29 Burst results for "western reserve university"

Considering German Jewrys History And Legacy With Jay Geller

Jewish History Matters

05:25 min | 2 weeks ago

Considering German Jewrys History And Legacy With Jay Geller

"Welcome to jewish history matters. I'm jason la steak and jay. Geller is joining me on the podcast today to talk about his book. The show alums a history of the german jewish bourgeoisie from emancipation to destruction. It's a fantastic book. That tells the story of german jewry as a whole through the history of one family and in particular the four scholem brothers each of whom followed their own political and historical path gerhard or gershom scholem the zionist who is most widely known for his scholarship on jewish mysticism alongside. His brothers. varner the communist. Reinhold the nationalist and eric the liberal. It's a multilayered approach towards thinking about jews in germany as well as the broader possibilities of history and its contingency the scholem brothers really showcase the myriad possibilities for political and cultural activity of jews in germany prior to the second world war as well as the different outcomes of the jews in germany verner was murdered by the nazis at involed gershom immigrated to palestine and eric and reinhold made their way toss. Australia altogether sketches the outlines of the german jewish cultural and political millea as the diaspora of the jews of germany after the holocaust and so the scholem family is simultaneously an eminent middle class. Jewish berlin family and at the same time. It's also distinctly normal quotidian every day it showcases through this microcosm the whole story of choose in germany in the lead up to the second world war and the holocaust as well as aftermath jay. Geller is the samuel rosenthal professor of judaic studies at case western reserve university's department of history in addition to the show alums which will talk about. Today he has also written jews in post holocaust. Germany nineteen forty five to nineteen fifty three. I'm so excited that jay is able to join us on the podcast today to discuss the show alums and german jewish history in the largest terms the book and the issues that it raises helps us to think through both the history of jews in germany as well as the legacy of german jewish culture on a wider scale. Thanks for listening in. Welcome to the podcast. Thanks thanks for having me. This book is is such a fascinating. Approach the micro history really that is focusing on the four scholem brothers. You know obviously gershom. Scholem is definitely the most well known of these figures who are studying you as a major figure in jewish intellectual history jewish scholarship. But i think that part of what you've done here which is so interesting is to bring forward a handful of people who each represent different pathways through german jewish history and this really illuminates a lot of important issues. Do you maybe want to explain briefly about these different trajectories About these different figures in the show family and what they represent in the eighteen ninety s arthur bitty show-me who are the owners of a print shop berlin had four sons reinhold arish varner and gerhard litter known gershom and in time they viewed the travails of german society and experience the ambiguities of not the difficulties of german jewelry and they chose for different political paths. Brian whole the oldest was a national liberal or right liberal. Eric was a liberal democrat or a left liberal van was a social democrat and later became a communist in gershom of course was zionist so in this one family among these four brothers we see four political paths taken by german jewry in the first decades of the twentieth century raven. These weren't the only pads but they were by far the most common covering most of the political spectrum verner began his career as a socialist but he joined the communist party at the time of the The merger of the independent social democratic party but the communist party and he quickly rose to become the second most powerful member of the german communist party. He was a personal rival of of stalin and the stalinist clique in german communism in the mid nineteen twenty s when stalinist is attempting to take over the other communist parties in the commoner

Scholem Germany Jason La Steak Gershom Gershom Scholem Geller JAY Samuel Rosenthal Eric Verner Varner Reinhold Gerhard Berlin Department Of History Case Western Reserve Universit Palestine Arthur Bitty
Red Sox hire first Black woman to be pro baseball coach

KYW 24 Hour News

00:27 sec | 2 months ago

Red Sox hire first Black woman to be pro baseball coach

"Make history CBS is Matt Piper tells us why the Red Sox have hired Bianca Smith, the first black woman to coach in professional baseball history. The 29 year old would be a minor league coach in Fort Myers, Florida. Smith played softball at Dartmouth College in previously worked in athletic departments at Case Western Reserve University and Carroll University. In November. The Miami Marlins named Kim in general manager making her MLB's first female G M. That Piper

Matt Piper Bianca Smith CBS Red Sox MLB Fort Myers Dartmouth College Carroll University Softball Case Western Reserve Universit Smith Florida Miami Marlins KIM Piper
How We Study Alzheimer's and Potential Treatments

Healthcare Triage Podcast

06:13 min | 4 months ago

How We Study Alzheimer's and Potential Treatments

"We have two guests today. the first is alan pal quits. He is the senior research professor of medicine and president and ceo of the indiana biosciences research institute. Also joining us is bruce lamb. He is director of stark neuroscience institute. Welcome both of you. Thank you so we usually like to start off by asking people how they got to the position that they're in like how does one become a senior research professor of medicine allen and what is president and ceo of the indiana biosciences research institute. So if you could tell us a bit about what you do and how you got here so thank you very much earned so I think my experience has been somewhat atypical. In terms of coming into academia. I spent twenty eight years at the leeann. Company started off as a bench level. Scientists of medicinal chemist and eventually in my last eleven years woods the vice president discovery chemistry research and technologies where oversaw small molecule drug discovery across all the areas of therapeutic interests that lily so this was a very rich experience and and after being there for quite some time. I had the opportunity to make an early retirement at the end of two thousand seventeen. And i was thinking about my next steps and i had developed long relationship with a not shaker. Who the rhinos. The key leader here at a school of medicine and asked me to come over and help with the position. Health initiative than any perspective that i could provide in and input in you know things kind of transpired in i came over as a professor of medicine and eventually met bruce and you know a lot about our work together here in the past year and really create some great synergies and then as i spent some time that you another opportunity came up in in the community and this lousy indiana bioscience research institute which is an organization that really had a ton of blossomed out of a vision to really create additional note of innovative research and capabilities. That would draw the community together and diorite been around for about five or six years. And now i'm there to really help create additional bridges and create new scientific directions that really elevate The the sciences here in the mid west. And hopefully beyond great and bruce sort of what what has been your experience. How did you get to hear. Thanks a lot erin. So i'm a phd level basic scientist by training. I was at johns hopkins At case western. Reserve university. In cleveland clinic in doing science research into alzheimer's disease actually for my entire career and then I saw this unity to come to indiana in early. Two thousand sixteen to lead out this translational neuroscience research institute Stark neurosciences research institute. And it's a really unique Place that brings together. Clinicians basic scientists translational People now drug discovery as well sort of brings everybody together into one location to really do innovative and interdisciplinary research. So we wanted to talk today about alzheimer's disease. So i'd really like to start by just for our listeners. What is alzheimer's disease. Yeah so alzheimer's. Disease is obviously a brain disease And it was first described. And i think the history is important because it sort of still sort of how we've sort of you. The disease was described by a bavarian neuropathologist us alzheimer in early nineteen hundreds And he had a patient who had dementia sort of loss of memory She had paranoia clinical features that she had and then when she died Being a neuro pathologist he looked in her brain did standard stains at the time and described this unique brain pathology which still even today sort of defines the disease and that was primarily that there were two primary major neuro-pathological hallmarks that he observed in the brain tissue one where these amyloid Sort of the sticky substances which were aggregating in the brain and the other words what we currently today called neurofibrillary tangles which is another Brain pathology and even today it still sort of those two primary brain pathologies that are pathan demonic for alzheimer's disease. However i will say that as we've gotten into the modern age and in our began to understand the complexities reprieve that alzheimer's disease is a is a complex set of probably multiple disorders which are very related to one. Another but actually. There's probably not one set of alzheimer's disease out there. So is it. Is it just sort of like a neuro degenerative. Cognitive decline is we just believe is because of a few specific reasons so there's clearly a lot of neurodegenerative cognitive decline syndromes but alzheimer's is just a group where we think we know where the pathologies right sort of defines. You know one particular type and again. There's there's many different types that this is probably the most common one and it's also very much age related so you really see sort of a doubling after about the age seventy seventy five doubling every five years of of the incident so with sort if the baby boomers reaching the age of sixty five at ten thousand. A day right. Now that's why there's the big increase in number of cases is there a typical course. Does it usually hit a certain age. And last a certain amount of time. It's pretty variable You know there is a sort of a prototypical alzheimer's disease. But if you talked to the clinicians. And i'm not a clinician. But if you talked conditions they say if you've seen one case of alzheimer's disease you've seen one case of alzheimer's disease You know that really. There's so much variation in how how people present their how it progresses within those people So it's it's pretty variable. Obviously the common underlying features certainly memory loss at least at a general level but within that you have other changes sometimes with personality disorders of all variety of other things that can come along with alzheimer's

Indiana Biosciences Research I Alzheimer Alan Pal Bruce Lamb Stark Neuroscience Institute Indiana Bioscience Research In Reserve University Stark Neurosciences Research I Bruce Allen Cleveland Clinic Brain Disease Johns Hopkins Erin Neuro Degenerative Indiana Paranoia
How We Study Alzheimer's and Potential Treatments

Healthcare Triage Podcast

04:44 min | 4 months ago

How We Study Alzheimer's and Potential Treatments

"We have two guests today. the first is alan pal quits. He is the senior research professor of medicine and president and ceo of the indiana biosciences research institute. Also joining us is bruce lamb. He is director of stark neuroscience institute. Welcome both of you. Thank you so we usually like to start off by asking people how they got to the position that they're in like how does one become a senior research professor of medicine allen and what is president and ceo of the indiana biosciences research institute. So if you could tell us a bit about what you do and how you got here so thank you very much earned so I think my experience has been somewhat atypical. In terms of coming into academia. I spent twenty eight years at the leeann. Company started off as a bench level. Scientists of medicinal chemist and eventually in my last eleven years woods the vice president discovery chemistry research and technologies where oversaw small molecule drug discovery across all the areas of therapeutic interests that lily so this was a very rich experience and and after being there for quite some time. I had the opportunity to make an early retirement at the end of two thousand seventeen. And i was thinking about my next steps and i had developed long relationship with a not shaker. Who the rhinos. The key leader here at a school of medicine and asked me to come over and help with the position. Health initiative than any perspective that i could provide in and input in you know things kind of transpired in i came over as a professor of medicine and eventually met bruce and you know a lot about our work together here in the past year and really create some great synergies and then as i spent some time that you another opportunity came up in in the community and this lousy indiana bioscience research institute which is an organization that really had a ton of blossomed out of a vision to really create additional note of innovative research and capabilities. That would draw the community together and diorite been around for about five or six years. And now i'm there to really help create additional bridges and create new scientific directions that really elevate The the sciences here in the mid west. And hopefully beyond great and bruce sort of what what has been your experience. How did you get to hear. Thanks a lot erin. So i'm a phd level basic scientist by training. I was at johns hopkins At case western. Reserve university. In cleveland clinic in doing science research into alzheimer's disease actually for my entire career and then I saw this unity to come to indiana in early. Two thousand sixteen to lead out this translational neuroscience research institute Stark neurosciences research institute. And it's a really unique Place that brings together. Clinicians basic scientists translational People now drug discovery as well sort of brings everybody together into one location to really do innovative and interdisciplinary research. So we wanted to talk today about alzheimer's disease. So i'd really like to start by just for our listeners. What is alzheimer's disease. Yeah so alzheimer's. Disease is obviously a brain disease And it was first described. And i think the history is important because it sort of still sort of how we've sort of you. The disease was described by a bavarian neuropathologist us alzheimer in early nineteen hundreds And he had a patient who had dementia sort of loss of memory She had paranoia clinical features that she had and then when she died Being a neuro pathologist he looked in her brain did standard stains at the time and described this unique brain pathology which still even today sort of defines the disease and that was primarily that there were two primary major neuro-pathological hallmarks that he observed in the brain tissue one where these amyloid Sort of the sticky substances which were aggregating in the brain and the other words what we currently today called neurofibrillary tangles which is another Brain pathology and even today it still sort of those two primary brain pathologies that are pathan demonic for alzheimer's disease. However i will say that as we've gotten into the modern age and in our began to understand the complexities reprieve that alzheimer's disease is a is a complex set of probably multiple disorders which are very related to one. Another but actually. There's probably not one set of alzheimer's disease out

Indiana Biosciences Research I Alan Pal Bruce Lamb Stark Neuroscience Institute Alzheimer's Disease Indiana Bioscience Research In Reserve University Bruce Translational Neuroscience Res Allen Johns Hopkins Erin Brain Disease Cleveland Indiana Paranoia Dementia
How Nomination Of Amy Coney Barrett To Supreme Court Might Affect U.S. Climate Action

Environment: NPR

03:46 min | 5 months ago

How Nomination Of Amy Coney Barrett To Supreme Court Might Affect U.S. Climate Action

"Environmental Policies Almost always end up in court these days and several of president trump's most contested chart changes to environmental policy are likely headed to the Supreme Court if Conservative nominee amy, Coney Barrett confirmed, it could have a major impact on how the US treats climate change as NPR's Jeff Brady explains it's difficult to predict how Amy Coney Barrett will rule on specific cases. Environmental Law was not her focus as a professor and not something she dealt with a lot during her time on the Court of Appeals for the seventh circuit. Her judicial philosophy does offer clues discussed that when her nomination was announced, a judge must apply the law as written. Judges are not policymakers and they must be resolute and setting aside any policy views. They might hold Barrett's judicial philosophy show skepticism of government and favors. Deregulation over-regulation says, Harvard law professor and former Obama administration official Jody Freeman I think generally speaking it's GonNa be a corporate court good for business good for corporation. Freeman says Barrett is skeptical federal agencies stretching their authority under laws where Congress hasn't given them clear direction. But Freeman, says agencies need to have flexibility. Even when Congress passes new laws are always ambiguities they're always things congress doesn't fade there always is new science new understanding new risks, new problems, new data. And it's impossible to specify each and every small kind of decision that the agencies make and sometimes agencies have to use existing laws to address new problems like climate change. That's what the Obama Administration did after failing to convince Congress to pass legislation focused on the polarizing topic, the EPA turned to the decades-old Clean Air Act to regulate greenhouse gases a two thousand seven. Supreme. Court case Massachusetts versus the EPA determined carbon dioxide could be regulated under the act. It became an important environmental ruling and now some worry a more conservative Supreme Court could overturn or weaken it case Western. Reserve University Law Professor Jonathan Adler. Unlikely on the question of whether greenhouse gases are pollutant, but he says it's more likely on the constitutional issue of standing whether Massachusetts and the other states had the right to sue the federal government standing inclement cases can be a challenge and I think based on what we've seen on the seventh circuit. A Justice Barrett. Certainly won't make that challenge. Any easier Adler Conservative agrees that bear it a skeptical of agencies overreaching their authority but says that doesn't mean Barrett is hostile to addressing climate change just that Congress needs to pass more specific laws constant do a lot of that these days but but yes. I'm old fashioned in that I. think that's what we had members of Congress and that's what we elect senators to do this appeals to conservatives like Tom Pile with the American energy alliance he supported Barrett's nomination on his podcast was duke it out where it belongs in Congress you guys win congratulations expanded to include co two regulation. You got it but Reverend Lennox Yearwood with the hip hop caucus says, he wants a different kind of justice who will lead on fixing big problems like climate change is a lifetime position and so that's why you have to have people in those positions who have a world view. that. Is One that Debbie will go by the Constitution. But also understands the nuances of the world we live today year would is among those who say they want the Senate to wait on a confirmation vote until after the presidential election. Jeff Radi? NPR

Justice Barrett Congress Environmental Law Amy Coney Barrett Jody Freeman Supreme Court Court Of Appeals NPR Obama Administration Professor EPA Massachusetts Jeff Brady
"western reserve university" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

07:46 min | 5 months ago

"western reserve university" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"From University Hospital in Cleveland Case Western Reserve University medical professor also in Cleveland. Okay, doctor, we were talking about masks on DH. I wondered whether or not President Trump's Diagnosis. Positive diagnosis with the Corona virus is going to lead to people saying more so see masks. Work masks work. If Trump would have masked himself, then he certainly wouldn't be sick right now, and your thoughts are Dr Davidson. Wait. We cannot. We didn't have you up. Go ahead, sir. Sorry. I was going to say you can't pick this on a one off no basis. One example here. One example. There. But we've talked about this off year multiple times. I think the science is pretty clear that any type of barrier between your mouth and those somebody else will be increase the probability of transmission of this virus or enviros, for that matter. So I think that it is important in their masks as much as you can. Um, I'm not going to say in this case, President Trump if he was wearing a mask more he may or may not have gotten because he's traveling a lot of multiple people. He was exposed. We knowwho picks at it. If he would've war mask who knows they're not foolproof, but they do show to decrease the transmission. There's no question in my mind, and there's no question of the science minded that happened. So to the discussion of masks, then to kind of again. Continue something you and I have debated a bit off the air. Not that I'm in a position to debate you as a physician, but Tom Dr Redfield of the CDC really opened a lot of eyes, including mine about 2.5 3 weeks ago, maybe was less than that. I can't recall specifically, but he was talking about the masking issue. And he was talking about vaccines, and he said that look and he held up a mask. And he said, it's my belief that this is the most important tool in stopping the spread of Corona Corona virus, perhaps even more than a vaccine, he said. And now his words were. This is what's important. He said. This will keep me safer than even a vaccine would now his language. There was important to me, Dr Davidson because the guidance from the CD has been all over the map about masks. First of all, they're not needed. Second of all, they're not. They wouldn't work against something where the particles are so small then, Yeah, okay. They can be helpful, then. Well, it's not really to protect us to protect somebody else. And now here's Dr Redfield saying, No, it's to protect me. Me wearing this mask will keep me safer. And even a vaccine would so considering that he's the head of the CDC, and they change their message about every you know, three or four weeks. How can we really truly believe in the efficacy and the effectiveness of the masks? Well, Bob, there's a lot of digest their but number one. I think that You're right. There's been so many mixed messages since we started back, and you know as early as January. And I think that you know my opinion on this is that this is a extremely novel virus. We don't know anything. Still don't know very much about the buyers were knowing war every day, but when they started, we knew absolutely nothing. Maps and the same time the context of the kinds of that we have very little pee pee, so people are very cautious about people going out wearing masks. That's my first comment. My second comment as you come up with the viral particles being too small, That's true. These thieves, viral particles are tiny and they can't get through the mass. But guess what The viral particles are and what you're worried about. Viral particles actually attached to the respiratory droplets. They can't travel without respiratory droplets. So if you could stop some of these respiratory droplets, by definition, you're going try. You're gonna stop some of the virus. There's no question about that. Now are they 100% cool proof? Of course not. But if you could put some sort of barrier between your mouth and somebody else, I think it can help prevent now going back to Dr Whitfield's comment. I think that some of the context behind that Could be the fact that we're just not very confident a hell effective vaccines going to B and B you and it's seeping in everywhere. So those are some things you got to think about. Who knows when that's gonna happen by for one. I'm a lot more confident that we will. We'll have a back seat with his next six bucks. But again, that's not gonna be 100% effective. Why What? Why do we? Why don't we put so much put so much stock into something that has proven to not to be effective. Since the mask mandates went into widespread effect across the country, You know, we keep it. We keep being told that mass mandates work and masks work. And yet since the mandates went into effect we're not seeing but massive drop in cases. In fact, we're starting to see an increase in cases Now, I still say, Of course, that case does not mean a whole lot when you have a 99 and a half percent recovery rate. But still, they're complaining about cases. Cases keep expanding cases, cases, cases cases. Well, I thought the masks, not the cases I saw thought they stopped the spread as you just described, and we could go into a number of other countries where Max masks have been mandated long before the United States as a group of states chose to Dubai governors. But in a number of other countries where the decrease never happened after the masking and dozens and dozens of foreign countries A couple of fast this one is I am not form asked me the exact take. It's something the government should try to stay out of this much as possible. We recommend them. We consider science behind it. I don't believe that we should be mandating. People wear masks, however. There has been a spike in large numbers of patients as you described, but keep in mind. Where were the large amounts of of positive patients? These were the younger pieces the pieces between 18 35 years old. Buddies have now shown that most of them have picked him up from gold bars go on at the young people. They're not wearing masks. They're going to bars. There's hardly any mask wearing these crowded bars, and that's where a lot of this took place in the summer in Florida and other places. I think site shows that I think that when this is all said, and done when we digested and dissect this, it's gonna be a while. 10 years down the road, take a book. That's respectively at all the data. I think it's going to show that mask Yeah, I'm going. I'm going to challenge that when the time comes down, and I'm gonna put it on the record here. I don't think they do. And I think again that some of the numbers in the foreign countries and again I don't know if we're going to sit here and dissect the Bar habits of everybody, another country. But in many other countries where mass mandates were put into effect nationwide, which, of course they're not here they're rates did of infection did not drop. In fact, they went up as steady as they did before the mandates and indicates that they're really Not as effective as many of the medical professionals layer thinks so We'll let that you've got it. You've got your money on red. I've got mine on black will spin the wheel. And in a few months or or maybe a few years we'll look and see which one of us got. Which one of us one that one that little round, but Dr John Davidson. It's gonna be a decade until we figure this soul out, but that's kind of terrifying when you think about it in those terms, But that's what it is. Doctor. I really appreciate your time. Thanks so much as always. Thanks for having me on Dr John Davidson is with case Western Reserve University medical professor there, and there was well a position at university hospitals in Cleveland. My name is Bob France. I am also in Cleveland. Just coincidentally. And I've got another half hour of your phone calls on the Larry ownership. You're listening to the Larry Elder show. Stuck in traffic. We've got the answer. This report is sponsored by Staples Stories in San Lorenzo. Sound found 80 right before a street to.

Dr John Davidson President Trump Cleveland Tom Dr Redfield Bob France CDC professor University Hospital Cleveland Case Western Reserve Dr Whitfield Larry Elder Western Reserve University government United States Staples Stories Dubai Florida San Lorenzo Max
"western reserve university" Discussed on Ron Paul Liberty Report

Ron Paul Liberty Report

05:34 min | 5 months ago

"western reserve university" Discussed on Ron Paul Liberty Report

"Hello everybody and thank you for joining into the Liberty Report with me today is Daniel McAdams. Our co-host Daniel good to see you. Are you this morning? Dr. Paul doing fine doing fine? And I'm sure you've stayed up and listen carefully Years cuz we're going to give you a couple quizzes here pretty soon. Well, I stayed up too and I listen to it sort of, you know, I did I tried to but it was a pretty painful for me to do that. But evidently it was painful for others. Nobody's right and say what's not a wonderful debate. We we learned a lot and he gave me make up my mind. You don't hear much of that but there was one article. I'm going to read a little code from from case University because they're worried about the children the children. Oh, no the kids the students, you know at the school that they might get upset with this and I think they should be upset. I think they should be really upset about what time Going on and coronavirus is and everything else but there are upset with the school wants to make sure that it's not nobody's emotionally stressed out over this and they've said that this this is a known function. If you're under stress, you have these areas where you go and get unstressed at you and you have counselors coming to help you out. That's what they needed here Western Reserve University the sight of last night's presidential set up dedicated support spaces for students who've been triggered by the tense exchanges. Now there were some but I'm not quite sure I would think the philosophy that has these supporting might be part of the problem that creates the stress but the university this is really because it's medical now, this is down my alley the university announced that the support space is not a summer. Okay for Psychotherapy and does not constitute mental health treatment. You should be feeling good about the fact that your taxpayers money are being spent wisely to take care of the mental health of the kids better. They worrying about the mental health of the kids are sending no matter how old they are with face masks to school and really cause an anxiety. But anyway, this is we can rest assured that there are checking on the kids and we don't want them to be stressed because they're they're going to be stressed that when they find out what what the non political system has and what's in store for them. If we ever have a have a sorting out of all the mess that we have and that debates don't seem to resolve much of that song. What what did you gain from this little reacting to that? You know, we don't support the draft, but sometimes when I see something like that, I really started to reconsider our view on the drought because wage These guys are running off to.

Western Reserve University Daniel McAdams Dr. Paul Daniel good
"western reserve university" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

02:55 min | 5 months ago

"western reserve university" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"Three days ago, and they all had the name military balance it with military. They all had the name Trump on Vice for anything. It's good Vice President Biden Final question for you. Will you urge your supporters to stay calm while the vote is counted? And will you pledge not to declare victory until the election is independently? Sort of? Fine? Yes, And here's the deal. They count the balance. As you pointed out. Some of these ballots in some states can't even be opened until election day. And if there's thousands of ballots going to take time to do it, and by the way, our military They've been voting by ballots for sensitive the end of the civil war enough in effect, and that's and that's what's happened. Gonna happen. Why was it not? Why is it for them somehow, not fraudulent. It's the same process. It's honest, no one has established at all that there is fraud related to mail in ballots that somehow it's a fraudulent process already been established. So take a look at count. You know you had an opportunity. They have no idea why President Martin Go ahead. He has no idea what he's talking about. Here's the deal. The fact is, I will accept it. And he will, too. You know why? Because once the winner is declared, after all the all the ballots are counted. All the votes are counted. That'll be the end of it. That'll be the end of it. And if it's me, infact fine. If it was not me, I'll support the outcome and I'll be a president. Not just for the Democrats. I'll be a president for Democrats and Republicans and this guy. I want him back. We'll say that's the end of this is the end of this debate is valid Count. We're gonna leave it there. To be continued as in more debates as we go on President Trump Vice President Biden. It's been an interesting our half. I want to thank you both for participating in the first of three debates that you have agreed to engage in. We want to thank Case Western Reserve University and the Cleveland Clinic for hosting this event. The next debate, sponsored by the Commission on Presidential Debates will be one week from tomorrow. October 7th at the University of Utah. In Salt Lake City. The two vice presidential nominees vice president Mike Pence and Senator Kamala Harris. I'll debate at 9 P.m. eastern that night. We hope you watch until then. Thank you. And good night. And so ends a mess in the first presidential debate between Donald Trump and Joe Biden exhausting at times to listen to Littered with cross talk and bitter exchanges, not just between the candidates but also tension between the president and the moderator, Chris Wallace. The two men continue standing at the podium in the Hall of Case Western Reserve University and the Cleveland Clinic's Health education campus. In Cleveland, Ohio, the audience they're restricted duty Cove. It concerns the president now joined on stage by his wife, The first lady and now Joe Biden, The former.

Trump Vice President Biden vice president Democrats President Donald Trump Cleveland Clinic Hall of Case Western Reserve U Cleveland Western Reserve University fraud Salt Lake City Ohio Chris Wallace University of Utah Senator Kamala Harris Mike Pence
"western reserve university" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

03:59 min | 5 months ago

"western reserve university" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"And will you pledge tonight? That you will not declare victory until the election has been independently certified. Resident trump my supporters to go into the polls and watch very carefully because that's what has to happen. I am urging them to do it. As you know, today, there was a big problem in Philadelphia. They went in to watch. They were called Pollwatch is a very safe. Very nice thing. They were thrown out. They weren't allowed to watch. You know why? Because bad things happen in Philadelphia, bad things. And by emerging I am urging my people. I hope it's going to be a fair election. If it's a fair election. What I am 100% onboard, but of icy tens of thousands of ballots being manipulated. I can't go along with that. And I'll tell you what I got from a common Does that mean you other people? Detective means you have a fraudulent election. You said the mineral balance. They're not equipped. These people aren't equipped to hell. It number one number two they cheat. They cheat. Hey, they found ballots in a wastepaper basket three days ago, and they all had the name military balance it with military. They all had the name Trump on advice for anything. It's good Vice President Biden Final question for you. Will you urge your supporters to stay calm while the vote is counted? And will you pledge not to declare victory until the election is independently certified? Yes, And here's the deal. They count the balance. As you pointed out. Some of these ballots in some states can't even be opened until election day, and the first thousands of ballots going to take time to do it. And by the way, our military they've been voting by ballots. First since the end of the Civil war and in effect, and that's and that's what's happened gonna happen. Why was it not? Why's it for them somehow, not fraudulent. It's the same process. It's honest, no one has established at all that there is fraud related to mail in ballots that somehow it's a fraudulent process already been established. So take a look at county Bolognese. You know you had an opportune looking. They have no idea why President Martin Go ahead. He has no idea what he's talking about. Here's the deal. The fact is, I will accept it. And he will, too. You know why? Because once the winner is declared, after all the all the ballots are counted. All the votes are counted. That'll be the end of it. That'll be the end of it. And if it's me, infact fine. If it was not me, I'll support the outcome and I'll be a president. Not just for the Democrats. I'll be a president for Democrats and Republicans and this guy. I want us back on valid gentleman. We you say that's the end of this is the end of this debate is valid Count. We're gonna leave it there. To be continued as in more debates as we go on President Trump Vice President Biden. It's been an interesting our health. I want to thank you both for participating in the first of three debates that you have agreed to engage in. We want to thank Case Western Reserve University and the Cleveland Clinic for hosting this event. The next debate, sponsored by the Commission on Presidential Debates will be one week from tomorrow. October 7th at the University of Utah. In Salt Lake City. The two vice presidential nominees vice president Mike Pence and Senator Kamala Harris. I'll debate at 9 P.m. eastern that night. We hope you watch until then. Thank you. And good night. And so ends a mess in the first presidential debate between Donald Trump and Joe Biden exhausting at times to listen to Littered with cross talk and bitter exchanges, not just between the candidates but also tension between the president and the moderator, Chris Wallace. The two men continue standing at the podium in the Hall of Case Western Reserve University and the Cleveland Clinic's Health education campus. In Cleveland, Ohio, the audience they're restricted duty Cove. It concerns the president joined on stage by his wife, The first lady and now Joe Biden, The former second lady has joined.

Trump Vice President Biden vice president Democrats President Pollwatch Cleveland Clinic Trump Philadelphia Donald Trump Hall of Case Western Reserve U Cleveland Western Reserve University Senator Kamala Harris Ohio Salt Lake City Mike Pence fraud
"western reserve university" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:32 min | 5 months ago

"western reserve university" Discussed on WTOP

"Joe Biden venue Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland. The moderator, Chris Wallace of Fox News, CBS News political analyst Leonard Steinhorn sums up what Former vice president Biden needs to accomplish if he's to emerge. The winner against President Trump Bottom line is this if Joe Biden stumbles and falters and doesn't have a response to the president's fuselage out of attacks It could be a very long night for him. But if the authentic Joe Biden comes out someone who's likeable but passionate about our country, someone who's will tow leaders Levin by his humility, someone who can relate to the lived experience of so many Americans. It will be a winning night for him and Turbo charged his candidacy just 35 days before the election. The debate airs at nine o'clock tonight, double d T O P will have special reports and team coverage and you can also watch and listen to the baby to the debate at w t o p dot com 3 32 new this afternoon, Joe Biden and running mate Kamala Harris just released their 2019 tax returns, posting them on the Biden campaign website. This comes a couple of days after the explosive New York Times report showing Sid and Trump paid little or no federal income tax is over the past 15 years. Last year, the former vice president and his wife, Jill, had more than a million dollars in taxable income and paid more than $300,000 in federal income taxes. Paris and her husband, Douglas am half earned more than three million last year and owed more than a million in taxes. And there's a follow up to the New York Times story about President Trump's finances. This time, it's focused in part on some Russian connections. The Times reports. Mr Trump licensed his name to bare rock group, a development company and says documents show bare rock pursued financial backing in Russia. Pay for hotels bearing the trump name. The Times reviewed one plan titled Russian Fee Agreement, which called for $50 million for three Trump Hotels in the U. S at CBS. White House correspondent Paula Read. Supreme Court nominee Amy Cockney. Barrett has started her goodwill tour on Capitol Hill in the building up to next month. Senate confirmation hearing President Trump's choice to replace Ruth Bader Ginsberg will meet with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and eight other key Republican senators. It's unclear whether she'll talk with many Democrats. Some Democratic senators who don't believe that justice should be confirmed this close to an election have said they won't meet with Barrett. Republicans are pushing for a confirmation vote before the November race up next on w..

Joe Biden Mr Trump vice president President Trump Hotels New York Times Ruth Bader Ginsberg Barrett Chris Wallace Senate Leonard Steinhorn Western Reserve University Cleveland The Times CBS News political analyst Mitch McConnell Supreme Court Turbo
First US presidential debate: What to watch for from Trump and Biden

WBZ Midday News

00:54 sec | 5 months ago

First US presidential debate: What to watch for from Trump and Biden

"Of the most watched presidential debates in history. President Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden debate tonight on the campus of Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland. A preview this hour from the AP saga. Madani. The first presidential debate could be a pivotal moment in an election year like no other with the nation facing multiple crises. HEALTH, political racial, The debate takes on more importance. The virus pandemics upended normal campaigning, but just how much importance Amid all the tumble, the race has stayed largely unchanged since Joe Biden sees the Democratic nomination. He holds a significant lead in national polls, and there are comparatively few undecided voters left. Meeting, President Trump has fewer than five weeks to change the narrative. Soccer Megane Washington Noise

President Trump Joe Biden Vice President Case Western Reserve Universit AP Cleveland
"western reserve university" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:06 min | 5 months ago

"western reserve university" Discussed on WTVN

"It's not rocket science. It's my computer career dot edu A former Pike County sheriff, pleading guilty to several felony charges. Charles Reader entered his plea Thursday and is awaiting sentencing. He was accused of stealing money seized during drug busts in order to feel his gambling addictions. Part of a plea deal, Rita will not be able to work as a peace officer or hold any public office in Ohio Thie, Ohio National Guard will be deployed during the upcoming presidential debate in Cleveland. President Trump and Democrat presidential nominee Joe Biden will meet September 29th. The Cleveland Clinic campus at case Western Reserve University Governor DeWine's calling up 300 Guard members to ensure quote a safe and secure environment for those attending the debate. Dr Joe Biden's coming to Ohio but only through a virtual visit, it was announced. The wife of current Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden will make a digital trip to Ohio on October 8th. There are currently no details on where or what her visible focus on Paul's president Trump's stop in Toledo on Monday Road to the White House by partisan condemnation of the president's continuing questioning of the American voting system. The Senate taking nearly immediate action, extraordinary move all unanimous vote, saying that there must be a transition of power that is peaceful, and it says there should be no disruptions. By the president or any person in power to overturn the will of the people. ABC is Jonathan Karl, the president and Joe Biden meat. In their first debate next week, Biden spokeswoman Kate Bedingfield playing it close to the vest on how they'll handle the president on opportunities to speak directly to American voters about his plans to I banned and built on the affordable care act about his plans to create jobs in the country, the president suggesting Biden is taking drugs. Somebody said, Oh, he won't do well at the debate. I said, I think you're wrong. He'll do fine. He's gonna do fine. Give him a big shot or something and he'll go out there. No indication Biden is taking energy boosting drugs. Richard Cancer ABC News Still ahead on news. First five tech trends from ABC News, BUSINESS News, Sports and more Mark Blazer show today at 3305..

Dr Joe Biden president President Trump Ohio ABC News Ohio National Guard Pike County ABC Charles Reader Cleveland Clinic Senate Cleveland Western Reserve University Jonathan Karl Governor DeWine Mark Blazer Rita Richard Cancer officer
"western reserve university" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:08 min | 5 months ago

"western reserve university" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Succinctly. But Jack Callahan, Fox News President, Trump, telling a campaign rally outside Pittsburgh Tuesday night opponent is against oil. Guns and God upcoming election, the most important in the country's history. Joe Bike not on the campaign trail Tuesday, his running mate, Kamala Harris, attending a roundtable meeting in Detroit and I both have a very strong and long standing commitment to organized labor, Tio what we need to do to always support collective bargaining. To work against rightto work long a week before the first presidential debate, the candidates now know what they'll be Asked about Fox News Sunday host Chris Wallace. We'll ask President Trump and former Vice President Biden about their records, the Supreme Court covert 19 race and violence in US cities in the integrity of the elections. The commission on Presidential Debates is released. The topic selected. Each of those segments will be 15 minutes in length. The first debate is next week. Tuesday, September 9th at case Western Reserve University in Cleveland Clinic in Ohio Boxes Jarod help around the House has voted overwhelmingly to approve a stopgap spending measure that will keep the government open through December. The 11th Spending authority would have expired at the end of the month. As the US passes 200,000 deaths blamed on the Corona virus, a report the FDA is typing the vaccine approval process. The Washington Post reports. The FDA is about to roll out tough new standards for any emergency authorization of a Corona virus vaccine, making it exceedingly difficult to get one cleared before Election Day. The higher standard, they're said to be an effort to boost public confidence back in May, polls showed 42% of adults would definitely get the vaccine and others 30% probably would. But this month, the number of definite was cut in half, too. Just two out of 10. That's Fox's Rick Leventhal. America is listening to Fox News. Tuesday, President Donald Trump and former radio 77 W A. B C. Brian Kilmeade entertaining and informative, They said. Well, why didn't you.

President Donald Trump Fox News FDA US President Vice President Kamala Harris Jack Callahan Pittsburgh Chris Wallace Fox Washington Post Brian Kilmeade Western Reserve University Joe Bike Cleveland Clinic Rick Leventhal Supreme Court
"western reserve university" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

AM 1350 WEZS

01:59 min | 5 months ago

"western reserve university" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

"Opponent is against oil. Guns and God, the upcoming election, the most important in the country's history. Joe Bike, not on the campaign trail Tuesday, his running mate, Kamala Harris, attending a roundtable meeting in Detroit and I both have a very strong and long standing commitment to organized labor. What we need to do to always support collective bargaining to work against rightto work long a week before the first presidential debate, with candidates now know what they'll be Asked about Fox News Sunday host Chris Wallace. We'll ask President Trump and former Vice President Biden about their records, the Supreme Court covert 19 race and violence in US cities in the integrity of the elections. The commission on Presidential Debates is released. The topic selected. Each of those segments will be 15 minutes in length. The first debate is next week. Tuesday, September 9th at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland Clinic in Ohio Boxes Jarod help around the House who's voted overwhelmingly to approve a stopgap spending measure that will keep the government open through December. The 11th Spending authority would have expired at the end of the month. As the US passes 200,000 deaths blamed on the Corona virus, a report the FDA is typing the vaccine approval process. The Washington Post reports. The FDA is about to roll out tough new standards for any emergency authorization of a Corona virus vaccine, making it exceedingly difficult to get one cleared before Election Day. The higher standard, they're said to be an effort to boost public confidence back in May, polls showed 42% of adults would definitely get the vaccine and others 30% probably would. But this month, the number of definite was cut in half, too. Just two out of 10. That's Fox's Rick Leventhal. America is listening to Fox News. Tuesday, President Donald Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden face off in an epic showdown to decide the future of our nation..

President Donald Trump Vice President Joe Biden Fox News US FDA Kamala Harris Joe Bike Case Western Reserve Universit Chris Wallace Fox Rick Leventhal Washington Post Cleveland Clinic Detroit Supreme Court Ohio America
Why Do Balloons Stick To Our Hair?

BrainStuff

03:17 min | 7 months ago

Why Do Balloons Stick To Our Hair?

"Why do balloons stick to our hair? Brain stuff is Christian Sagar here when you were a kid, did you ever rub a balloon really fast against your hair to make it stick what about as an adult well, after many years of speculation Case Western Reserve University scientists have pinpointed exactly why this party trick happens. We've known forever that when two objects are rubbed against each other, there's a build up of an electrical charge called static electricity or tribe electric charging. If the two objects have opposite charges positive and negative, they'll stick together but some objects appear to charge more or stick more closely together than others like the balloon on your hair now wise that according. To a new study published in the Journal Physical Review Materials. The crux of the phenomenon lies in how strained the balloon material is for the purpose of this study, the scientists stretched a film of Polly tetrafluoroethane the lean let's call it p. t. f. e. for now that's one of the brand names. For Teflon, they took that and they rubbed it against a film of unstrained unstretched PTSD and they found that even though the materials were chemically identical, they generated charge transfer in one direction as if they had two different chemical compositions, the stretched or strange sheet carried the positive charge. Well, the unstrained sheet carried a negative charge. The more strained the material was the more likely. It was to experience systematic charge transfer. This is because the micro structure of the material was altered when strain leading to tiny holes and cracks. These imperfections allowed the rubbing induced friction to facilitate charge transfer leading to static electricity in a press release. Co Author Dan Lacks explained that they think the void regions in the fibers are tiny cell fibers. They think that those were strained when the polymer had different bonding and thus a charge that was different. The researchers also examined the phenomenon using packing peanuts which just love to stick to people's arms. In fact, polystyrene peanuts and plastic bags are currently being closely examined to give us a better understanding of static. Electricity Ideally, scientists will nail it down. So precisely that they will be able to control it, helping to prevent tribe electric explosions such as explosions of coal dust in mines and develop more effective products. For example, pesticides that will stick better to plants or paints that will stick better to cars. It may not seem that dangerous but in fact, static electricity can ignite fuel vapors at the gas pump causing fire to avoid such a catastrophe try not to get back in the car after you start the fueling process because sliding across the seat generates static electricity. If you must re enter your vehicle, be sure to ground yourself I when you get back out by touching the metal part of your car door.

Journal Physical Review Materi Dan Lacks Christian Sagar Western Reserve University Ptsd Polly Tetrafluoroethane
US presidential election: Debate venue moved over Covid precautions

News, Traffic and Weather

00:27 sec | 7 months ago

US presidential election: Debate venue moved over Covid precautions

"Presidential debate has been changed. The Commission on Presidential Debates announced. The University of Notre Dame has withdrawn from hosting the first presidential debate on September 29th. Instead, that debate will be hosted by case Western Reserve University. And the Cleveland Clinic in Cleveland, Ohio. Case. Western Reserve University hosted the 2000 for vice presidential debate. The second presidential debate is scheduled for Miami on October 15th. The third will be held in Nashville. October 22nd. Ryan Burrow

Western Reserve University University Of Notre Dame Cleveland Clinic Ryan Burrow Cleveland Ohio Nashville Miami
Notre Dame withdraws from hosting first presidential debate because of COVID-19 constraints

Robert Pratt

00:29 sec | 7 months ago

Notre Dame withdraws from hosting first presidential debate because of COVID-19 constraints

"Virus outbreak has caused the University of Notre Dame to withdraw as host of the 1st 2020 U. S presidential debate scheduled for September 29th. If the event happens, it will be moved to Cleveland and be co hosted by case Western Reserve University and the Cleveland Clinic in June. The University of Michigan bowed out of the second presidential debate on October 15th. It's been moved to Miami 1/3 presidential debate has been scheduled for October 22nd in Nashville, Tennessee.

University Of Notre Dame Western Reserve University Cleveland Clinic University Of Michigan Cleveland Outbreak Nashville Tennessee Miami
Iran scientist acquitted in US trade secrets case deported

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 9 months ago

Iran scientist acquitted in US trade secrets case deported

"Askari ka been invited in April twenty sixteen accused by federal prosecutors of trying to steal secret research from Case Western Reserve University the Cleveland school have been working on a project to create and produce anti corrosive stainless steel the scientist ultimately was acquitted in November after a U. S. District tossed out the case by the prosecutors the release comes as the US under president Donald Trump continues a maximum pressure campaign targeting Iran off the unilateral during from Tehran's nuclear deal with world powers in may twenty eighteen I'm Charles de Ledesma

Cleveland School Scientist U. S. District United States Donald Trump Iran Tehran Charles De Ledesma Case Western Reserve Universit President Trump
Can Red Flag Laws Help Prevent Mass Shootings?

BrainStuff

06:53 min | 1 year ago

Can Red Flag Laws Help Prevent Mass Shootings?

"Today's episode is brought to you by Lexus. You at Lexus. Their greatest curiosity is you because the most amazing machines aren't inspired by machines they're inspired by Dole that's why Lexus asks different questions better questions more human questions like can you see with your ears and the answers are as inspiring as you are which allowing the police to take guns away from people who judge finds dangerous that included ninety four percent of Democrats eighty five percents Republicans and eighty two percent of independent unspoiled this August even President Donald Trump who otherwise mostly has been an opponent of gun control indicated his support for Red Flag laws traumatic end not permanent so far red flag laws have been enacted by seventeen states plus the district Columbia in Florida where a red flag laws medicine is an example of what many advocate as a way to prevent the mass shootings that have increasingly plagued the United States red flag laws are designed to get mental illness or other factors that might show up in the federal instant background check system and prevent the person from buying a gun from a dealer in the first place the problem is that loopholes it as potentially being a threat to themselves or other people police and courts would have the authority to remove firearms according to Flannery Red Flag Laws on people who have felony criminal record or mental health record those rules are too narrow and too broad they identify lots of people because they had an involuntary commitment. We spoke with Jeffrey Swanson a professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University School of Medicine he said we focused all his attention on the point of sale on the other side the National Rifle Association's website criticizes existing Red Flag Laws as violating gun owners Second Amendment Rights Civil Rights and second described scary situation an employee allegedly had confided to a CO worker that if he was fired from his job he would shoot supervisor and other employees though he would warn the eighty five years ago and wouldn't hurt anybody in the also failed to identify people who do pose a risk we also spoke with Daniel J flannery director of the having to charge the employees with the crime the cops obtained a court order and the next day seized five firearms the Court subsequently issued another order allowing authorities introduction of iheartradio hey brain stuff lauren bogle bomb here in California the manager of a car dealership contacted police and worker in advance so the CO worker could escape thanks to the red flag law the California enacted in two thousand fourteen the police could take action in this case right away without on emissions in state records submitted to the background check system have often enabled people who went onto become mass shooters to obtain guns even when they should have been disqualified begun center for Violence Prevention Research and education at Case Western Reserve University he said this is about putting protocols in place so that when an individual is identify them having guns poses a risk and the person has an opportunity to get the weapons back at some point a flannery said there's due process to that so that it's not authorities away to intervene and take guns away from a person who's perceived as a possible threat they can do that even if the person doesn't have a criminal record or a history of being institutionalized destroy a middle ground between protecting public safety and individual rights a person who's flagged isn't arrested or charged with a crime and authorities have to be able to convince a judge that did some strong public support a Washington Post and ABC News poll conducted in early of September two thousand nineteen for example found that eighty six percent of Americans supported enacted in two thousand eighteen in the weight of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting authorities have utilized it to take guns away for more than two thousand people red flag laws have attract to hold onto the weapons for a year that case described an article by University of California Davis researchers that was published in August of two thousand nineteen in the journal Ause of internal Edmund advocates that are against red flag laws say the seizures of these individuals weapons is a violation of the constitutions guaranteed due process which means the people should have the right to argue their case in court before their guns are taken not after and whether or not red flag laws do much to prevent mass shootings is difficult question to answer the study we mentioned that the of this episode conducted by the UC Davis researchers cited twenty-one cases in California in which a court issued an order to seize guns quote after the subject of the order had made a clear declaration of intent to commit a bash shooting or had exhibited behavior suggesting such an intent but it's not really possible all to prove conclusively that any of the individuals actually would have committed such an act Swanson wrote in Washington Post opinion piece that red flag laws aren't necessary early going to prevent killings by mass shooters except in instances in which alerts citizen notices that an angry young man is amassing an arsenal nevertheless Swanson's imports such laws because he and other researchers have found strong evidence that they reduce another sort of gun violence the cumulatively Inflicts Much Higher Death Poll Suicide by firearm in two thousand seventeen he colleagues calculated that for every twenty guns seized through Red Flag Law one suicide is prevented preventing people with the missile to develop suicidal idealization from getting guns does save lives because research shows that people who attempt suicide by other methods and up surviving eighty to ninety percent of the time but with a gun they're effective at killing themselves almost all of the time Swanson said from the picture of public health that's good enough reason for red flag laws today's episode was written by Patrick Jake Hager and produced by Tyler Clang brain stuff is a production of iheartradio's has it shows works for more on this and lots of other topics visit our home planet how stuff works dot Com and for more podcast my heart radio visit radio APP apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your hello this is Julie Rieger author of the goes talker and Co host of insider's guide to the other side and I'm Brenda I may not have written a book but I mean Julie's book and you are the most gifted on the planet on insiders they leave you with one question. What amazing ideas will you inspire next discover the answers Lexus dot com slash curiosity? We'll come to brainstorm due to the other side launches on October sixteen in every Wednesday after that listen to insiders guide to the other side on the iheartradio

Lexus Jeffrey Swanson President Donald Trump Duke University School Of Medi United States Columbia Florida Flannery Dole Professor Of Psychiatry And Be Democrats Republicans Ninety Four Percent Eighty Six Percent Eighty Two Percent Eighty Five Years Ninety Percent
Even In The Robot Age, Manufacturers Need The Human Touch

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:53 min | 2 years ago

Even In The Robot Age, Manufacturers Need The Human Touch

"Support for NPR comes from investor dot gov. Presenting this message when it comes to investing. We all have questions and investor dot gov has answers, it's your free resource for tools. Tips and information about investing before you. Invest investor dot gov. Well, bots have revolutionized auto manufacturing. But they've hardly replaced the human touch and Pierce cumulative domino ski reports. And volvo's. New plant and ridgeville, South Carolina. A half dozen robot arms move in coordination behind a sif defense their spot welding cars body together. Eventually, this will be an Esa sixty a luxury sedan. A small cluster of sparks flies up. We are at the very start of the production line. Were metal components are combined to form the car's body here automation dominates. There are more robots than people in this building. And right here where the robots are welding roofs, together, it's dimly lit robots. Don't need much light to work. Jeff Moore is the head of manufacturing for Volvo in America. He says when you're thinking about what jobs to assigned to a robot you start with work. That's repetitive. Especially if there are safety concerns with all the the heat and sparks and the high current and things like that associated with welding that's a natural spot to be looking at where you can more heavily automate but follow the car body is moves down the assembly line and soon enough the lights come up and humans takeover at the other end of this building people run their hands over the surface of the metal healing for imperfections. There are some things robots are better at than people their precise and consistent. But there are other things. People are better at humans are underrated. Tesla CEO Elon Musk tweeted last year after tesla tried to switch to an extremely automated system. Ultimately, the company gave jobs back to people and we're good at more than just testing. How things look and feel here at the Volvo plant in another vast building a long line of people are preparing engines to go inside the cars, this work involves a lot of fiddly parts with odd shapes which need to be threaded together or moved around in complex ways, robots are bad at these fine motor skills. People are great at it. And this line handles, different engines gas or hybrid all wheel drive, eventually electric Motors. They all take different parts, humans are good. Switching back and forth. Robots? Not so much Jason dodgems working on this line used to work at a plant that made bearings. That was less hands on. He says. The actual labor party. You were basically doing the inspection. This has a lot more manual labor to problem solving. Skip ahead down the line and workers have put together the engine transmission axles, everything to make the car go. The car body is waiting on an elevated conveyor. Now, the two need to come together. Trae yawns helped set up blind where this marriage happens. It just radiator is not pushed back for. No, it will crash the body and first workers had to fix the placement again. And again now a robot could see that problem, but it won't get annoyed by it. People got tired of doing it in a fellow came up with an idea, and he points to a little yellow piece of plastic it holds the radiator in place to prevent that crash Geoff Moore says Volvo has already applied for multiple patents based on ideas that teams from workers at this new plant. Humans have strengths compared to robots and all sorts of workplaces not just auto plants and in general people in robots work best together with robots handling dangerous, monotonous jobs and precision work while people switch between tasks and make decisions, and there's a sort of philosophical lesson here. Susan helper is an economist at case Western Reserve University. People often think of manufacturing workers is actually a poor substitute for a robot people complain, they get tired, so gee, wouldn't robust be better. That's a fundamental misunderstanding. She says, but in practice, these things are really difficult and the assembly line worker is making judgments a lot. And it turns out that when you take that person away you end up with some problems that are hard to solve historically helper. Says some factories have tried to treat their workers like robots doing repetitive work without thinking the best thing robots can do is not replace. People but free them up to work like people domino. Sqi NPR news. Ridgeville carolina.

Volvo DOT Jeff Moore Assembly Line Worker Jason Dodgems South Carolina NPR Pierce Ridgeville Carolina Tesla Geoff Moore Elon Musk Trae Western Reserve University America CEO Susan
"western reserve university" Discussed on A Moment of Science

A Moment of Science

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"western reserve university" Discussed on A Moment of Science

"Time to go again to the moment of science. Mailbag a listener writes dear moment of science. Why do chimps and gorillas walk on their knuckles and do any other animals? Do this group questions? The answer to the second question is no Timpson guerillas are the only creatures that walk on their knuckles as to why they do this. That's something that's puzzled researchers for years. But scientists at case Western Reserve University seem to have found an answer. The gist is that the apes evolved to both climb trees and get around on ground according to Newton's laws of motion every action as an equal and opposite reaction. So when Shimpson guerrillas walk on the ground, the ground push back up and their bodies simply aren't constructed to handle that energy, right? Chimps and gorillas have long arms, short legs, stiff upright back. Ax torsos shaped like cones and flat feet. That's great for climbing trees, but not so great for walking using only their feet, their fluffy make walking difficult, which is why they use their knuckles, which work like shock absorbers to deal with the energy of the ground pushing up. Plus their cone shaped bodies allow for fishing shoulder rotation, which also helps absorb energy when the apes travel on the ground reunions, of course of arched feet, which is why we're able to walk long distances without damaging feet, just like eight knuckles, like shock absorbers, our foot arches do the same. This moment of science comes from Indiana University. There, hundreds more moments of science on our website at a moment and science dot org, or you can also view videos and sign up for podcasts. I'm Don glass and I'm yeah, Cassandra.

Western Reserve University Don glass Indiana University Shimpson Newton
"western reserve university" Discussed on CBC Radio - Spark

CBC Radio - Spark

03:07 min | 2 years ago

"western reserve university" Discussed on CBC Radio - Spark

"Internet connected speakers, powered by digital assistance, like Amazon's echo Google home and apples home pot, and then they're all the other smart things in our homes, the smart thermostat, the internet connected kettle or the wifi bathroom scale? Yes, it's a thing, but here's the issue. The devices aren't just stand alone objects. They have software software that needs to be updated terms of service that might change. And that means you have an ongoing relationship with the company you bought your device from. So how big is shift is this trend? I think this is a really fundamental shift. Well, okay, then this is Erin, prisoner escape. He's a law profit case Western Reserve University in Cleveland. He's also the co author of the end of ownership about how personal property is changing in our internet of things. E world, Aaron argues that we've gone from buying stand-alone objects that we could do as we liked with two objects that are soft. Wear and internet enabled. And now I think the line between products and services has become incredibly blurry. Aaron makes a compelling case that we need to figure out what personal property means a digital era. When things are also services. Are there examples that you've seen that you consider particularly telling or particularly agrees? The one that comes to mind that was just a few years back when a company called nest, which is owned by Google, decided that a home automation hub that they sold a product called the revolve was a product. They were no longer interested in making no longer interested in supporting, and they sent out a message to the owners of these devices that on a certain date in the future, they simply wouldn't work anymore. The company simply expected consumers to deal with this in. Convenience, right? This product that they bought for three hundred dollars or so was essentially turned into an expensive paperweight. It seems like now we have this. I have to say in the infinitive full disclosure, I have a Sonos system, so I'm partly invested in this kind of thing that there's a sense of kind of I don't know, moral outrage on about this, but do you think that's a sign of a temporary shift as we just don't conceive of these things in terms of their new relationship, we're still thinking of them in in terms of the way we used to think about when you would buy a hammer or whatever. The question is whether those isolated incidents of outrage translate into some broader pushback, either in the marketplace or through some changes in the law to give consumers the kind of control that they expect over the devices that they buy. My focus for the last few years has really been to bring as much attention to these kinds of questions as possible. So that consumers under. Stand the the bigger picture here, not just the one device that they own that may be affected, but how this impacts the broader marketplace for consumer goods? Yeah..

Western Reserve University Google Aaron Amazon Cleveland three hundred dollars
"western reserve university" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

04:00 min | 2 years ago

"western reserve university" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Case western reserve university school of law and he joins us on the phone now jonathan i i thank you so much for joining us and i really appreciated the piece that you that you had published yesterday night tweeted it out because you explored some of kavanagh's previous opinions and and some of some of his other writings and i've had a really good insight because he has a lot of unlike maybe perhaps some of the other nominees this particular nominee has quite the paper trail and i love that you you kind of laid it all out for some initially what do you think that this was a slam dunk in terms of of the selection is this the best nominee the president could have chosen i think when you have highly qualified nominees like the president was considering deciding which one was the absolute best is hard but i think there's no question this is a very solid choice and especially given the priority this administration at placed on trying to tame the administrative state having a judge who spent the last twelve years on the dc circuit writing over one hundred opinions involving administrative law that's kind of choice you want if you care about making sure that federal agencies play by the rules and don't exceed their authority so in that respect you know incredibly strong choice and he's from what i understand a very strict textualist which might a i think in maybe perhaps some of his opinions that might and i talked about this a little bit earlier it i think it might pose a problem for some conservatives for instance when i think it was the his case where it concerned obamacare when he was discussing the mandate and when he was discussing at at birth control and and and access to contraception things of that issue but is it fair to say then that was the seven sky beholder is it fair to say that i think that some on the right one to have it both ways wherein they they want a strict constitutionalists someone who keeps to the letter of the text escalated but yet at the same time they seemingly also want them to legislate from the bench on issues that they feel vitally important which in which are sure i mean we'd all love to have our cake and eat it too we wanted the judges to apply the right method and we certainly hope that they reach results that we as well but and and someone like touch cavenaugh we have someone that's really in the former category when it comes to the laws that congress passes congress passes a bad law and he's asked to apply it he's going to apply it he's not gonna do congress's job for it and i think that's what we want to judge legislators should legislate judges should adjudicate and keyshawn the dc circuit that when it comes to federal regulatory agencies in particular he spends the time to to read the statute that congress and acts and is he agencies are playing by the rules and and doing what congress gives them the power to do he lets him go and if if they're not if they're cutting corners if they're trying to their power beyond what congress said they could do he's very quick to to strike that down and i think that's i think that's what you want out of a judge right in the sense that that's what that's the job the judges have and if it turns out that congress rota cockamamie statute which we know congress sometimes does then it's it's congress's job to fix that right well and for instance with the with the garza versus horrigan that was the two thousand seventeen the illegal immigrant who wanted to obtain an abortion and he actually cited although he i thought his what he wrote was very interesting but he he said that the majority of decision was inconsistent but at the same time he was just as as you were saying he was operating within the the the.

western reserve university sch twelve years
"western reserve university" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

03:39 min | 2 years ago

"western reserve university" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Case western reserve university school of law and he joins us on the phone now jonathan i i thank you so much for joining us and i really appreciated the piece that you that you had published yesterday night tweeted it out because you explored some of kavanagh's previous opinions and and some of some of his other writings and i had a really good insight because he has a lot of unlike maybe perhaps some of the other nominees this particular nominee has quite the paper trail and i i love that you you kind of laid it all out for us initially what do you think that this was a slam dunk in terms of the selection is this the best nominee the president could have chosen you i think when you have highly qualified nominees like the president was considering deciding which one was the absolute best is hard but i think there's no question this is a very solid choice and especially given the priority this administration has placed on trying to tame the administrative state having a judge who spent the last twelve years on the dc circuit writing over one hundred opinions walls and you'd ministry of law that's the kind of choice you want if you care about making sure that federal agencies play by the rules and don't exceed their authority so in that respect incredibly strong choice and he's from what i understand a very strict textualist which might i think in maybe perhaps some of his opinions that might and i talked about this a little bit earlier i think it might pose a problem for some conservatives for instance when i think it was the his case where it concerned obamacare when he was discussing the mandate and when he was discussing at at birth control and an access to contraception things of that issue but is it fair to say then that was seven sky beholder is it fair to say that i think that some on the right one to have it both ways wherein they they want a strict constitutionalists someone who keeps to the letter of the text escalated but yet at the same time they seemingly also want them to legislate from the bench on issues that they feel vitally important which in in which are sure i mean we we'd all love to have are taking you to we wanted the judges to apply the right message and we certainly hope that they reach results that we like as well but and and someone like touch cavenaugh we have someone that's really in the former category when it comes to the laws that congress passes congress passes a bad law and he's asked to apply it he's going to apply it he's not gonna do congress's job for it and i think that's one the judge legislators should legislate judges and keeshond on the dc circuit that when it comes to federal regulatory agencies in particular he spends the time to to read the statute that congress and acts and is he agencies are playing by the rules and doing what congress gave them the power to do you let go and if if they're not if they're cutting corners if they're trying to expand their power beyond what congress said they could do he's very quick to to strike that down and i i think that's i think that's what you want out of a judge right that's what that's the job the judge's has and if it turns out that congress a cockamamie statue which we know congress sometimes does then it's it's congress's job to fix that right well for instance with the with the garza versus hardin that was the two thousand seventeen the legal immigrant who wanted to obtain an abortion and he act actually cited i mean although he i thought his what he wrote was very interesting but he he said that the majority's decision was inconsistent but at the same time he was just as as you were saying he was operating within the the the.

western reserve university sch twelve years
"western reserve university" Discussed on Freedom 95 Radio

Freedom 95 Radio

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"western reserve university" Discussed on Freedom 95 Radio

"Development and more recently to help advance stem cell research and treatments researchers typically take tissue samples from fetus that has been aborted they under conditions permitted by law and grow south calls from the tissues in the petri dish again this has been going on now close to one hundred years that we've been using aborted fetal tissue right because of course it has to be aborted because how else would you get this fetal tissue they say many of the uses of the fetal tissue and much of the debate are not new it's just knew that the public is finding out about it and this is from an associated professor of bioethics in western reserve university so again i want wanna say many of the uses of fetal tissue and much of the debate are not new he states it's just at the public is finding out about it this is big because again the video that's putting planned parenthood on defense is that people are trying to buy that planned parenthood is selling this aborted fetal tissue but again this has been going on for hundreds of years so if your brought back by this you're completely appalled so you're appalled because your just finding out about this but again these have been in things aborted fetal tissue have been vaccines for decades this is not new you're just finding out about it the cnn article goes on to talk about how one of the earliest advances with fetal tissue was used was used to the fetal kidney cells were to create the poliovirus.

professor western reserve university cnn one hundred years
"western reserve university" Discussed on Talk Radio WPHT 1210

Talk Radio WPHT 1210

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"western reserve university" Discussed on Talk Radio WPHT 1210

"Two thousand sixteen election i told you about the courts kids as also the reason why they still hate him and want to come after me they'll never stop it will never stop somebody said to me the other day they go you know if anybody can win those democrats over to his side it'll be trump if they get the majority no no no no it's not about that not about him it's them they are inside dying over this you don't hear about it in the news you hear about this show but they're dying on the inside knowing the federal judiciary is being remade for the next fifty years it's killing him it's killing them because the courts where they go to get all the stuff that congress can't pass for them the high degree of competence and proficiency the administration has brought to this task is hard to reconcile with the haphazard and not always fully competent handling of lots of other issues by the administration said jonathan adler a professor at case western reserve university school of law any federalist society member who praised trump's judicial picks as unexpectedly strong in two thousand sixteen adler signed a letter titled originalists against trump with five dozen fellow conservatives who argue that trump admires dictators is above the law and cannot be trusted to respect the constitution today professor adler says he was very wrong when it comes to trump's judicial selections some conservatives believe it will be trump's biggest legacy quotes from mark meadows of the freedom caucus his greatest achievement will be the judicial nominees because it is a much longer lasting legacy than any of his other actions he gets an a plus for his nominations have a number that have been confirmed so far this is a.

congress jonathan adler professor trump mark meadows western reserve university sch fifty years
"western reserve university" Discussed on Freedom 95 Radio

Freedom 95 Radio

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"western reserve university" Discussed on Freedom 95 Radio

"For vaccine development and more recently to help advance stem cell research and treatments researchers typically take tissue samples from a fetus that has been aborted they say under conditions permitted by law and gross out cells from the tissues in the petri dish so again this has been going on now close to one hundred years that we've been using aborted fetal tissue right because of course it has to be aborted because how else would you get this fetal tissue they say many of the uses of the fetal tissue and much of the debate are not new it's just knew that the public is finding out about it and this is from an associated professor of bioethics in western reserve university so again i want to say many of the uses of fetal tissue and much of the debate are not new he states it's just that the public is finding out about it this is big because again the video that's putting planned parenthood on defense is that people are trying to buy the planned parenthood is selling this aborted fetal tissue but again this has been going on for years so if your brought back by completely appalled so europol appalled because your just finding out about this but again these have been aborted fetal tissue have been in vaccines for decades this is not new you're just finding out about it the cnn article goes on to talk about how one of the earliest advances with fetal tissue was used was used to the fetal kidney cells were to create the poliovirus.

professor western reserve university cnn one hundred years
"western reserve university" Discussed on WBAL 1090AM

WBAL 1090AM

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"western reserve university" Discussed on WBAL 1090AM

"And their faculty and students that's really what it comes down to let's go to david in baltimore david you're on wbal hi i went to a school in cleveland ohio case western reserve university is very similar the job i do have their own police force and as far as being a more safe i really didn't notice that much difference but one thing about the schools in maryland i know that happens and morgan and and copying they never in the past have included the communities around them in their point is they always try to use the weight with the legislature to fully so to speak their will upon the community and this may be some vestige of the practices that they've done in the past it's it's typical of all of the schools well that's clearly what some are trying to say here david and i do understand that you have to work in concert and the plan was i think to work closer to me my dream is that schools like hopkins and the other schools do develop either really good security forces and they'll have some security forces but i mean really good ones or police force if they want to go down that road and in the sun article a loyal and notre dame said they're not looking to do that so in my dream world though there be either the schools having their own police forces or really good security forces and they're working closely with a baltimore city police very closely and all these neighborhoods securities that are popping up which again i think it's the greatest compliment to baltimore all these neighbors securities popping up they're also working with the baltimore police in the working with each other and they're working with each other then you can really get some things done and you can react quicker more is out there looking for things more notifications to me this is a dream this is a good thing for one zero four six seven wbal certainly takes a lot of weight off the baltimore police and that's why they're in favor of it and that's why the mayor's in favor of it they get it i really don't have a good argument i have seen yet against it other than some people's feelings were they didn't work closely with them four one zero four six seven wbal text us foreign zero four six seven nine two to five much more.

cleveland western reserve university maryland morgan david baltimore ohio
"western reserve university" Discussed on The Peggy Smedley Show

The Peggy Smedley Show

01:39 min | 4 years ago

"western reserve university" Discussed on The Peggy Smedley Show

"What could be prepared for the more connected world your host you smart pillow a damn welcome back to the peggy smedley show mike final gas today has been leading new research in alternative energy and in the process has secured some major deal tnt funding has published a hundred scientific publications and granted to patten's her expertise and thermal energy transport has enabled her to be a valuable asset in many organisations as well as the united states department of energy please welcome alexis abramson meld then tame are malls professor in energy innovation mechanical in the aerospace engineering at case western reserve university alexis welcome to the show thank you for having me so alexis we've had some amazing women today just talking about how they advanced in their careers in an have been named the women of i tina md am and i wanted to really have another professor on the show who really has advanced and understand the internet of things in influencing some of the sectors in you are just you that bill so well so let's in a little bit about they yes thank you as well for being here so let's talk about that how is i o t when we talk about all these things and you've done so much in your career is really amazing to understand how was i o t influencing let's talk about like energy and things will we talk about arrests and you've advanced your career and you understand what you've done.

alternative energy professor aerospace engineering peggy smedley tnt patten united states