9 Burst results for "warhol world"

"warhol world" Discussed on Ghost Town

Ghost Town

05:55 min | 1 d ago

"warhol world" Discussed on Ghost Town

"People that are like, Oh, well, well, look who's back or you don't know what if you had a chip on his shoulder, but it had to be pretty pretty tough because it doesn't prepare you know but let's say everything goes well in your child star and you stop being a child star in your pretty well, Justin and you're like whatever, and then you go to high school, which is tough general even if you're not but like even let's say child star wants to be normal go to a normal high. There's already an adjustment period already socialization that you're unfamiliar with but like at any credit at any stress or struggle to the mix, I can't that's just sounds incredibly traumatic. So, we found some comfort in in drugs and heroin. And, he eventually had two sons and a short lived marriage, but also had a lot of trouble with the law so. He had he had trouble. Yeah, and and that's just A. The road he went down he was sentenced in nineteen sixty one. He was remanded to the narcotic rehabilitation. Center. At the California Institute for men in Chino, California because drug addiction. So problematic and just run INS with the law. This is your. You know this is hopefully will help Mrs. You're sentence, and then after that finding acting work forget about it. Yeah. Especially, what year was this anyway sixties so acid we're. Like late sixties were like again a little bit more culturally forgivable like your child star you had drug problems you're incarcerated like who? It's like great. Enjoy yourself find a new line of work He did briefly find a home. In a community in New York City. With a little. Collective. I like to call the factory. Andy Warhol. World of the AVANGARD. Heaven's Gate I was like Oh boy no no this is much cooler. Yeah. but also probably not good for a guy trying to rehab himself. But. If you know he. For a time found his people and his last role was actually in a short film produced by. Andy Warhol. It was called dirt and he played a nun and it is odd I have watched it. And I listen. I'm very interested in that time period. Yes. In Your City, I love pop art I really love that Andy Warhol pop art were I just. Find that whole thing pelling and? It's things like this that I'm sure opened up you know a bus Kiat, right? Yeah for sure. Yeah. Even a lot of art and yeah that time is really interesting and just like four making community art and communal art and like obviously Andy Warhol is not non-problematic year and I, think you know a.

Andy Warhol Justin heroin AVANGARD New York City California Institute California Chino Mrs. You
"warhol world" Discussed on Craft Hangout

Craft Hangout

13:36 min | 2 months ago

"warhol world" Discussed on Craft Hangout

"Ten time capsules warhol filled and sealed for storage. And I know the Andy kept everything. We're there any treasures special celebrity autographs rare collectibles. The Andy had. And what is the strangest thing that you have found in the capsules? Ou such good questions. While I love the time capsules because education has really done a lot of work around time capsules so his time capsules birth kind of he was a pack rat Yep and collected everything that really came through his life and it was really great because he collected all of this Ephemera from his daily life from mundane things like postcards. Art Invitations even artwork itself. So really they were just standard packing boxes that he would shove stuff in and then once it was filled he would pack it up to date on it and then send it to storage in kind of you know forgot about it in a way Until later on you know. They kind of became his time capsules in some craziest things that I've heard that were found in them was a half eaten piece of birthday cake. A mummified foot. Not that he was creepy may be creepy but it was something that he had bought at auction. Every day tells a different story. Right denture molds all kinds of bizarre. Thanks I pulled a book for you guys. It's one of our newest releases. Ooh And it goes through all of Warhol's archives from Ada Z. Oh My Dad. The name of that again. What is the name of the book? It is a for Archive. Warhol's world from agency and the way it's arranged is kind of Alphabetically as for archive of is for boxy Aquinas major diaspora duchamp So it's a really great pithy way to explore his collection in explore some of the items in his time capsules and I'm also excited to tell you about an education project that we finally finished input online. It's called Time Capsule Twenty one where you can actually go online and take a look at some of the contents in more halls time capsule twenty one and why that time capsule is super. Exciting is because a lot of source material for his later. Works were found in there. So that selling our website were hauled dot. Org backslash time capsules and that really kind of set us off in a new direction education wise We had an exhibition that traveled through south. East Asia. Called Andy Warhol. Fifteen minutes of fame and we activated this time capsule project four youth so we had youth from Pennsylvania and youth from Southeast Asia Singapore Hong Kong Japan making time capsules of kind of their youth objects. They kind of represent them and they would pack up a time capsule and they would exchange it and then we had a video conference where they can ask one another about the objects and it was so fascinated. Cool justice either exchange. Yeah and then one of our later. Most recent ones is called community. Time capsules that we've been kind of working on for ten plus years but it's finally online it is fully realized and what we've done is we've interviewed undocumented. Various immigrant groups in western Pennsylvania carpet the Rousson African Americans Russian Americans and we asked them to kind of show us ten to fifteen of objects they brought with them or their parents brought with them when they emigrated and we kinda showed them on the same page as warehouse. Time capsules so thinking about the age that we're in right now. This idea of time capsules. Like what are students doing? What are they putting a time? Capsule Right now in the age of Covid nineteen because I mean this is going to be a moment to really preserve and examine definitely so I have a question Andy. Warhol pioneered blurring the lines of both commercial and fine art so moore example. He did fashion illustrations of shoes for magazines in his early career and then he embraced popular culture in is fine art work so my question is how do you think this blurred line has affected? Today's perception of art s a great question Warhol graduated from Carnegie Tech which is now Carnegie Mellon and Pittsburgh Pennsylvania in nineteen forty nine. He graduated with a degree in Pictorial Design. And pretty much immediately. After graduating he moved to New York with his friend and artists. Philip Perlstein and from there he really took off running and became well established in the commercial design world and you know had a successful career during the early fifties and sixties. So I think you know. When the pop art movement started to gain traction late fifties and sixties were was really well positioned to create these mass produced images that used tools that was known to him as a commercial artist. When we think of repetition we think of Boll design we think of like simple design all of these tricks of the trade. He kind of had up his sleeve. I think that really allowed him to kind of step out as the Prince of pop as people call him. But you know on more of like a deeper level. I think that his extreme furlough boxes. I have a little replica. Cute they're so teeny weeny. Hello you're going to have to demand you're GONNA have to please take pictures of Joel AIDS so we can post them and our social media so everybody else can see 'cause we're lucky we're seeing it will need to post. I'm all of a visual learner. So I get it but What I love about the Brillo boxes not that I think it's like an amazing aesthetic piece of artwork but it really did kind is great example of what changed the art world and the philosopher. Arthur dantonio really wrote a lot about Warhol's below box You know the Berlow box you could find it any supermarket so what you know really changed from. Warhol's Brillo box to one that you can find in the every day. And what makes something a work of art and I think it was kind of introducing those aesthetic questions into the art world. At the time you know what elevates something to the status of high art what's higher what's low art can umbrella box that looks identical to one in the supermarket. Be An art artwork and what makes it an artwork because it's enough museum. Is it because a famous artists. Nearly were homemade. It is it because it was so screen printed and not commercially produced. Is it because the boxes were built so it really brought up a whole new line of questioning in the art world? I think that's a really great way to kind of look at that. That Campbell soup cans meal. It was a way of democratising the art world and not making it so twenty or high art because the regular everyday person has probably had brillo experience. Because you don't have a cleaning Lady Doing Your sinks right you know had a Coca Cola. You've had Campbell's before probably so I think it was kind of you. Know this democratization as well as this universality of these products you know they're known locally nationally internationally mostly everyone has had some sort of experience with it and they were very pop and that was you know the movement at the time. I also fine just because I've been a fan of Andy. Warhol's work since I was young that everywhere I go in this world I now look at like packaging design a lot differently. I actually will notice for instance. I keep my pens in this crush. Tomato can but it's really like the beautiful details in colors that somebody did this. It wasn't like you're going to have to take a picture of that. We have a lot of visual AIDS being guy name. Oh at the factory. Who just did it could have been somebody that was hired in purposely made that waste and either way. I'm I'm I don't think if it weren't for my learning about Andy and his of I. I don't think I would have ever been trained to do and I love it. You definitely captured. Were Hall. Sensibility of Pop. He did this cross country road trip. And you know. He's looking at all the fifties sixties motel signs and diner signs and he said. I'm GONNA paraphrase knocking. Remember it totally. Once you got pop you could never see assign the same way again. Once you got pop you could never see America the same way again and I think that's just what you said. You see things in a different way. The common every day all of a sudden can become art can become pop can become cool. You know there's a coolness of the fifties and sixties SINU- in graphic design. And I think that you know he really plugged into that so speaking of this common every day being cool and being art when I saw the entire Campbell's soup cans series at the Moma last year. I honestly had like an emotional reaction. So why do you think a collection of artwork with the most mundane subject ever a can of soup could resonate so deeply with viewers throughout the years? I think you know in the same vein as Berlow in the same vein as coca-cola again another warhol quote which is of paraphrase. You know about Coca Cola. He say you know everybody can have a coke. The bum on the street can have a coke. Princess Diana can have a coke cope. No matter how much money you have in. It's the same experience and I think it's you know again. Ability for the high low to be able to experience a work of art in a similar manner we definitely bring our own context our own filter to the artwork to the experience. But it wasn't exclusive anymore. What I love about the museum is new in Nineteen Sixty. Two were hall famously. Showed his campbell soup. Paintings thirty two paintings of campbells but before that And what we see throughout the museum because we have a large collection of his work now. We're organized chronologically. When you start at the seventh floor you see what came before those nineteen sixty two small painted soup cans and they're really large explorations of the Campbell's soup can and they were done money. He blew them up there. You know larger than life and they're meticulously hand and then he started the nineteen sixty two series. You know and he arranged those at the original exhibition of them. In a way that was almost mimic the supermarket experience. He kind of had them sitting on shelves but by the end of nineteen sixty two he kind of started his romance with photographic silkscreen printing and then he began printing a lot of these cans. And that's what I love teaching people when they come to the museum that every because everybody knows about the silkscreen printed camp but they don't know that his first exhibition of them they were hand painted and they don't know that before those came all of these experiments large small law you know why short and we also have one where he meticulously masked out and painted over. Can you do with tape? He kind masks and so every year like a little more tape falls off a little more tapes. This work of art that is constantly changing. And they're not in finished. Yeah exactly and then one of them also has ripped torn label and kind of drips on the side which is so great to talk about because you know the dominant. Art Movement of the time was abstract expressionism. And you Kinda see that bridge rate. There were holes allowing the drips like Jackson pollock. But he's also doing pop object you know and because he wasn't really accepted. I think into the abstract expressionist Robert Rauschenberg like manly man artists when he got grounding in the pop art movement you know he really just wrote it and you know it became his in a way. So that's what I love about the Campbell Soup Cannon. I liked that you ask that because when I interviewed for my job at the museum you know I was like. Oh my God. How long am I going to be able to work here? This Campbell's soup can thing is gonna get old really quick and I am almost twenty years later and you know every week a teacher or patron yo asked me something where I have to do a deeper dive and I'm like Oh my God. Where did this or Oh my God. This relates wore like this. So I'm always making these really amazing connections and you know when I thought early on. I'm like all the Soup Kangai guy say there's been few moments where I've been in the store and Campbell's will put out like they're warhol soup cans. Brillo did the same thing like it. Didn't say Warhol but there were like are retro packaging. Why.

Andy Warhol Campbell Nineteen Sixty Pennsylvania East Asia AIDS Robert Rauschenberg Jackson pollock New York Brillo dot Philip Perlstein Pictorial Design Covid Boll Southeast Asia Singapore Hong Pittsburgh America
"warhol world" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

11:55 min | 1 year ago

"warhol world" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Back the highlights from the two hundred interviews that we've done over the past two years on the art newspaper podcast this week. We're looking at two conversations about Andy Warhol. The huge warhol retrospective effective from A to B and back again which began at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York last November is now at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and later travels to the art institute of Chicago across to podcasts last year we looked in detail at the show itself and it will host Legacy Z. of it later you hear from Jeremy Della. The British artist who as a young man spent a few weeks Warhol's let studio the factory in New York but I is an interview from October last year. We've done a desalvo the curator the touring retrospective Donna was to come to our senior editor in New York Nancy Kenny in a catalog essay for the exhibition. You write that you met with Warhol in the eighties. When you were curator the Dea Art Foundation I'd love to hear about those interactions sure well <hes> <hes> you know when I met Warhol in eighty five eighty six? I A little fuzzy myself about the time but I believe it was late eighty five early eighty six it was <hes> during a time when I was taking forward some exhibitions from the museum's collection election and the had this incredible retrospective collection of Warhol's work and so really that's sort of was the framework if you will the context for it all and you know at first he was not very forthcoming. <hes> there was an exhibition of the disaster paintings that organized and he was not really that involved but then I had this idea to do something that really examined his pre silkscreen work work he'd made from sixty to sixty two Enron. I reached out to him. He was very intrigued by the idea quite interested in it and it was at a time when he himself was revisiting hand painting in his collaborations with Basquiat and <hes> Keith haring. I found him a very open been shy interested artists well and course when you're young curator sort of overwhelmed by the mythic status of someone such as Warhol so I was <hes> you know in my own for me. I was a bit take it back about how to approach him but then the conversations became really quite straightforward and very <hes> he was very forthcoming with information. I asked him a lot about the period of time he'd worked in the fifties in particular are interested in that and then you know how it was that he came to make these decisions between the more gesture abstraction and the move toward you know something that really appeared printed the last warhol retrospective organized by American Museum was at the Museum of Modern Art in Nineteen eighty-nine just two years after his death <hes> that's almost three decades ago. What new perspectives have you gained since then sure I mean it's it's sort of amazing easing to imagine that you know it's been that long since a U._S.? Institution took on <hes> a major retrospective of Warhol. I think in many ways that you know there's an entirely new generation many of them were not even on born in nineteen eighty nine and so you know I think that <hes> there's a generation that's been grappling with both rethinking painting what painting can be engagements with abstraction but also I think a fluidity <hes> pity or a comfort zone with looking and working with new technologies media-driven things <hes> digital technologies so that's something that's really struck me immensely in all these years later is to see a new generation for whom warhol makes total sense and it made me see I really felt that Warhol was very ahead of his times and that they're the perception of his work in the sixties of course you know was for the most part he had his detractors tractors and still does but for the most part it was an incredibly radical move to make a silkscreen <hes> to use silkscreen to make a painting but you know in the seventies and eighties Warhol's work wasn't quite as popular and I I think that you know his use of technology photography <hes> ideas about image making and of course in an age of instagram and so many other social media platforms you know Warhol's famous statement you know everyone we'll be famous for fifteen minutes which is probably fifteen seconds <hes> rings incredibly true so on some level. I'm particularly interested in a generation of artists that <hes> came a couple of decades several decades after Warhol and a new audience <hes> of people who will becoming too or halls work in many ways in many instances. I think not necessarily for the first time but to see this level of depth in the work will be for many people a a A. I hope an eye opening experience just the show cast the nineteen sixties as his biggest moment. No it really <hes> you know felt very it was very important to really look through at the trajectory of Warhol's worked to consider his career as a whole and I think there's been so much attention paid to the sixties. Both you know in critic particularly at a critical level <hes> and the later work suffered a bit and it's there are those people and critics and <hes> and Norma scholarship after Warhol died of course when he died in eighty seven and a lot of work also came out that you know would had not been shown in his lifetime really changed perceptions. I think about warhol world's a gay man especially the early worker the fifties where you see an aspect of Warhol that you isn't as evident in the later work but I think that seventies and eighties period <hes> was misunderstood stood. It didn't really look even though the technique had similarities with sixties. The subject matter was completely different. <hes> yes hammer-and-sickle <hes> which you know he was inspired by graffiti going to Italy during the time of the Red Guard but then here's an artist who makes skull paintings or paintings of shadows <hes> this subject matter is quite distinct from the more quote unquote iconic imagery of the sixties so what I've tried to do which I think that you do at any Ortis case is to really show how those ideas have evolved over time and I would say if almost half maybe slightly half the exhibition is also devoted to the work that he made post nineteen sixties well. Let's dive into his early career. In nineteen forty nine more than a decade before the Campbell soup cans or the Mao or the Maryland images were also familiar with warhol started out as an illustrator and commercial advertising and he became quite a successful one. How did that influences later work well? What are the arguments of the exhibition is that that fifties period was foundational for Warhol because to a large extent he was already a talent an an extraordinary draftsman <hes> and I think that in coming to New York and he didn't set out to be a commercial artists he came with his college friend Philip Perlstein and they were roommates together and you know they were wanting to be artists but they had to support themselves warhol very readily God the job at Glamour magazine because he had this great proficiency a drawing <hes>? I think that throughout the fifties what he was able to do was to also see very firsthand the mechanics of visual visual communication how images are put together. How desire is created in a product whether it's a shoe <hes> you know or pharmaceutical and so to be part of that and to see and work with art directors you know many extremely sophisticated and really well trained themselves some in the bow house you know he had a firsthand for front row seat and engagement with that process as what you how you work with an art director how the art director transmits their idea of how it needs to change and also he had this he was immersed in the technology of the period technologies the periods such as photostats machines opaque projectors all the things that you use in to create these images that are fundamentally their final? <hes> you know the final their final <hes> location is in print so he's working in a world in which print and particularly increasingly more photography is the language of popular culture. You write that early in his career. He seems to have run into censorship when he tried to show at art galleries. What were they objecting to well? You know it was hit. Many of his early paintings <hes> were the subject matter you know would was mostly figurative although they did he would use different patterns to obscure the image or he would mimic the brush strokes of you know some I argue one some restaurants at Rhinehart <hes> ornate off Gottlieb <hes> he there's a particular incident that led me to that conclusion and it's really one that was rebounded to me by Philip Perlstein Warhol had made a series as of paintings in round the late fifties that he asks Pearlstine to take to the Tanger- Gallery which was a cooperative gallery. Many of the IBEX painters were involved. The subject was of two boys kissing and of course they took he dutifully took the to the gallery and they laughed so it wasn't I dunno censorship's the right word but it's certainly was not at all in sync with the kind of subject matter at that time <hes> that's not to say there weren't artists this such as Larry rivers in particular who warhol credits as an influence who were playing with that kind of figurative subject matter I also that had this you know kind of coded Campy Coy <hes> aspect to it but it it was not. I'm not what they were GONNA. Show at those galleries back then the art will was dominated by Macho abstract expressionist wasn't it absolutely I mean you know I it's the women the great women of that period from Grace Oregon and and you know Joan Mitchell show. Are you know got there do but much later on in a lot of ways so yes it was a very male male defined although a number of women who were working at that time and you know you have early Johns and Rauschenberg working at that time so you know Warhol's part of a group of artists who <hes> for whom that subject matter would would not have appealed or that Bravura you know <hes> was just out of sync and he's also younger. He's a younger generation so <hes> this is extremely difficult time and <hes> but he keeps you know peas persistent in making his work like any any driven artist well. The show has examples of his early handpainted work. There's the Coca Cola bottle for example which not apparently painted in a drippy abstract expressionist style but he also painted it in a way that resembles a commercially printed image. Now I mean this is really seen as kind of breakthrough moment for him because much of the work that he was making you know and many any other artists by the way we looked in sign <hes> James Rosenquist there were many artists who were still in that late fifties period you know were making we're interested in subject matter but still feeling that they had to in some way tip their hat to abstract expressionism so wore homemade two versions of the painting and one was a giant coke bottle that had drips on it and he invited is a very famous story invited for Friends Irving Plum Ivan Carp M._e._d...

Andy Warhol warhol world Philip Perlstein Warhol warhol Whitney Museum of American Art San Francisco Museum of Modern New York the art newspaper art institute of Chicago Dea Art Foundation Museum of Modern Art Donna Keith haring James Rosenquist Maryland Jeremy Della Nancy Kenny senior editor Joan Mitchell
"warhol world" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

12:50 min | 1 year ago

"warhol world" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Everybody. Welcome to all of it. I'm Alison Stewart Campbell Soup cans sculptures, made a brillo boxes. Double Capote portraits. Make no mistake. Andy Warhol is one of the most recognizable artists of a twentieth century. He made our that even non patrons of the art world encountered on a regular basis and yet hard as it is to believe Warhol had not had a full career retrospective in the US in more than three decades. But all that changes this week with the opening of Andy Warhol from a to b and back again, a monumental exhibit that just opened at the Whitney on Monday and runs to March thirty first before moving on to Chicago and San Francisco he exhibited curated by the Whitney's, Donna salvo and she joins us in studio. Welcome donna. Oh, thank you. Either way. Thank you. I waited yesterday. And it was just it's enormous. It's expansive. The crowd is worth watching as well. Yes, it is. Yeah. There's a lot of social anthropology going on. It's interesting, and it's a visual fief feast, which is very Warhol everywhere else. Very well hall. I talked to my left and I saw a member of the Kardashian clan. And I looked to my right. And I saw a correspondent from PBS news hour. Oh my gosh. Warhol's world. What were your goals in incubating? The sure well, you know, it was really an attempt to bring some clarity. I think to an artist who so profuse have been so much work that in a way, it's almost impossible in certain way to grapple with it all, but also sort of Scituate, the work and its development over the course of Warhol's career and see his experiences as a commercial illustrator when he first comes to New York as well, as you know, how Warhol is really grappling with the fundamental problems of of of art making and that's often lost in so much of the discussion that has happened during Warhol's era when he was alive and even after he died as just the man with the funny wig who went to a larger parties, and he's so much more than that. He was so prolific in deciding what would be in this exhibit. How'd you make your choices? And how did you decide to organize it? Sure. Well, I think I. Decided that the best thing was to do it largely chronologically because it's the way to track in a sense, the development of Warhol's thinking, his ideas, and there are certain key works that you just can't imagine a Warhol retrospective. Without the thirty two Campbell Soup cans from the museum of modern art or the Marilyn diptych, you know, from the Tate or nine Jackie's from the Whitney's own collection. So they're just sort of key works, and I'd done a show years ago on the fifties called success successes. A job in New York at the grey art gallery that was of the commercial work. So I knew a lot of that work the hardest thing, of course, is there so much really really great work. And I you know, I had certain feelings about certain works that just do certain things and so had to be very judicious in making those decisions about either. Introducing a new idea a new paradigm shift or that show, how Warhol engages with color, and then re engages with it. And also painting hand. Painting and a lot of that you see in the early days of the sixties, but then again in the seventies and eighties and Warhol's career had fallen off. And then throw on top of that film, photography video publishing television. It's it's tough. But it's one of the challenges that you live for as a curator. I'm sure I'm sure I want to talk about a couple of of the pieces that I didn't know that. Well, and I think a really interesting, ladies and gentlemen, from nineteen seventy five it's one of his history is where we don't know the we don't know the identities that there are anonymous for a reason we tell people about their sure so he was approached by a dealer in Italy to do a series of portrait of the term would be used then of drag Queen or trans people, and he he did not want. The superstars of the of the factory candy, darling. He didn't want them. And so wore home went on a search. With his friend Bob cello to find a sitters, and he went to a New York club called the guilty grape where there are a lot of direct performers and they were each asked to pose for they didn't know they were posing for Warhol. They got paid a very little amount of money like fifty dollars and Warhol made Polaroid's of them, which we then translated into photographs. Now, it's interesting because when he showed them they were called, ladies and gentlemen, and they're very there are very few paintings. We're Warhol also features people of color, and so in our showing of them and others. I think have followed have have done even earlier than us. We've actually included the names because we know who they are they signed the Polaroid's and one of them in particular is Marsha p Johnson who was a very leading figure of the gay rights movement very involved with stonewall villa Meena Ross who had a band. So it's interesting times have changed. Luckily. Luckily, and I think we're sensitized to, you know, saying, well, they're not just anonymous individuals, and it's part of the complexity of Warhol in the different circles in which he moved and those he didn't move within their also introduced color in an amazing way. And there's a great essay the catalogue by the artist Glenn ligon who really talks about that who speaks from the perspective. And as an African American man, an artists of colored and color, and really you see Warhol with these exuberant colors, and the poses are kind of amazing to see these individuals who were performers and full of life in these portraits. So it's an incredible series. And there are hundreds of them. We only have a small selection, but we have a one that's really large scale. That's fantastic. There's also his first ever public artwork. The most wanted man yet. Most wanted men was it created and what for well. He made it for the New York state pavilion of the world's fair. So. Philip Johnson the architect designed the pavilion any commissioned a number of artists. Many of the pop artist ROY Lichtenstein Klaus Oldenburg along with Ellsworth Kelly to make works for the facade of the pavilion and Warhol was decided that he would use these images taken from a New York City. Police bulletin of individuals wanted for crimes, and he silkscreen them onto a huge canvas. And they were put on the facade of the pavilion. Now, they fair organizers weren't so happy about this. They thought that they were perhaps not the image. They should project in to the fair and family friendly. They asked him to submit something else. He wanted to have a portrait of Robert Moses, the great either destroyer or maker of New York, obviously, he's a contentious figure it may said, no. So he painted them over in silver. And that was it. He also made a film series called the thirteen most beautiful boys. So this is where you see these dual mass specs of. Warhol? And I still think it's incredibly outrageous thing to have put it the world's fair at that period of time. This is pre stonewalls a very different time. But not everybody got that reading of it people knew who were in the know. Anyway, that's why and they're the anti hero. They're the complete opposite of what you would have expected. But it's why it's such an incredible series. We're speaking with Donna desalvo's. She curated the Andy Warhol show from a to b and back again, which is currently at the Whitney it just it just opened up. There is the death and disaster series as well. Which really you get a sense of how obsessed he was with media and headlines in terms of this series. How does it fit into his whole career? Sure. Well, it's a very important series. And it's often seen as one of his pivotal series of works. I mean, he was obsessed with media because we're obsessed with media. So he was reflecting in a sense, the cultural desire for news, and you know, spectacle and tragedy, sadly cells. So he picked up on that. So many of the images were discarded from AP wire photo or UPI because they were too gruesome some of them actually appeared in magazine. So he was gonna do a show in Paris, which he was gonna call death in America. And these were that's where they were first shown. So you have images of car crashes suicides, and you have some where there really speaking to historical moment. So it must race ri- which uses the famous Charles Moore photograph of the civil rights protests in Birmingham, where they protesters are attacked by dogs or there's one of two women who die as a result of eating tainted tuna fish, they botulism or you also have a suicide of a woman who's fallen from jumped from the Empire State building. Some of these appeared in life magazine, some of them never made it because they were so gruesome, but I think what you see there is you move from celebrity to this anonymous because we don't know who these people are. And it also gives you the darker side of Warhol's whole project. You know, there's a dark side to Warhol there's a dark side to consumption to overconsumption and also look where there's a base insect that attracts us to looking at some of these images, we're bombarded with them, and you know, Warhol is grows up in the age of radio TV comes into the what into the picture mid fifties. So we're more and more that culture that time people are looking at images for more, and they're the great pictorial magazines life, look as well as New York Post Daily Mirror. Some of these things don't even exist anywhere. So the picture became the language, and we're we're in even more today. I think about that sometimes as I was walking through what about Andy Warhol were alive during the internet. Yes. Sorta makes your head. He's in pre digital guy. Yeah. It's an amazing. It's amazing thought there's also some very interesting behind the scenes almost like quotidian pictures of him vacuuming gallery where he's going to have a show. Why was it important to have that be part of the actually a work of art? So he well because I think that when we're hall was shot in nineteen sixty eight by Valerie Solanas who had written a book called scum the society for cutting up men, and he she was very unhappy with Warhol he promised to produce one of her make her one of her screens into a move. It didn't happen and she shot him. And he was fate. I mean, it was a near fatal shooting. He comes has a period of convalescence. You know, oftentimes people think this is when Warhol's work declines, and what you see through some of these experiments in this period of sixty eight to seventy two are actually how fertile his mind is an I believe you learn a lot from an artist by seeing the works at actually. Never make the quote unquote, big time because they show the process, you know, it's never a to z. It's a to be eight z ADD back and forth. And so that gallery that's actually a project. He was asked to do for a non x a women's college doesn't exist anymore. And he along with a number of other artists were invited to do projects in the gallery. So what does he do something? So simple as you say so quotidian he vacuums the gallery, it's documented and he leaves behind the bag of dirt. So all that exists. And I just think it shows him as a conceptual artist shows some has humor chosen is also looking at almost kind of emptiness nothingness, which is a serious read serious and funny symbol, Tena Asli. There's also one of these time capsules why did he do those? So they start from a very pragmatic place. He was moving. Stay removing factories moving the studio he had all this junk that people sent him fan letters invitations all kinds of things. So it started very practically Vincent Fremont who worked with him for many years. They just got these boxes, and they started he started packing things away at a certain point. He just systematize isn't. So they're six. Six hundred sixty of these time capsules and they just have an array of things, I think they're so great because they might be the kind of thing you might find an anthropological digs an archaeological dig someday. And we have one on display from the period around nineteen seventy two seventy three and their fan letters Christmas cards things from each cell Laurent artists. Like Ray Johnson. It runs the gamut from the famous to the unknown. Some of them are their books. Apparently, they opened a time capsule at the end of Warhol museum that had a birthday cake that wasn't eating. So you get the sense of the stream in the flow of culture..

Andy Warhol Warhol museum New York New York City Alison Stewart New York state pavilion US donna Whitney Capote Polaroid Glenn ligon Philip Johnson museum of modern art Ray Johnson Italy New York Post PBS Chicago
"warhol world" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

12:49 min | 1 year ago

"warhol world" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Stewart Campbell Soup cans sculptures, made a brillo boxes. Double Capote portraits. Make no mistake. Andy Warhol is one of the most recognizable artists of the twentieth century. He made art that even non patrons of the art world encountered on a regular basis and yet hard as it is to believe Warhol had not had a full career retrospective in the US in more than three decades. But all that changes this week with the opening of Andy Warhol from a to b and back again a monumental exhibit that just opened at the Whitney on Monday and runs to March thirty first before moving onto Chicago. And San Francisco the exhibit is curated by the Whitney's, Donna desalvo and she joins us in studio. Welcome donna. Oh, thank you, growl guy, either way. Thank you. I waited yesterday. And it was just it's enormous. It's expansive. The crowd is worth watching as well. There's a lot of social anthropology going on. It's interesting, and it's a visual feast, which is very Warhol oil, very well hall. I talked to my left and I saw a member of the Kardashian clan. And I looked to my right. And I saw a correspondent from PBS NewsHour. Oh my God. Warhol's world. What were your goals in incubating this exists? Sure. Well, you know, it was really an attempt to bring some clarity. I think to an artist who so profuse made so much work that in a way, it's almost impossible in certain way to grapple with it all, but also sort of situate, the work and its development over the course of Warhol's career and see his experiences as a commercial illustrator when he first comes to New York as well, as you know, how Warhol is really grappling with the fundamental problems of of of art making and that's often lost in so much of the discussion that has happened during Warhol's era when he was alive and even after he died as just the man with the funny wig who went to a large parties, and he's so much more than that. He was so prolific in deciding what would be in this exhibit. How'd you make your choices? And how did you decide to organize it? Sure. Well, you know, I think. First of all, I decided that the best thing was to do it largely chronologically because it's it's the way to track in a sense, the development of Warhol's thinking, his ideas, and there are certain key works that you just can't imagine a Warhol retrospective. Without the thirty two Campbell Soup cans from the museum of modern art or the Marilyn diptych, you know, from the Tate or nine Jackie's from the Whitney's own collection. So they're just sort of key works, and I'd done a show years ago on the fifties called successes a job in New York at the gray or gallery that was of the commercial work. So I knew a lot of that work. The hardest thing of course, is there's so much really really great work. And you know, I had certain feelings about certain works that just do certain things and so had to be very judicious in making those decisions about either. Introducing a new idea a new paradigm shift or that show, how Warhol engages with color, and then re engages with it. And also painting. Hand painting and a lot of that you see in the early days of the sixties, but then again in the seventies and eighties and we're holds career had fallen off. And then throw on top of that film, photography video publishing television. It's it's tough. But it's one of the challenges that you live for as a curator. I'm sure I'm sure I wanna talk about a couple of of the pieces that I didn't know that. Well, and I think a really interesting, ladies and gentlemen, from nineteen seventy five it's one of his portraiture is where we don't know the we don't know the identities of the people that there are anonymous for a reason we tell people about their sure so he was approached by a dealer in Italy to do a series of portrait's of the term would be used that of drag Queen or trans people, and he he did not want. The superstars of the of the factory candy, darling. He didn't want them. And so Warhol went on a search. Search with his friend. Bob Cole cello to find a sitters. And he went to a New York club called the guilty grape where there are a lot of direct performers, and they were each asked to pose for they didn't know they were posing for Warhol. They got paid a very little amount of money like fifty dollars and Warhol made Polaroid's of them, which we then translated into photographs. Now, it's interesting because when he showed them they were called, ladies and gentlemen, and they're very there are very few paintings were Warhol also features people of color, and so in our showing of them and others. I think of followed have have done even earlier than us. We've actually included the names because we know who they are they signed the Polaroid's and one of them in particular is Marsha p Johnson who was very leading figure the gay rights movement very involved with stonewall villa Meena Ross who had a band. So it's interesting times have changed. Luckily, luckily. And I think we're sensitized to, you know, saying, well, they're not just anonymous individuals, and it's part of the complexity of Warhol in the different circles in which he moved and those he didn't move within their also introduced color in an amazing way. And there's a great essay and the catalogue by the artist Glenn ligon who really talks about that who speaks from the perspective. And as an African American man, an artist of colored and color, and really you see Warhol with these exuberant colors, and the poses are kind of amazing to see these individuals who were performers and full of life in these portraits. So it's an incredible series. And there are hundreds of them. We only have a small selection, but we have a one that's really large scale. That's fantastic. There's also his first ever public artwork. Most wanted man yet. Most wanted men when was it created and what for well. He made it for the New York state pavilion of the world's fair. So Philip Johnson the architect. Design the pavilion. Any commissioned a number of artists. Many of the pop artist Liechtenstein Klaus Oldenburg has long with Ellsworth Kelly to make works for the facade of the pavilion and Warhol was decided that he would use these images taken from a New York City. Police bulletin of individuals wanted for crimes, and he silkscreen them onto a huge campus. And they were put on the facade of the pavilion. Now, they fair organizers weren't so happy about this. They thought that they were perhaps not the image. They should project in to the fair and family friendly. They asked him to submit something else. He wanted to have a portrait of Robert Moses, the great either destroyer or maker of New York, obviously, he's a contentious figure, and they said, no. So he painted them over in silver. And that was it. He also made a film series called the thirteen most beautiful boys. So this is where you see these dual mass specs of Warhol, and I still think. It's incredibly outrageous thing to have put it the world's fair at that period of time. This is pre stonewalls very different time. But not everybody got that reading of it people knew who were in the know. Anyway, that's why and they're the anti hero. They're the complete opposite of what you would have expected. But it's why it's such an incredible series. We're speaking with Donna desalvo's. She curated the Andy Warhol show from a to b and back again, which is currently at the Whitney it just it just opened up. There is the death and disastrous series as well. Which really you get a sense of how obsessed he was with media and headlines in terms of this series. How does it fit into his whole career? Sure. Well, it's a very important series. And it's often seen as one of his pivotal series of works. I mean, he was obsessed with media because we're obsessed with media. So he was reflecting in a sense, the cultural desire for news, and you know, spectacle and tragedy sadly cells so he picked up on that. So many. Any of the images were discarded from AP wire photo or UPI because they were too gruesome some of them actually appeared in magazine. So he was going to do is show in Paris, which was going to call death in America. And these were that's where they were first shown. So you have images of car crashes suicides, and you have some where there really speaking to historical moment. So it must race riot which uses the famous Charles Moore photograph of the civil rights protests in Birmingham, where they protesters are attacked by dogs or there's one of two women who die as a result of eating tainted tuna fish. They Don botulism, you know, or you also have a suicide of a woman who's fallen from jumped from the Empire State building. Some of these appeared in life magazine, some of them never made it because they were so gruesome, but I think what you see there is you move from celebrity to this anonymous because he's we don't know who these people are. And it also gives you the darker. Outside of Warhol's whole project. You know, there's a dark side to Warhol there's a dark side to consumption to overconsumption and also look where there's a base insect that attracts us to looking at some of these images, we're bombarded with them. And you know, we're all is grows up in the age of radio TV comes into the what into the picture like mid fifties. So we're more and more that culture that time people are looking at images for more, and they're good the great pictorial magazines life, look as well as New York Post Daily Mirror. Some of these things don't even exist anymore. So the picture became the language, and we're we're in even more today. I think about that sometimes as I was walking through what about Andy Warhol were alive during the internet. Yes. Of makes your head Smith. He's a pre digital guy. Yeah. It's an amazing. It's amazing thought there's also some very interesting behind the scenes I was like quotidian pictures of him vacuuming gallery where he's going to have a show. Why was it important to have that be part of the chefs actually a work of art? So he well because I think that when we're hall was shot in nineteen sixty eight by Valerie Solanas who had written a book called scum the society for cutting up men, and he she was very unhappy with Warhol he promised to produce one of her one of her screens into a move. It didn't happen and she shot him, and he was faith. I mean, it was a near fatal shooting. He comes has a period of convalescence. You know, oftentimes people think this is when Warhol's work declines, and what you say through some of these experiments in this period of sixty eight to seventy two are actually how fertile his mind is I believe you learn a lot from an artist by seeing the works, actually. Never make the quote unquote, big time because they show the process, you know, it's never a to z. It's a to be eight z ADD back and forth. And so that gallery that's actually a project. He was asked to do for a non a women's college that doesn't exist anymore confidant college and he along with number of other artists were invited to do projects in the gallery. So what does he do something? So simple as you say so quotidian he vacuums the gallery, it's documented and he leaves behind the bag of dirt. So all that exists. And I I just think it shows him as a conceptual artist shows him has humor chosen is also looking at almost kind of emptiness nothingness, which is a serious read serious and funny somewhat Asli. There's also one of these time capsules why did he do those? So they start from very pragmatic place. He was moving. They removing factories moving the studio. Jio? He had all this junk that people sent him fan letters invitations all kinds of things. So it started very practically Vincent Fremont who worked with him for many years. They just got these boxes, and they started he started packing things away at a certain point. He just systematize. So they're six hundred sixty of these time capsules, and they just have an array of things, I think they're so great because they might be the kind of thing you might find an anthropological digs an archaeological dig someday. And we have one on display from the period around nineteen seventy two seventy three and their fan letters Christmas cards things from each seller on artists like Ray Johnson. It runs the gamut from the famous to the unknown. Some of them are their books. Apparently, they opened a time capsule at the end of Warhol museum that had a birthday cake that wasn't eaten. So you get the sense of the stream and the flow of culture, and in a way, that's..

Andy Warhol Warhol museum New York Donna desalvo New York City Stewart Campbell New York state pavilion US San Francisco Whitney PBS Capote Chicago Glenn ligon Bob Cole Philip Johnson museum of modern art Polaroid Italy
"warhol world" Discussed on Food 4 Thot

Food 4 Thot

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"warhol world" Discussed on Food 4 Thot

"And there was something. So interesting to me about like, queer and queer powerfulness. And how I think in a certain era, you you may be had to choose. And if you wanted to go out into the world and put yourself into a position of influence and of power you had to marry that and as a black man in that industry as a large black man who could be physically intimidating and seen that way. It was really it was really amazing. It's an incredible incredible documentary and also all of his caftans because he wears ten. I was thinking about his whole narrative of sort of staying at the Y and like there were roaches in there. And he was younger, and then sort of coming up sort of Andy Warhol's world, it's just such a hustler. Hustler respect that if you have enemies if you haven't seen his video talking about Michael Cohen's close you must. Because you know, it's like the tacky python coat, and it's like him just reading it for Phil. So that's thing. Number one. He's great. He's sitting on a porch. I think it's house in Westchester. That's number one. Number two. It's a little contentious. But Hilton als wrote an essay on him from the nineties that's gorgeous about basically, how hard it is to be the only black person in the room in fashion, and before it came out onto a was fine with it. And then a lot of people felt like he was making fun of him, which was not helton's intent. But apparently Andre turned after the article came out kind of turned against it. And so it is it is a com Helton is kind of a problematic Fave and a lot of ways. Right is definitely an essay. That is worth reading. It's gorgeous and complicated. And said, yeah, yeah. But complicated in San oh, it's my -ality..

Phil Helton Andy Warhol Michael Cohen San oh Westchester Andre Hilton
"warhol world" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

02:21 min | 1 year ago

"warhol world" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"I'm particularly interested in a generation of artists that came a couple of decades several decades after Warhol and anew audience of people who will be coming to or holes work in many ways in many instances. I think not necessarily for the first time, but to see this level of depth in the work will be for many people. I hope an eye opening experience just the show cast the nineteen sixties as his biggest moment. No. It really, you know, felt very it was very important to really look through at the trajectory of Warhol's worked to consider his career as a whole. And I think there's been so much attention paid to the sixties both, you know, in critic, particularly at a critical level and the later work suffered a bit. And it's there are those people and critics, and and Norma scholarship after world died, of course, when he died in eighty seven and a lot of work also came out that you know, had not been shown his lifetime. Really changed perceptions. I think about Warhol worlds a game man, especially the early worker the fifties where you see an aspect of Warhol that you isn't as evident in the later work. But I think that seventies and eighties period was misunderstood. It. Didn't really look even though the technique had similarities with sixties the subject matter was completely different. Yes. Hammer and sick. Coll- which you know, he was inspired by graffiti going to Italy during the time of the red guard. But then here's an order to make skull paintings. Or paintings of shadows. This subject matter is quite distinct from the more, quote, unquote, conic imagery of the sixties. So what I've tried to do which I think you do at any ortis case is to really show, how those ideas have evolved over time. And I would say if almost half maybe slightly half the exhibition is also devoted to the work that he made post nineteen sixties, let's dive into his early career and nineteen forty nine more than a decade before the Campbell Soup cans or the mouth or the Maryland images were also with Warhol started out as an illustrator and commercial advertising, and he became quite a successful one..

Warhol Campbell Soup Norma Maryland Hammer Italy
"warhol world" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

05:41 min | 2 years ago

"warhol world" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Is. Well, you see it reflected, I think, in the characters and their individual stories. I think they're existing in this world that doesn't really participate in these issues. Because they're in a bubble during a bubble. They're very much in a bubble and those that do want to participate or who are unsatisfied with, you know, the rules of Singapore. They leave, or they spend half the you're in London or Paris, or they go and party, you know, on yachts in international waters, right? That actually happens in the story. Some thinking of what a contrast, it must have been to go from the restrictions which you might not have been aware of when you were a child in Singapore, and then eventually moved to New York where you worked at interview magazine, which is an offshoot of the Andy Warhol world and in the design world. I mean, it's it's a, it's a very artistic world and. Parts of the art world, very class oriented, but in parts of it, it's a kind of bohemian society were those kind of boundaries can come down, so absolutely. Yeah. So what was it like for you entering New York into a part of Bahia Mian culture where a lot of the restrictions that you may have had to deal with in the past or that parts of your family still have to deal with in Singapore didn't matter anymore. Well, I mean, there's a reason I've been here for twenty three years. You know, I think my moving to New York was actually a reaction against Houston, and we, you know, my upbringing there in a way because if you if you remember I left when I was eleven years old. So you know, my memories are embedded in this amber history that you know of a place that really no longer exists. And so you know, for me, escaping the New Yorkers was escaping at that time the boredom of suburban Houston, you know, I wanted, you know, those always a part of me that was just so fascinated by New York. And you know, I I remember subscribing to Vanity Fair starting in nineteen eighty six. And you know really being fascinated by the world of New York and wanting to move there as soon as I could and I did. I moved there as soon as I could when I turned twenty one. You know. So for me, it's, it's always been. This has always been the the haven. You know where where I can explore my creativity and you know live life. However, I want to. So I have a Mahjong question for you. 'cause Mahjan figures into the movie and Mahjong. It's kind of like a card game in a way, but it's played with beautiful tiles instead of cards, and you know, you bet and everything kinda like you wouldn't poker with chips. When I was growing up, Martin was really big in my neighborhood was all like the Jewish women play Mahjong. I used to play Mahjong with my friend. Paula when I was a child, we took our parents Mahjong sets. I really thought like this is part of Jewish culture. It was a Marsh. I'm part of your life when you were growing up. It was in the sense that it was always being played around me. My grandmother was known to be the most lethal Mahjong playing. Amongst all the women in her sat and her generation and no one, it got two point. I think we're no one wanted to play with her anymore because she would just win every game. So you know, I always remember it fondly and you know many of Friday night when there were family gatherings in our home. You know, there would be her. I would remember my grandmother in the corner at the Mahjong table holding court with a few friends and relatives. You know, playing a game and I, of course, don't know how to play macho. But what I would do after they were done with the tiles was I would arrange them into like peaceful sculpture buildings, and I knew how to make the turtle. Do you know how to make the turtle? No, no, I don't know what you're talking about. There's a very specific turtle. You can lay out and create with Mahjong tiles. So that was me with my John. But you know, it's actually one of these games I would love to learn. It looks like great, fun, Kevin, Kline. It's been great to talk with you. Thank you so much and congratulates been such a pleasure and such. In honor. Kenan Kwan is the author of the novel crazy, rich Asians. And as an executive producer of the new film adaptation after a break, Ken Tucker will review a new album featuring songwriter and singer. Robbie FOX and singer, Linda Gail, Lewis Lewis who has Jerry Lee. Lewis is sister. I'm Terry gross, and this is fresh air support for this podcast and the following message come from gobble. The meal prep company for busy families gobble makes home cooking easy. So families can spend less time in the kitchen and more time together, gobbles team of chefs chop and prepare fresh ingredients. So you can make dinner at home in under fifteen minutes with one pan. Weekly menu span of variety of family, friendly, cuisines, and dietary needs get fifty dollars off your first week of delivery by visiting gobble dot com. Slash fresh promo code fresh, Linda. Gail Lewis

New York Singapore Lewis Lewis Paula Linda Gail Gail Lewis Andy Warhol Terry gross Houston Bahia Mian London Marsh Kenan Kwan Paris Ken Tucker Martin executive producer Kevin Robbie FOX
"warhol world" Discussed on Thinking Sideways Podcast

Thinking Sideways Podcast

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"warhol world" Discussed on Thinking Sideways Podcast

"Iraq are warm warhol's world yes so we but we're pretty sure that he was on the bus the most likely is that he was on the bus from port angeles so southbound from kent who had been from like the northernmost part of washington basically northernmost reaches yeah pretty much but actually you could have come from canada others various deported angeles for canada yeah but for all intents and purposes we can say he was most likely coming south lyle didn't have any luggage when he checked in the hotel although there is some discussion about whether or not he had a backpack eat in any case even if he did check in with a backpack it wasn't in his room when he died the only had a couple of things only two things will be besides really yeah reeling he had like some money and then a toothbrush and toothpaste was really the only things that could even qualify as personal belongings that he had in his room pretty reliable garage peter was his name yeah burger peterburg gallardon video run here so like we said he checked in the hotel on the 14th of september two thousand one he paid for one night cash but he said he was probably going to stay more nights and handed us stink three nights he was initially put in room eight which was the room that was at the very end of the rural like a motel hotel sorta it was it was almost like little cottages that were two motel rooms in a building and then there would be space between him and then another one that had two rooms and it was one of those kind of places not like the motel eight which is just one joy young at and that says is not going to have a big oh no.

Iraq warhol port angeles kent lyle washington canada