're purposeful about your reading. You get a lot more out of it. Tracking possibly classes conferences podcasts. Yes other opportunities to improve your writing skills so that when you're like oh what was that thing that i was gonna check on that really cool class that i saw when when was that where was it put it in one place that you can find it and then again last bonus system is the series bible. If you're someone who writes a series this is invaluable. You are not gonna remember all those details but your readers will and they'll write you about them okay. So did i forget any. What other systems do you think are critical for managing your writing life. Semi your thoughts. You can reach me by email at info at the rookie writer dot net and if you're interested i do have a planner called the rookie writer playbook. It's available on f._c. And it'll be there will be a link available in the show notes. It's as well it tracks just about all these things i in fact. I designed it so it would all right then. Thank you so much again for listening hope. This was useful to you. I would love to hear from you whether it's on the actual i tunes or other podcasts catcher apps on reviews or whether you're sending me email. I like to know what works and what doesn't work. I don't wanna waste your time tom. Okay thanks so much again until next week when we will be talking about how to deal with fear until then happy writing people <music>..

writer ed green
"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

The Rookie Writer Show

02:23 min | 1 year ago

"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

"The space and the time to track your sales and take note of the effects that your marketing efforts including putting things like social media is just one of them. The effects that those efforts have upon your sales so you'll also want to keep track of when you're looking at this sorts of marketing and sales tracking systems people that you've met while networking you never know how you might be helpful to one one another with beecher promotions reviews blurbs that kind of thing so i actually have a couple bonus systems that i think are helpful but maybe not essential you might also consider tracking your reading. What have you read. What are you reading now. And why. What do you want to read. Are you keeping up the speed on the types of books papa popular in the genre that you want to write in. Are you continuously building. Your writing skills by reading different books related to areas that you you have weaknesses. Are you reading research for your story. You're working progress. Are you keeping abreast of trends in the publishing industry. Just be a purposeful with your reading and enjoy it obviously first and foremost enjoy it if it's not enjoyable anymore than than you're doing the wrong thing but if you can be a little bit mindful in full of how you choose the things that you spend your time reading your reading time on that will have that will pay dividends as well you might also as the bonus system consider tracking classes or conferences or podcast sir other opportunities to improve your writing skills. Maybe you heard about a conference friends. That seemed like a perfect fit for you but you couldn't do it this year. If you have some sort of system even as i mean even as simple as just popping in your phone's <music> calendar for next year <hes> maybe a few whatever around the time the registration time was this year. Put yourself a little note in there that says hey hey check out this conference. Good fit for me this year mark it could be that you keep track of it on one page a place where you continuously continuously or listing classes or conferences or podcasts or whatever you would like to check back because you know that that's something that you would like to spend a little more time on there are just innumerable valuable ways.

marketing and sales beecher
"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

The Rookie Writer Show

04:13 min | 1 year ago

"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

"For you. Make sure you factor in your skills. Your resources your inclinations. There's no point in trying to take on a particular app or software program or whatever if it's if you are if you know you're going to fight against against it or you know what's going to intimidate you. Whatever it is. That's gonna keep us. It's going to be barriers to you using it. Just let it go find something better. I will suggest though that you at least try the program and app evernote. You can use it on your phone. You can use it on your computer tablets. Whatever it can serve serve as a short-term harvester of your little ideas as they come at you and the real good information storage system searchable. It's got a million features gers and it's free so what you can do is you can try it out. See what you do and don't like about it and it'll give you a baseline so that she can figure out what else he might be a better fit for you okay. The third system we want to think about is a draft management system so again. There is no one-size-fits-all in this or any of the other system so if for instance you like to write longhand when you're doing your drafts then someone else's file l. naming tricks or the various features on programs like scrivener or story. Is that allow you to save different versions of the same same document within the same major file won't do you any good so the bottom line is this when you start to right make make a decision about how you're going to keep track of your different versions of your project and then stick to it it could be as simple as you print off the version every day or you give it a different name by date or i lots of people have very specific ways that they save their files and organize is them in folders and there's a few links in the show notes where people get into a couple of those whatever it is find your system and then stick with it you wanna avoid the frustration. The things like misplacing draft or section or chapter realizing that you've been revising an old version of chapter been there. There's little more frustrating in the writing process than suspecting that you actually did something better in an earlier version of a story but no longer have access to it. If you always he's working the same document the entire time if you don't create different versions or different drafts then you'll essentially rob yourself of the opportunities to go back to earlier versions one draft means you've already sent those words those versions into the great beyond and they have left no trace that they existed so make your decision decision there and then stick with it. You'll be so glad okay number four a submissions management system. If you want to be published eventually it'll be time to start sending out all those words out into the world and the little bits of business work you've been doing we'll start to pay off now that was seen a wide range of ways ways that people have cut have dealt with this system and figured out a way to manage it for themselves one prolific writer and single mom of two boys who also was teaching the class and like working fulltime and just basically being a dynamo. She kept everything in a notebook where she wrote down where she had sent things and the responses she'd gotten it was a simple as that for her. It wasn't pretty but it was super functional lots of people i know use spreadsheets and swear by them. Some people use online programs like air table which is kind of like a and advanced spreadsheet that is also free and kind of also. That's a little bit like a database so you can go through and track more information. Some use paid services like duo trope to help them track of it or they simply go with the basic features and submit and pretty much only submit to things through submit -able however you do it. Just make sure you have a way to track the places that you wanna send end things and the places you've already said things will save you.

writer
"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

The Rookie Writer Show

05:22 min | 1 year ago

"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

"If you can try to do these two things things will open up for you that you cannot imagine in the coming weeks. We'll be talking about specific time management tools like pomodoro 's and <hes> words sprints and time studies and things like this that will only how does that up routines eighteens that only enhance seared <hes> the efficiency of your time <hes> word tracking things like this feel free to google any of those I will not have links on any of these sorts of concepts on the page that <hes> for this week's episode but like I said for this week take a look at your work through the Lens of these two best tools number one find the time little bits of time crappy imperfect time and do some work anyway. Even if it's just the tiniest inching forward think of your writing life like a shark and I know this is an urban. This is actually not accurate but we all think this that sharks have to keep moving or they die think of your writing life like that. It has to keep moving or a dis. Even if it's movie just a little bit do it just move it. Move it forward and honor think take a minute when you can set it up some reasonable deadlines. If you don't have time for a big planning process right now I get it and we'll although I cannot urge you enough to take some time and look at big picture but even if you can only make deadlines for yourself for this week like <hes> okay shape I the thing I'm working on want to have a thousand words added to at this week. That's a if you're slammed. That's a very reasonable deadline. That is four pages. You can get four pages in even if you are jam packed in week. If you are had been sitting on something you've been revising revising revising and you're like okay a reasonable deadline for me. This week is that I am going to send this to one other person or I'm going to find find one other person. That would be a good critique partner for me. Are I'm going to find <hes> of good Beta reader for me. Make that your deadline and then honor it. Don't let it go by Keith that forward momentum. And you'll be amazed that you can do next. Week's episode is going to look at rejection and why it's your new best friend. I can't tell you what a great tool of that is as well actually super. We're looking forward to recording that episode. It's maybe one of my favorite topics <hes> for this week swing by the website. Check out the show notes. Thank you for listening. I tell you when I hear someone say that they've been listening and it actually helped them. It makes my whole day. It makes my whole day. Maybe my whole week. This is why I'm doing it. Please let me know what's useful. What's not useful? I did mention the whole thing about planning there are planners on my Oetzi. Shy My on my Oetzi shop the rookie writer shop. I don't know where the rookie writer Varsity shop something like that. They're up there <hes> <hes> I'm going to be putting them on sale at the end of the month. If you WANNA wait for that but if you're ready to go there for July through September <hes> and I think they're twelve bucks or something twelve fifty. Maybe <hes> their our principal. You can use this tool to help you think through when you're deadlines might be in when you might find pockets of time to work. It's been a real game changer for me to use this tool. I looked at about half half a dozen different planners for writers and then created one that worked for me a little better <hes> in how I organize my work I can also recommend with great enthusiasm. <hes> Sarah Cannon does <hes> has a page called heart breathing's and her planner is one that I admire. There's one call the author planner that is very good as well in fact I can even put the links to the other planners. Incase mine is not your cup of tea. Take a look at those <hes> it could be that that would be those would be better tools for you than mine would be more power to you. Go for it <hes> but do try to find something that works for you so that you can track when you can find those little slivers offers of time and when you're gonNA put your deadlines in because those two things will change everything and I since I've said it like nine times if you're still listening. I'M GONNA wrap this up now. I will look forward to getting everything a little more perfect for next week for next week's podcast on rejection which is kind of funny all by itself but anyway <hes> until then happy writing people. If you like this episode subscribe maybe also recommend to a friend or leave a review on itunes or your favorite podcast catcher think also maybe about swinging by the rookie writer dot net. It's the rookie writer dot net there. You'll find show notes for this episode as well as..

writer google Oetzi Sarah Cannon partner Keith principal
"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

The Rookie Writer Show

14:56 min | 1 year ago

"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

"Hey everybody welcome to episode ten of the rookie writer show today we're gonna be talking about sales categories in specifically commercial vs upmarket vs literary so again again i'm gonna dive right into it like i always did in the first two episodes of the who what category we've spent some time thinking about whether we want it to be what kind of writer we want to be do we wanna be 'em professional writer an amateur writer or hobbyist where we sort of in the pre writer dreamer stage and we end the next episode we looked at what kinds of stories we might wanna tell like 'em occasion unra basically and today what we're gonna do israeli demystify sales categories and get a sense of where are books might land in these three large groupings here's the cool thing to know you only need the care about these sales categories if you want to be a professional or an amateur writer because they are essentially tools to help communicate what kinds of stories you're writing to agents or audiences so if you're looking to be traditionally published then you need to be able communicate agents and editors at publishing houses this is what i write if you're looking to be nb published then you need to be able to communicate directly treaters hey this is what i right so if you're not looking to be a professional or amateur writer you don't have to worry about these at all if you're just looking to be a hobbyist or if you're still in the preliminary stage where you're just kind of dreaming about maybe someday i wanna be writer you can kind of put those in the back of your mind in case it ever transitions into a situation where you would like to start submitting things either to agents or out into the public but if it's just for you or if it's just for a small community related to you you don't have to worry about these sales categories at all on my website the rookie writer dot net you'll find on the show notes for this page a really fantastic stick info graphic put together by ps literary agency that has in a release the sink in visual way a great way of demonstrating the basic characteristics of literary fiction upmarket fiction end 'em commercials fiction and examples within each of those i'm going to just run through them verbally but i urge you to go and take a look at this it's a it's a really well done graphic okay we're gonna start with literary fiction literary fiction tends to be very oriented towards art end it is looking to question some of the things and the prevailing culture it's asks a lot of the reader to in terms of filling in the blanks or inferring things there's a lot of times if he endings are very clear or satisfying for the reader they play with structure a lot they play with their with language a lot it's a very innovative and they're very comfortable taking risks they contend to be a little slower paced and a little bit more focused on the interior already of the character versus the events happened outside or to the character next i'm gonna actually cut to commercial fiction commercial fiction is at the other end of the spectrum in books it fit into this category they aim is much more entertainment the author does a lot of the work for the reader laying out these events of the story in a way that doesn't require the reader to infer as much or the filling in the blanks the writing tends to be a little more fast paced while they're still lots of character development within these stories the distinct inferiority might not be explored quite as much but it won't be explored as much as it is with literary fiction 'em you opt in has a very satisfying ending the end readers have come to expect that from commercial fiction 'em unless it's part of a series it tends to tie up all the questions that it that it laid out throughout the story it reaches very broad audiences and this is where you're gonna find things like mystery and romance in size fi and fantasy and thrillers in westerns it's all the genres for the most part tend to gravitate towards commercial fiction there is hearing there a few examples of genre books that have have gone into that are categories more as literary fiction but for the most part this is where genre lives in commercial fiction the third category is upmarket fiction and that's where the other two to sales categories meet in the middle it tends to have a lot of the same characteristics of commercials fiction it has a broad audience it tends to be a little faster paced it tends to tie up 'em the questions instead it lays out in the story so you don't have to guess ending irby confused by it or those sorts of things but it elevates the language in the themes in gets a little deeper into the interior already the character's than a lot lot of the the commercials fiction does books in an upmarket fiction category will gravitate towards universal themes that people can relate to in their own lies but the lend themselves to discussion so this is where you're gonna find you're club a book for the most part one of the things that you should know about these different categories is did they oftentimes go by other names literary almost always just goes by literary so that one's easy commercials marshall fiction can also be known as popular fiction or nonfiction and some of these authors and those are the ones that you're gonna know they're gonna be the things that you see in the in the wine while you're waiting at the grocery store 'em it's it'd be the james patterson the written or roberts the dan brown's that kind of thing the upmarket sales category is sometimes also known as mainstream fiction or crossover fiction or book club diction if you see any of those that means upmarket market some sample authors from this might be celeste eating elmore leonard gillian flynn 'em they ten again to blend art and entertainment and you're gonna see these at your book club meetings literary always goes i literary it very much focuses on art and culture and these you're gonna see in class is an on lists for the peel it's there in the booker and things like that if these concepts these sales categories were applied to to fashion just as a way to kind of understand there's a little bit more if this was related to the world of fashion then commercials fiction would be your favorite local malls mainstream stores market fiction would be like the local boutiques or the stores at the fancy mall whatever you're fancy mollis andy literary fiction would be more like new york fashion week i think i forgot to lift off sample authors of this but you know them it's the toni morrison's the colson whitehead's the donna tarts what's interesting to me was when i did a little research on this there was a report on the number of agents seeking books and the different categories end you would think that commercial fiction would actually have be most agents looking for actively looking for books and those cat in that sales category but the truth is 'em as of twenty nineteen there about two hundred ninety five agents actively looking for four books if it these categories like i mean sorry the sales category of commercial fiction there's about sixty three agents actively expressly looking for books that fifty upmarket district description and what was interesting to me would sit there are four hundred and twenty nine agents which is by far the largest number looking for literary fiction so one thing that i think lends itself to 'em explaining this is that for the most part literary fiction is still published almost exclusively through traditional puff publishing methods so that is just say that if you want to publish a literary fiction book the odds are that you are doing it with an agent and through traditional publisher or a small smaller publisher whereas if you're writing commercial fiction there's a decent and chance that you might be looking at c n b publishing pass so that is where i think the discrepancy there might be if i had to guess i think it's interesting that there's so few agents actively looking for up market despite the fact that from everything that i read it's kind of a sweet spot for especially traditional publishers and i v only way i can kind of understand that and if someone knows better please let me know 'cause i think this is interesting topic 'em my best guess is that when agents put out literary but they're looking for literary a lot of times they will be very very very happy to get up market as well so because upmarket k a mainstream fiction jk crossover fiction jk book club fiction is something that people don't really always understand i i think that in some cases they might just not wanna mess with it as part of their profile but again if you know please reach out to me and let me know and and i kind of understand how this might make sense okay which sales category should you should for and the answer is as close as you're bookshelf what do you like to reid what is it you're actually drawn to what is it that you can't wait to get your hands on when it comes when it's released what authors are the ones that you watch out just see when they when they released a new book what do you love to write whatever you love to write in whatever you love to reid that is the sales category that you should be shooting for one of the things that i found was an article by any new power i think it is she does a good job it's called the differences between commercial and literary fiction and again the link is on the show notes on the on the web page she offers examples of books have similar topics in storylines but they're done with different underlying approaches that puts them into three different sales categories and all three are books are accomplished by accomplished authors that have done well they all have plots they're heavy on suspense and intrigue but just the way that they wrote them when whether it went along with the expectations tation of genre for instance or to the degree to which it answered all the questions at the end or the way it played with language determined where if it on the shelf so she gave examples of a commercial example would be loves music love to dance by mary hagans clark a literary example would be pale fire by vladimir nabokov an upmarket example would be rebecca by daphne demane each of these books is well done critically or commercially acclaimed or boat and yet they all fall indifferent sales categories there is no sales category this better than any others it is literally just the way that they percent in group books that have things in common so that at readers know what they're getting an are satisfied with experience now the role the motivation we touched on this a little bit already you should write the books that you liked her reid did she liked to right but one thing that i think is kind of note worthy is depending on what you're what you're motivations are and we looked at this a good bit and episode three which is one of the why episodes i have six different motivators the people often have as reasons for why they want to write and most people don't have just one but in fact a combination of several of them depending on what dominates your motivating equation let's say there there are different sales categories and types of books that might actually better fit your motivations that might sound confusing let me try another way okay i'm just gonna dig in and give you examples if for instance that's your primary motivator for writing books is itchy wanna get a message out about a specific topic her issue than any of the katter sales categories could be a good fit for you there's never any wrong category had a gory for you but perhaps the best fit might be an upmarket book because they tend to be focused on inspiring discussion and relating to issues in people's wives and so because upmarket books tend ten to fit that category that if you are looking to promote a message that might be a good sales category for you to import if for instance you are most motivated by entertaining an audience lifting them out of their data day 'em problems and issues and just whisking them along on a story then you might want to look at commercial because that is the category that tends to value entertainment over any any sort of other aspects of the story they just want to tell a good story whisks somebody away they don't necessarily need them to think heavily about the story liner have a tons of tons of questions about it or any of these issues laid out they really really want that to be something that just gives them a wrist spite from their daily chores and toils if however what you are think you're motivated by you're audience in that you would like to challenge them intellectually early if you would like the challenge the prevailing culture then you might be looking at litter areas a better fit for you because that there's a lot of room for playing with a structure in the language in a way that really that really pushes people to state in different ways and they have before about a different topic endorsed starts a conversation with in the culture is your primary motivation is to be recognized then it depends on how you wanna be recognized if you want to win one of the big prize is that people always refer to like the nobel prize for literature the or the peel it there or.

writer
"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

The Rookie Writer Show

15:48 min | 1 year ago

"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

"Thought of writing when you're first thinking about being a writer or if you're at that stage right now on your entertaining it if I asked you to closure is imagine it you'd probably picture something along the lines of this. You see a writer sitting alone with their computer or their no pad or if you're really old school, maybe their typewriter, there's probably sitting near a beautiful view or maybe in. Like a messy office, the papers everywhere, and they're just they're alone, either typing away, like crazy or scribbling away, like crazy or looking incredibly frustrated because the words won't come at all. And this is the picture that we see in movies that we see teeny and therefore we see it in our minds eye. We think that writing is one thing that it means you sit down and your fingers flying one way or another words are coming or the aren't near incredibly frustrated, and that's rating is, but I'm here to suggest that there are five stages of writing. So let's get into. The first one is pre writing and that at, at this stage you might just be kind of ruminating on an idea. You might be kind of vaguely researching a topic, you might be reading a lot of other books, that remind you of this sort of story that is beginning to percolate in your mind. This pre writing stage could be just along these lines, or it might ramp up a little more to something like now, you're starting to do something along the lines of what author Gwen Hayes calls the spark sheet, where she writes everything down that she knows about her story before she's about to write it. There's nothing necessarily super organized about it. But that's how she does it. Judy Blume is famous in her. I think it was in her masterclass that she talked about how she always had notebook where she would keep all of the thoughts on a project and that one notebook and she would just scribble you know, Willie. Alien it as ideas came to her. She said when she got towards the end of a project, she would go back to her notebook and highlight the stuff that she used and just kind of go through page after page after page to see if she had worked in most of the things that she wanted to get into this book, when she first envisioned it. So this would also be a former pre right and just scribbling in an oak dumping in one place, designating one notebook that would be a former pre writing, you might ramp it up to the next level. And now you're looking at being able to write let's say a log line like a one or two sentence thing that really boils down for you. What the story is about or a synopsis, maybe a three or so page, but it could be longer depending on if it's for you, or if it's something you plan to use later when you're submitting to agents and things, but of whatever link a synopsis that sort of describes scene after seeing what happens or maybe an outline where you. It down. Seen act. One scene. One this happens these characters this point the time line, this setting that kind of thing might be really concrete like that. If you're given to plotting if you're given to be more of a fly by the seat of your pants, or when you're writing and you'd like to just kind of see where the muses taking you, you probably won't do a lot of those more structured and elaborate things. Whether you're a panther or planner applaud her, I would urge you to do a couple of things at this pre writing stage, the first state of writing that is number one take a second to look at your calendar. And get a sense of when you think you might be able to work on this every day. Ideally or whatever you know it works out for you and number to try to keep all of your thoughts on this story in one place. I know it seems really obvious no, too. But you would be amazed at how quickly all those ideas about this, one project, scattered into a bunch of different. Books on nap on your phone, and this file, in that file, it's, it's amazing how quickly that happens. However, you fall on, on the pre writing continuum do try to look at those two habits because I think it will serve you really well. If you go to the website for each of these steps, there's a couple of tips and tools that I include underneath each of the sections, it's my favorite software app. And then also my favorite low tech solution to the same sorts of things for this one, I reference story planner app, and there's a link to that as well as Scrivener in story, est both in this section. And in the next phase, which is drafting now this is the part that does look a lot like the movies, you are actually just getting rolling on writing. This is the time when it's time to start letting those words flow, if you are a Pancer you might have just about started at the stage and if you're a pretty heavy plotter, or a planner then you felt like this day would never come, but here it is. As you are doing it now that you've gotten started drafting don't stop keep going until you get to the finish line. If you're in our editor pops by your desk, or where it is you're working just to say, hi, just repeat the mantra, first drafts crap until they go away. They will eventually leave you alone enough to get across that finish line. Even if you have to crawl across the finish line, even if you are kind of shuffling, and you're outta gas just get all the way through that first draft. I've seen way too many people get hung up on the step. And just try to muddle it by doing too many things at once, like, let's say step number three rewriting during the drafting stage. We don't want you to get stuck in the drafting stage going looping around trying to muddy at doing a little this little of that until you have the most beautiful first chapter, but you're not getting cross the line when you are in the drafting stage get through it just get that first draft down. You will be so happy. Okay. Back to stage three re writing it. It's this point that you should have a complete if imperfect first draft and how much that first draft hangs together structurally will depend a lot on whether or not again, your pants or plotter, if you're a plotter, if you're a hard, plotter, you probably worked out a lot of the bugs of your stories plotting issues before you even sat down to write that first draft. So you might have less to do there in that way, if you are a Pancer, if you're a Pancer, then you probably have a little bit more work to do there, because you just kinda followed things where they went during the writing stage. This is the time that you can actually go back to anything that you created during the pre writing stage as kind of like a touchstone to inform you on the things that you need to do next. So it's a good time to revisit what you had in mind when he sat down to write this book in the first place, and then you can start to better assess where the gaps are between what you actually get down on the page. And what you intended to get down on the page. Now, please. Stand, you will never ever ever be able to get down what you had in your mind's eye, and it's just something I think all writers have to make peace with you might get really close. You might get something that dazzles you almost as much, or perhaps even more. But you are ever going to get exactly that story. It's never gonna live up to that original dream vision. You had when you I thought this is what I want to do. And of course, you could see it all unfolding in the space of a couple of minutes in your mind's eye, and it takes longer to get that down on the pate revisit that first pre writing stash. Look at what you actually have after the second stage drafting and that's when the rewriting that's the magic of the rewriting us try to get those to become a little closer together. So that it's the best story that you can make the feel structurally, solid, the characters feel real the setting skill vivid. Your theme pops your voice is clear those sorts of things get all those things done. One so that you could move on. And however many drafts it takes for some people that might be to persuade people that might be twenty it's really gonna be your process. Don't let it hold you back, though, from getting to the fourth stage which is polishing polishing his things like do you have a favorite word or of words, did you like to use a ton you do because everybody does start finding those so that you can pick those out and start replacing those different or better words, so that you read it doesn't get hung up on this little tick of yours, or do you have a tendency to slip slip into passive voice a lot or? Do you have a tendency? Sometimes you're writing in present tense mall. Sudden rating past tense or your point of view shifted your head hopping. A little these sort of smaller nuance things along with course things like grammar, you know, like are your commas in the right place? Did you use affect when you met effect things like that? So this is the state time to polish I would argue that it's smart not to do this. These sorts of things until you get to the state. Some people cannot resist doing a little of this, while they're drafting and a little of this, while they're rewriting you can do that. It's you do you in the benefit of that, of course, is when you get to the stage, you have less to do than somebody who just sort of force themselves to overlook it for now, which is great. Here's the, the danger of this approach, however, because you've probably gone through and polished, as you were going. If you're if you have that tendency, then you probably polish something that's not gonna end up in that final draft. And then it makes it harder to let it go when it would actually do your story, the most service, it would benefit your store the most if you would. So just as long as you're going in where you're good for both drafting and rewriting. I, I love stories and Scrivner for polishing. I am all about auto credit as a starting place and there's links to all of these programs that you can learn more about them. I think it's also good idea to run things through. Through your word processing spell. Check in grammar. Check word has a particularly good one supposedly Google doesn't, Pat, Google docs is not as good. I don't know where pages falls on that continuum. It seems fine. In addition to that use Gramley I think there's free options, along with paid ones, and, and also Hemingway. They're both good about catching grammar things that between your your word processor. Spell check and grammar. Check grammar early and Hemingway. You should be pretty good on grammar issues. Autocrat does something a little bit different. And it's what it does is picks up things like those favorite words of yours, that you're overusing, or the passive voice of the tent swishes switches, or things like that. Anyway, there's a link on my website to all of these things, and you can check those out, they'll final stage of writing is releasing. And it this is absolutely just as much stage of writing as any of the others and an effect. If you drop the ball this stage of trying to get it out to your intended audience, whether that's through. Agents or publishers, or self publishing or just literally binding it, so that your family can read it because they're your intended audience, if you neglect this last step, you in many ways render all of the others mood. So for this one is far as tools. It really depends on whether your traditionally publishing or, or planning to Indy or self publish and in those circumstances, if you're indie publishing definitely checkout. Vela m-. It's a great way to format your book beautifully and easily, if you're traditionally publishing. That's a more involved topic that will be on an upcoming episode but for starters go check out, submited, -able and set up a free count..

writer Pancer Hemingway Gwen Hayes Judy Blume Willie Google others editor Scrivner Pat
"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

The Rookie Writer Show

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

"Me. And might be useful for you as well. I'd like to wrap up this episode with an explanation about why I chose the name of the show. I chose the name rookie writer because I have such an affection for rookies, and let me tell you. Why rookies have a lot of talent and a lot of enthusiasm. That's how they get to be rookies in the first place it basically gives them admission to the game. But they also have a lot to learn. And the thing about it is is that you are going to feel like that probably your entire writing career. Most writers do one of my favorite quotes is from Ernest Hemingway. And it goes something like this. We are all apprentices and a craft in which. No one ever becomes a master. So you might as well embrace it. I know I have lean into that rookie status embraced renews. Yasim and your talent. And yes, also that feeling of always being a little bit at the beginning of something always having something more to learn because that's the nature of writing. That's the fun of it. And that's the challenge of it. Come back for episode one. What kind of writer, are you? Let's find out. Thanks again for joining me. I'll see you next time. If you like this episode, please hit the like or whatever it is give it a thumbs up. Subscribe. I don't know. It's my first episode. I'll get better at this part. And also swing by WWW dot the rookie writer dot net. It's once again T H E R O K I E W R. I T E R dot net is the rookie writer dot net. Okay. There's going to be already some resources books. I recommend the show notes for this episode and links to different tools that I have available for downloading to help you start thinking about how to organize your reading life in a way that works for you. Okay. Thanks again. I'll catch you time. Until then happy writing people.

writer Ernest Hemingway
"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

The Rookie Writer Show

05:13 min | 1 year ago

"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

"Novels or easings. Are you a blogger? Are you a short story writer? Are you a memoir star you a flash fiction person? There's a lot of areas of writing that we don't immediately think of when we're starting out. We just think books, but there's such a world of writing that comes at us all the time that I think that there's room for a lot of exploration here to see what might match up with your interests and skills, and desires, we'll also be looking at things like if you do wanna be professionally published do you see yourself as more of a commercial writer and upmarket writer or a literary writer, and also what is the difference between commercial and upmarket and literary writing. We'll also be looking at John razz, and the organizations that support them and the tropes that are common in them. And the space that they occupy. In the market place at this point in time. They'll just be a lot of ways for you to look at what you're working on really having a lot of confidence and clarity about your choices. In terms of what you're going to write. We'll help alleviate a lot of the problems including things like writer's block and procrastination. Because if you know what it is that you are working on what it is you want to get out into the world. It goes a long way towards making that time that you can carve out to write more productive and more valuable because you know, where you're going. You have that guide star you've answered that question for yourself when we get into asking when and where questions about our productivity challenges they oftentimes are intertwined much like the who. And the what were and you'll see that episode usually episode two in a given month will be tackling those questions the kinds of questions will be looking at in the win episodes might be. Looking at your time and your writing habits, it could be everything from your sort of long range plans to how you're managing your small pockets of time. It's the day to day stuff. And it's also the big picture things. But it's also going to be things like are you the kind of person who enjoys writing at the same time and the same place every day. Or are you the kind of person that needs a little variety? Are you really good at using those little pockets of time as they present themselves, or do you need to have a certain ritual that happens every time before you're able to really slide into that writing space. That is the most productive for you. Where questions will include things like not only the space where you're able able to find to right? But also the tools that you use to rate looking at whether or not you're most comfortable using a computer or writing things out by hand or dictating and pushing you to try some. Of the others to see what that brings to your writing experience. In addition. It will be things like looking at tools and hacks and techniques to help you store the information like ideas or drafts to make it. So that you're more organized, and you can more easily access the work that you that you've completed or the work that you are you would like to do when we get into the Y episodes, which will be usually the third episode in any given month. We'll be looking at primarily our motivation and our support. So in these areas, I mean, what motivates you to face off with the blank page. And the reason we care about the answers to these questions is because there is no better defense against the twin demons of procrastination and perfectionism than knowing why you are willing to sit down and do this when you could be doing just about anything else. Generally speaking every month episode four will be a how episode. And by that, I mean, the kinds of practices and habits and ways that we can support our writing life by taking care of our bodies and our general wellness because though I like to treat myself like I am sort of floating head the truth is I am a better writer. I'm a I'm a better everything when I'm taking care of myself and writing is no exception. You'll hear a lot about this. If you're a podcast fan. Like, I am this is showing up everywhere sort of remembering that writing is just a piece of your life. It's not the whole thing, and you need to treat it that way. Finally on months where we have five weeks. There will be interviews with other rookies where I will get into all of these questions with them and look at their back story and the ways that they have tackled some of the issues that they've found in overcome. So that they're sharing their tips and experiences with you and more ideas grab with all of the. Questions I'll be bringing in experts from time to time. In addition. I'll offer my recommendations on other podcasts YouTube channels books, magazines, apps and software that have worked for me.

writer John razz five weeks