2 Burst results for "william pickens"

"william pickens" Discussed on Into America

Into America

05:29 min | 3 months ago

"william pickens" Discussed on Into America

"Fifty. Hey l. problem Because i want to ask you this. Your family's has been there for so long. And i wonder when you reflect on it all your hope for your family's legacy instead arbor francois. I wanted to continue. I'd like my children grandchildren and continue to enjoy this place because it is so special and accessible. I do have some worries about the future. I feel attached to this place. And i children are attached to this place and at attachment is so strong that i'm sure they'll move resist long as hard as they can Vacating this land. I my hope is that My great great great grandchildren have shot. Those plays and i just have one grandchild. Oh you got to get to work john. Hello is is he right there. John right there. you're here. Mr pickings his son. John was sitting next to him helping with recording amid john on the beach in sag harbor ten years ago. He's the one who hooked me up with his dad. So i got him in on the conversation. Also how you feel man hanging in there. Yeah well want to ask you ma. Obviously you know talking to your father about the legacy of your family out. There is pressure on you and your family. I don't have any kids. i don't have a wife. thank you this man. Made miracles out here literally found his wife made a life and still had brooklyn's still queen still had harlem in existence. So now we're here. We're just trying to still shelving alive and a living place. It's not a dying place you don't come here to die. You come here to live here to see your friend you come here to run outside you come here to take your shoes off you. Come here to let your dogs run you know. Come to hide you. Come here to thrive when you think about your generation the next generation are you concerned that folks will sell off and folks will look for the money and not be able to hold onto. It is a real concern. You have some like that. And then but then you have other generations where their their families are working hard to keep. This see is different for us because it didn't cost us. This was already given to us. We had to maintain and that's a costume itself but for us it's maintaining our own piece of life in our own piece of liberty in our own piece of justice and this is where we found it and this is where we've carved it out for everyone else so you don't have to come in and fight to earn these things because the respect is already understood the thing about these kids they don't change if you don't change the knox status saying that's the key to my grandma had to the door because it's the same. Wow yeah how was growing about their changed you. Well it's changed me in in. That is just giving me a well rounded experience. I mean it. It might be something more of a privilege but it's an experience it's like being able to come out and see your neighbors and know your neighbors but how your neighbors know and see you. Yeah they have to see you out on the water in join it. They had to see you driving down the beach to know that you're here enjoying rights and privileges not excluded from anything. The doors opened and the love is real. And this is god's country we are still in god's country without freedom there is no joy and we have found and freedom picking. What's it like when you hear your son. John described his experience and how much is meant to him. What does it mean when you hear him. Speak about this community that you helped kind of nurture and build. Well it means that it worked at the time and effort. We put in to establish this as a viable community over the last several decades. That that feeling Has emerged out children and grandchildren that boy. We're lucky pretty lucky. To have this and are alive and we have to figure out a way to preserve it and nurture it though. When i hit my son john extolling virtues. Place i smile william pickens. The third lives in sag harbor new york and we always love hearing from our listeners. Said don't forget you can tweet me at. Mainly that's at tre mainly my full name or write to us at into america at nbc. You and i dot com. That was into america at nbc and the letters u. n. i dot com into. America is produced by isabel angel. Alison bailey bryson barnes. Aaron don max jacobs and ice turner. Original music is by. Hannah's brown our executive producer is ellen brakeman. Entre may leave. We'll catch you next day.

ellen brakeman John john isabel angel sag harbor Aaron don max jacobs ten years ago Fifty Alison bailey bryson barnes america America nbc william pickens arbor francois one grandchild last several decades next day i dot com ice turner new york
"william pickens" Discussed on Into America

Into America

07:32 min | 3 months ago

"william pickens" Discussed on Into America

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That's sim plli essay f. E. dot com slash dateline today. And we're back with william pickens step back a little bit to go further back in history. Obviously through as you mentioned the sixties the black community harbor was right. You all out there. Bunch. but what about black folks and sega harbor period like how did we. I get out there and win. Because of the whaling industry willing was the economic arm of sag harbor in eighteen thirties you needed to have men who would be willing to go for a year and a half away from america to weigh all gone to the pacific. They had to go around south america. No panama canal. So you when you signed on the ship here. A few blacks from africans cape verde islands harlem brooklyn token number became shipmates on these wailing craft and they would be gone for eighteen months but that was really the first african presence in sag barbara. So you're going back to nineteen th century but by nine thousand nine hundred. John hope the great scholar from georgia as wife went from savannah georgia to say harbor by boat. She was going to live in new york but she got off the boat and sag harbor and liked it so much that she rented a room and built a house as the middle class black folk and the university folks heard about saying harbor. John hope grade scholar and then my aunt who was a teacher heard about it and they were friends she was friendly was this woman is hope because she had taught to test gigi and gave her the idea. We'll come on out so it started very small. It wasn't over thirties. That more african americans came to sag harbor and there was a schoolteacher who started technical high school and he came out and built four or five little cottages for his friends and rented them out and that started more volume of coming to say harbor back in the thirties. The depression was on so folks. Weren't taken fans investigations right harbor afforded you a fishing opportunity in cantata coming out by train and boat to check it out but you weren't buying property. The property was not for sale. That didn't happen till after world. War two an all new land became available so sag harbor as we understand. It is long island but kind of talk to us about the black beach communities within arbor. Well there three beachfront communities as your rest which was the first one. I was founded in nineteen forty seven by two sisters and all started very innocently after world. War two all. This land was available and the people who owned it needed money. Sagar wilson came along the owners. Here this family from virginia they owned all property that we have here now and he saw. Okay i'll do what they're doing and as you rest and find a lot of willing customers if the price is right who african american. That's how this happened and never was impulsive. Came through my father-in-law who helped sell the lots to all his friends. None of a beach. Gimme four or five hundred bucks and we get ourselves some property and they did the thing that made this different. Was that you own the water front. You couldn't do that in a-plus or a while but here you can own the bay front. You can actually own property that would guard against on the beach. That was the fundamental difference. And that's why the beachfront lots went really fast. He because the men and women recognized his glorious opportunity. We had our own beach and that was a big difference beach front. Ownersh you folks in the community been able to hold onto that sense as a change at all. Well it's it's changed a little bit. But i think there's a determination now that the families who can stay here we'll stay because to replace. This is almost impossible. It was wonderfully accessible for us but now it's accessible. Everybody and all we can do is guard against the encroachment by staying here and paying our bills paying taxes improving our properties That's the only way we're going to survive this. You know what. What percentage of your neighbors are black now like i'm more say what percentage of your neighbors white now has the demographics of the place dramatic change in community one of the communities at fifty five forty five now white at seventy thirty so seventy thirty one community is gone over that the stakes are that high though. If if you don't hold onto it it'd be going for all gone once it's gone. Forget to buy to buy back. Forget house for hundred thousand and now it's going to cost three million back. I mean that's the economics of the day. That's a threat. it's a threat. It was no interest from the larger community until maybe twenty five years ago. They were by never turn off the highway to see what's going on over here right. This is a black enclave. Maybe thought it was dangerous. Or maybe the waste of time. But it wasn't until the mid ninety s that the white population began to look safe harbor as an investment opportunity. So it's about twenty five years. The first.

Sagar wilson new york eighteen months south america four william pickens nineteen th century hundred thousand america three million eighteen thirties John five hundred bucks virginia today georgia sixties a year and a half simplisafe mid ninety s