35 Burst results for "webb"

"webb" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

04:11 min | 3 d ago

"webb" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"I'm jesse thorn. My guests are david mitchell and robert webb for almost thirty years. Now the to have performed as the comedy duo mitchell and webb. They've starred in shows like the mitchell and webb look peepshow and back which is just entering. Its second season on ifc. Well let's play a little bit of peep show which was the wonderful and so funny television show in which the two of you start for A something like ten twelve years nine seasons over quite a number of years You are a duo of roommates on the show and mark who is played by david. Mitchell is a socially awkward loan manager with a cynical outlook on life another intelligent but unlike a ball schlub. And jeremy who's played by my guest. Robert webb is is a slacker. And a musician without talent and the show also start. Olivia colman in wisconsin and created by jesse armstrong so in this clip jeremy span just got their first paid gig ever and he is celebrating at a restaurant with mark..

Olivia colman robert webb jeremy Robert webb david Mitchell mark david mitchell jeremy span jesse thorn mitchell second season two jesse armstrong webb first paid gig wisconsin duo almost thirty years nine seasons
The Latest: Rose the exception on a tough day at the Masters

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | Last week

The Latest: Rose the exception on a tough day at the Masters

"Justin rose has taken a remarkable full shop lead after the first round of the masters the English one nine under for his last eleven holes on his way to an improbable seven under sixty five on an extremely challenging first day at the hot and flushed Augusta national course it is the fourth time he's one of the first round at Augusta and he said that putting full clear of Hideki Matsui yama and Brian Harman Patrick Braden Webb Simpson are among those at two under with jobs space at one under on a day with just twelve players broke par on Graham make us

Justin Rose Augusta Hideki Matsui Yama Brian Harman Patrick Braden Webb Simpson Graham
How Three Women Re-Wrote the Story of War

On The Media

02:05 min | 2 weeks ago

How Three Women Re-Wrote the Story of War

"Before the vietnam war there was a law that banned women from reporting on the front lines of any war for the us. When president johnson refused to officially declare a state of war in vietnam in opening appeared no ban a handful of pioneering women bought one way tickets into the battlefield they had no editors no health insurance and little or no formal training reporter elizabeth becker former washington post war correspondent in cambodia and then npr's foreign editor and then national security correspondent for the new york. Times has just published. You don't belong here. How three women rewrote the story of war. Chronicling catherine lewa a french. Photojournalist franky fitzgerald an american long form journalist and author and kate webb in australian combat reporter elizabeth. Welcome to on the media will thank. You broke his great to be with you. I wanna start with where you started. You give your initial experience very short shrift. When asked why did you cross the ocean to cover a war. When you're so young you said the short answer was a nightmare. I was all too keen to leave behind. My masters adviser had rejected my thesis on the bangladesh war of independence after. I refused to sleep with him and he said one wasn't related to the other. Just tell me what happened. This was nineteen seventy two and there weren't that many women in graduate school and he made a move. And i said no. He pressed on and i said no he rejected. The thesis. said. I had to work harder on it. Then resisted any idea that one related to the other. That even made a pass at me. So you know you're young enough that you think that you have your whole life ahead of you and wary enough that i said i'm not leaving my life in this guy's

Elizabeth Becker Vietnam Catherine Lewa Franky Fitzgerald Kate Webb President Johnson Washington Post NPR Cambodia Elizabeth New York United States Bangladesh
"webb" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

02:50 min | 3 weeks ago

"webb" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

"Between the law and look for blessings and sky to make me. Hey and rich and live. Is that really what you on. I am a whole. I do fair lack a wedding down the down the miami product. No way home which you on down the downey. So could you up there bastard. Child don't trust you to do that with one. Hey and in a pod goal with the your stop. i am so easily satisfied. Either call of lover. Who would take little your aries session. I am a whole put you on a wedding dress down the ira down. The i am a product. No may home puts you those down. The down the can hot by spans. Alan and you know deceived. And.

"webb" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

07:45 min | 3 weeks ago

"webb" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

"Of an unknowing truth right on me. It's also the only place you are. That's right you know like well. That's why i can't when. I'm watching him making a murderer. I'm like proved that. I had a sandwich this morning like you can't you can't prove anything or you prove anything. You could be like the sandwich in there or there wasn't a sandwich like we record these conversations in it's fun to have that but like the files will be gone someday. You know what i mean like. Everything is slipping away. And the more you let. Go of form the boeing. The spirit the more capable you are of getting in touch with the formless and another word for the formless would be the eternal and the eternal is not really interested in which mammals making sounds was logically right and argued there point better. Everybody would do well to just be like i like everything in this universe this body. This mind is opinion. this thought. This voice is passing. The thing that isn't passing. is my pilot light. My pilot light is a piece of the same infinity that made the stars that built this body and that is the only thing. And that's why you say. God as he is not as i think of him but just just say like mary yes to it and you'll see all of this new stimuli coming from outside and inside and that's mysticism jarwin right. That's right domestic religion but as beautiful as much as that all rings totally true like radiating for me. It's not a thing against which you can measure yourself to see if you're practicing correctly that's right and that's what we most so desperately want. We want to know we're doing better than that guy and to be special and to know that you exist because i think it comes down to fear of death if i'm doing this well and you're agreeing with me. Then pete exists so the my lizard grain relaxes and goes derek. saami the listeners are may i exist. I'm special it's so different. I realized i had this dream about this guy. He was throwing playing cards. And i was throwing playing cards and when my playing cards got thrown. They turned into unbelievable just last night. Unbelievable perfect three dimensional butterflies flying in place or actually bees. They were like beautiful bumblebee butterfly. Hybrids so i was doing this impossible trick and the guy that was throwing the cards Would just throw a playing card in. Hit might be. He didn't care that. I was making literally a miracle and i was like. Oh that's why. I don't like that guy. It's a guy that i have a problem with. I was like you know. Why have a problem with that guy. He doesn't reflect back to me my specialness. He doesn't validate how much better i am than he is. That's humiliation and yet it's uncomfortable to and i'm all for vow mirrors back my value and mare backer value i mirror there's place but in the eternal scheme of things. I'm trying to get more comfortable going. I don't in the grand scheme need you. Derrick to like me are affirm me. I do short game right now. That's that's part of the poppet. Show that pete is putting on right now. I want you to like me. I'm trying more and more to drop on the inner source where all truth all life and everything comes from two point pointed inward instead of out of a made a whole career of going like is that good to get a lot of tweets. And it's a fucking fool's errand. Because as soon as i define myself by public opinion now. I'm addicted to it and even comedian in the world. I'm in a mansion on a hill scheming on how i can remain relevant and now again fifty-five Aren't anything learn. Nothing but more the pressure for more success. I mean it's a it's a. It's a momentum up hill off a cliff but not to overdo the boat metaphors. But i got to do more. I don't know if in your time So many of these waters you ran across the game Don miller but donald miller so he wrote a book called blue like jazz so he's a fascinating guy. We've known each other for super long time. And he's got this great bit language that he would use where he would talk about how. Everybody's life is basically a process of convincing. everyone else. Did they deserve to stay in the lifeboat. And because somebody's got to get out of life. But i mean the lifeboat. It's it's it's time brennan how everybody got go and so everything. I'm doing is in effort to persuade. Everyone around me and probably more deeply myself that i deserve to be in the lifeboat and i deserve a state lifeboat. I'm valuable in the lifeboat on the. Yeah and so he would tell he really had a look on. A huge failures are huge. Like how. How did i manage to do that or to treat those people like that or this thing in my life. This corner fell off or whatever it is. It's like oh well like that was me just obsessing on persuading everybody of my value in the lifeboat. Yeah that's it goes wrong. You're like i mean a kicked out a the lifeboat now. Oh for god's sake. And i got i got everybody's got a as a guy valuable in the lifeguard. I love that language. it's beautiful. I read that book decades. Before i was ready to hear it. I really think ears to hear is valuable thing. And i did not have i was reading it hoping it would reflect back to me what i already knew. I was not reading a book to hear something new I know my dad under the bus. I've quoted him saying that many times. But i think it's indicative of something that we all do. My wife left me. My first wife left me. I'm twenty eight years old. And he said will she laughed you. You've come out clean. And basically what he was saying was. Don't worry everyone's going to keep you in the lifeboat. She's she's a bad person. And you're a good person in your life so they was actually from that lens. I can see. And i even knew at the time. My dad is leading me. How he can it was just. It's indicative of what we do like your wife leaves you. I'm a failure. I can't keep it together. You know. I watched the tiger woods thing all the affairs. And all this stuff and how we love to tear down. And that's basically kicking him out of the lifeboat and what tiger needs to realize what i he doesn't need to realize anything. But what we all would do well to realize is your place in the lifeboat is evidenced by your being in the lifeboat. It's not paying twelve. Pga tournament perfectly. And it's not having a tv show or whatever it is in my case you are not a stranger here avance by the fact that you are here. Yeah that's your ticket to the show. It's not earned it's freely given and you have to fit your accepted and that's your work. No prayer to how many times they don't care is did it or didn't do it. Mostly in the thing that's tough about about. it's actually. it's a gift. i really do. See these gifts but like in my story I was the one who left the lifeboat. I was the one who you know in my first marriage like i was the one who who burned the thing down. I was the one who screwed up. And so for me it. It's basically as me hold my nose and back out of the lifeboat. Like i didn't belong there and and it took me a to like you know if you see your say. Hello the the in the dylan song. Says if you see her yeah. I always respected her for doing what she did and get free..

donald miller first marriage last night first wife twelve fifty-five this morning Don miller Derrick twenty eight years old saami two point pete brennan dylan
"webb" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

07:15 min | 3 weeks ago

"webb" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

"It was like billy graham crusade. Who here wants to make a commitment to pray this prayer every down which you to come up to the front come up to the front right now stand up and do it and i i was thinking finally some justice because all these people they they they stock bibles onto shelves in boy. And they're gonna see through this. Here comes our justice. And i swear to god the whole place just comes up in tears arm-in-arm like a you know. Come up to the front. He prays over him. Let him be faithful to pray the thing every day in the success stories and all the abundance and then they all sit down in the we have to get up and and i swear to god the the the the rest of the banks always been a little bit of a. I'm excitable. I mean is that is. Is that a secret at this point. An hour timpson and number. I'm arranging five. Oh who like gundy's. I'm obsessed with information i ha- prepare around four corners. All the time well anyways. So but i'm excitable. I've got this energy thing misdiagnosis a seven. I thought for sure you were is. Okay okay yeah. I could see that And so a so. They're all looking at me. Because i'm the one who would say something like the head of the label is there because it's a big moment for our band and they're looking at me and he's just sweating bullets looking at me and i'm and i'm looking like i met like the starting block of the fucking olympics. I'm gonna. I'm gonna sprint up there and grab the mic in sue five. This is your five. I'm glad i know you're going up. Challenge oh boy and and so they're all looking at me and just looking like do seriously another time not not right now and so we go up there and i do try to hold my tongue a little and all i sat just isn't like listening to guys i don't i i'm hearing some of that i can't speak to it And i i don't know like i don't know what that was all about terms of what's biblical. What's what's what's not. But here's a song i i do. All we can do is tell you our version of a thing and so. Here's the but what happened. Was we got through that night. But that night i went back to my hotel room and i wrote a song. That's called wedding dress and that song is not about bruce. Wilkinson is not about frigid. as ultimately it's song about me and and but but what it did is it was calling out just how much we want to hear that and how much how easily we will believe that and the course of it is I'm a whore. I confess but i put you on like a wedding dress and i run down the aisle and and it again. It's a song about me. It's a song about all the ways. I do that same thing. It was just triggered by seeing it done like a metaphor right in front of me. It took me a minute to figure out how i do it left and right but you wouldn't do it if we're not. Yeah god no. That's exactly right. I'm always in my crosshairs and you can't help. Be when you're a professional auto biographer. You're always in your crosshairs. The thing that pisses you off is the thing that deep down you know that you think that's true of everybody. Yes i think that's true. Yes right so anyways. That song i showed it to the band and they were like wow like. That's that's powerful song and we love it. We support you and that you could never play onstage mccain's goal and i was like you know what you guys are right like. We've spent ten years building something and it would just shatter it. But that was kind of the point that that song literally like launched my solo career. Yeah that's listened to it. It's it's a lovely song. And i couldn't quite figure out. There's there's imagery in it. That was like this about his divorce. Is this about what a grant also researching you while. I was listening to it so please don't banana unclear song or something. We mean the message. Is the wedding dress. That you on your. Yeah yeah. I mean to me at that. Time would have said if you're telling me the god loves me for any jesus plus blank whatever's in that blank is gotta go. That was the message of my. My practice of evangelical christianity was jesus is the whole shebang and so there's not other stuff i add to it right and so the idea was this guy selling people stuff they get for free like if because of jesus if that's if that's the way that you're looking at it and it wasn't for me at that time if jesus the whole shebang the whole enchilada for you and because a him you get all of god's love and riches for all eternity and like you are a son or daughter if that's if that's what it is then what's what has he withheld from me that you're selling me if i pray this prayer thirty times like are you really saying i'm going to get to heaven. It'd be disappointed that i didn't know this prayer because there's all this crap that god didn't give me ben. Apparently he withheld from jesus tube. Because that's what so it's like that's fathering me. I think that's one of the funniest things about again. I i understand the attraction to prosperity magic s. but it's it's built on the backbone of religion the didn't rescue his own son from crucifixion. Take my mouth maybe. If you had prayed the praya jay bilas. I wouldn't have been able to say no if you can read that obscure passage at the garden of good seventy. I'm going to have to let you be tortured and murdered right. You didn't live till nineteen ninety. Eight ran the book written. And so you'd have the benefit of this modern knowledge. Yeah it's just a little too. I mean i don't even have to explain what's by and it's been done a thousand times and he wasn't he didn't invent fat trick in. That book didn't do it for the first time. It's been done many times. But that's what i was responding to them of like you know like i'm undeserving of a thing. That's given to me for free. And i'm trying to come up with a way to buy it. I'm trying to come up with a way to convince myself. I don't have it right and that i still need it. And you're trying to sell it to me and convince me i don't have it and that was just like pry bristled at at it. Also just strikes me how much In the life of jesus. He's telling people to leave things no he didn't say like pray this prayer. And you'll be the greatest fishermen and all of galilee. He said. Drop everything and let's just basically go be hippies community that makes you you leave it right. Yeah because it's not anything anyway. Yeah it's it's the prodigal son over and over this guy's story would be if the prodigal son had gone on. His wayward adventure prayed the prayer jabe as he would become what donald trump you know what i mean like. You would've yes yes. We want to expand art era. Dory's that's needs. This isn't even interested in expanding his territories. I just read this. Ritchie pointed out that taught me that jesus always talking about a minority. He's always saying like we're like eleven in the bread. The don't get me wrong. The harassment read is is loved and accepted valuable and made of the same stuff. The as the eleven fundamentally but he's talking about a minority component. He's not diagnosed revolution of a new religion he sang. We'll keep the light burning for those confined at not a new.

donald trump ten years Ritchie five thirty times Wilkinson Eight Dory olympics seven jesus first time one frigid nineteen ninety eleven An hour bruce christianity evangelical
"webb" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

06:26 min | 3 weeks ago

"webb" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

"It's like you kind of sabotage yourself. You can't help but right now mimic yourself. You can't help but try to recreate a thing. That was organic eighteen minutes ago. You know you just can't help do it. And and that worked for a little bit honestly near the end of ten years with that band which is god knows more than twice what most people get in a band. I started to realize what we've built a thing and there's expectations around thing and there's people's livings connected to a thing and i have. I'm more risk tolerant than the rest of my friends. And i think as a songwriter. This just things i want to explore. You don't spend ten years. Touring in and out of a lot of churches and big christian festivals to not have books full of of content. That you can't wait to write about but you're kind of gnawing on the hand that's feeding you the whole time and i couldn't do that inside of the band and so i started kind of write songs that were not in an effort to launch a solo career. God knows but songs they were like. Wow that's great and you can never ever play that onstage. Eddie navarre sugar low. You know what i know. What give me a area that you were singing about her writing best. Yep so here's an example so there was a book that you might have heard it because it was really big and this would have been lord knows twenty years ago but well okay by the way. You should have josh harris here. Because character he wrote that book and he's fully deep whatever and has fasting perspective on all this his former life as the guy who wrote talked to josh anyways so it was this book the jay okay so the prayer jabe was this little hardback book. It looks like it goes on coffee table. Written by getting bruce wilkinson great bible teacher. he'd written all these great commentaries and stuff but this little book was about this one. A random prayer from the old testament super obscure character. We don't know much about. We don't really know much other than this one. Line of this prayer. He prayed about expanding territory and giving him and we don't really know what god did. We don't know how he answered. We don't know if he prayed it more than one time. We don't know much. But bruce found it and he thought you know i'm gonna make a little thing out of this so he wrote a book rage and it was like a thing. Where if you pray this prayer every day for thirty days. It's the prayer that god can't not answer the god must answer. That's on the back of the book. Got and it was like take the jay bilas challenge and go pray this prayer every day for thirty days. And god's going to expand your territory and give you riches and give you wealth and he would say a spirited gospel yes but it was being done. The trojan horse was beautiful. It was it really. Was i mean he built. It's so beautifully. He was an unlikely character to come up with this. Because he'd been a trustworthy guy. It reminds me of it reminds me of like the bible code. There was like a real. Yes hi to be like can we. Yes crack. the bible's magic to work for us and it just squeeze it like an orange and so anyway so he wrote this book. And i don't even think he probably thought maybe he just had hit hit a quota or something. I don't know but he he turned it in and it actually just went. He sold ten million copies of it. It just went huge. And so then. As as i'm sure you understand there were just merch lines flying every direction. The job as devotional. Bible in the craig says i love. We're talking about one. Passage in the old testament gets bible. It's fascinating and but he and he would do this thing where and so. Here's that's all context. Here's what happened so my band was at one of these things that it was called. The cba was atlanta georgia. The christian booksellers association. It's where you go. If you're a person who makes things it's getting sold into that world you go there you make your case and you play your showcase and you do your thing so we were there to do and we had a great spot. It was like all of the christian Retail buyers for the nation. Were in a ballroom. These are the people who put everything on every shelf. It snagged christian bookstore. That's hundred percent correct. Yeah for the retail so they were all there and it's also authors to so and we had this great spot. Because because bruce wilkinson prejudice was the biggest world right then it was so big it was so big like these stores were doubling their revenue just with all the end caps at the front of the stall the j. as goods like all the james branded stuff because the book was so big expanded. A secretary bro. well ironically. It's one of those works but just for me. Yeah that's right but it only works for me. Works wants but it works. It works under very narrow condition but anyways so we were the opening slot and he was the headliner Or you know what i'm sorry. He was he was the headliner. We were the after party. That's what it was so we were in this big ballroom. Some other bands at played. An bruce wilkinson was going to speak. And there's a huge deal because he's the he's the biggest thing in the world right then to these people so he gets up and i'm thinking okay. I don't want to be one of those people like that. We mentioned jars of clay. They're super good. Pows mind that we've been friends for twenty years and those guys have gone through seasons in their career where they got really big like they had. That breakout stuff. That happened with their music in the ninety s and they were opening for staying like they broke out of the universe for a minute. Yeah and they've always been automated. They're still awesome. But the point is everybody piled on those guys when they got big because it was like. Oh something must be up. You know like the cell thing anymore. They're not even a thing. You can do any more successful in anywhere doing anything by texting how you do it like. That's not but in the nine we were mad or we green. They went to geffen suspicious. Exactly so anyways i was like i wanna walk in with an open mind and i was like i want to hear what he has to say. Maybe this isn't i. I've just heard stuff about the book. I've read this. I want to hear what he has to say so he gets up and for two straight hours. Just tickles years of all these chris retail buyers and like. Listen everybody. I want to give you the best challenge for thirty days. You pray it and this time next year you're gonna come back in here. I mean i. I had i watch it. Come out of his mouth. You're gonna come back in here and i want. I cannot hear your stories of how your christian bookstore has doubled in. Revenue doubled in size. Your gonna be buying the store next door. It's the press. God must answer. He's an expand your territory. I cannot wait and who here..

bruce wilkinson thirty days twenty years next year josh bible Bible twenty years ago ten million copies two straight hours ten years eighteen minutes ago Eddie navarre josh harris hundred percent more than twice atlanta georgia jabe more than one time bible code
"webb" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

08:06 min | 3 weeks ago

"webb" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

"Loves you and i. He doesn't know me saying anybody. And i go got review to and he is. That's why we don't get cove. It and i was like okay. You know what. That's why did that bother me. Because i subscribe to those feelings all the time i i'd love me and that's why when bad things happen that fell apart. Yeah well and because occasionally those rules work like in any random thing we can anything. We're testing at any time. It's it's as you were good boy. And that's why jet appetite to you and that's why they gave shocks. You don't have insurance. Being a good boy is a good thing even scientists that will say getting the the tribe to like you as beneficial like there's no shortage i'll find out scour the universe defined the expert that agrees with me and that and that's why talking old people as a drag because they have every seat on their council filled and what jesus is saying. I think i started says about new wine. Skins means tear the whole thing down. That's what buddhist when he says the world is on fire. Humiliate yourself surrender. And do the better but mary did. This is again ritchie. Just say yes. I don't understand. But yes. I don't understand but okay i don't understand but how that's all is said and that's why and it's back to failure. It's back to like again like why you're pregnant. In that time without a husband was was a failure idea right. Do you think growing up without a father was a failure. Yes look at this. Jesus getting baptized. This wasn't a guy whose agenda was to prove to you that he was perfect or that the plan was to be perfect or the perfect. This was a guy going like okay. I'm here and i'm dance. Most impart for imperfect circumstance and the most imperfect moment in the most unlikely part of the world. It's like all of those things lined up and actually the whole story in the old testament story is nothing but those stories. It's one cup after the other as the hero. And that's kind of it's like it's almost designed to make sure you don't mistake these people for euros that's right and that's what i i love that. Okay what did i did. I do this. We could do this all day. I'm afraid because it's all i really wanna do. Some some forced some willed humiliation. I remember i was talking to krishna. Dasa and criticism musician who was with round us in india. Who met marashi. I won't tell the whole story. But the point is a guy who's who's pretty dyed in the wool when it comes to who is guru is and what he's about what. His practices ends up architecture. That means he he's in love with his guru. He's in love with the universe and that's how he is truth and i was like i watch this documentary about a guy who interviewed people who were in cults and he d program and one of the things that he would say is. We're not all one you think we're all one That's ridiculous. Like if i poke you feel that that's you you're over there. I'm over here. And i and i said to k. d. said what would you do if if d program are said that to you you're grew wasn't the universe he was a man. You're not the same as me. You're over there. And say he said okay and i was like that some next level i never thought of just going the bible contradicts itself. Jesus which is a man. He's not even referenced another historical documents and just going okay. He's not a man in the sky but also he is jesus the one and only son of gotten so am i and so are you. These are other wonderful paradoxes. Because if the these phrases made sense they wouldn't they wouldn't add up to mystical religious practice. It would be like all. These are my rules and this is the construction. This is not ideas their relationships there are things that are supposed to feel different at different times. So with hundred percent right. Why don't you tell me. I didn't listen to candidates. Call i knew about annan's call Tell me a bow how you grew up. We start anywhere you want. I'm interested in texas christian. University is interesting to me. Yeah i now just starting a christian band what it means to be in a christian ban what it meant to be all. That's very interesting. Yeah well so. I always lived in south. I started in memphis tennessee. I live in nashville now. So i'm not too far from from there but And i have always played music. That's always been i've Much the way my story goes is. I'm not good hardly anything. I'm like five six. I'm uncoordinated was terrible school. I've been unsuccessful in relationships. You know my whole adolescent was a nightmare. Everything about my life was frustrating. And then i found music and found it really young and that was a gift. Why was it. What what flavor nightmare was it. Well just like everything that was being measured and valued in the first half of my life. I was terrible at so it's like do you have a girlfriend. How're you doing in school. How can kick the soccer ball. And i and how tall are you. I was terrible awful Awkward about all that stuff. But i found music and i found it early and so that became like my whole thing is good hardly anything but the few things i'm good at i'm super fucking good at five managed to be able to focus on those few things and that's my whole life is obviously the the slow working my way down to the tip of the spear you know to get to spend as much time as possible only doing things that i feel like i'm uniquely can bring value you know into situations that i can get into and so the point is when i was a kid i found music found early single digits seven eight nine somewhere in there and then just focused on that to the detriment of everything else and so just went ahead and kept all those narratives going failed out of school in just was terrible and continued to be at the things that didn't seem to matter to biogen college. I didn't go to college. Yeah texas no so. I was at didn't go to college. I was college in proximity to college. Mind geographically physically. Yes yes geographic. So what happened was Plane band all through high school wound up in. Its it was. It was this monk's seventh or eighth century monk or whatever and And he was like one of the first translated the bible from latin to english and did it through songs. That was the cute story. We all learned in college. I didn't because i didn't go to college. Clarify that one more time but all my friends were learning that so we started this band and it was started in texas i moved to texas. My parents moved to texas. When i was in high school. And a buddy of mine from high school and a from his his from college Started a band and a month later. They needed a guitar player. In that was me they. We all met each other. And my my buddy. Who was the other guitar player and singer. I sang and played guitar and wrote songs for that for that band. came so the other guy who played in that band other singer. His dad was the pastor mega church pastor second baptist. Church houston Ed young huge huge president the southern baptist convention for many years. Big figure in that deal. I didn't grow up with that. I grew up in the church and stuff My parents i was in the south of course but He was at tcu texas christian university. That's kind of our band got started. So i'm kinda moved there to fort worth texas and that was kind of where the band i was a little wandering and then move there and we started the band and toured texas colleges for a bunch of years and that was in the early nineties and then we got signed to a record deal and imprint. So you play well so and so it was..

india nashville marashi english Jesus jesus latin eighth century bible seventh a month later texas memphis tennessee krishna first half ritchie hundred percent early nineties one cup one
"webb" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

06:58 min | 3 weeks ago

"webb" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

"There's this exhausting process that's going on. It seems to come in waves the crash on the beach. And i think we have some a couple of friends in common thing in about gungor. And i'm thinking about dave bizarre. Maybe and folks who have been through this and publicly documented it in such incredibly helpful way for for people to have at least some bread crumb trail to follow. And where i've landed is in order to avoid the exact same thing you were talking about just a second ago with. I don't wanna become a reverse fundamentalist. And now i'm certain about these new things just in the said just a certain was about the old things and now i'm defending and always coming apologised for this new thing where i've landed is and i'm not trying to be provocative to use language like this but i think words like belief are heavy. They're heavy unnecessarily and really loaded for people. And where i am is like you know what maybe we could avoid all this d and reconstruction. Maybe we need to deconstruct the deconstruction. And let's and the only way to do that is to stop constructing. Don't construct anymore. What if rather than believing stuff beliefs. Which again brings conclusion bias with. It brings a lot of exhaustion. These great patterns of what if we just hypothesized. And that's kind of so now i don't have beliefs. I have hypotheses. I have hypotheses about reality. That i'm testing in real time. All the time if they continue to hold weight and ring true. Let's bring those with us. Continue to test them and if they turn out not to work overtime then that's fine. Let's let's come up with some new hypotheses. And i'm not and i'm and i'm actually not even closed off to the hypothesis. The let's test it of there is a god who is both good and powerful. Who made all things to whom we must be reconciled. Who's made away blah blah blah blah. That's a hypothesis. Try it out. See how feels. Yeah but but exactly but then. Let's do ironically what jesus would do and let's let's maybe respond with follow up question and say okay. Well that all sounds fine saved from what like my my bad like what did i do. Are you saying it's it's so there's a whole here comes a whole theology to come in to explain that to me when but what if that's what if those those sources of authority don't really ring true to me or matter to me in the same way they do. You can explain it in some other way psychological guilt. I mean we have the book everybody poops because out of the womb. We feel shannon. Walk what we are my daughter. I don't think she does yet but later when she learns that you shouldn't fart in front of people and then and then somebody a longtime dallas. I really do sure arts are hilarious but like do you know what i mean like. Shame and there's no better hotbed that i've found fame and self An undulation flagellation flashlights. And yet whipping yourself then the church and when you have adt theologian coming in protesting a little too much about how you are. Born with. Original sin and a wicked. I'm not convinced you're not still feeling really bad that you shit. I'm not convinced that you feel shame. That poop comes out of your body every morning. And i don't think you can accept okay. I'm talking about real deep. Young men big unconscious row hardwired. Yeah right and so. I don't need any help feeling. And even when you're like the works of jesus that save us. I'm like i i'm with i'm with richie doesn't love us because we're good. God loves us. Because god is good and the genes didn't come to change god's mind about humanity. Jesus came to change humanities lining up. And i was like that's a combined that's a complete reversal. That's my working hypothesis right right that. That sounds good i end. He says it'll take your entire lifetime. Three ritchie three hard richest come in The third one is the whole game is to accept that you were accepted. That's the whole to say that. I poop and i have lustful thoughts violent thoughts and i've hateful about this and that and that and you still. You are accepted class consumerism. If you don't if you don't create the problem then you can't you can't sell the solution that's right and so it's like you have to come in and that's why the probably both grew up in a church without on a wall somewhere of like. Here's the chasm and here's you and here's god's plan that was that was Steps to peace with. God was the name of our search laws. And you gotta get over the chasm and here comes the bridge judas. And that's how you get across a but if there's no chasm and if there's no broken there's no benefits like second trying to sell me and the economy of the evangelical you know military complex or whatever starts to fall but underneath that spark that we were talking about that. The plumbing and machinery is built on top of and i do think that sparks there. And that's the challenge of being kind of deep converted. Or whatever i don't like to i think more about where i'm going and we're coming from worming propelled to than we're i'm being. I wanna get into that there. Were you sure no no. No i was just saying you know for me. It's yeah it's just it. It's a matter of remaining open to where you've been as a possibility. Not just something. You've never considered and i think that's the challenge of saying okay. I spent thirty five years of my life obsessed with maybe a version of this. That wasn't true. I i've i you know i you know some some. Some god's deserve atheists right and sometimes you have to kill not real god to find a real maybe there is one there. But that's what it's what it's you know. It's the death this whole but you end but the point is when you get through it you have to try to remain open and this is the hard part to sang. Maybe there is a version of something that i am familiar with but i need a whole new way to look at it and talk about it in language it but it's maybe there was something true back there. Maybe i need to find my way back into it. But without the connotation all the baggage shit that i'm bringing within that's the challenge is to is it's not just say okay i'm deconstruct namo condemn anything except thing. I previously the none of it to be truly open. You gotta be truly open you know. And that's what's hard anyway there. It is no that was. I love that we can wrap it up here. That was worth it for me. These conversations are are a hate to use edifying triggering word for can't it's a accountability. I find it very edifying. I always think of george harrison who is a beautiful mystic black. Can't he seemed to have been a beautiful missing and he said god it's great moment in that scorsese documentaries in the second part. Yana goes. gold isn't just a big old man in the sky. And you know he also is knows like that's that's what i'm going to for. I'm going nowhere to stand. You know what i mean. It's.

Yana Jesus thirty five years second part jesus richie george harrison both third one God gold dave bizarre second ago gungor one friends second judas shannon three
Has the Pandemic Resulted in the Death of Privacy?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

04:37 min | Last month

Has the Pandemic Resulted in the Death of Privacy?

"Last year. Around this time we talked with. Amy webb futurist and founder of the future today institute about how businesses might respond to the pandemic and how things might change in the future as a result of such a big direction. Changing event one thing. She was really clear on. Is that most likely. The pandemic would accelerate the death of privacy. And now amy webb says. Yep that definitely happened starting in school one of the interesting thing. That's things that has happened over the past twelve months that we've really relaxed some of our feelings about privacy and security for a lot of people who were able to send their kids back to school. Those schools required downloading an application and filling out. Pretty private details about your children that ranged from where you've traveled to whether or not somebody had symptoms all of. That's attached to that child's name and it gets uploaded and there was no choice if you want your kid to go to school. Got to download this app to your phone. Which by the way. There's a lot of other personally identifiable information. That's that's attached to it and it's not like these apps for sending purely anonymous data back and forth. We're going to have to reconcile that at some point. And i here's like another interesting set of connections that i can make about the past twelve months multiple times. We've been in situations whether it was the emergence of the corona virus or the insurrection on the capital or the craziness and volatility in the market as a result of game stop trading in previous years our government institutions and our regulators would have stepped in and they would have stepped in to to mitigate what was happening and instead we saw companies stepping in either to provide services that the government couldn't or to regulate in some way one of the things that we saw happen as a result of the virus was something that i call a c. it's like a diaz except companies so rather than it being a distributed. Denial of service gobert denial of service And it happened again again. And i think we are now on a path where we have to ask given what we've just seen over the past twelve months. What role in the future to our institutions. Play and what influence do companies actually have on society. That you know. Maybe they've had for a while but we haven't been willing to confront and does that mean for all of us going forward so fair to say examples of a see dos would be for example twitter banning president trump robin hood shutting down trading when things got really relatively game stop. Aws and yeah. I mean we can. We can rattle off at this point a pretty long list and again our governmental institutions in this country. Were not set up to move fast and break things. There's one way to look at this last year at this time and we talked the virus felt like it was emerging. The problem is that we. We'd like a four month lead time and there just wasn't any action taken so in a way Everybody kind of dragged their heels and failed to make decisions and contingency plans at every level and in every type of business in every school. There's nobody seemed to be prepared. Even though we were essentially watching a slow-motion explosion happening and then in the aftermath of that we saw you know. I don't know there's no other way to to phrase this. I mean we saw a government leadership that just didn't have the chops we had people running the show. That just didn't have the experience. And i think that created this vacuum for google and apple to step in and try to build contact tracing systems and a year later everyday people stepping up to build corona virus vaccine information websites. Because it's been so challenging and there was there was no direction whatsoever and in the interim we've got companies making decisions about whether or not to allow people to do their business or to say what they wanna say. I think there's been a really profound shift that everyday people will start to recognize. That hasn't an apparent yet because we've been dealing with the crisis from day to day

Amy Webb Future Today Institute Gobert Robin Hood Twitter Apple Google
"webb" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

The Michael Berry Show

03:52 min | 2 months ago

"webb" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

"With real energy by the way he had a lot of people who who felt displaced or ignored and He gave them a voice especially with the kind of policies That he did. He advocated and the things we got pass. So i i think i think senator holly is white it's interesting to see what the whole impeachment processes everything kind of side tracked and and if this point but i think when we misses all over those people who are thinking that The the mo the more populous part of the party is going away that this was just a flash in the pan. We're going back to where we were are sadly mistaken. There is no energy there where the where they came. There is no energy justice with our guest is jeff webb. The book is american restoration to unshackle the great middle class. And hey mommy's you're going to be very interested in what business jeff comes from all you girls out there. This next segment is for you. Were talking to jeff webb. He is the author of american restoration. How to unshackle the great middle class. He has credibility when talking about business and therefore politics because of his immense success the industry from which he hails. You might be surprised by. This is what. I call a mommy segment. And i consciously do more and more of these because i think that women especially women who raise children and our divas of the home whether you work outside the home or not are not sufficiently engaged in our political process because too few people have not gone out of their way to engage them to talk about mom to talk to mommy's about things like school and healthcare and our economy and the things that matter to the people who are keeping the families together so that in mind jeff you come from the cheerleading industry and i guess y'all were the biggest the biggest boys. Y'all were the biggest folks in the cheerleading industry. Right talk a little bit about your background. Well i I was yelling at the university of oklahoma. And when i graduated i decided to start a company that would take what had been a kind of a a student leadership position. Frankly for for for decades and try to modernize the concept was and athleticism entertainment to To cheerleading and raise a little money from friends and family wasn't very much started. The company ran out of my apartment for several years and hired college your leaders to To help me train. High school and college cheerleaders and mostly in the southern united states about how to incorporate kind of new concepts of have with all the acrobatics and so on and the the the concept took off and We were able to eventually. We could create kind of the concept of a cheerleading competition. What people have seen on. Espn for years and years. Just kind of our idea. And that we use that to actually showcase the kind of the new style that we developed and We were we hooked up with espn and the and it's early days and our early days and the exposure we got on espn helped drag the company along and and expanded nationally. We added uniforms and As well and i built a pretty significant Pretty significant company. So when i when i i left the practice of law in the mid nineties to start a real estate company and i.

jeff webb jeff southern united states holly mid nineties espn senator Espn university of oklahoma years few people divas american
"webb" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

The Michael Berry Show

04:26 min | 2 months ago

"webb" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

"You know what we have too little of. We have two little of positive thought too little ambition to little of optimism. Too little of what makes america great too many naysayers dragging the rest of us down drowning us in the misery and the sadness instead of toppling monuments. We should just build more. So i have consciously decided that. We're going to have more positive guests on this show. And i want to leave you or you. Leave me when you leave this show. I want you on many days to say you know what. I'm gonna do something positive. I'm gonna make a difference. I'm gonna feel better so with that in mind. Our guest is jeff webb. He is the author of american restoration. How to unshackle. The great middle-class less start with the problem you're solving is the great middle-class currently shackled. Jeff absolutely not being the middle class. has been under a salt for forty years just kind of trickling down if you will of of their capabilities. They're bared their opportunity to move forward. it's been chip away chip away chip away for nearly forty years and You know you you have a situation now. This is pre pandemic where forty percent of american workers live paycheck to paycheck anyway. Any money to same for you know a medical emergency kind of family emergency for college tuition and any of that. They have an average credit card debt unpaid and credit card balance each seven thousand dollars. They can't seem to pay off. Their kids have come home from college or the mountain student debt. Living in the basement there they they're either underemployed or can't find a job and again this is pre pandemic and think everybody understands that when the smoke clears here. Hopefully just a few months. We're gonna find that the middle class working americans have been harmed more probably than any other group You know president president trump was the first president and a couple of decades really to kind of the mantle of the middle class.

Jeff forty years jeff webb forty percent trump first president each seven thousand dollars two little american american restoration america pre pandemic president couple americans
Preparing for Core Web Vitals with Kathy Brown & Karl Kleinschmidt

Voices of Search by Searchmetrics

09:07 min | 2 months ago

Preparing for Core Web Vitals with Kathy Brown & Karl Kleinschmidt

"Kathy let me start off with you. Gimme the update in the lay of the land. Where do we stand in terms of the out of core web vitals. So you got it exactly right. We are anticipating that the core web vitals will roll out in may twenty twenty one. And it's going to be part of the larger page. Experience ranking factor that ragging factor includes lots of other ranking factors. That are already employ such as https mobile friendly and penalizing intrusive ads in mobile. But what's new is the core web vitals of course so most of our clients are busy looking at their google search console. Report to see what. Google is telling them the corwin i need to focus on and make better and yeah we're just waiting to make better and waiting for the rollout in may so interesting to me about core web vitals. It is really the start of google talking a little bit about what their ranking factors are not specifically from a content ranking but from a technical perspective when we think about what core web vital actually are. Help me break down the difference between the core web vitals. We're talking a lot of detail about what each individual acronym means but overall what our core web vitals. What's the utility for them. Yeah the other thing. I wanted to mention is. It's kind of unusual for google to pre-announce changes. I mean usually we have these four updates or changes at gonna get just roll out or we don't get a lot of notice about the with the vitals we've gotten almost a year's advance notice or where vital so that may give you a clue on how important google thinks. These are the core web vitals. As i mentioned are part of an aggregate raqi factor called page experience. And one thing. I think is kind of interesting as we know. Google has been telling us like you need. Make your pages more performance. They need to be faster. A lot of people listening to this podcast probably know about sap which is the first content full paint so you need to get something on the screen fast or your user will abandon your side and never come back. What i find interesting about. Page experience in the core web vitals is that it's not just about speed it's also about. The experience of the page. Does the page jump around. Does the page respond input and in fact. That is the three core web vitals. There's largest tempur paint which is a measure of one. Something meaningful appears on page. There's f. i d. Which is i input delay. And that's a measure of how quickly the page response to any input. Like a click. Or scroll and then finally we have cunard layout shift which is a measure of how much the page jumps around as rendering. So it's almost like a more holistic view of the page experience and not just about speed but it's also about having pleasing experience as you get the page loaded and interact with it. I think it's also important to say that a lot of your user experience and or technical staff of bharati heard of these terms in the past and maybe are already tracking them before this was announced. But there's a lot of little intricacy to worry about with how google is calculating them that you wanna be careful to take into consideration so that you don't rely on non google definitions of those terms one of the things that i took away from some of google's announcements last year and the rollout of core web vitals that they are actually talking about what their ranking factors are. Carl as you mention. Google is essentially assigning values to how they're figuring out what they consider to be a good page experience. It's one of the most important ranking factors that at least they've publicly stated and there's https and some of the security protocols and some of the other things that google on the technical side of said. This is how we evaluate pages. Kathy you also mentioned that. Normally they don't give us an advance notification of when something is rolling out normally they roll it out and then tell us to me the separation of church and state here is when it's a content ranking factor. How do we figure out whether something is relevant to the audience. We're going to do it and then tell you when it is a tactical ranking factor. They give us a little bit more notice so that brings us to the conversation about making the business case. What the business. Impact of the rollout of core web vitals. We know that some of our clients are having a pretty easy time of getting the organization to focus on some of these court web vitals and with some of other clients or some other organizations. We've talked to. They've had to beat the drums a little bit to get upper management or other departments to really pay attention because it takes a while to really diagnose problems with your poor web vitals not like updating a title tag. It's definitely more involved than that. When i think core web vitals. I know it's kind of in the seo bucket because google made the announcement and it definitely is going to impact your ranking. But it really shouldn't be thought of just benefiting seo a pleasing page experience at loads quickly response to input and doesn't visually jump around is good for everything. It's good for your conversions. It's good for your bounce rate. And if i'm in an oral at have to help make the case for allocating the appropriate vestment for working core web vitals. Those are the arguments. I would make and google's actually published quite a bit of studies as well as some of the science had behind the four webb vitals. One of the comments. I'm going to quote this directly out of the google article. We found that when a site needs the above thresholds in these thresholds. They given us for the poor web. Vitals users are twenty four percent less likely to abandon page loads by leaving the page before any content has been painted. So it's just not an seo thing to be good for your conversions. It's going to be good for people not abandoning shopping hearts. So i think that's the business case you really need to make mean yes. Of course we all want higher rankings but it is all about making the experience so good that all your other core. Kpi's are gonna benefit as well. And i think if you have a department they're gonna be your best friends in selling the impact of it. They're going to have very very similar goals to what you want to accomplish. So i would definitely get together with them to make sure that you explained from an seo perspective and most of the time they're going to agree with you and that you can join forces to sell it. I think the business impact here is. There are potential ranking impacts. That are going to be significant. That google has said a year in advance. These are the metrics that were going to be evaluating for some of our technical ranking factors. If this was not important. Google would not have given us so much. Lead time to be able to optimize our site for these metrics. They pulled his was going to happen. They provided the metrics. And now they're actually giving a general sense of the timeline of when it's going to roll out my feeling is that this is gonna be something that will heavily impact. Seo performance. I think that the case that you to have mentioned is hey. This is good for the overall experience. This is going to impact business performance and we should take it seriously because google has given the search community a long time a long leash a lot of leeway to be able to implement changes to optimize towards these metrics. Am i wrong to think that this is going to be a big deal when it rolls out of any sense of the type of impact that core web vitals might have when it actually comes alive to market well. Of course the big hundred thousand dollar question is how much impact will either good or poor core. We're vitals. i think it's important to just make the point. That content is still important. I mean if you're pages not a great match for the searcher intent and it doesn't satisfy the surge even if you have great core web vitals you still going to struggle but there are plenty of market and niches especially like an ecommerce where the differentiation between the different pages is not that big and at that point. Google's got to pick someone to rank in position one and if most the pages are just product pages and they're kind of similar you can bat that four by bills will have an impact on who makes it into position one.

Google Kathy SAP Carl Webb
Will Cancel Culture Come for Us All?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:42 min | 3 months ago

Will Cancel Culture Come for Us All?

"You heard representative. Jim jordan of ohio. Say this week as the house debated whether to impeach the president many of these republicans are calling it cancel culture. This has been a controversial topic. But we're going to dive in quality assurance where we take a second look at a big tech story in the news. Last march futurist. Amy webb predicted that cancel culture and the backlash to it would become an even bigger deal in the year ahead said now that's proving true in more ways than she even expected in the aftermath of the attack on the capital. Eric trump Very publicly proclaimed that his family. You know we're being cancelled and it's interesting to see the push pull the tension between those seeking to cancel others. Those complaining that they themselves have been canceled. You know this is one of these situations where the technology enabling all of this is both megaphone and also the infrastructure and also the stop button so the question really is. Who's the ultimate arbiter. What are the rules. They're becoming less and less clear. How do we tease apart. The arguments about cancel culture that are kind of specious and the real behavior. That is behind it right. So here's the predicament. There's a sort of glomming on when you feel like you agree with somebody. The instruments of technology of made that really easy i mean. Let's think back a few months ago when everybody was posting a black square on their instagram accounts. Away of signaling. Their discontent corporations were doing that too. That has translated to real world. Cancellations i mean we have started to see corporate denials of service ranging from aws kicking parlor off to facebook and twitter and more recently youtube silencing. Donald trump's accounts and that for some has social consequences but for other that has real world business consequences. And we're in the situation where we are both inventing the rules and playing the game at the same time. is there confusion. Do you think because there are many people who say particularly. Let's say like on black twitter that there was never a mechanism to address problems. Before and that you know what came to be seen as cancel. Culture was really almost like collective bargaining happening on twitter. It was a whole bunch of people who could like you said express the same opinion and get a result when they never could have before well. The lifeblood of cancel culture is dopamine right. It's the hit that we get from. Feeling like we're a part of a movement and you can see that visualized in metrics. There are some easy fixes to this. We're not gonna fix our culture overnight. The actual problems that we are having we can totally address the mechanisms that are helping to fan the flames twitter could take away metrics so the general public no longer sees the number of times something has been re tweeted or liked maybe you as the original poster could see that but others cannot. That's one way to reduce that dopamine head to reduce the sensation that we are feeling the sense of urgency. 'cause urgency is also part of cancel culture and the same could happen on facebook. There are addressable problems here. you know. There's an argument to be made. That cancelling cancel culture gives rise to additional cancel culture right. it's it becomes as vicious cycle. I mean that's what we're seeing right now with eric trump and the remarks that he's making about cancel culture and and specifically with regard to his dad. You know. i think that's where some of the resentment comes in. I do think that around the time of the metoo movement what has come to be called cancel. Culture right was an exercise in power by people who traditionally have not had power and that that was part of the democratizing effective social media that a lot of people could say the same thing all at once about a misbehaving man or white supremacy and get a result. And that's the tricky. That's the tricky side of us right. Because arguably the net effect of that movement did real good in society and so cancelling the mechanisms that would have led to. That may not be the best for our longer terms but the flip side is that we wind up in the situation that we're in now and if you stop for a moment and think about the words. The semantics cancel culture is alliterative. It's easy to remember. It's an active verb and it itself is conceptually easy for people to understand whereas dachshund or something else may not be right. 'cause cancel culture was a more positive reframing in some ways of targeted harassment which i think we have to be honest about. That has been the mechanism of the far-right online. And you know it's like cancel. Culture was the leftist rebrand That's you know. I hadn't thought about that before but you're absolutely right and i think that that is some of the that is currently being made by those on the far right which is that they themselves now are being targeted and harassed and listen. I'm a target of some of that. Hate and as much as it pains me to say this. They do have a point. Cancel culture impacts them through targeted attacks the same way that they are targeting others. The solution to all of this would be for somebody to come out to the playground. Blow the whistle and tell us all to settle down. We're going to get detention by that. I mean leadership which we have had very little of over the past few years.

Eric Trump Amy Webb Twitter Jim Jordan Donald Trump Ohio Facebook Confusion House Youtube
Missions to Mars, the Moon and Beyond Await Earth in 2021

Geek News Central

02:44 min | 3 months ago

Missions to Mars, the Moon and Beyond Await Earth in 2021

"He may have been asked to have that. Removed nasa net nasa gets pumped for twenty twenty one with hype video full of moon dreams and mars. Hope nasr's big plans for the year but doing space is still pretty hard. Last year was a big one for space missions. We got We got man missions back to the international space station. After many years of the shuttle being retired it's amazing. How long we relied on the russians. Now we don't have to write them a check but the russians are still lifting astronauts. The iss many most of them are from other countries. Now the space agency released a video previewing hyping. His plans for the new year and the moon is the star of the show. Why are we going back to the moon. Really you know honestly is that. Make any sense for some of you. Don't think we went to the moon begin with i think they ought to land on one of those missions close to a nasa landing site from the early days in. Show us some of that stuff. Did they left while the video. Swallow hope and optimism We know that the space launch system has delays is largely because of coronavirus pandemic parts parts parts and parts and parts and parts. I'm having issues getting some stuff here too that i need because there's no parts the first big test of the orion spacecraft is in the works for twenty twenty one with artists one. But we'll have to wait and see if the unscrewed mission able to launch this year after all and Of course the presser veers roller is set for a landing on mars on february tnt. So we got that to look forward to the twenty one minutes of how or whatever it's called If all goes well mark the start of a long range plan to bring martian rock samples back to earth and of course the much much delayed. James webb space telescope is still on the calendar for an october thirty first launch date. We spent so much money on the james webb space telescope. I just everyone will probably be holding their breath all the way to or visit with this thing and at the same time. The hubble is well you know well at its end of life you know well close to its end of life issues and we got a lot of the hubble is operating in your systems have died and there's no way to go and repair it so I wonder what they're gonna would have to do. If the james webb space telescope had issues once they launched but so

Nasa Nasr International Space Station James Webb
Green Beret charged in Illinois bowling alley shooting

Mark Levin

01:25 min | 3 months ago

Green Beret charged in Illinois bowling alley shooting

"S. Army Green Beret accused of shooting up a bowling alley Saturday in Rockford, Illinois, killing three people, wounding three others is staying behind bars, said state's attorney J handling. At this hearing, the judge denied bond for Mr Webb. As such, there is no amount of money Mr Webb can post Get out of jail. Prosecutor says Duke webs alleged attack seems to been random, A jazz musician and his family staying in the New York City hotel. See there were wrongly accused by another person and hotel management of stealing her cell phone. Kenyan, Harold says all went beyond embarrassment and pain of the accusation because he says that patron also physically assaulted his son A. B C's Adrian Banker Carlo Hotel says in a statement that they did reach out to the family to directly apologize. Meanwhile, the family's attorney says that they're petitioning the Manhattan D a to press charges of assault and battery and says that in uber driver later returned that woman's phone you're listening to ABC News. Do you? The Ohio Department of Health reported 4519 New Covad cases today with 62 new deaths. The fate of Columbus Police Officer Adam Coy's job is now in the hands of the city's public safety director, Ned Pettus. A disciplinary hearing was held today for the officer that is accused of shooting Andre Hill. Boy has been stripped of his police powers and has surrendered his gun and badge is pedestal liberates the officers Fate, a

Mr Webb S. Army Green Beret Duke Webs A. B C Adrian Banker Carlo Hotel Rockford Bowling Illinois Ohio Department Of Health Harold New York City Columbus Police Adam Coy Manhattan Ned Pettus Abc News Andre Hill
Lawyer: Soldier charged in Rockford shooting may have PTSD

AP News Radio

01:01 min | 3 months ago

Lawyer: Soldier charged in Rockford shooting may have PTSD

"An attorney for the U. S. army special forces sergeant accused of killing three people at an Illinois bowling alley this past weekend says her client may suffer from PTSD Winnebago county state's attorney J. Hanley says thirty seven year old Duke Webb who had just completed a fourth tour of duty in Afghanistan has admitted to the shooting rampage inside a bowling alley that left three people dead a fourteen year old male was shot in the face he is alive but hospitalized in critical condition sixty five year old Thomas first half was on the first floor when the defendant began shooting first a first test began running toward the stairs when the defendant shot him in the torso he tells W. LS TV that victim died as did two other men but Webster Turney says he'll undergo a mental health evaluation suggesting he suffers from post traumatic stress disorder Webb is assigned to Eglin Air Force base in Florida and was visiting family in the Rockford Illinois area I'm Jackie Quinn

Attorney J. Hanley Duke Webb Bowling U. S. Army Winnebago County Illinois W. Ls Afghanistan Webster Turney Thomas Eglin Air Force Base Webb Florida Rockford Jackie Quinn
Army sergeant charged in Illinois shooting that left three dead at bowling alley

Sunday Standards

00:29 sec | 3 months ago

Army sergeant charged in Illinois shooting that left three dead at bowling alley

"Special Forces Sergeant based in Florida, has been charged in the deaths of three people and wounding of three more in an apparent random shooting at a bowling alley in Rockford, Illinois. 37 year old Duke Webb was charged with three counts of murder and three counts of first degree attempted murder. Police chief Dan O'Shea said the men who died were age 73 65 69. He added that two teenagers for wounded that a 62 year old man who was shot several times, is in critical condition. Watch

Duke Webb Dan O'shea Rockford Florida Bowling Illinois
Military Member Charged In Shooting At Illinois Bowling Alley That Left 3 Dead

WGN Programming

00:51 sec | 3 months ago

Military Member Charged In Shooting At Illinois Bowling Alley That Left 3 Dead

"Florida resident and active military member Duke Webb has been charged with three counts of murder and three counts of attempted murder for last night's shooting at a suburban Illinois bowling alley, located northwest of Chicago. Rockford Mayor Tom McNamara spoke about it a short time ago as we come to the end of this most difficult year, and we look ahead at this new year upon us We know that this type of violence needs to stop. This type of violence in the city of Rockford needs to stop. This type of violence throughout our country needs to stop and today with eyes of the country on us We need to show as rock 40 Ines, how we respond to an incident such as this. A vigil will be held for the deceased victims this afternoon. The three dead or all men, ranging in age from 69 to 73. The injured range from 14 to 62 years of age on are all unfair to critical condition. Police believe the shooting was a

Duke Webb Mayor Tom Mcnamara Rockford Florida Illinois Chicago
Man charged in Illinois bowling alley shooting that killed 3

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 3 months ago

Man charged in Illinois bowling alley shooting that killed 3

"An active military member from Florida has been charged with shooting in Rockford Illinois Saturday night they killed three people and wounded three others including two teens police chief Danno Shea says thirty seven year old do Webb was arrested at the scene of don Carter lanes which houses a bar and grill as well as a close bowling alley and there is surveillance video of the shooting we believe this is a completely random act and there is no prior meeting or any kind of relationship between the suspect and the victim three men the oldest age seventy three were killed in addition a sixty two year old man along with two teams picking up food there were shot and wounded Webb is charged with three counts of murder and three counts of attempted murder I'm Julie Walker

Danno Shea Don Carter Rockford Webb Illinois Florida Bowling Julie Walker
3 killed, 3 others wounded in shooting at Illinois bowling alley

IRG Health Talk

00:15 sec | 3 months ago

3 killed, 3 others wounded in shooting at Illinois bowling alley

"Police in Rockford, Illinois, say that the man responsible for shooting and killing three people Saturday night in a bowling alley and injuring three others didn't know any of the people he allegedly shot. The suspect, 37 year old Florida resident and army soldier Duke Webb is in custody.

Rockford Illinois Bowling Duke Webb Florida Army
Who Was Thomas Becket?

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

05:14 min | 4 months ago

Who Was Thomas Becket?

"Thomas becket yes okay. Born around eleven twenty and died in eleven seventy. he's also known as saint thomas of canterbury or Sometimes who refer to him as thomas a becket. Okay yeah anyway. So thomas becket. He is venerated as a saint and martyr by both the catholic church and the anglican church He engaged in conflict with henry. The second king of england over the rights and privileges of the church and at one point excommunicated the archbishop of york so tough rain away to france for a bit under the protection of king. Louis the seventh of france but then he returned in eleven seventy two england so henry second in england said something to the effect of like ugh. This guy is driving me. Four of his knights interpreted this as a command to go. Get rid of thomas becket So on december twenty ninth seventy reginald fitz ertz huge morville william to tracy and richard le breton showed up at canterbury cathedral. According to accounts left by the monk jer vase of canterbury and i witnessed named edward grim. The knights placed their weapons under a tree outside the cathedral and hid their chainmail armor on your cloaks before entering the cathedral to challenge becket priest the night. He's hold beckett. They were taking him to winchester england to give count of all of his actions and kind of like hold him accountable in front of people but becket refused so the four nights retrieved their weapons and rushed back inside the cathedral. Oh my god. I beckett proceeded to the main hall for evening prayers and the other monks tried to like themselves into different parts of the joe for get said to them. It is not right to make a fortress out of the house of prayer in order them to reopen the doors so the four nights wielding they're drawn swords ran into the room saying like thomas becket. He's a traitor. To the king the knights found beckett in his spot near the door of the monastic cloister the stairs into the crypt and the stairs leading up to the choir of the cathedral where the monks were all. They're like still saying their prayers. Like oh no right. There's just four guys having running in with okay upon seeing them becca. I am no traitor. And i'm ready to die so Edward grandma eyewitness. He wrote a very extensive account of exactly what happened. I will save you all the details. Let's just say that for nights wielding swords kill the priest in canterbury cathedral. That's terrible so soon. After his death the faithful throughout europe european venerating beckett as a murder in february eleven seventy three which was just a little more than two years after his death. He was canonized by pope. Alexander the third and so sure typically like canonization of saints takes lake decades. Yeah stuff happened so the fact that this happened so quickly was kind of saying that. This guy was a big deal. So related trivia. Facts about thomas becket. Geoffrey chaucer's the canterbury tales. Ninety two is set in a company of pilgrims on their way from southern to the shrine of saint. Thomas becket in canterbury cathedral. Okay never made that connection no me neither ever okay So the schreiner was built between eleven eighty and twelve twenty and up to one hundred thousand. Pilgrims would have visited the shrine every year for more than three hundred years. That's my gosh locked. Yes it was adorned in marble gold and jewels and murdered saints. Tombs was one of unparalleled splendor in fifteen thirty eight. during the reformation. The shrine was destroyed following the orders of henry. The eighth who definitely be talking about in a little bit more twenty. Twenty researchers digitally reconstructed the raised sanctuary and available to view on the beckett story online and we'll share linked to that because it's really interesting how they did that. They took This thing had been such a big deal for more than three hundred years. And then it was raised more than four hundred and fifty plus years ago at this point and so they took accounts that the pilgrims had made that other monks had made in in digitally recreated which is pretty up and also modern works based on the story of thomas becket include. Tes elliott's nineteen thirty. Five play murder in the cathedral later adapted the opera assassination cutter. Dry ill the brando pizza'd in nine hundred fifty eight. You did that. Can i tell you flawlessly Also nineteen fifty-nine play by John we called beckett which was made into a movie with the same title and paul. Webb's play four nights in nair's borough which was written in one thousand nine hundred nine which recounts the aftermath of the murder of thomas becket by the four nights who made the worst career choice in history. Yeah that's goes without saying well if you don't if all of these facts don't stick in your head. Look at the name k. e. t. the cane. His name is right in the middle. And if you look at it. It looks like four blades. Good the name so four blades. Stuck together by the four to killed him in canterbury. That's thomas becket.

Thomas Becket Canterbury Cathedral England Beckett Becket Reginald Fitz Ertz Morville William Richard Le Breton Edward Grim Henry France Saint Thomas Edward Grandma Anglican Church Canterbury Catholic Church Tracy Knights Thomas Louis
"webb" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

07:25 min | 5 months ago

"webb" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

"Consumer voting with their dollar in the next ten or twenty years or or critical but it certainly all time that we can to make a drastic shift. And hopefully there's a silver lining on a coded. It's the guy the galvanized us together. We can for me even being in kentucky. You know what happens in the capital china affect southeast kentucky in two months. Now if that doesn't wait people under up to understand that there's one in the wrong. I really have no idea what will but i am hopeful that if people are amid we see now it doesn't matter we can't separate ourselves at or whatever or so interconnected we have to solve problems together and then hopefully coming out of coma there's seven galvanizing spirit carries is on. Yeah i agree with you. And i find that to be such an inspiring perspective and i think it's important to hit on the truce that we need to understand that we have we as humanity. We have engineered a global planet. We've chosen this. We've increased travel. We've we've become so enamored by so many aspects of each other's cultures and yet you also see the politicizing of culture in place in such a strange way and what i wish we could hold. Is that two things can be true. We concern global priorities for humanity. And we can care about our local community and that feels really clear to me in places like you're referencing when we talk about kentucky when we talk about appalachia because with anywhere you look you can see the history of the region and you know you mentioned that that your area of kentucky is is is or has been a huge coal producing Resource for america. We powered america on coal for a very long time. And yet we do to your point have to understand that. As we evolve science evolves we have to engineer better systems. And when i think about generations. You know i i know. Your granddad was a coal miner. I i know that there has been devastating impacts of of mass job loss across the region. You know at least two today. Eleven coal companies have filed for bankruptcy just since trump was elected president and the job losses are meaningful to people in these areas that have been employed in these companies. And so when. I start thinking about innovation when i start thinking about how we've got to do better to support seven and a half and eventually nine billion people i think about regions like like the one that you grew up in. I remember in the last election cycle. Just thinking you know. Why aren't these big. Solar companies marching into kentucky and saying we're going to build new solar plants. Here we're gonna give you better jobs with better wages cleaner working environments less health hazards great benefits. We've we've gotta we've got to think about all these people in all these places as we think about innovation and change. And and i i suppose i just say all of that really offer that. It's something that you know being from california and knowing how the environment's been important to me Much in the way it was to you playing outside for my whole childhood. I to think about what i want it to look like for my eventual kids and their eventual kids and and i wonder seeing those impacts in your community. Do you now traced back. Because it's easy for us right to have conversations in the present and say this is what we'd like to see differently and this is how we'd love to invest in people and support economic development in hard hit regions of the country and then think about the global impact and all of it and then we have to. But do you think that that came from. You're seeing the region change throughout your life do. Do you think that's why you took the path that you did in college. Why you went to washington d. Do you think that those things are all tied together. Yeah one absolutely so a couple things on that for me a and that's where we so what what were pursuing a very exciting thing about what we're doing is is i do. Look at my background. I try to tell anybody and everybody at mead around here just one individual the it comes from a background somewhat similar may be very similar to many people around here in. it's somehow leadership's responsibility it either. Universities or whatever to inspire and galvanize youth rates so for me doing it's it's the largest all-cash investment ever made in eastern kentucky were building in the poorest congressional district of us in yes. It's been a long process. But i'm just one individual and frankly at this point i could related here until i'm one hundred but i could somehow pass at some point in this thing's going to carry on one way or the or move on. How do we galvanize young us. I don't know but what i do is the best and brightest from kentucky. Don't say to rebuild a region. They moved to boston. Move down land in san francisco. That is a problem and we got. We have got to get our best and brightest to not. Just sit in san francisco in building figure out our wiki get tennis shoes faster. And figure out having back to their communities rebuild their communities reimagine. What's possible for me it. Was you know moving back. Kentucky happened about ten the down to the state for ten years and i got an undergraduate. I'm wanted to build energy projects going to build a. You're not going to build natural gas. That was emerging but not the so. What was a lot. Women solar so for me the sustainability east ruling name over time and it was just a sheer fact that i wanted to build. Stop in at that time when you built winning solo a part of building large-scale solar some of the largest in the us. In what i saw happen over that ten year time frame of friends namely even just seeing local news and what was happening i mac. I think it's one of the darkest stains in american history. I think we'll look back how we shut down the mines in whether it's the laughed the right you know the recive or the conservative side. It's irrelevant but we. All benefited from low cost electricity. The carried us to be the economic powerhouse. That literacy came from coal. shut down the mind. Forget the mars. It's the people who power those nights coal is just. It's a piece of material in the earth but the people that actually powered this.

kentucky san francisco coma southeast china america trump engineer us boston california appalachia washington president
Taylor Swift Rips Scooter Braun For Selling Her Masters For $300M

Bloomberg Businessweek

04:52 min | 5 months ago

Taylor Swift Rips Scooter Braun For Selling Her Masters For $300M

"Well as I mentioned earlier, I've been dying to this story across the Bloomberg late yesterday about the celebrity talent manager kind of arch nemesis of Taylor Swift. We're talking about Scooter Braun shaking off and selling Swifts master recordings from our first six albums to L. A based investment firm, a Shamrock Capital advisors. So writing about it, as only he can do, noting that Taylor Swift is a bulletproof investment. Their own. Alex Webb Bloomberg opinion European technology media columnist with us on the phone from London, where it's evening, so thank you for agreeing to do with this because I know it's getting late. They're over in the UK, Alex Love love this story. So why is Taylor Swift, a bulletproof investment? But in the bars we can sort of in very broad terms. Um, DVD after its office three categories. There are those that have clearly suffered things like hospitality tourism. There are those that have done really well, you know the likes of zoom and telling health companies and gold, for instance. And then there are those which haven't necessarily been well if it affected possibly by the virus, but equally when Sorry. I'm being like next kind of ours. But equally when life hopefully returns to new, normal, they're not going to see a drop off either. And, frankly, music streaming fits into that category on dumb Taylor. Swift is, of course, one of the most desirable catalog of music right now on, so private ecstasy is nothing up. Yeah, it's really is kind of fascinating. I think the more that we are. Unfortunately, in this lockdown, like we continue to see those companies that are figuring their way through are benefiting as a result of it. On you Do think about right. As you say, Spotify. I mean, is one of those that I mean, we really seen that stock shoot up tremendously, but the subscriber numbers you say you're growing and much the same pace as they did before Cove it But nonetheless, people are thinking about content to put on these platforms. Exactly. And so this fund Shamrock Capital, which actually originally the family investment vehicle from Roy Disney and his heirs, they raised the second Fund this summer to invest in content. That's not just music. That's also film and video games, in fact, But the Lions are certainly the biggest investment so far. We don't know how much it's going to be funded by debt, but they're ponying up 300 million for this tastes with Captain Officer First six albums. And it's also remarkable piece of business for the Carlyle Group and Scooter Braun because they acquired the whole label, but 300 million as well just a year ago. They also have some big smiles and that one day I'm gonna ask you could you say it's bulletproof investment, but my dollar daughters really into Taylor Swift said. There's been a lot of Taylor in our house. On. I like her, too. What's interesting, though, is she has been in a battle with Scooter Braun really kind of ticked off that she has basically lost control of her music. And she has talked about re recording those early albums and then putting them out again. Would that reduce potentially The value of this investment. I think it would. It would certainly lasted only limited upside, I would say, you know, I think in an ideal world she would be helping them promote music because, of course, she will still get a cut. From the publishing royalties on bond there. Unfortunately, she's not willing to play with them on that, because into Braun is still going to be getting some sort of residuals from many further plays as part of his deal with Shamel. Nonetheless, I think as a listener, there is still great loyalty in any music to the original version on D s so while around the edges, it might reduce a little bit of the of the upside. I really don't think it's a death now. Well, I love this story 11 because you write about Taylor, but I also do love this kind of big takeaway that you talk about this third category as you mentioned of companies that have profited. Were modestly for the pandemic, but they're unlikely to see their businesses negatively affected when it's over. It's an interesting way to kind of look at this market environment We just have about 30 seconds left. Yes. And I think that you know, the key point here is the steady, predictable returns. Spotify is quite a good business not possible at the moment, not generating met. Great was sent to shareholders beyond the stock price so that they think the great appeal for private equity. Do you have a favorite Taylor Swift song? But I was too embarrassing to say that I don't know how it happened all that well, But let's shoot for London boy, right? Because that's really where I am. Yeah. I mean, come on, Alex. She date somebody from the UK right for like 50 from where I live. Same. Same. All right, Alex, thanks for sticking around

Taylor Swift Shamrock Capital Advisors Alex Webb Bloomberg Scooter Braun Alex Love Braun Shamrock Capital Taylor Bloomberg Roy Disney Spotify Carlyle Group London Shamel UK Lions Alex
The Latest: Masters 1st round halted with 44 on the course

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | 5 months ago

The Latest: Masters 1st round halted with 44 on the course

"Casey has taken the lead after a weather shortened first round at the masters the Englishman lighting up a three hour rain delay before posting a seven under sixty five that the leads and a shelf life and Webb Simpson by two defending champion Tiger Woods is among those of foreign debt after an effort was bogey free sixty eight but some big names were unable to complete their opening rounds including Dustin Johnson Brooks kept up and Justin Thomas they all face an early start on day two to catch up I'm grandma goes

Webb Simpson Casey Tiger Woods Dustin Johnson Brooks Justin Thomas
Episode 136 Mega Movie Monster Mania pt 1 - burst 21

The Moratorium

03:37 min | 6 months ago

Episode 136 Mega Movie Monster Mania pt 1 - burst 21

"Let me scroll down here in verify that. That was current. What we got we got amazes monsters Yet, he knows your loan was nineteen, eighty I credit before the love boat and bosom buddies started in nineteen, eighty, nine, I love those and buddies. And Nineteen ninety-two as mazes and monsters. Now he just shows up as. A friend of a friend the the college student. I don't know. He looks really young and yeah he's trying to be nice and Quirky it works he he really does work for him in this film, but he's not a big role right Now, this film I think was totally either. In sync or ripping off Halloween. Okay. What Year did you say this? This is nineteen eighty. So Halloween was seventy eight. but Halloween to was what eighty two I think. But this sounds like the score could have been done by John Carman. Saint something's the scares not so much in the same thing it has the same trope that the woman can't do anything by yourself. this does have James Webb Hornet. Really, young, he's thirty four in this film and he's playing a professor who is banging one of his students guy. I I'm sorry you have to see him that way. Yeah. The student he's banging is Elizabeth Cam and Elizabeth Kemp. Came back to play and the clairvoyant. Who has also directed by the same guy okay. The Director of this film is Armand. Mastroianni and K and Toyo- on the Sandwich. Isn't it? It's a double decker sandwich. Yeah. Is Married to Mary Elizabeth Master Antonio to This guy also directed Cameron's closet Oh that's another. Another way back when for me that was nineteen, eighty eight for Cameron's closet. I remember that I had the Fan Goria that I kind of talked about Cameron's closet and I was so excited to see it. Also get it confused with cellar dweller and I'm not real sure which one is which. I think I got confused with the woman in White Lady and The lady in White Yes lady and I love that mood. Are you talking about the one with Lukas Haas and yes yes. Yes. That was a great movie director also he did. the TV movie for the ring which I clicked on. Not the same guy so don't even. That was Natasha, Kinski and Michael York and a Danielle Steele. Oh my God how? Eighties. Possibly, get. That that's painful. Is Very painful that was actually nineteen, ninety six how really? Got Horrible as why I clicked on it, I was like Oh man really and I no no. No. Thanks unless unless mustaches. Well, let's never yet but he directed like eight episodes of Friday, the thirteenth, the series also tales from the dark side. Music that.

John Carman Elizabeth Cam Elizabeth Kemp Mastroianni Cameron Mary Elizabeth Master Antonio James Webb Armand Saint Lukas Haas Michael York Danielle Steele Kinski Natasha
"webb" Discussed on 3 in 30 Takeaways for Moms

3 in 30 Takeaways for Moms

04:42 min | 7 months ago

"webb" Discussed on 3 in 30 Takeaways for Moms

"Dot co for all the details on those courses and of course I will link that in the show notes and now onto the show. Here's my conversation with author Amy Webb about teaching our children about disability. Let's jumping. Amy Welcome to three and thirty. Thank you. Thank you so much for having me. It is thrilling for me to be able have you on to talk about this topic that is so important and also to be able to congratulate you on your new book, which just came out awesomely Emma my kids love both of your books so much and I just think they are an amazing resource for families. So thank you for the work that you do. Thank you so much I'm I'm really glad to hear that. And today we're we're doing a series for the month of September called. You are your child's most important teacher with back to school season in swing and so today we're going to be talking about how to talk to your children about disability and I'm so excited that you've come with your three takeaways for us and we can just dive right in because we have a lot to cover. Absolutely and I'm so glad you mentioned the back to school to because I think this is the best time like one of the best time to talk to kids about this because they're going to have kids who are of all abilities in their classroom. Yes. So my first takeaway is bring disability representation into your home. So when my daughter was little meaning that you know she wasn't in school yet. So we were out in a battle the time going to playgrounds and going to different story times we were just constantly in that mode of. Being aware of the kids around her being aware of their, wearing her of teaching them as I mean kids would. Stare and point they would say things they would sometimes come up and grab her arms and I. You know from the very beginning felt like, I, I need to be an educator I, want to be a bridge between. Them and my daughter because at this age, these are her peers you know when she's. She's little enough that also she's not at an age that she can advocate for herself and so from from zero to five got that fell on us and I really wanted you know the way I had seen my other daughters kids. Play, really, easily together at that age not playground or park, and so but when they have these these questions and they're like, Whoa, what's going on she doesn't have an arm. wise that wheelchair there's this huge boundary there. So for so long I thought well, kids don't know any better..

Amy Webb
A Conversation With Maria Hinojosa And Lulu Garcia-Navarro

Latino USA

06:03 min | 7 months ago

A Conversation With Maria Hinojosa And Lulu Garcia-Navarro

"The one and only Monday. Joins, me now welcome Lulu. It's it's such a pleasure. I. It is such a pleasure to have you on and to read this book it's called once I was you and it is based around the story. Of how you came to the United States for the first time, tell us that story. Yeah. Well, it's an interesting story. I didn't actually know it like a lot of us. We don't actually ask our parents. So how exactly did I know that you came for example, my whole family we were born in Mexico my dad MPC go of us in Mexico City and dad gets hired by the University of Chicago. He's a medical doctor dedicated to research and long story short he helps to create the cochlear implant. He was an amazing human being. May He rest in peace? So that was in Chicago and my mom, and the four of us kids I was the baby in her arms get on a plane. It's the early nineteen. Sixty's we fly from Mexico City to Dallas and change planes in Dallas, and then we're GONNA fly onto Chicago and. When I finally found out the story when I wrote raising, which is a Motherhood Memoir that I wrote like twenty years ago. You know I found out that there was this whole thing that happened at the airport and that an immigration agent was like you know saying that had some weird skin thing and you know maybe had to put me in quarantine and my mom was like Nah and then I came and I saved the no she didn't say it like this but basically, it was like me Ma Ma Ma you know. She's five feet tall by the way, but stood up and. Know had this kind of moment with immigration agent and and it was a story that I told. Kind of like saying, wow, my mom is such a cool woman like I understand where I get my powerful voice even though she's tiny, she spoke back to an immigration agent. and. Then in the writing of this book, blue is really what happens is that I really understand what was happening there. There were trying to separate you from your mother. They basically told your mom that they were GonNa, take you away and put you in quarantine quote unquote and that she was free to go with her other children but that you would have to stay behind I mean. Can you imagine like? When my mom called me in the midst of and you know Lou that I've been covering this story, the entirety, my career immigration writ. Large. And my mom calls me at the airport. I was flying from one back when we were flying around and in the midst of the height of babies being put into cages, we were hearing the voices. You know we knew this was happening. This is not. This not begin with the trump administration but anyway. Mom. Calls me and she's crying she's like is Gay It could have been me. If I'm a your she was like that was I could have been one of those moms and I swear to Lulu that. By heart dropped I was like Oh. My God. So it's not a story of like my mom. Eh, you know speaking back it's a realized now a story of trauma and that. Wouldn't have happened I think had I not written the book and had the horror of immigration policies becomes so. Crystal. Clear. So inhumane so hurtful and frankly now finally so public You. As you mentioned what brought to Chicago, which is where you grew up, but you always maintained your connection to Mexico and your roots you'd go back and forth. You came here on a green card. When did you become a citizen? I asked this simply because that transition of becoming. An American you said was difficult for you. You. You found it hard to sort of occupy these two spaces. So, it was great because in the writing of the book, I actually had to like do the time line and and then I had to go back and find my citizenship. It was a actually I had just come back from a reporting trip with Scott Simon Scott and I were down inside whether it was December of Nineteen eighty-nine Lau Offensive Little Trenton Webb the FMLN offensive the guerilla warfare was happening inside word and I went down to produce Scott. And I came back and just a few days later I took the oath. Look the reason why it was complicated was because way back then maybe now I am beginning to understand maybe it was because of that traumatic experience in Airport in Dallas I, always kind of new. Like this isn't a certain thing for you. This thing about you being able to come in and out of the United States you've done your whole life. Now. You're a woman you're a journalist you've been to Cuba. You've got you've been tool Salvador you. You know. There may be a time when they say you can't come back and I understood that and so I have to be honest as I am the memoir he was motivated in large part by fear that that my green card could be taken away and that I could not be allowed and this was before this whole conversation of like what's happening now you know this was way before it was a different time but I think I kind of I, kind of knew it. So the thing that happens when you become a citizen in this country is you have to raise your right hand and you have to swear that you will bear arms for this country. And people who are born in this country like my own kids haven't had to do that. When you have to do that you take this thing really seriously you know like the Constitution and the bill of rights and you know all like you take it really seriously, and I think that's why because the book is certainly it's about immigration, but it's also about like my. My struggle for democracy and being seen as a journalist taken seriously to be that's all a part of democracy and it just becomes I mean I was living with a green card I was I was definitely understanding my role as a participant. But when you raise that right hand, it's at a whole

Chicago Dallas Mexico City United States Mexico Ma Ma Ma Scott Simon Scott University Of Chicago LOU Cuba LAU Trenton Webb
Border Patrol finds missing Texas girl at checkpoint on Interstate 35

Charlie Parker

00:31 sec | 8 months ago

Border Patrol finds missing Texas girl at checkpoint on Interstate 35

"Gunshots. U. S. Border Patrol agents found a missing girl in a big rig truck more than 400 miles from her home. They stopped the truck at a checkpoint on Interstate 35 in Laredo, then found the girl hidden inside. The Border Patrol did not publicly identified the girl or the driver. They were both transferred to the custody of the Webb County Sheriff's Office, which will investigate. This incident comes just shortly after a woman was seriously hurt, jumping from an 18 wheeler on Thursday to escape alleged sex traffickers on Interstate 20 and

U. S. Border Patrol Border Patrol Webb County Sheriff's Office Laredo
"webb" Discussed on View from the Cheap Seats

View from the Cheap Seats

07:14 min | 11 months ago

"webb" Discussed on View from the Cheap Seats

"Hey, guys welcome to the show as promised. We have great guests. Someone who we turn to a personally spams for his insights when it comes to recruiting. And somebody who we understand in a way understands the college football. Landscape and the mentality of the athletes that are entering the college game. That's part of why we wanted to have this guy on. Because it's not just from Michigan. He understands on a national scale. What kids and families and people are going through as they make a decision for college? And therefore he has sort of his finger on the pulse of what people are thinking. This is a very difficult moment that we're all trying to make our way through and come out on the other side. Be Brighter were grateful to have him here Sam Webb. How are you Sir Fellas? I'm doing great glad to. To be on man I'm excited. Let me just save first and foremost that we love you. I feel like people don't say that enough, but we love you man. We love what you do. We love how you treated us. Every time we've come on done your show I. Mean it's more than just we come in your show. It's after we get off the phone with you. When we listen to it, you spend the next five minutes talking about how you feel about us and go unnoticed, and that makes us feel great and just I. Feel like we need to say it more. We love you. Guys. The love is mutual I. Love You guys right back. Love what you do love that. She loved Michigan. That you represent Michigan low that you guys make me laugh all the time, and I love to laugh so that that's another. South of the guys I appreciate the opportunity to be on your show. We'll the love that we're talking to you now. Because I feel like okay, we're recording this on June. Third this will drop on June fifth, but between June first and June eighth was Kinda. This were Kinda getting down to this crunch time here as to what's going to happen with college football and I know you've talked about it a lot on your show, the Michigan insider. It's such a fascinating show. Let me take a step further and say you have very nimbly in very smartly. Development started doing an all recruiting podcast. Which? That is the one thing we can talk about right now is the future twenty, twenty, one, twenty, twenty, two, twenty, twenty three. That gets people excited. WHO KNOWS IF WE'RE GONNA? Play football this fall, but we know that we will have teams in the future. So what? What do you foresee is going to happen because in my brain? The SEC is GonNa do this. This no matter what lot for a lot of reasons, we get into it because there social reasons to I mean it's what we're dealing with right now and then. WHO's GonNa? Follow suit, and who does it hurt if we don't? It's the big ten says that we project our student athletes yeah, so I think that the it's trending towards playing college football nationwide. The prerequisites for it were. A downtrend in the number of cases I. Now we have still haven't seen the the level of downtrend that they talked about needing to see fourteen consecutive days. That kind of thing, but. Enough to wear their optimistic too optimistic enough to open things back up. I was one layer of the of the onion. The other layer was testing. Testing capacity. How how liberally could you test your team? And so it goes without saying that you need to be able to test players. Coaches and anyone that's involved contest. You need to test before every game, but that's not enough to really root out during a week. Where you have practice, you likely have players interacting with other people on campus. You know, can you? Can you rely on? You know not having a great deal of exposure during the week. If you are testing during the week so I, think they. They are they feel good enough to look ahead and say they can test a few times a week. We re looked into it and it sounds like testing about three times in a given week can can really account for you know anyone that might have the the virus during the weekend longer testing before games, you can play and so I think that's where it's trending. The one question I have is will they have some sort of a universal procedure or policy about how much you test what you do win. There's a positive test I think that's the next layer only conference to have A. L. Conference Wide Standard so buyers the pack twelve. And you think about it? It's GonNa have an impact. If we do way, you know players testing positive. You think about schools with elite quarterbacks. You think about the Trevor Lawrence's of the world. The Justin fields of this world, if by some chance you in a game, where say you know, Ohio? State is playing end state or you know if Justin fields is out and we don't. Don't know who the backup is. Not Person Isn't necessarily tested like the complexion of that game completely changes or Michigan, Burr, so high estate, obviously the full teams full strength, but if by some chance, some elite player on the team is out now it's a whole different ballgame. You GotTa make sure that you know you gotTa. Make sure it has not Ryan Day during the test. In, Ohio stay right. Play. A. Noble what you're talking about is right. You need an independent. This is what I believe about everything. This goes on. This goes in terms of the people who are investigating George Floyd. It can't come from someone who is with these people every day. If you have to walk down the hall and see Ryan Day and he gives you a nod, and you're like were okay, but it's not okay. That's not good. It's gotta come from an outside source in order to do this football's big business as you have mentioned many times on your show a Lotta. These athletic departments have built their. Very Shakily now we see their entire income on football. You don't have football. YEP, probables! Absolutely! I that's that's everything and you know I was. I was saying sort of tongue in cheek. But. But they they across college football. Came up with the standard when it came to a concussion protocol. Right? That's rare with the medical staff and be football staff are totally separate in a medical decisions. Don't root through the coaches, so it's as long as the convention is the same right. There's no reason to think that it won't be. Then I think you can, you can trust the integrity of of of the testing, and really who's who's the coach and the and the team. If you will to to make sure that you quarantine, whoever might be who might be positive because your whole team could be ravaged by UK. Catch it. You can spread. It's your family. I think the self interest involved in making sure. The tests are accurate, is kind of one of its checks in the system of checks and balances.

football Michigan Ryan Day Ohio Sam Webb Trevor Lawrence SEC George Floyd Justin fields UK Burr
"webb" Discussed on No Wahala with Tune Day + Bawo

No Wahala with Tune Day + Bawo

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"webb" Discussed on No Wahala with Tune Day + Bawo

"Webb thing at times where ten food passive stance on that determined to see the good apple of the bad he's a he's a true will continue to guide and man talked about a lot is there anything else that's it as long as you got the music then we're good oh yeah i mean death but right over the definitely definitely have the the three scammer songs including time monies so he just got to start the show i think his i say he's going to have to start the show with his music or something todd money then oh my god i i don't know why he just didn't keep the original i don't know man i don't understand the minor scammer so let me not even good yeah very simple habits twenty two you know what i'm saying thank you all for listening you know what i'm saying make sure you patronize your local truck late establishments you know this i'm saying make sure you know when you get that check you know before you decide to hit up the you know all the the yacky suppliers i don't know what even want the out of what the what the new you know terminologies for we've and stuff are adding i haven't even dated my my terminology leonardo just make sure you're reinvesting into the community saying i here you know taiwa while you're tyrone saying oh that we gotta make the word now i heard tyron.

tyron Webb todd
"webb" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"webb" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"So yeah yarikhanov kinda was a shakedown a series attest we learned a lot from that to to really kind of reduced risk um change our plans of operations and um and just to improve our system reliability and stuff like that so it really helpful say you can't put this sort of i guess quote pretend um james webb inside to see our a list let's see how this reacts and get ready for the real james webb bakara like he said chamber a was not designed to testings web is designed for for human missions and they put human um human a vehicles in there i think the lunar module and stuff like that right they actually tested censure be yeah and she degenerated said the service command module's at all yeah but skylab was in chamber a as well oh oh can dumb um and then of course it's continued its use for just a development of shuttle and space station and stuff like that in terms of more were hardware than human i'll gay yes tensing so but you know whatever unita large thermal vacuum chamber it's one of the very few that that exists so if hungary asset for for nasa that something like that see started gearing up four james webb testing in 2014 you said sawyer was on so we we had to modify the chamber quite a bit in the end years for that word two thousand nine through about 2012 i actually replaced the pumping systems especially the high backing systems because all of them were idle oil type of cyst oil within i'm or an oil pumping system and everything we can have any type of uh oils around james webb has everything went to like real clean newer technologies um or thermal systems used to only kinda get to about one hundred calvin and we needed he be able to get to about fifteen kelvin and then of course we ended up this testing at twenty calvin for james webb but still we wanted to be able to kind of exceed that requirement to read it uh so 15 was kind of where we thought we'd need to three had to put a different trout in that a and.

nasa sawyer calvin james webb hungary fifteen kelvin
"webb" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"webb" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"Actually so it's flying to los angeles and will be at the north of bremen a facility at r in redondo beach south of la ex uh work is integrated with the the sunshield and the spacecraft bus so the unison sunshield been you know one of the huge parts of the the telescope in a fouryearlong most important parts and uh so it it has a series of testing once it's fully integrated mostly deployments by and mccoo stick testing all right we'll fantastic that's why i think you're the perfect person to have here since you've been you've been here working with james webb spell it space telescope for quite some time now so you kinda have a good sense of not only the testing by a little bit more about just what is this telescope away what is it going to do so i'm kinda wanted discounted dive into that just the whole overview of what is the james webb space telescope so let's start with that what is it okay so you know james webb is uh it is a kind of a general purpose sign hence tool uh it is a part of the next generation of vom great observatories nasr's working on so we think of like the hubble hubbell was probably the the biggest known great observatory in its generation so yeah like you know yet sean drug cobble spitzer and i think a few other ones that were you know smaller but hubbell was the big one yeah and uh that's kind of nasr's plan for you know the science abs mission and some of their observations and james webb is that big big observatory so it is not a replacement for hobble but a successor okay so so from what i know about the telescopes in i'm definitely not a scientist or physicist are everything so this is kind of like hubble re can read things in the visual spectrum and then chandra is more can x ray and spitzer is more infrared did i mix those up no you're absolutely correct very good yeah so then web.

los angeles bremen redondo beach james webb hubbell nasr scientist chandra ray james webb space telescope physicist spitzer
"webb" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"webb" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"Dubbed the naked scientists podcast is produced in association with spitfire costeffective voice internet and ip engineering services for uk businesses find out how spitfire can empower your company at spitfire dot coderch uk you're listening to the naked scientists and for the next part of the program we're going to be exploring masses largest and lightest telescope now you may be familiar with the hubble space telescope which has launched in 1990 orbiting the earth it has detected newmains around pluto taken breathtaking images of early galaxies and allowed scientists to pin down the age of our universe but knowing the age of all universe isn't enough astronomers want to be able to see this very beginning with the successor to hobble the james webb space telescope thrive uh i workable for a long time hubbell when it was launched rewrote the astronomy books and james webs going to rewrite american power the sun changes affect the size of a tennis court and that has to be unfolded in space it's mirror is seven times the collecting area of public you could put seven hubbell optics in the same you know surface areas the where this thing i spent twenty years lacking honestly to be strapped on invade the rock from peacefully by it up into the sky a little bit hacking tipping abide one picture the biggest telescope dish that technology can make next to wit a sun shield the size of a tennis court now imagine folding them up like origami into a rocket m blasting them one million miles into space this enormous engineering challenge is exactly what astronomers all across the boat a facing as the james webb space telescope undergoes its final tests ahead of launch and its aims a just as ambitious as its engineering we want to go back and look the verb beginnings of the universe not as nasty spill eggs he's the project manager of james webb overseeing every step of the telescopes mission from design development and terrestrial testing right three two on all of its operations.

project manager uk james webb space tennis james webb space telescope james webb twenty years
"webb" Discussed on Astronomy Cast

Astronomy Cast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"webb" Discussed on Astronomy Cast

"Out to the first galaxies to the cosmic webb at the largestscale that we have today and the level that the simulation can now predict what the universe looks like it's just amazing and what so cool about these is watching how they've changed over time trying to understand how you go from an essentially smooth distribution of matter in the dark ages of the universe to having the completely lumpy bumpy swiss cheese of modern day cosmology requires getting all sorts of different things interacting from figuring out how does different dark matter interactor not interact how does the temperature the velocity of the particles right after the qasem i quit background has released affect things you have to factor in all of these different affects and it's difficult so we talk about how many particles there are we talk about is it gas is it all these different ways of approximating things and we've gone from basically a thousand by 1000 particle cube two million by a million to ever ever larger simulations spanning more fine grain periods of time so it's no longer this seed represents what will become a galaxy to it's this seed represents a star cluster to this represents a star and we can see the universe inner simulations turned on light up collapsed down and evolve into what we say yeah the people through pocket hesitancy of but i was sort of putting up videos from this a lustrous simulation showing what dosing relations look like it it's just it's so impressive just to see how well and how detail that out.

webb