18 Burst results for "western Sydney University"

"western sydney university" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

04:37 min | 2 months ago

"western sydney university" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"Even before president trump fired this country's top cyber security official last night for truthfully saying there was no fraud or software glitches that cost the president votes in the election. He lost even before that cybersecurity experts had been warning that the presidential transition period is a huge opportunity for hackers. Governments of course aren't alone in their vulnerabilities companies around the world. Continue to get hit by ransomware. Their computer systems infiltrated critical. Data locked up. ransom demanded. Funny thing happened not too long ago. Though one ransomware group took some of its proceeds and gave them to charity. Hackers maybe with a heart mono here's got about a month ago cyber security consultant brett callow at the firm mc soft emailed me a screen shot from the dark web. It showed the hacker group dark side posting receipts of ten thousand dollar donations to charities when for children the other for clean water. Nice stay said that play felt. It was only fair that they return some family that i had taken to charities have had you think kobuk is. We pleased tonight. It'll be held to change. Someone's life dark side talks to the public through blog posts in the dark web to be clear. This is a criminal outfit. But it's one of several trying to brand itself as on me sound a similar group which is not been named publicly recently hacked into a company locked up its data but then quickly reversed course. Investigators say the ransomware group responsible supplied decryption key. As soon as they would total. it's a hostile. This was in germany. Now bad people do seemingly good things in the offline world to this old newsreel shows men coming out of a depression era soup kitchen in chicago. Funded by the mobster. Al capone and so on a sunday and a very hot in japan. Violent organized crime groups gave sonam relief in twenty eleven and right now says social psychologists travaglino at the university of kent. Italian syndicates are providing pandemic aid. They're report from the europe which says the mafia in italy at the moment. Is this money. Supporting relation through the knockdowns. They ensure that everyone can eat. Travaglino says that kind of generosity serves the criminal enterprise by buying off the community the mafia the function around a rule. Which is the needs known as amish. Da which means rule of silence. You never report the police. they do. For example you never denounced them and that's really important for them to operate because they need the kind of level of public support and to get that support. Some cyber groups work to appear customer-friendly while committing their crimes. Like in that movie. La story from the ninety s. the two main characters chitchatting when a pleasant man with a gun approaches. Bob thank you very much. Cyber analysts catalysts. Act nice thinking that they're victims will come lee fork over the money. They have guaranteed response. Dawn's last services speedy polite that decryption to come with a guarantee that they will work. It's hard to know the actual motivations in any one particular case but atlanta more shot professor of cyber security at western sydney university in australia has interviewed many hackers in the course of her research when we were doing some interviews with people in in eastern europe than in russia the people in question perceived themselves to be like robin hood stealing from the rich to give to the poor. It's a way for crooks to appease their consciences she says in fact some even clean up and organiz victims files as they rip them off to be clear many are not buying this court. Altruism one nonprofit that the dark.

europe Travaglino president trump robin hood Al capone ransomware fraud brett callow chicago sonam consultant Dawn official university of kent italy germany western sydney university atlanta
"western sydney university" Discussed on Think: Sustainability

Think: Sustainability

03:24 min | 7 months ago

"western sydney university" Discussed on Think: Sustainability

"The bishop. Research with western Sydney University found that the Community Greening Program Reduces People's anxiety and stress helps form a sense of pride and belonging and motivates people to eat healthier probably since nineteen seventy. This is win. The evidence started now.

western Sydney University
"western sydney university" Discussed on The Philosopher's Zone

The Philosopher's Zone

08:11 min | 8 months ago

"western sydney university" Discussed on The Philosopher's Zone

"Of thinking about Participatory Planning as a speech act. That's working towards consensus. And start to think about participatory planning as a place where people might not agree with each other. Because there are inherent power imbalances between residents governments developers and others so she builds on a tradition coming from CAL Schmidt which sets up the normal state of affairs as an stem relation between friends and enemies and so she caused this the realm of antagonism and she says this is a normal thing. Okay that actually. We do disagree that actually we persistently disagree that you can't reason it away and this is basically what move calls the blind spot of Liberalism. Ikat actually deal with the fact that there's a persistent antagonism that's always potentially emergent in the social realm central to this idea is the fact that we're not liberal individuals. Actually our identity is constituted by. What's outside us? She calls a constituent of outside and so the US them relationship which comes from Schmidt at tradition. The stem relationship is the reason that we have antagonism. As a potential you are defined by. What's happening outside you? They reason our stem relationship. They there's always the potential for antagonism to occur again. Copy reason to why so this Rome of antagonism. She sees it as unproductive enemies. We're not gonNA get anything done but the reality is we do get stuff done so there is a kind of consensus. That's happening out there. But her critique of liberalism says that there's a a an ignoring of the white power talks this it centrally sit around rational argumentation. Shantelle move in her ideas of agonists pluralism says that. Okay fine You've come together you've had your discussion you walk away and you dissatisfied and that's normal so if we accept this climb that people fundamentally disagree with this idea that comes from Schmidt and in a foam is not uncontentious but if we accept this idea that people would disagree with each other in community participation processes doesn't they shutdown dialogue to bite and our ability to compromise. What does this mean for building city with antagonism at the center and so if a move she's got this idea of antagonism? That says that we've got an Austin relationship. There are Power Relations Day. That we need to accountable. And she does this through a Neo. Marxist guys went with her Jamie which is the ID that things settle around and arrangement of power. Okay I and saw a social outcome. Is it in and of itself? A kind of consensus. Can you give me an example of we talk about the process of building a thirty year plan around Sydney? The ultimate outcome which is gone through lots of drafts which is an inclusive process is settled it's printed. It's online it's Day. That is a hegemonic outcome instead of thinking about it as a rational consensus seeking process. She sees it. As a result of an arrangement of power and discourse that has resulted in a consensus that is contingent. It's only gonNa make sense until the next plan comes along and the next plan will be a new articulation of different types of players and actors and voices and so she sees. This is a much more productive way of thinking about democracy and that commitment to social action motoritss the antagonist to agam and so instead of thinking about the antagonism of enemies she thinks about the agony them of adversaries people who have a different idea but actually a committed to a social outcome. That actually was speak across difference in the mode of respect across difference so that they can actually achieve goals knowing that the other person wants something slightly different to them recognizing and respecting that and coming together to do that but they stay in the relationship in order to remain inside politics. Because you don't want to be cost out as an irrational acta that's that Idea of the sort of liberal rationality that. The system has so you're using move to conflict and the ever-present potential for antagonism between different groups of people and organizations at the center of the politics of development. And you're also using the to suggests that antagonism can be moderated to agonising and this will allow very diverse groups of people and organizations with very different views about the CD to actually achieve and oven planning outcome and this outcome could be a thirty metropolitan plan or could be a building and whatever the outcome whether it's a plan or a building. This is always going to be temporary. What to use your terminology contingent allow reminding plice until as a new rearrangement of power a reconstitution of that plan or building in the future. So would it be fair to say than that move was interested in the political philosophy of antagonism and agonisigly? But what you're interested in is how these ideas hit the ground in cities. I think that move is interested in how those ideas hit the ground in the city but just because the nature of the discussions that that happened within disciplines plays at a higher abstract level and it plays out at the scale of the nation state as well Which is a team of Plyer in thinking through you know democratic institutions coming from the social sites way more interested in you know the white people Opposition within this. So what we're doing is we're actually bringing together some ideas that we see build on What we say is a really strong political position. That move is put in place but that can org meant that gives more depth to understanding that and we're particularly interested in the types of motivations that people have when they are engaged in the politics of the city and specifically interested in the values that drive people's engagement so it's not that I'm against an economic solution. We have to have economic solutions. In this time of crisis it's about critical framing of that economic solution and the speed with which this is happening. Is you might say precludes a critical engagement. Just another bit of the red tape that gets in the why but instead of thinking about the voices of those entrenched actors that are producing particular type of economic rationality as an outcome. Perhaps we should think about a more. Socially viable said of outcomes investing in affordable housing rather than building apartments and so further going down. That path is not necessarily going to give us the social outcomes that we should be seeking to be underpinned by the economic initiatives and so by taking a wider view of value theory. Not just the economy that actually taking a moral framing we can actually contest these rational ideas of what the emergency should produce. We're in a time of crisis. We need to have outcomes but we need to be careful about what those outcomes are Cameron McAuliffe senior lecturer in Human Geography and Urban Studies of Western Sydney University. And you also heard crystal. Legacy senior lecturer in urban planning at the University of Melbourne Combat Story was produced by Dallas Raja's more info on the website. This has been the philosophy zone and you can find a spy the our website or the ABC listen so many programs available for streaming and download. We have a back catalog going back all the way to two thousand five. So there's a lot to discover their thanks for your company this week. I'm David Rutledge. Tweet me at David Peas on and I'll see you next time..

Schmidt us senior lecturer CAL Schmidt David Rutledge ABC Rome David Peas University of Melbourne Cameron McAuliffe Neo Sydney Jamie Austin plice Plyer Western Sydney University Dallas Raja
"western sydney university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:09 min | 11 months ago

"western sydney university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Day is not an option it's too expensive so was moving it's a struggle it's really a struggle you want to do things but that he just zaps it out of here heat waves as well as being a silent killer it's a social kill Lucinda Coates is a scientist with risk frontiers a private research center that focuses on natural hazards like bushfires cyclones and flooding about twenty years ago coats had the grim task of cataloging how many people each of those natural disasters have historically killed in Australia and that's when we first started thinking hang on a minute heat waves they seem to have killed more people than all the other natural hazards combined yes all other hazards combined with elderly people and the poor most at risk cook says it's too soon to know how many people may have died during this past summer's extreme heat but history it might provide a somber clue in nineteen thirty nine in two thousand nine Australia had devastating bushfires Black Friday eight and black Saturday as are now called both were preceded by heatwaves and does he waves a loan code says are each believed to have killed more than four hundred people the deadliest fire a hundred and seventy three is set twice as many as it's come to the bush fires but then he waves didn't get nearly the same attention it was all fire photos of crying families and singed teddy bears and you can see why they the news with the bush fire is a terrifying thing that heat waves how can you take a picture of a heat wave I've got a powerpoint presentation with this a young chap just holding a water bottle up and drinking out of the water and that's that's my picture of a heat wave so it's really hard to communicate the immediate danger and there's a fast growing need to communicate that danger a recent climb a report by the Australian government found the country has warmed by more than one degree Celsius just in the last century extreme heat events are increasing in frequency as is the risk of extreme fire and extreme flooding all of which has happened in Australia in just the last few months Sebastian fat which is a research fellow at western Sydney university who's focusing on climate change in urban heat everything's extreme it's exactly like how scientists for thirty years predict climate change to actually pan out and it's not twenty thirty or twenty fourteen to twenty fifteen anymore it's twenty twenty we have it it's happening Fouts says there are ways you can build for heat for example houses could be painted certain colors to reflect light green or living roofs could provide insulation houses could be built smaller with more room for trees and green space Australia is updating its national construction code in twenty twenty to an extreme heat is being considered in the changes but new coach would primarily be aimed at new buildings and the people most affected by heat tend to be folks like merry Khanyar living in older buildings that were designed long before bouts of extreme heat were much of a thought don't get me wrong I appreciate the roof I have as my head and being able to pay pay for it we'll do that but I think sometimes it's poor design but with public housing.

Australia's Extreme Heat

Environment: NPR

05:07 min | 11 months ago

Australia's Extreme Heat

"By and large are pretty direct people so it figures walking into Mary Con Yards House west of Sydney. She would get right to the point. Good how are you hot cooking here? It's about thirty eight degrees Celsius outside one hundred Fahrenheit which is relatively cool compared to what it's been like this frontal at least it keeps some of the heat out some not much. Three fans are humming in Conrad's living room. The lights are off to save money on electricity in con- yards banks cleaned to her forehead like she just got out of the shower. Just vacuumed ZANU. Coming and this is what happens to me. Lives in community housing a rental unit for lower income. People that's located in Greater West Sydney a fast growing part of the country's largest city that a few months ago held another distinction the hottest place on Earth about one hundred and twenty degrees Fahrenheit or as Conard puts it. It was hot and when its stinking hot door. Just you know hot hot like it is on this day. Conard like many people in West. Sydney has a really hard time running. The air conditioner. Day is not an option. It's too expensive so is moving. It's a struggle. It's really a struggle. You WanNa do things but the heat just zaps it out of you. Heat waves as well as being a silent killer. It's a social killer. Lucinda coats is a scientist with risk. Frontiers a private research center that focuses on natural hazards like bushfires cyclones and flooding about twenty years ago. Coats had the grim task of cataloging. How many people? Each of those natural disasters had historically killed in Australia. And that's when we first thinking hang on a minute hate wives. They seem to have killed more people than all the other natural hazards combined. Yes all other hazards combined with elderly people in the poor. Most at risk code says it's too soon to know how many people may have died during this past. Summer's extreme heat but history might provide a somber clue in one thousand nine thirty nine in two thousand nine. Australia had devastating bushfires black Friday and black Saturday as they're now called both were preceded by heat waves and those heatwaves alone code says are each believed to have killed more than four hundred people the deadliest fire a hundred and seventy three is twice as many as succumb to the bushfires but the heat waves didn't get nearly the same attention. It was all fire photos of crying families. And cinch teddy bears and you can see why the the newsworthy bushfire is a terrifying thing but heatwaves. How can you take a picture of a heatwave? I've got a powerpoint presentation with a young chap just holding a water bottle and drinking out of the water bill. That's that's my picture of a heatwave. So it's really hard to communicate the immediate danger and there's a fast growing need to communicate that danger. A recent climate report by the Australian government found the country has warmed by more than one degree Celsius just in the last century. Extreme heat events are increasing in frequency as is the risk of extreme fire and extreme flooding. All of which has happened in Australia and just the last few months. Sebastian vouch is a research fellow at western Sydney University. Who's focusing on climate change in urban heat? Everything's extreme. It's exactly like how scientists for thirty years predict climate change to actually pan out and it's not twenty thirty forty or fifty anymore. It's twenty twenty. We have it. It's happening vouches. There are ways you can build for heat. For example houses could be painted. Certain color to reflect light. Green or living roofs could provide insulation. Houses could be built smaller with more room for treason greenspace. Australia is updating. Its National Construction Code in twenty twenty. Two and extreme heat is being considered in the changes but new codes would primarily be aimed at new buildings and the people most affected by heat tend to be folks like Mary concert living in older buildings that were designed long before bouts of extreme heat. Were much of a thought. Don't get me wrong. I appreciate the refi. Have my head and being able to pay pay for it and do that but I think sometimes it's poor design went with public housing. The nonprofit that LISA'S COGNAC. Thome knows this is an issue. Divisional Manager Heather Chaffee says she hears it from clients all the time for us as a housing provider. Tricky housing market. It's it's distressing to be honest. When often doesn't own the homes they rent chaffee says so? It makes it hard to make modifications instead. They focused on warning tenants. When extreme heat is coming but she knows that's not enough heat. She says is a global social justice issue. It's the poorest people that are going to suffer them iced so she says there needs to be a larger societal discussion about how we prepare for extreme heat because as a summer just showed. It's already

Australia Heather Chaffee Sydney Mary Con Yards House Scientist Conard Lucinda Coats Greater West Sydney Conrad Australian Government Western Sydney University Research Fellow Thome Mary Divisional Manager Lisa
"western sydney university" Discussed on The Philosopher's Zone

The Philosopher's Zone

08:15 min | 11 months ago

"western sydney university" Discussed on The Philosopher's Zone

"Every now and then we seem to have to ask why philosophy exists at all. It's an inquiry that goes back at least as far as the fifth century. The time of the playwright Aristophanes who wrote a comedy that deals with this very question two and a half millennia. Light Up. The question is still being asked. Most recently in a book is titled Y Philosophy It's coded as Diego. Booby associate professor in philosophy at Western Sydney University and Jeff malpas professor of philosophy at the university. Of Tasmania Yeah. It is indeed a very old question David. In the case of stopping this is interesting because it depicts socrates as as running a philosophy school where students are engaged in absurd and pointless activities like inventing a a unit to measure the distance jumped by a flea or the exact goals of the buzzing noise of fly and the only thing. The students actually learning. This goal is how to turn arguments into winning arguments and rebel against their fathers in the clouds. Which is stop and his play. We already find all the classic. Stereotypes that are always invoked to mock philosophy and affirm its futility philosophies presented as technique to we otherwise hopeless meritless. Arguments have thanks to a conceptual tricks. Philosophy students lose time in pointless experiments. That have no practical implications the philosopher himself in this case socrates effectively floats in the air in a basket with his head. The literal in the clouds removed from concrete. Reality so yes. Attacks against philosophy are as old as philosophy itself which is to say almost as old as Western culture. The reasons why they keep coming up are always the same. I think philosophy doesn't change anything. It is said philosophy is used less than and so on. I think that philosophy has this tendency to look at the war in different ways and this is disturbing to anyone who for a variety of reasons wants people to keep looking at the war in in the same old way so in this sense there is nothing new windy increasing tax. That in the past few years have been directed against philosophy from scientist politicians and public figures in general it seems that every generation of philosophers is called to respond to such attacks and justify their existence over and over again. Okay this unprecedented crisis. What smarts knew about? What's the crisis and what's new about it? Philosophy is always been or at least thought of as being that search for the truth even when some philosophical approach is questioned. The very idea of truth this move is made in the name of a supposedly Superior Truth Nata theoretical truth but but a practical truth traditionally That's my point. Even when philosophy was criticized I was criticized precisely for supposed inability or unwillingness to reach the truth nowadays however not only philosophy but truth itself seems to be under attack along. I will say with academia more generally Insofar as universities are institutions whose go ease or at least should be the search of the truth now that some politicians and public commentators tend to appeal to emotions in personal prejudice rather than rational thought. It is hardly news. What is new in? Our view is how the spread and use of social media facilitates cultural environment in which facts that do not fit a particular narrative are disregarded or ignored and these are indeed very worrying phenomena more urgent and pressing concern for us as philosophers is that so many people do not see these phenomena as a source of concern at all. But is there a sense in which Jeff? I'll ask this view. Is there a sense? In which philosophy or certain species of philosophy is partly to blame here. Because we we do have a familiarity that says the back in the nineteen seventies the post structuralist arrived on the scene and you had philosophers like dairy. Darren for lack Hano or all undermining the notion that bill could be any such thing as truth and that skepticism escaped from the university laboratory and infected popular culture. Now here we are in a post-truth world and it's all the fault of post modern relativism over philosophy behind that relativism. Where are you in that argument? Well firstly I mean it's worth pointing out that when it comes to the major figures that you mentioned particularly figures like Derrida earned Fuca. They were a bit more careful than to make any sort of straightforward relativization of truth which is always a rather peculiar thing to want to do so Fukumaru in his light lectures emphasize. The importance of speaking. The truth is a political act so so when we speak about the main figures there they often have slightly different view but there is a sort of popular academic line on some of these matters particularly in relation to truth. That says well truth. Like everything else is just constructed. It's just a social phenomenon and I think it's true that that has become almost taken for granted and sort of unthinking why in some parts of academia and seeped into popular culture but I actually think that that is in part a manifestation of a shift within from our survey but of a shift within the culture. So I- tie this disdain for truth the forgetfulness of truth back to a whole lot of other changes. If you think back to some of the developments around the history of Neo Neo liberalism developments in the seventies and eighties for instance where we decided or some people decide at some politicians decided. Perhaps the it was better to emphasize process over principle that it was better to emphasize certain sorts of economic managerial outcomes over any sort of value. Because after we all have different values and we can't decide between them then I would say that's probably where the current neglect of truth has one of its origins. Anyway it seems to me that the tendency to regard economics as the arbiter just about all arguments not only means that we don't pay attention to haul set of values human values if you like but it also means that one of the values we no longer pay attention to his truth or at least truth just becomes another commodity. It becomes a matter of what you can get away with. What can get you more money or whatever it no longer becomes a matter of attaining to what is being said or what is being done and with a genuinely accords with the way the world the way we think it ought to be with something that goes beyond just economic value that goes beyond money when it comes down to it so I think there are. There are some academic tendency set of that have contributed to this. But there's also a much deeper loss of any sense of real orientation or value to anything other than self interest in money And I think that's become a pervasive problem that underpins the lack of attention to philosophy that underpins the lack of attention to truth and I would say underpins the lack of attention to thinking. You make a really good point there about the monetization of of knowledge that I'd like to get back to but first of all just with this idea of the relationship between truth and philosophy. It seems sometimes that people people minions this this idea that just abroad in society that truth is really the domain of science and the philosophy wants to be respected as a truthful or useful discipline. Then it needs to be somehow practiced along. According to the model of Science Francis. Crick wanted philosophers have never successfully solved the problem. You what usually happens is some philosophical problems. End Up a scientific ones Nanday all by scientists. Is that a fair claim..

professor of philosophy Jeff malpas Aristophanes Diego associate professor Western Sydney University Tasmania David scientist Crick Derrida Darren Fukumaru
"western sydney university" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

03:25 min | 1 year ago

"western sydney university" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Not talked about in professor John White House with this taught him a thing for bush Limbaugh western Sydney university professor pediatrics are good just two minutes you're not enough time for this you professor you gots a petition signed by two hundred of fellow medical practitioners looking for the Australian government to call a tribunal on this all talk about what happens once that's up that petition became so well regarded in sign so often nothing would reduce does look to our politicians for understanding of this nor of support because of the job the big hit because they are about to post lowers even more draconian here then you then the laws that would put with pro here the the the lord's controlling the way you manage those children what were you it in the state of Queensland they're about to pass a lore which will put a person who does not refer a child who's confused ridge gender does not put them under the pathway of hormones and surgery if we don't do that then you can face at eighteen months time in jail on believe even you don't have that serve other look to help politicians for understanding or support in this we we have to start raising like a movement greater duty of care movement of where analyze a doctor's greater duty of care obeying the government or in refusing to send children or under that parkway of medical escalation is unbelievable ends in this in this country kids in in as quick as forty five minutes are can be put on the path of this is the so called gender therapist our professor white hall this is the first step you talking I'd states I hope you'll do more this and I want to thank you for being brave because there are a lot of people who know it's wrong there are endocrinologist in our country who've lost their board seats they've lost their jobs there are journalists who lost their jobs for daring to even talk at this and I thank you Sir for the bottom my heart for sure in this and I hope people heard it so I'm I'm very happy to be on your program I love your country Sir and not only because I've got to grand children who are in fact Americans well then we we need to get you over here and to your kids this they're welcome here it's so it's such a player here alright professor John white hall what you see the university they're damn lucky to have you pre sheet you come in on the Rush Limbaugh program thank you professor Starman filling in for Rush Limbaugh on the EIB network you're listening to the EIB network radio WFLA optima tax relief that's a place to call when you have problems with the I. R. S. let me give you another example of how optima can help Eric fell five years behind to the IRS they froze his bank account they demanded money that we didn't have so that's when he called optima tax relief they took control the situation they got his bank account released they set him up with a payment plan that was hundreds of dollars a month less than the I. R. S. was demanding now that's how optima has.

professor John White House bush Limbaugh Sydney university professor
"western sydney university" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

10:30 min | 1 year ago

"western sydney university" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Back to top Erman guest hosting for Rush Limbaugh E. I. V. network thank you for having it is thought Herman filling in for Rush Limbaugh you seen in in government schools around the country in efforts to divorce gender from sex and this is had some unbelievably surprising and somewhat scary soldiers and about a four thousand percent increase in kids who are identifying as a gender separate from their their biological sex ends on the west coast in in areas around the country there in fact places where kids can gets hormone treatments without parents will consent serving at the age of thirteen surgery starting at age fifty of taxpayer supported if they're citizens of that state so this can sound like well white this is in affect us it does because there's an effort of course to have this be taxpayer funded around the country ought reached out to experts in pediatric his name is John white hall he is a professor of pediatrics at western Sydney university he's a fifty year career fifteen years he was director of the neonatal intensive care in Townsville north Queensland which included resuscitation and saving lives around the country is widely regarded as perhaps the most respected pediatrician in Australia recently he had said that medical watching that is surging hormones for kids who believe that they are different sacks is perhaps the greatest medical scandal that we've seen in our lifetime and professor white hall joins us now super early in Australia thank you for joining us professor you're you're welcome or you're a bit too generous in your introduction you're welcome well I I'm just reading what I've read about you in what's explain to people what's the what is going on to young people and let's start with this idea of this application what's called puberty blockers which in our country the FDA has not approved for this use this this stops purity but do I understand are also affects brain development or does but this is completely ignored as like UPS conspiracy of silence or the proponents of its use because it is being shown them scientific literature I didn't write this stuff I'm just relaying it to you there are researchers throughout the world especially in Glasgow and always goes low for example who have shown that there is a sustained interruption with the function of the limbic system in shape when you put them on to blockers around the time of P. B. so what one knows the limbic system that's a system in your brain that coordinates emotion and thinking and reward and ambition and the forms a kind of a world view like an identity and upon that did the then you make executives decisions no that is interfered with in shape they can demonstrate that a hundred the effect of hundreds of genes they have found in Oslo to be messed up and not surprisingly the the sheep do badly in my uses later on and they are also much more emotionally Les Paul this is a really important thing because of the my sheep are much more gung ho risk taking and the female she is she a much more anxious and use within the navy so we know who the children when we know you're not like these other people's reports not mind that seventy five percent of the children who expressed confusion of the gender are also suffering from diagnosed psychiatric illnesses mental disorders such as anxiety and depression even schizophrenia so this is an up already very vulnerable group of young people by their own internal may it'll disorders and usually associated with family disruption and other things and now you putting them on to puberty blockers which you're going to affect the limbic system the judgment and so forth and make them more emotionally vulnerable so what are we doing this allegedly to help them work out more clearly whether they're a boy or a girl and whether they want to reproduce later on and this is a sensible thing this is biologically implausible this is child abuse in my opinion because you they're putting these blockers the putting children as young as ten in the house young is when the story was ten in the house who went on to blockers in order to helping things right and its biologically implausible and in research the the this this kind of work it's gonna make him worse well we're on that can I just say the next step in this pathway this sort of escalation of medical intervention for childhood to gender dysphoria the next step which comes after this but at an increasing the younger age is the administration of cross six whole months now than other words east region to a boy in the and and just suffered will go though the literature is filled with all sorts of complications of that to do with susceptibility to thrombosis heart attacks and so forth but they do not mention the the thing of exquisite importance the effect on the number one organ which is the brain now again not my research but ignored skins pears your songs by the proponents of this people have shown that if you put an adult my own onto east region the brain shrinks at a rate ten times faster than aging after only four months now these are not my words these are the MRI studies and we are putting these children on these cross sex hormones at the age of enormous brain growth and development that is to say to adolescents and and and what's going to happen well are you seeing we know that the suicide rate is much higher in adults who have undergoing Trajan research we know that I mean this went twenty times higher it's it's proven and every one of the proponents say well that's because that's helpful because we we don't accept them well that's nonsense the that raises his the whole that a high rate is in the most accepting six countries like Holland and Belgium and so forth another thing the other thing they don't want to talk about is well hang on a second you have interfered with the limbic system you have made this person is already vulnerable person more emotionally stable you have shrunk he's Brian will be defeated with their bright may be the treatment itself has so influence the functioning of the brain that this person no longer feels that life is worth living there all sorts of things that are not talked about in professor John White House with this tournament feeling from Rush Limbaugh western Sydney university professor pediatrics are good just two minutes you're not enough time for this you professor you gots a petition signed by two hundred of fellow medical practitioners looking for the Australian government to call a tribunal on this I'll talk about what happens once that that petition became so well regarded in sign so often nothing redo does look to our politicians for understanding of this nor of support because of the baby because they are about to post lowers even more draconian he then you then the laws that would put with pro here the the the lord's controlling the way you manage those children where you it in the state of Queensland they're about to pass a lore which we'll put a person who does not refer a child who's confused ridge gender does not put them under the pathway of hormones and surgery if you don't do that then you can face at eighteen months time in jail on believe even you don't have that so look to our politicians for understanding or support in this we we have to start raising like I'm a movement greater duty of care movement of wherein lies a doctor's greater duty of care obeying the government or in refusing to send children or under that pathway of medical escalation is unbelievable ends in this in this country kids in in as quick as forty five minutes can be put on the path of this of the so called gender therapist our professor white hall this is the first step you talking I'd states I hope you'll do more this and I want to thank you for being brave because there are a lot of people who know it's wrong there are endocrinologist in our country who've lost their board seats they've lost their jobs there are journals have lost their jobs for daring to even talk at this and I thank you Sir for the bottom my heart for sure in this and I hope people heard it so I'm I'm very happy to be on your program I love your country Sir and not only because I've got to grand children who are in fact Americans well then we we need to get you over here into your kids this they're welcome here it's so it's such a player here alright professor John white hall what you see the university they're damn lucky to have you pre sheet you come in on the Rush Limbaugh program thank you professor start Herrmann filling in for Rush Limbaugh on the EIB network you're listening to the EIB network has the answers Russia is on an S. T. optimize optimize tax relief that's a place to call when you have problems with the I..

Rush Limbaugh Erman Herman
"western sydney university" Discussed on Tumble: A Science Podcast for Kids

Tumble: A Science Podcast for Kids

05:43 min | 1 year ago

"western sydney university" Discussed on Tumble: A Science Podcast for Kids

"If you have a cat or dog that you need worm each month. It's basically stick that launches the pill into an animal's throat so that they swallow it and from there the pill is on its mission. The capsule had to make its way past the acid in the stomach to a place where the bacteria could survive so once that capsule optional went past the stomach it broke open and let the bacteria in the Hind Gut which is whether they needed to be sort of like a spy by catapulting itself down the throat. It's hence bringing through the stomach yeah once they get past the VAT of acid than they can get to the price. At least that was the plan so the first thing we needed to do is to work at teed. We actually get live save my probes into the Koala. Did it do what we wanted it to figure that out. They waited for the Koalas to to poop straightforward. If the pill had done its job they should have found. Even more mess made microbes in the poop than they put it in and that's what they saw aw great. This is what we want. We've got the bacteria in that and they're establishing and growing but the amount of bacteria was different for each Koala meaning meaning that the microbes did better in some Koala guts than others and then the next thing was to go okay so we've got the bacteria in does that change what the Koala will eight. It was time for another mess mate only buffet at the Koala Hotel. What do we got here. Math estimate again is a koalas approached. The Mess Mate Buffet. The scientist watched in anticipation will they he did and what we found is the ones that it worked really well full. They will willing to eat quite a lot of mess mate the ones that didn't work as well well for not so much they ate some but not as much so does that mean that the fecal transplants were successful or not. Michaela in her colleagues were able able to give the koalas nuked gut bacteria in that's the main thing that they'd wanted but the poop transplant wasn't an instinct cure for every Koala's tummy troubles we find also in humans when we give them fake transplants it works for some people doesn't work so well for the papal. There's always a bit of variability certainly isn't for everyone. nope but Michaela's sees fecal transplants as a potential way to help Koalas Hawalas that have been moved like those from Cape Outweigh and get adjusted into their new home environments if we could give them they capsules before releasing them into a new area with different trees that they have to feed on then that might help them to adapt to the different food sorta like a housewarming present except instead of casserole. It's poop exactly so if there's another another crisis the POOP pill may be ready to pop in to help but there's a bigger lesson for conservation in general so so what I take home message is is that it looks like what a Koala eats is affected by what microbes probes they have in guts and that's really important because in conservation we do too quickly look at the animal and how it interacts with the environment separate from what's going on inside them in other words conservation scientists tend to study ecosystems more than they look at digestive systems and this is saying. Maybe we need to take a closer look inside awed the animal and see what's going on there. 'CAUSE that's important too if we're trying to save these animals in the meantime the Koala population nations keep outweigh is back to its normal size in eucalyptus forest or slowly recovering to the Koala crisis was tragic but Makila who says it taught her a lot about how to do science when so much is at stake. I think the big thing with all of this is when anything like like this happens. Everybody has opinions and science is one of the best ways of finding out which of those ideas is rush going out and actually testing the idea and finding the answer and that's how we make sure that when we make decisions in conservation with making the right ones based on facts and based on evidence okay so now it's your turn to take a closer look at animals insides. which is your favorite animal eat does? Does it have any kind of weird eating habits and how might it's gut help. It's eat what did he let us know. If you find anything out that's both gross and fascinating were always interested in things that can be described that way things today to Dr Michaela Blyton postdoctoral researcher at the University of Queensland Australia. She did this research Wallet Western Sydney University..

Dr Michaela Blyton Koala Hotel Hind Gut Makila scientist postdoctoral researcher Western Sydney University University of Queensland Austr
"western sydney university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"western sydney university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"We do what we think in who we are. Who'd be quite horrific thing to see everything that you'd ever consumed in thrown away. And in this first episode before I look back at our wasteful passed on examining the reality of today's trash challenge. Good evening. Imagine. How much we produce? It's just shocking. This is the history of wastefulness on the BBC World Service. I'm standing outside my house in Sydney where every week. I put my rubbish intervene it gets collected. And soon it's gone. How did it get to the point today where it's so easy to be so wasteful in developed countries like here in Australia? Here's professor gay Hawkins from western Sydney University research is how history has shaped our wasteful ways. Well, it starts really with the introduction of the sewage system because there's been some great histories written the introduction of sanitation in the growth of nineteenth century cities, and that was an amazing public health achievement. But people were much more use to before the rise of sanitation to sing waste detritus human and animal filth in their everyday encounters in cities now that might have been pretty bad for the public health. But it was pretty good for understanding that, you know, waste was close to you. It was visible. You had to avoid it and move through it what a sewage system was sanitation system. Does is introduce infrastructure. Of rapid disappearance. Where you really don't know what happens to it. So so flashing is the beginning of that culture of it. Just disappears. We've had increasing distance from our waste over the twentieth century. And that's a good thing. It's why you've had the growth of mass cities. But it means that we don't understand what happens to our ways to win. We finished with it where it goes how it accumulates the kind of environmental pollution affects it generates. 'cause that all happens in a hidden reality that is often at the age of cities, the shadow places that filthy horrifying, toxic and most ordinary people joining count them..

Sydney BBC World Service Sydney University gay Hawkins Australia professor
"western sydney university" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

13:39 min | 2 years ago

"western sydney university" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"But I guess that they're pushing you the basis pushing your go ahead after me. Need Democrats like me to put my country before my party and want you to be successful. Because if my successful my country does well in my state does. Well, that's more important to me that any party affiliation is. Wow. That's Joe Manchin who was saying that stuff the democrat from wow. West Virginia Virginia, West Virginia. Right. Yeah. Joe Manchin, I've always I've. He is if I had to say, I like a democrat. I would say that about Joe Manchin because he just doesn't seem nuts. And he also knew you know, why he survived by the way the reelection. Do you know why you survive he survived because he didn't go? He didn't. But the administration. Yeah. West virginia. He didn't buck the administration. He actually wanted to work with the president. And that's like, okay, we can deal with that. So that's I mean, that's how that worked amazing. So I mean, you see there there's he he would he's a guy would say is a liberal not a progressive. There's a difference between the two, you know, there's there's a definite difference. So in. Australia. Universities are starting to ban sarcasm. No. Nope. In fact, Gideon rose. Nah, the director policy at the institute of public of fast said that the majority of stralia and universities hostile to free speech, and that they've banned sarcasm because it's a quote foam of violence. Now, they had a public affairs free. They had an free speech on campus audit in two thousand seventeen and they found that the university of Queensland western Sydney University and Charles Sturt university all band sarcasm. It's literally included in their bullying policies. They put it with ridicule. It literally includes sarcasm in its guide. On how to for real. This is a real thing how to identify potentially aggressive behaviors. And don't want to be careful with humor and sarcasm. Seriously. I'm look I'm looking at it right now. Like, they say identifying potentially aggressive behaviors prolonged glaring. No, I contact. Oh my goodness. I mean, it's just crazy. So they say that sarcasm is apparently like oh my gosh. You want to take over from here because I got to face palmful sarcasm. So that's a weird. But show me on the doll where the sarcasm hurt. You is what I say do people turned into such pansies. That wasn't sarcastic. Really are. That's not the word. I preferred to is the one and allowed to buddy. FCC understood. When did they turn when did this happen? Oh, gosh. I think it's been happening for a while cash. People are just these people are weak. Oh sarcasm bothers, you know, it hurts. Yep. They're saying it's like, it's like assault. Salt is good. I I just. Yeah. Nope. Nope. Nope. I just this is so ridiculous. All of this assist. Silly. I why is there says no reason why should we all know, we all have friends that don't understand sarcasm. Right. Like, there's always that one friend that you're sarcastic with. And they just don't have things like that. Because I just don't associate with those people. I can't stand that. Down. I'm like, you know, what you're stupid go away. Well, that's harsh. But no, it's why here's the thing. Why do we have to know? Why do we why do we have to serger coat everything? This is the problem. Everyone wants to be handled with kid gloves and get participation trophies. And no one wants to be offended. I don't care if you're offended when people say, I'm offended. I immediate what to me? What I hear is. I am week. I'm a weak person. It's a miracle that I still exist. That's what I hear. When someone goes. I am totally offended. I hear our week. I to have posted to remind me to breathe and blink. That's what I hear. I just think you're advertising how weak and silly. You are no one cares. If you're offended. What are you support your expecting like what a crown like at a beauty pageant and a bouquet of flowers because you're offended. We wanna do your fended you, you know, one. You don't have the right to not be. You don't have the right to tell someone don't offend me. Now. And especially when people are so weak. Know intellectually and in their personal constitutions that they are triggered over the existence of the chance that someone might disagree with them. People are I could grief. Just like with Twitter trying to heaven forbid, you have a genuine conversation about transgenderism we can't have that because truth might trigger some people. So we need to shield them from truth and aid them in you know. Just they're one sided argument. That's how we got flatter. Yeah. That's why flatter are still exists because of because of that. That's that's that's why. I don't know. I. All of this is just it's I just get so disillusioned with people. I have to include this headline as well. None of these things go together. But I am mystified by this. So Japan, cybersecurity minister cybersecurity. What does it just cybersecurity? What does that mean to you technology? Computers online safety of your information. Yeah. Okay. Well, the minister that's in charge of all of that for Japan the country. Well, he had no knowledge that he never has used a computer. And then he doesn't even know what a USB port is. Yeah. Yeah. He actually goes I give instructions to my aid. So I don't punch into a computer myself. But I'm confident that our work is flawless. Okay. What? This is essentially the people who are arguing for firearm policy here. They've never took the same thing. So this. I mean, lawmakers it actually was highlighted in Japanese media, they were incredulous over this guy. I mean, he runs their cybersecurity ruling-party lawmaker Yoshitaka second rata was in charge of the twenty twenty Tokyo Olympics, and he was asked questions from independent and opposition legislators, and that's when he gave that quote, and he can't he goes. He when he was asked about the grid, and malware, he didn't even know how to answer these questions he says, well, the USB was basically never used. He didn't even know what it was. He was just saying things. I'm not making any of this stuff. This is on ABC. I'm not kidding. You. And lawmakers did not even understand how to deal with it. Because all of this was live on their television, national television, and they get they I. And while Sacramento was having this discussion. Bureaucrats were they were on television racing over to him running over to him to give him sheets of paper with information. So he at least could say things that sounded somewhat smart. And he was named a his position last month during the cabinet reshuffle. And he and they go, well, he's not expected to have much hands on responsibility handling of either cybersecurity or the Olympics, but he's the head of cybersecurity for Japan. Yeah. I mean, I. The USB was an actually used in. They're looking at each other. Like, what do you know what you're talking about doesn't? It doesn't sound like you know, what you're talking about. Well. Okay. I it sounds about right for government. Right. That sounds about right for government. That's what it sounds like as ever swimming. Or hey, the headlight guard, but can't swim. Eventually swam before and the lifeguard never actually swam. But that just have someone do it for me. Doggy paddle. We don't use too much. Yeah. Oh my heavens. I can't even deal with this. So Julian Assange is going to be prosecuted for espionage, US officials are hopeful that they're going to get him extradited from his bolt hole there in the Ecuadorian embassy in London. And to face charges in an American courtroom. I wish that people would stop blowing smoke up his bike. Because the guy is a Creighton. I mean, let's not forget when we had our soldiers in Afghanistan. He put our military lives in danger because he published informant he public he will he outed the informants that our troops were relying on for intelligence. He put all of these informants lives in danger. He took the way that it was described. Our the eyes and ears that our units rely on for the battlefield. He obliterated all of that. And you know, that the documents that he published when they raided bin Laden's compound in a Bod, Julian Assange is documents on our military and outing our informants and everything else that that was found amongst the documentation in bin Laden's compound. So people need to stop acting like Julian Assange is king blank blank mountain because he's not he's a Creighton. And he jeopardized the lives of I don't know how many people and he's he's he's he's he's a he's a stooge. He's never been an ally of the United States. He he actually worked with our enemies against us to imperil the lives of innocent people. So I don't know why in the world anybody who is on the right, especially would defend him. What do they think it's cool or something or do? They just not know what the hell they're talking about. Remember when they did was it the collateral damage video that they put out. Oh my gosh. I just remember so many stories, and I had people by the I have friends, by the way who were serving and who were NF ghanistan at the time this all happened, and they these veterans and these special operators. They cannot stand this guy because of what he did everything changed their movements had to everything changed. Everything was outed. Disaster. So all the people that, you know, throw it down if you claim to love the troops don't blow don't kiss Julian Assange, but could you can't do both. You can't say that you support troops while thinking Julian Assange is a great guy because he almost got him killed. And the informants that they relied upon to help not only keep them safe. But also move about and carry out their missions. I disguise Creighton. And he's a stooge for Russia. I mean, that's true. I mean, this people I don't know people forget about this. Or what? It's a Ben Sasse was right. He released a statement saying this is cut and dried WikiLeaks as an outlet for foreign propaganda. And Julian Assange is an enemy of the American people. And it's true. He is no allied to serious journalist or defenders of free speech. He's in bed with a guy who murders journalists and dissidents. So I don't I mean, I do not know a veteran that likes Julian Assange big as those who. And I have friends that were in service on the battlefield at the time. All this stuff went down. And I have heard them for a fact run this guy down. They cannot stand him. They think he's an enemy of the state. Because he is. We have Florida man on the way. And let's see here. We've got some stuff. We got Florida man on the way, and we got a bunch of stuff as well happening. I ended up getting a couple more MAG lights. I wanted to make sure that I have a magnet for like my kitchen and one from living room. And then when the dogs go outside at night. I always take my big giant, my MO one fifty Alar 'cause that thing has a beam throw of more than a quarter mile over a thousand lumens of light not that my dogs are like running a quarter mile away from me. But I just you know, we have coyotes in the area, I want to be able to see everything. So I always take my nag laid out with me whenever I go outside. I like MAG light because I've always had this is always been the first thing that I've gone to because it's dependable it holds up after I mean, I the house full of boys in this thing holds up all my MAG lights, hold up. And it is something that represents decades research. It's just totally state of the art they always refine it, and this is why a lot of people on the force a lot of people who are serving our country. They carry MAG lights. Because they're dependable. Right. I mean, you want the best, and you want to have something that puts that that gives you effective usable light. They also have the survival light the MAG M L three hundred L, it's a four cell LED eighteen days of effective real usable light that's more than four hundred hours on a single set of.

Julian Assange Joe Manchin Japan West Virginia United States Gideon rose president Australia Olympics Twitter Florida assault Virginia Afghanistan FCC director Alar university of Queensland weste Charles Sturt university
"western sydney university" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

04:38 min | 2 years ago

"western sydney university" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Going to beat me. But I guess that they're pushing you the basis pushing you go ahead after me. Democrats like me put my country before my party and want you to be successful. Because if my because my country does well in my state as well that's more important to me that any party affiliation is. Wow. That's Joe Manchin who was saying that stuff the democrat from wow. West Virginia Virginia janea, right? Yeah. Joe Manchin, I've I've always. I he is if I had to say, I like democrat, I would say that about Joe Manchin because he just doesn't seem nuts. And he also knew you know, why he survived by the way the reelection. Do you know why he survived he survived because he didn't go. He didn't. But the administration. Yeah. West virginia. He didn't buck the administration. He actually wanted to work with the president. And that's like, okay, we can deal with that. So that's I mean, that's how that worked amazing. So I mean, you see there there's he he would he's a guy. I would say is a liberal not a progressive. There's a difference between the two, you know, there's there's a definite difference. So in. Australia. Universities are starting to ban sarcasm. No. Nope. In fact, Gideon rose. Nah, the director policy at the institute of public of fast said that the majority of Australian universities all hostile to free speech, and that they banned sock hasn't because it's a quote foam of violence. Now, they had a public affairs free. They had an free speech on campus audit in two thousand seventeen and they found that the university of Queensland western Sydney University and Charles Sturt university all band sarcasm. It's literally included in their bullying policies. They put it with ridicule. It literally includes sarcasm in its guide. On how to for real. This is a real thing how to identify potentially aggressive behaviors. And it warrants to be careful with humor and sarcasm. Seriously. And look I'm looking at it right now. Like, they say identifying potentially aggressive behaviors prolonged glaring. No, I contact. Oh my goodness. I mean, it's just crazy. So they say that sarcasm is apparently like oh my gosh. You want wanna take over from here because I got to face palmful. I only have sarcasm. So that's a weird but show me on the Delaware. The sarcasm hurt you. Is what I say do people turn into such pansies? That wasn't sarcastic. No. They really are. That's not the word. I preferred to use. But it's the one and allowed to buddy. FCC understood. When did they turn when did this happen? Oh, gosh. I think it's been happening for a while cash. People are just these people are week. Oh sarcasm bothers, you know, it hurts. Yep. They're saying it's like, it's like assault. Salt is good. I I just. Yeah. Nope. Nope. Nope. I just this is so ridiculous. All of this assist. Silly. I why is there says no reason why we all know, we all have friends that don't understand sarcasm. Right. Like, there's always that one friend that you're sarcastic with. And they just no I don't have friends like that. Because I just don't associate with those people. I can't stand them. Down. I'm like, you know, what you're too stupid. Well, that's harsh. But no, it's why here's the thing. Why do we have to know? I'm being told. Why do we why do we have to sugarcoat everything? This is the problem. Everyone wants to be handled with kid gloves and get participation trophies. And no one wants to be offended. I don't care if you're offended when people say, I'm offended. I immediately. What to me what I hear is? I am week. I'm a weak person. It's a miracle that I still exist. That's what I hear. When someone goes. I am totally funded. I hear our week. I have to have posted to remind me to breathe and blink. That's what I hear. I just think you're advertising how weak and silly. You are no one cares. If you're offended. What are you support your expecting like what a crown like at a beauty pageant and a bouquet of flowers because you're offended..

Joe Manchin West virginia Gideon rose Virginia Australia university of Queensland weste Charles Sturt university president assault director FCC Delaware institute of public
"western sydney university" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

12:59 min | 2 years ago

"western sydney university" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Oh, the data show on news ninety six point five WDBO. Sean. You're not going to be. That they're pushing the is pushing you go ahead after me. But you need Democrats like me. Put my country before my party and want you to be successful. Because if my president because my country does well in my state as well that's more important to meet at any party. Wow. That's Joe Manchin who was saying that stuff the democrat from wow. West virginia. Virginia wrestlemania right? Yeah. Joe manchin. I've i've. He is if I had to say like a democrat. I would say that about Joe Manchin because he just doesn't seem nuts. And he also knew you know, why he survived by the way the reelection. Do you know what he's arrive? He survived because he didn't go. He didn't. But the administration. Yeah. West virginia. He didn't buck the administration. He actually wanted to work with the president. And that's are like, okay, we can deal with that. So that's I mean, that's how that worked amazing. So I mean, you see there there's he he would he's the guy would say liberal progressive. There's a difference between the two, you know, there's there's a definite difference. So in. Australia. Universities are starting to ban sarcasm. No. Nope. In fact, Gideon rose now, the director policy at the institute of public affairs said that the majority of a strategy and universities all hostile to free speech and that they've been sock hasn't because it's a quote foam of violence. Now, they had a public affairs free. They had an free speech on campus audit in two thousand seventeen and they found that the university of Queensland western Sydney University and Charles Stewart university all band sarcasm. It's literally included in their bullying policies. They put it with ridicule. It literally includes sarcasm in its guide. On how to for real. This is a real thing how to identify potentially aggressive behaviors. And it warrants to be careful with humor and sarcasm. Seriously. I'm looking at it right now. Like, they say identifying potentially aggressive behaviors prolonged glaring. No, I contact. Oh my goodness. I mean, it's just crazy. So they say that sarcasm is apparently like oh my gosh. Take over from here because I got to face pump sarcasm. So that's a weird. But show me on the doll where the sarcasm hurt. You is what I say many people turned into such pansies that wasn't sarcastic. Now. They really are being real. That's not the word preferred to is. But it's the one and allowed to. FCC understood. When did they turn when did this happen? Oh, gosh. I think it's been happening for a while cash. People are just these people are week. Oh sarcasm bothers, you know, it hurts. They're saying it's like it's like a salt. Salt is good. I I just. Yeah. Nope. Nope. Nope. I just this is so ridiculous. All this assist. Silly. I why is there? There's there's no reason. Why should we all know we all have friends that don't understand sarcasm? Right. Like, there's always that one friend that you're with and they just don't have things like that. Because I just don't see it with those people. I can't stand. I'm like, you know, what you're too stupid. Well, that's harsh. But no, it's what here's the thing. I do we have to know. Why do we why do we have to sugarcoat everything? This is the problem. Everyone wants to be handled with kid gloves and get participation trophies. And no one wants to be offended. I don't care if you're offended when people say, I'm offended. I immediately. What to me what I hear is? I am week. I'm a weak person. It's a miracle that I still exist. That's what I hear. When someone goes. I am totally offended. I hear a week. I have to have posted to remind me to breathe and blink. That's what I hear. I just think you're advertising how weak and silly. You are no one cares. If you're offended where did you support your expecting a crown like a beauty pageant and a bouquet of flowers because you're offended. You're offended. You know one. You don't have the right to not be. You don't have the right to tell someone don't offend me. Now. Especially when people are so weak. Know intellectually and in their personal constitutions that they are triggered over the existence of the chance that someone might disagree with them. People are good grief. Just like with Twitter trying to heaven forbid, you have a genuine conversation about transgenderism we can't have that because truth might trigger some people. So we need to shield them from truth and aid them in. Just they're one sided argument. That's how we got flatter. Yeah. That's why flutters are still exist. Because because of that, that's that's that's why. I don't know. I. It all of this is just it's I just get so disillusioned with people. I have to include this headline as well. None of these things go together. But I am mystified by this. So Japan cybersecurity minister cybersecurity what does that just several security? What does it mean to you technology? Computers online safety of your information. Yeah. Okay. Well, the minister in charge of all of that for Japan the country. Well, he no knowledge that he never has used a computer. And then he doesn't even know what a USB port is. Yeah. Yeah. He actually goes I give instructions to my aid. So I don't punch into a computer myself. But I'm confident that our work is flawless. Okay. This is essentially the people who are arguing for firearm policy here. They've never took the same thing. So this. I mean, lawmakers it actually was highlighted in Japanese media, they were incredulous over this guy. I mean, he runs their cybersecurity ruling-party lawmaker Yoshitaka seco- was in charge of the twenty twenty Tokyo Olympics, and he was asked questions from independent and opposition legislators, and that's when he gave that quote, and he he goes. He when he was asked about the grit, and malware didn't even know how to answer these questions he says, well, the USB was basically never used. He didn't even know what it was. He was just saying things. I'm not making any of this up. This is on ABC. I've not kidding. You. And lawmakers did not even understand how to deal with it. Because all of this was live on their television, national television, and they get they. And while Sacramento was having this discussion. Bureaucrats were they were on television racing over to him running over to him to give him sheets of paper with information. So he at least could say things that sounded somewhat smart. And he was named his position last month during the cabinet reshuffle. And he and they go, well, he's not expected to have much hands on responsibility handling of either cybersecurity or the Olympics, but he's the head of cybersecurity for Japan. Yeah. I mean, I well the USB was an actually used and they're looking at each other. Like, what do you know what you're talking about? Doesn't. Doesn't sound like you know, what you're talking about. Well. Okay. I F sounds about right for government. Right. That sounds about right for government. That's what it sounds. Swimming. Or you know, what I mean like, hey, the headlight guard, but can't swim. Swam before on the lifeguard. Never actually swam. Just have someone do it for me. Doc you pedal. We don't use too much. Yeah. Oh my heavens. I can't even deal with us. So Julian Assange is going to be prosecuted for espionage, US officials are hopeful that they're going to get him extradited from his bolt hole there in the Ecuadorian embassy in London. And to face charges in an American courtroom. I wish that people would stop blowing smoke up his by. Because the guy is a Creighton. I mean, let's not forget when we had our soldiers in Afghanistan. He put our military lives in danger because he published informant. He he will he out of the informants that our troops were relying on for intelligence. He put all of these informants lives in danger. He took the way that it was described. Our the eyes and ears that our units. Rely on the battlefield. He obliterated all of that. And you know, that the documents that he published when they raided bin Laden's compound in Julian Assange is documents on our military and outing our informants and everything else that that was found amongst the documentation in bin Laden's compound. So people need to stop acting like Julian Assange is king blank blank mountain because he's not he's a Creighton. And he jeopardized the lives of I don't know how many people and he's he's he's he's he's a he's a stooge. He's never been an ally of the United States. He he actually worked with our enemies against us to imperil the lives of innocent people. So I don't know why in the world anybody who is on the right? Especially would defend him. What do they think it's cool or something or do? They just not know what the hell they're talking about. Remember when they did was it the collateral damage video that they put out all my gosh. I just remember so many stories, and I had people by the I have friends by the way who were serving and who were in Afghanistan at the time this all happened, and they these veterans and these special operators. They cannot stand this guy because of what he did everything changed their movements had to everything changed. Everything was out at. Does astor. So all the people that, you know, throw it down if you claim to love the troops dump blow don't kiss Julian Assange, but because you can't do both. You can't say that you support troops while thinking Julian Assange is a great guy because he almost got him killed. And the informants that they relied upon to help not only keep them safe. But also move about and carry out their missions. I this guy's a Creighton. And he's a stooge for Russia. I mean, that's true. I mean, this people I don't know if people forget about this or what? It's a Ben Sasse was right. He released a statement saying this is cut and dried WikiLeaks as an outlet for foreign propaganda. And Julian Assange is an enemy of the American people. And it's true. He has no allied a serious journalist or defenders of free speech. He's in bed with a guy who murders journalists and dissidents. So I don't I mean, I do not know about her in that likes Julian Assange, those who and I have friends that were in service on the battlefield at the time. All this stuff went down. And I have heard them for a fact run this guy down. They cannot stand him. They think he's enemy of the state. Because he is. We have Florida man on the way. And let's see here. We've got some stuff. We got Florida minute on the way, we've got a bunch of stuff as well happening. I ended up getting a couple more MAG. I wanna make sure that I have a magnet for like my kitchen and one from living room. And then you know, when the dogs go outside at night. I always take my big giant, my M L one fifty ilar because that thing has a beam throw of more than a quarter mile. It's over a thousand lumens of light not that my dogs are like running a quarter mile away from me. But I just you know, we have coyotes in the area, I want to be able to see everything. So I always take my MagLev out with me whenever I go outside. I like MAG light because I've always had it. This has always been the first thing that I've gone to because it's dependable it holds up after. I mean, I I the house full of boys in this thing holds up all my MAG lights, hold up, and it is something that represents decades of research. It's just totally state of the art they always refine it, and this is why a lot of people on the forest a lot of people who are serving the country. They carry MAG lights. Because they're dependable. Right. I mean, you want the best, and you want to have something that puts that that gives you effective usable light. They also have the survival light the MAG lite M L three hundred L, it's a four cell LED. Get eighteen days of affective, real usable light that's more than four hundred hours on a single.

Julian Assange Joe Manchin president Japan West virginia Afghanistan Olympics United States Virginia Sean Australia Gideon rose Twitter Florida institute of public affairs FCC Russia Yoshitaka seco university of Queensland weste
"western sydney university" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

04:41 min | 2 years ago

"western sydney university" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Oh, shot before he did not gonna beat me. But I guess that they're pushing you the basis pushing go ahead after me, but you need Democrats like me put my country before my party and want you to be successful. Because if my presence because my country does well in my state does. Well, that's more important to me that any party affiliation is. Wow. That's Joe Manchin who was saying that stuff the democrat from. Wow, West Virginia. Virginia West Virginia. Right. Yeah. Joe Manchin, I've I've. He is if I had to say, I like a democrat. I would say that about Joe Manchin because he just doesn't seem nuts. And he also knew you know, why he survived by the way, the re-election you as arrive he survived because he didn't go. He didn't. But the administration. Yeah. West virginia. He didn't buck the administration. He actually wanted to work with the president. And that's like, okay, we can deal with that. So that's I mean, that's how that worked amazing. So I mean, you see there there's he he's a guy would say is a liberal not a progressive. There's a difference between the two, you know, there's there's a definite difference. So in. Australia. Universities are starting to ban sarcasm. No. Nope. In fact, Gideon Rosena, the director policy at the institute of public affairs said that the majority of Australian universities all hostile to free speech, and that they banned sarcasm because it's a quote form of violence. Now, they had a public affairs free. They had an free speech on campus audit in two thousand seventeen and they found that the university of Queensland western Sydney University and Charles Sturt university all ban sarcasm. It's literally included in their bullying policies. They put it with ridicule. It literally includes sarcasm in its guide. On how to for real. This is a real thing how to identify potentially aggressive behaviors. And it warrants to be careful with humor and sarcasm. Seriously. I'm looking I'm looking at it right now. Like, they say identifying potentially aggressive behaviors prolonged glaring. No, I contact. Oh my goodness. I mean, it's just crazy. So they say that sarcasm is apparently like oh my gosh. You won't take over from here because I got to face palmful sarcasm. So that's weird. But show me on the doll where the sarcasm hurt you. Is what I say many people turned into such pansies. That wasn't sarcastic. No. They really are didn't that's not the word preferred to use. But it's the one and allowed to buddy. FCC understood when do they turn when did this happen? Oh, gosh. I think it's been happening for a while cash. People are just these people are weak. Oh sarcasm bothers, you know, it hurts. They're saying it's like, it's like assault. Salt is good. I I just. Yeah. Nope. Nope. Nope. I just this is so ridiculous. All of this assist. Silly. I why is there says no reason why we all know, we all have friends that don't understand sarcasm. Right. Like, there's always that one friend that you're sarcastic whip. And they just don't have friends like that. Because I just don't associate with those people. I can't stay. Night out. And I'm like, you know, what you're too stupid. Go away. Well, that's harsh. But no, it's what here's the thing. Why do we have to know? I'm being totally. Why do we why do we have to sugarcoat everything? This is the problem. Everyone wants to be handled with gloves and get participation trophies. And no one wants to be offended. I don't care if you're offended when people say, I'm offended. I mean, what to me what I hear is. I am week. I'm a weak person. It's a miracle that I still exist. That's what I hear. When someone goes. I am totally offended. I hear our week. I have to have posted to remind me to breathe in blink. That's what I hear. I just think you're advertising how weak and silly. You are no one cares. If you're offended. What are you support your expecting like what a crown like at a beauty pageant and a bouquet of flowers because you're offended..

Joe Manchin West Virginia Virginia Australia institute of public affairs Gideon Rosena university of Queensland weste Charles Sturt university president assault FCC director
"western sydney university" Discussed on Future Tense

Future Tense

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"western sydney university" Discussed on Future Tense

"We see significant increase in pressure areas and wounds, not healing, which wound cares. Exceptionally expensive. In the sick. We have an increased reliance on medications, we have increased hospital readmissions. And so I've role we know that the over sixty five population healthcare costs increase exponentially. But when we add malnutrition to that fact in we've got the one into residents being malnourished than we know that that adds a very large increase in terms of healthcare costs. So. Really the basis and the worst case scenario is if we don't fix that. We know that over the next fifty years that the over proportion of over sixty five year olds is going to increase to three fold. So this problem is only going to amplify. It will be out of hand. Would you help me sit plays along? Trial show. You do a great job to the full busy. He place it on the table. Very close to where it is the pitch. This brilliant. It's not just our bodies that get knocked around by the passing of time. But also our brains, Dr Genevieve Stana from the nickel health research institute, but western Sydney University research is how we deal with conditions like dementia through diet one in ten people over sixty five have dementia, and that heats one in three when you reach itchy so cannot dot influence or even reduce the risk of dementia. What's well-documented in what there's an emerging body of evidence to suggest is that we really need to take an across the lifespan a bridge to dementia risk reduction to those the recent Lenz commission that was published on the dementia prevention intervention and care. And basically what that looked at is essentially saying what can we do in our midlife as we're starting to age little bit. And then also in old alive to be able to reduce our risk. And what they showed is that if you can alter things like how base we.

Dr Genevieve Stana Lenz nickel health research institu Sydney University sixty five year fifty years
"western sydney university" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"western sydney university" Discussed on The Science Hour

"That the mouths like not tunnel migratory birds use the earth's magnetic field to guide them on their travels and they thought that what they would find when they were looking at these monsters they use stars maybe the moon phenomena gatien so it's the first time it's been found that insects using the magnetic field as well to stay a flight during migration what other insect flies that distance do you think be the monarch butterfly the only nine species the monarch butterfly and the bogan moth to migrate over such long distances using such a specific route and it's generational as well so i just found thousands of ancestral multiple as well have done exactly the same route and the team was totally curious about how such a small animal could travel sipho cy precisely and they think that they use an internal magnetic compass and basically to determine that direction i mean willed on them for having magnetic compass but that's still ridiculous distance to fly it tightly is and so they use this compass how could you directions i should ask south i'm actually as long as i know which way north is i'm pretty good i'm gonna say maybe a bit of an internal magnetic compass you've got my money i got one on my key ring chasing you're not a moth by any standards they think that they use this internal magnetic compass they align this direction using landmarks in the same direction as visual cues so it's exactly like if we were out hiking we would be using compass and we look at not direction so he's a big train the distance you know that if you're heading that tree you'll heading in the general direction that you want so you don't need to keep checking the compass every five seconds but the holy grail is finding out how the insects detect magnetic information at this hasn't been found in any animal before so more work to be done magnet sister mystery thank you now let's move onto story about saving koalas we heard earlier in the program about micro blames the bacterial zoo that live in our guts and help us digest food well that's not just a human thing his story of using the bacteria in koala poo to improve the diet it's my conic australian animal the caller and it only eats you clip to sleeves and only certain species of eucalyptus leaves ben moore is a zoologist at western sydney university who thought that the marsupials got flora might be making their pick he dot even more particular and he's been speaking about last to roland pease fussy eaters nf i miss the fussy eight is anything that there's seven hundred species out there on the list one hundred of them and probably many less than that to any really significant extent but this instable they the eucalyptus leaves the nutritious in it are not gonna poison them so i really wouldn't hold that against them tristesse i've never twisted eucalyptus leaf myself i've tried it's not it's not great i'm nutritious is a relative term they nutritious compared to most plant foods and certainly compared to the source of plant foods that we eat so the challenge eating leaves presents to animals is that many of them contain all sorts of different nasty toxins the very loving protein they're very rich in fiber fiber the minute certainly and many of them contain compounds called tenants as well which reduced the ability of the animal to digest the food this worthy gut bacteria become important well the gut bacteria are certainly important in digesting the food and breaking down all that fiber so an important source of energy for koalas is the energy produced by the bacteria as they meant that farber really large hind gut which is you know like it'd be firm integration chamber but what we're still trying to learn is just the role of the bacteria play in coping with some of those other challenges the companies throw up so that's things like breaking down tannin's detoxifying some of the toxins that are in there i mean i also because understand it your project is seeing if you can shift the diet of some qualities from one species of eucalypt to another one that's right and the reason we're doing that is because a particular circumstance occurring in this population of koalas so this is.

five seconds
"western sydney university" Discussed on BBC Inside Science

BBC Inside Science

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"western sydney university" Discussed on BBC Inside Science

"Plant toxins and these guys have been up to to demonstrate that they can introduce bacteria from animals that experience on those diets to animals that are naive and that can alter the willingness if those animals to eight dollars plant foods can you see this being applied to other species can you see this being a technique that conservationists will adopt around the world i wouldn't give up on its use koalas for status i mean there's thousands of koalas that had bought into care each year in a stralia because of illness or injury the almost always treatable antibiotics and that really knocks the microbiome back and we know that the koalas that recover and a released successfully tend to be the ones where the microbiome recovers so that works encouraging in that suggests that we might be able to help restore that microbiome for these koalas but it can certainly be used to rub spacey's and i know that there's other people working working with altering microbiomes in animals to all sorts of anes really the conference i recently attended i saw people talk about transferring skin microbiomes two frogs which may help protect them from kitchen fungus for example an agricultural example in old example infects comes from northern australia where sarah scientists back in the eighty s introduced bacteria from some hawaiian goats believe it or not which imparted the ability for kettle in northern ustralia to detoxify a toxic amino acid called mimic sane which is found in a introduced would he laid him that goes into ministry area that established itself in the nova trillion kettle population into this day those cadillac able to eat this nutritious but toxic plant food ben more from western sydney university please don't try fecal transplants at home especially on koalas do leave it to the experts that is quite enough now see an week.

spacey cadillac western sydney university australia sarah eight dollars
"western sydney university" Discussed on Nocturne

Nocturne

10:26 min | 2 years ago

"western sydney university" Discussed on Nocturne

"You're listening to nocturnal. Is the night really more dangerous than the day. Are there more wicked people out at night. Common wisdom tells us that the darkness is malevolent and that we're inviting peril. If we venture out into it. Respectable, people go to bed at our spectacle time and those that are out in the wee hours or rather up to no good or get what's coming to them. But what about the night? The person who has that joyous burst of creative energy when the sun is gone. The person who seeks out the world in its altered shrouded incarnation because it's quiet or beautiful or different. Research in two thousand thirteen found a connection between night owls and those with a sinister constellation of personality traits ominously labeled the dark triad Pieter Jonasson is the lead author on that study. The Dr. tried are three traits, dusted word, triad, composed of psychopathy narcissism. In Maquiavelian Nissim copies, main feature is antisocial. Activity. Narcissism is characterized by extreme selfishness, grandiosity and creating admiration and Webster's defines Machiavelli Anisim as the view that any means, however, unscrupulous can justifiably be used in a chief political Power. It's chief characteristics are manipulation, deceit and exploitation of others. Typically anyone who has one of them has the other because they're not actually genuinely distinct. They have unique features, but they share a really meaningful core which has to do with things like dishonesty. And what I've called a fast life strategy and features like that. So it's your unlikely to find someone who is for instance, a narcissist and also not going to score reasonably well on psychopathy. For example, these are traits that are considered to be socially tagging. Cystic often considered to be social pathologies traditionally considered even to be things that needed treatment. Dr.. Jonathan was trained as a social personality psychologist. His work draws from multiple disciplines like economics and anthropology to understand human nature. He's done a number of research studies involving the dark triad. An academic currently, senior lecturer, and hopefully soon to be an associate professor of psychology at western Sydney University. I do research in social psychology, personality psychology as well as organizational psychology. Typically using an evolutionary paradigm that essentially means what are the functional reasons for particular, say, mate preferences or personality traits in people's lives, functional as in the silicates survival and reproduction. A lot of research has focused on mating strategies, particularly which ones work and why you can take apparently bizarre kind of sexual behavior like Budi Kohl's, friends with benefits, and you can understand them through the Parag Matic lens of evolutionary psychology. So strategies like playing hard to get, for example, you do if you have the meeting shortage, if you can't get the guys or the girls you want, maybe you lower your standards, maybe you cast a wider net or maybe you just stain. Dr.. Jonas research actually reveals quite a lot of overlap between mating strategies psychopathy and nighttime behavior. In fact, he says the pickup artist community has been particularly interested in his research and their efforts to enhance techniques for seduction and sexual success with women, much of which takes place at night picking up girls. I suspect his easier at night than it is during the day, like going to grocery store and trying to run your lines is probably harder than running your lines at a nightclub. You know, when you're dressed all flash and all these things that pick apart as do booty calls tend to predominantly be one of the defining features is that there a phone call made with the implicit at least intent to get sex, and they tend to occur when it's dark out. A sexual request at midnight is not seen as creepy as a sexual request at noon, people's engagement in relationships of. These kinds all related to the dark triad and is something there that the the, the Dr. try traits and related traits like casual sex attitudes, Princeton's casualties behavior are things that are more nighttime oriented. The personality traits included in the dark triad have generally been considered to be pretty socially unacceptable, except that may be changing narcissism up until recently was considered a personality disorder, and now that narcissism has gone, what you might call mainstream. It's it's no longer considered a pathology because his narcissism is essentially everywhere you go. Now, people careers are built on their narcissism. I often say to people, people who have the assumption that narcissism is a bad thing. I say, how's Connie west doing with his narcissism is really suffering. You know, he's doing well because of his narcissism. It's about how you define well, right? So if you define well as having positive relationships that say positive psychologist or even hippies might think people should have then, no, they're probably not having those kinds of relationships like spiritual enlightenment and things like that, but they're, they're getting the relationship partners they want. They're having career success. Corporate psychopathy is one of these related topics. These these apparent effect curse assholes are able to rise in these organizations and crew lots of benefits, both financially and even romantically sexually. The same traits that society claims to revile are often highly valued given the right circumstances. You may have the disposition to be high on psychopathy, but you could have a context that shapes you in so that your psychopathy is expressed in a way that we're not particularly bothered by. Maybe you become a police officer, navy seal professor, for example, and we're okay with that. But if you're psychopathy is paired with an environment that might create criminality in you, you end up being a naughty person so to speak. So these traits that seemed like they might be bad often come with some glimmer of utility. So the idea of these are bad traits. The first problem there is as Juan, said good and bad, or should matter of point of view. And so like psychopathy these are people who are really good at prioritizing themselves often at the cost of others. And so in a really highly connected mutual stick world that we live in. Now, those are traits that not only we don't like, but we don't want to punish because they potentially cost the rest of us in terms of extra analyses. But if your back is to the wall, these are traits that are particularly useful at prioritizing yourself to do things like survive to get the things you need from the world when you are either literally under survival threat, or you've lived in a world and your psychology has been shaped in a way that says, life sucks. Take what I can get now, because I can't predict that. There's going to be there a time in the future. And so this is one of the contributions that I think I've brought to this field actually is to get people to back up a little bit and say, hey, wait a minute as much as we don't like these traits as people who people who tend to be group ish in their disposition, there are likely to be benefits to being. For instance, psychopathic. They example, I always give is, look if you're a mom and someone steals your baby from you as you're walking down the street, your ability to chase that person down and beat them up is a function of your ability of your psychopathy to switch on and to stop caring about the abductor and to prioritize you and your baby. And so this has direct Darwin Ian value to save your child at the cost of someone else. And so people usually seem to resonate with that particular example because they're like, yeah, that's what I would do that. You know what? He sees that as copy, but you're building to beat someone up is essentially your ability to turn off your empathy systems and all psychopathy as a clinical disorder, like a killer. Psychopath is really just a person whose life has so commonly led them to have to prioritize themself that we call it a essentially a lifetime disposition that these people have, and we want to lock them up and they do horrible things. So they had enough bad experiences that they're always on alert whether or not people become psychopaths because of bad experiences. The fact remains that being on the receiving end of psychopathic behavior is usually pretty unpleasant. Most people CD's trade says dark. I mean, if you think about them in a personally, you don't want to date someone who who you know vertically is a narcissist or someone who's you know vertically as a psychopath. You might have some ink Lamey. Lots of women say, oh, my boyfriend's a psychopath, and they don't really mean in a clinical sense there just being angry about their boyfriends, but to know for sure that this guy is a psychopathic. This girl is a narcissist is these are undesirable traits for both offer a romantic partners for our business partners. Dr. Jonas and maintains that viewing the dark triad traits as black white or. Good and bad is a faulty categorization based on moral judgments. Even the labeling of the trade says, quote, unquote, dark is part of that bias. According to him, it's a holdover of what is essentially it's Festtage of what I would call the old way of thinking, which is openly from people who only see the world in light terms. They think light is the only way to go. They don't think that the dark offers anything of value beyond that's fine. These people detect them, punish them, kill them, run out of our cities, identifying eliminate these social pathologies. That's basically why it's the dark triad. You know. But these are the people who lead the raids in wars of front for time immemorial these people who are able to in times of famine to kill that cute little bunny when we need to eat. I mean, because you can turn off your empathy system. So when they keep bunnies looking with those is most people are incapable of being essentially the psychopath saying, I need to eat. I'm going to kill this cute little bunny.

associate professor of psychol Pieter Jonasson Maquiavelian Nissim Budi Kohl Machiavelli Anisim Webster Jonathan senior lecturer Connie west Princeton western Sydney University Dr. Jonas Juan Darwin Ian officer professor