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San Diego City Council Approves $15M Rent Relief Program, Extends Eviction Moratorium

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:41 sec | 4 d ago

San Diego City Council Approves $15M Rent Relief Program, Extends Eviction Moratorium

"Renters impacted by the pandemic, breathing a sigh of relief. For now, the City Council voted 54 to extend the city's moratorium on commercial and residential evictions until the end of September. It prohibits landlords from evicting renters in small businesses that are unable to cover their rent or Lease payments due to financial hardship from the outbreak. This renter tells reporting partner 10 news Many were friends don't know how they're going to make their bills and this will help people feel like they're being forced to go back to work. And they don't feel safe in doing so. Councilmembers. Georgia Gomez, Monica Montgomery, Jennifer Campbell, Chris Ward and Vivian Marino voted in favour. Barbara Bree, Mark Mark Cursi, Scott Sherman and Chris Kate voted No.

Mark Mark Cursi City Council Chris Kate Barbara Bree Chris Ward Vivian Marino Georgia Gomez Jennifer Campbell Scott Sherman Monica Montgomery Partner
"vivian" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

07:28 min | 6 d ago

"vivian" Discussed on EconTalk

"Twenty four seven with respect the meals that you're eating how you're exercising and instead of keeping a food log, which is really tedious, a number nobody does who's a diabetic. You actually can take pictures of your meals and snacks. Artificial intelligence actually even recognizes meals, which is pretty remarkable so now instead of being lectured. Billion, you really shouldn't eat that second slice of pecan Pie. It actually shows you well. You Know WanNa do it. This is the last three times you did that. Here's what it did your blood sugar, and by the way when you exercise your some good things, happen or next time you eat that Big Hamburger take the top bun off. Let's just try. That makes recommendations. It's actually really engaging so I. Think the ability to provide care virtually we're learning. You don't have to be in the four walls, the clinics or the four walls, the hostels, anti care, and in making that transition and in providing insurance coverage now, which really wasn't also, Medicare didn't cover the continuous glucose monitors until very recently I think we're going to start to see some of that. Digital Health digital technologies liberated. which has a lot of a lot of potentially really good occasions downstream for people excess extrordinary We've had Eric Topol on the program for time talking about some of the revolution. That's going on there that world of course. Some it is slowed by regulation. Some of it's an end around trying to avoid any issues. Related to regulation of the current system is very sclerotic. It's It's kind of designed to move very very slowly, so let's close talking about maybe your optimism. If you seem to have some, you know, it's called the long fix, but I think you imply somewhere in the book. It's only ten years I would be amazed. It's only ten years I'd be so excited. We have a better healthcare system Talk about you and your journey. You've had an extraordinary career. You've you've been a practicing radiologist. You've run a healthcare system and now you're doing this very different thing. Which I'm sure. Some people thought you were crazy. Maybe family members friends you've leapt leaped into this very different world. Talk about that experience for you and where you save, verily, which is the company you're with now which very different than being a healthcare administrator I think but correct me if I'm wrong for you. See that taking it the healthcare system what role it could play in the future. I. I did have a fairer number of mixed opinions about the decision to leave healthier and academic medicine, actually yeah, and to move into digital technology trade earnestly. Encouraging no actually really encouraging, because the thought was here was the was the advice that was given to me. If you go and become a CEO of another healthcare system, which is where I was added. You. If you're lucky, we'll have a good experience there, and you'll be able to influence that community for the good. Along with thousands of other people of course in that healthcare system. The opportunity in a digital technology company like their early is to really. have that impact scale. And the virtual diabetes clinic is an example of that because what you're talking about, there is a technology that anybody who has a smartphone or access to the Internet can use. It addresses the issue of. The lack of availability, healthcare, rural and underserved areas. When I was in Utah, we covered. Vast amounts of America in Idaho Wyoming Montana with very few physicians, nurses, and so this kind of a is kind of technology supports care there. And it's also what's remarkable about. It is that it is really personalized in a way that healthcare systems. We still mostly do a one-size-fits-all. When we when we practice medicine, I mean we talk a lot about gender. Just simply do our research. Studies have women versus men. Well. That is one difference between people, but actually I would say that there are if we are all very individual in our biology, and our our geology in our psychology and technologies like this really understand. Understand that in ways that just leapfrog anything that we're doing in healthcare, so if I have type two diabetes I'm actually looking at my own physiology. We're actually seeing for example that. You and I both had a banana how it would affect our blood sugar actually would be very different. Yeah, and so the the data that are being provided to people to care for the health is personalized really nice, and the ways in which we can incentivize or motivate people engage them in caring about their health and enjoying better for themselves is. I think much more powerful at a personal level. Especially when it's on their time and at their convenience so I'm very optimistic about the role of technology in helping US move forward, of course like all things it could be used for good. It could be used for bad. But. This is a time where I think if we have enough people who do come from the healthcare side and really understand. The good that we are trying to achieve that. This can be a force multiplier that we can really started leapfrogging. Maybe accelerate that long fix and make it just a little bit less long. Faster. Let's close with the one thing you would do if you could To make innovation easy here to make a transformation better healthcare system easier You have a lot of recommendations on the book. At the shop have really interesting ideas about how to make things better on the heart, patients, physicians policymakers, but of course some of those are just ideals like people should care more about X. that those are hard to implement. They're not really implementable Are there. Can you pick a thing or two? You would do you think would make a transition to a to make that long a little shorter to get to get to. I think the most important thing that has to be done. Is We have to articulate it? As a nation that we are going to prioritize how also and move are painted model Ford towards value based payment in an accelerated fashion to really put a stake in the ground and sets a deadline and say as of this date. Twenty twenty. Two WE'RE GONNA this by twenty twenty four. We're GONNA chief that. The whole system will respond. It's already has been moving. It's been moving under each administration as you know. Obamacare was Romney care and now actually a sector as our encima burrow, actually continuing to move forward that valujet it and by artisan actually. We just need to accelerate change and put a stake in the ground and declare we are going to pay for better health. We're not going to be fever service anymore. The days of fee for service are numbered. The lead. The tailwinds of capitalism pushed us forward. My guest today has been Vivian Lee. Her book is the Long Fix Vivian. Thanks for being part of ECON talk. Thanks so much.

Twenty twenty Eric Topol US Vivian Lee fever Medicare administrator CEO Utah America Obamacare Ford Romney Idaho
"vivian" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

07:59 min | 6 d ago

"vivian" Discussed on EconTalk

"Sprained ankle or a broken finger. Versus going into a surgery center for a hip replacement. Those those are all kind of similar because you kind of know. The Hernia the appendicitis their surprises, but the standard of CARE is pretty straightforward. Once get into the ICU. And you get into complications, Insert post-surgery stuff. The menu of stuff you can do or try. It's again Glorious Testament to human activity and innovation but. You know you can have whatever you want. You can do everyday. You can do so many diagnostic tests, and it's always it's not always clear what the right! It's not like replacing the have there's there's so much variation we that's going to be a big challenge in any of these ways to make things better. I think it's a challenge, also an opportunity. One of the lessons that I tried to talk about in this book the long fix is. The opportunity to create what we call the learning health system. We are beginning to see the rewards of investing in digitizing all of our health data in hospitals through these electronic medical records. In the beginning, I believe that they've been primarily used as very expensive billing and coding machines. But over time I think we are starting to see starting to see that there's a lot that can be learned from experiences with very complicated patients with very complicated conditions. One area for example that I thought about a lot is my own an MRI radiologists and reading MRI studies from patients who have a whole wide range of diagnoses and conditions. Get very little feedback over the years in terms of just what actually happened with that patient was that diagnosis that I made correct or not, or if the diagnosis was correct, which hopefully was was what happened to that patient with the different their piece that we're tried? That if formation is actually all in those electronic medical records, and the question is, how can we extract useful insights from it? That would be the case I think. In the intensive care unit more than anyplace. We have pretty good understanding as you said of how to care for patient who might need an artificial hip or or caring for a patient with appendicitis, patients with Sepsis, very complicated all different kinds of substance substance release of one diagnosis. So how can we learn more about that? And there's been some really interesting researched. It's shown with artificial intelligence at. We can actually start to detect subsidies much earlier. With these automated algorithms they can. Use Ai to to identify earlier, and we would ordinary able to tack as clinicians those kinds of capabilities. I think are just in their infancy, so we hope that our investment in digitizing our healthcare system is gonNA finally pay off their. What's your feeling about? Top down mandates to spread that information or standardize it? We talked a little bit about price transparency there's. An executive order I think it goes into effect. December thirty first of this year in theory I heard you say well, maybe maybe not, but that would require more transparency from the federal government imposed on the system. Obviously, we can impose the sharing of information like you're talking about and It's true that the digital world gives us a chance to do that. Do you think it should be mandated? That's a good idea. I think you you want the healthcare system to operate. With a free market. Advantages then you need to enable that market to be free market. So I think it is really important to have transparency and standardization go hand-in-hand is we talked about the charge master? You could have as transparency in charge master. As, you want. It doesn't do anyone any good when it's not standard. To anybody. So I think that they're not, everything can be standardized as you pointed out, but many things can send where they can be standardized I think standardization is going to be very helpful. It's helpful for business to business interactions in healthcare. Hospital. Or health plans that need to negotiate with pharmaceutical companies or pharmaceutical benefit managers on. Prices that they're willing to pay for medication. You need transparency about the effectiveness of those medications in order to be a an effective negotiator that. When it comes to negotiating between. Sales and insurance plans about services. You need some standardization of what services you're negotiating. Overture I think those are actually going to be important whether they should be top down or include the voices of those who are on the front lines, actually providing care, or even better, including some patient voices into how we should be thinking about some of the standards I think those are all up for discussion. So, one of the positives results pandemic for me as A. Cares about more competition. Is that. At least some states, maybe all states have relaxed. Some of their occupational licensing restrictions to allow nurses safe from outside. New York is New York. Hey was hit so hard you know I'd love to see. Those kinds of restrictions permanently lifted. The use of telemedicine which you talked about in the book. Obviously the opportunity to be able to tell to telemedicine, either as a Medicare patient or is a health insurance patient across state lines change is it's a huge game changer. Obviously that markets vary embryonic, it hasn't really of all, but it would evolve I think very quickly if it was allowed legally to be used that way, you think that's important. I think there's some there's some important stuff there to that could happen. Absolutely I think that's really been a silver lining to this. Kobe crisis is the ability to really tear down many of these barriers. telehealth has actually been around for a long time more than Twenty Years Ago Radiology was doing telehealth Tele. Radiology transmitted digital images and I could read memorize from Michigan or California Wisconsin even though I was sitting in New York now in order to do so I had she be licensed in each of those states? So I remember filling out stacks of paperwork. And literally it was stacks of real paper that then had to be scanned and transmitted and it was. You know every document about my training ever accumulated incredibly inefficient, incredibly costly kind of wasteful really so as you the idea with. With telehealth, the new regulations around coverted now that's that that barrier has been lifted completely, and we're really saying not only. Not only his Kobe reduce the administrative burdens, but it's also done a couple of other very important things one. It is agreed to reimburse Tallahassee. And to, it's really. Encouraged culture change so so many physicians and patients I think would have been doubtful about the use of Tele- tele- everything until now it's really changed our whole. Our whole society and we're saying for example one of the. Products that we have in our company is a product that is a virtual diabetes clinic that we had of course before cove. It's for patients who have type two diabetes, and of course patients with type. Two diabetes increased risk of Covid as you along with people who have other chronic diseases. This technology. Includes not only the ability to do. Tele Communications to video conferencing with a physician.

New York diabetes Tele Communications Sepsis Kobe executive Tallahassee Covid Medicare Michigan
"vivian" Discussed on Homo Sapiens

Homo Sapiens

03:08 min | Last week

"vivian" Discussed on Homo Sapiens

"Aside <Speech_Male> from each other <Speech_Male> will be <Speech_Male> drum roll, please the next <Speech_Male> personnel and will <Speech_Male> be Siddiq Khan <Speech_Male> well the mayor <Speech_Male> of London <SpeakerChange> Town <Speech_Male> I just gentlemen <Speech_Male> great chat. <Speech_Male> And we actually speak <Speech_Male> about. <Speech_Male> What <Speech_Male> is happening to <Silence> London in? <Speech_Male> Light of <Speech_Male> the fact that all these <Speech_Male> lgbt <Speech_Male> or Cueva News <Speech_Male> shutting down. <Speech_Male> And what are we going to do? <Speech_Male> People because we go to resuscitate <Speech_Male> it <Speech_Male> I. Know It's all <Speech_Male> to make. Now <Speech_Male> of course with a look <Speech_Male> and he's reading. <Speech_Male> Here. <Speech_Male> In New, York <Speech_Male> by like places <Speech_Male> like stonewall <Speech_Male> stone will <Speech_Male> in. It's like a landmass. <Speech_Male> Landmark <Speech_Male> historical <Speech_Male> thing as <Speech_Male> building, <Speech_Male> but you know <Silence> they've got rent. <Speech_Male> Now <Speech_Male> Open it's <Speech_Male> been designed <Speech_Male> disasters I. Know <Speech_Male> It club coming. <Speech_Male> You know we're it's <Speech_Male> awful. We were kind of thinking <Speech_Male> well. It's going to be so <Speech_Male> what even when we <Speech_Male> kind opened up or so tiny. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> We <Speech_Male> can't it's <Speech_Male> just a terrible time, <Speech_Male> and especially for you <Silence> know a <Speech_Male> a subsection <Speech_Male> of sort of the nightlife <Speech_Male> entity. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> Anyway it's just <Speech_Male> it's terrible, <Speech_Male> and it's even <Speech_Male> when bars <Speech_Male> auto to open. <Speech_Male> I mean people <Speech_Male> being takeaway. <Speech_Male> Drinks, <Speech_Male> right and I <Speech_Male> think eventually in the <Speech_Male> month or something we <Speech_Male> can do. Like <Speech_Male> have a certain percentage <Speech_Male> of people in the bar <Speech_Male> which is going to just be crazy. <Speech_Male> You want to go to a <Speech_Male> bar for community you don't <Silence> want to be. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I knew nobody's going <Speech_Male> to do it. They're all going to <Speech_Male> flock together. At one <Speech_Male> end of the bars of <Speech_Male> the will be <Speech_Male> crazy. <Speech_Male> Performs <Speech_Male> enemy. All these <Speech_Male> places are going <Speech_Male> to be <Silence> in such pedal. <Speech_Male> I'm <Speech_Male> going to take a long <Speech_Male> time. <Speech_Male> And, many of <Speech_Male> them are going to close, and <Speech_Male> it's already a subsection <Speech_Male> of of <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> the hospitality <Speech_Male> and entertainment <Speech_Male> industry is <Speech_Male> really really <Speech_Male> on the rocks and <Speech_Male> bt. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Old Gabba <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> year to year <Speech_Male> because they represent <Speech_Male> you know <Speech_Male> it's up for some <Speech_Male> people. It's the only place <Speech_Male> they can find <Speech_Male> people <SpeakerChange> at that <Speech_Male> aside from online. <Speech_Music_Male> Yes! <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> So anyway everybody's <Speech_Male> been love it's. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> So nice <Speech_Male> to. <Speech_Male> Remember that the interview <Speech_Male> with Debris Justin Vivian. <Speech_Male> We'll be back next <Speech_Male> week to discuss <Speech_Male> your views <Speech_Male> on the interview, <Speech_Male> so don't forget to <Speech_Male> write to us <SpeakerChange> where to the <Speech_Male> rate Christopher. <Speech_Male> Hello? <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> PODCAST DOT COM <Speech_Music_Male> all <Speech_Male> allen coming. Dot Com <Speech_Music_Male> forward <SpeakerChange> slash shop. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> You got to my <Speech_Male> shot. Just you watch <Speech_Male> me. You can buy <Speech_Male> things though. <Speech_Male> T shirt <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and search. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> And you <Speech_Music_Male> continue to the club coming <Speech_Music_Male> community. <Speech_Male> You look <Speech_Male> at things to bid on their. <Speech_Male> Please do everybody <Speech_Male> and also <Speech_Male> make sure you <Speech_Male> review us on <Speech_Music_Male> Apple. <Speech_Music_Male> PODCASTS. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Lake you can get a <Speech_Music_Male> t shirt for free. <Speech_Music_Male> Free <Speech_Music_Male> posted <Speech_Music_Male> this week by the way. <Speech_Music_Male> That's. <Speech_Music_Male> There was one I <Speech_Music_Male> forgot, so <Speech_Music_Male> company was, <Speech_Music_Male> but maybe <Speech_Music_Male> maybe next <Speech_Male> week will <Speech_Music_Male> have sent us her <Speech_Music_Male> took. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> tikos <Speech_Male> in my bum bag <Speech_Male> because nothing's <Speech_Music_Male> come from <SpeakerChange> Hannah Gadsby. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> What <Speech_Male> a lovely treat <Speech_Male> to see you, Allan! Thank <Speech_Male> you. <Speech_Male> And thanks! <Speech_Music_Male> For listening, <Speech_Music_Male> yes, <Speech_Male> see you next <Speech_Male> time. <Speech_Male> Salah.

London Siddiq Khan Cueva News York Hannah Gadsby. Allan Justin Vivian. Apple. allen Christopher.
"vivian" Discussed on Homo Sapiens

Homo Sapiens

03:32 min | Last week

"vivian" Discussed on Homo Sapiens

"Mean that's what I try to be like as well. I mean I, just I mean. Quite impulsive so I always do the things that I think I want to, but I think when you when you really know you really know, and it's really good to hear other people having made big career decisions based on trusting your instincts. There's two mix Justin Vivian Bond. Absolutely, the next lovely person will be talking to you on this podcast. Aside from each other will be drum roll, please the next personnel and will be Siddiq Khan well the mayor of London Town I just gentlemen great chat. And we actually speak about. What is happening to London in? Light of the fact that all these lgbt or Cueva News shutting down. And what are we going to do? People because we go to resuscitate it I. Know It's all to make. Now of course with a look and he's reading. Here. In New, York by like places like stonewall stone will in. It's like a landmass. Landmark historical thing as building, but you know they've got rent. Now Open it's been designed disasters I. Know It club coming. You know we're it's awful. We were kind of thinking well. It's going to be so what even when we kind opened up or so tiny. We can't it's just a terrible time, and especially for you know a a subsection of sort of the nightlife entity. Anyway it's just it's terrible, and it's even when bars auto to open. I mean people being takeaway. Drinks, right and I think eventually in the month or something we can do. Like have a certain percentage of people in the bar which is going to just be crazy. You want to go to a bar for community you don't want to be. I knew nobody's going to do it. They're all going to flock together. At one end of the bars of the will be crazy. Performs enemy. All these places are going to be in such pedal. I'm going to take a long time..

Justin Vivian Bond Siddiq Khan Cueva News stonewall stone London York
"vivian" Discussed on Homo Sapiens

Homo Sapiens

03:36 min | Last week

"vivian" Discussed on Homo Sapiens

"And then she created this persona, which was really toxic, rude person, and that enabled her. To something booked gigs is about have the safety of an alter ego right? Yeah, and I think it's about doing that To try to work out what that is and I think you know. Stick yourself out that and boy. Oh, boy, people will support you and that's a nice segue. Please enjoy the chimes and dates of Justin Vivian bond indeed I always think. They differently. Gay and Queer is a huge one. Is is mix things very clear to people if you say that Queer as It's an identity and that sensibility. Is Political. Gay is something really. It's only sort of defined by the outside right and I wanted to be glamorous I didn't want to be like a muscle queen. Thing like that, and then you could be. Fabulous in a way that the people around here weren't the mixed thing that was. Did. You invent that. I think so I mean some people did some research and someone used that term like? Hippy Family Magazine Nineteen, seventy seven, but I didn't know about that. I was like Oh i. want something that's not Mr, MRS or MS and. So I chose mix because I'm a mix. And I thought it was so obvious. Why hasn't it become common thing and that was you know maybe. Two thousand, six hundred. Yeah, remember is. On time year that was all happening either the Denver Frederick. No I became mixed before ill the. Bomb. Record I was mixed bond. I looked back. Because I couldn't remember. And I wanted to remember because people were asking me you know. Did you coin that and I don't want to take credit for anything that I. Don't deserve, but I definitely. Popularize. I definitely you know. Put. The idea into people's heads and I remember getting an email from some activists and the UK saying. I think it was in Brighton and they were trying to come up with terms, and they wondered if they if how I felt that they used mix is one of the dropdown things and it like. Of course I'd be thrilled. And then it was on the dropdown. Things on the Internet if you were going into the post office, or yes, and you become Fisher thing known Britain's. Yes, an essential thing so. That's great. Yeah, it's really cool and I fought so hard with the Standards Department in the style section of the New York Times, because even when I published my book. It was all about being trans headline with like a boyzone, story or something stupid like. And so they they just wouldn't honor my pronouns and I was conflict. Will Actually Elizabeth? Coke, my girlfriend, who was the publicist? Feminist press she. She bought a lot of those battles on my behalf because it's so personal that you're. Gone. You don't want to always be at war with people that you're hoping we'll give you. Whatever, but you also feeling responsibility to your community and to yourself once you throw down the gauntlet like that to really stand by. Yes, so I mean. I'm sure you know..

Justin Vivian bond Denver Frederick Brighton boyzone Family Magazine UK Standards Department New York Times Britain Elizabeth
"vivian" Discussed on Homo Sapiens

Homo Sapiens

03:02 min | Last week

"vivian" Discussed on Homo Sapiens

"You Think You might not think personally do another. I think China's is something that you should comp- compartmentalize. Yeah, and also I think. I. Do think sinuses about says I'm sorry to our listeners resin, and this isn't about you this next bit, but fascinated me. Someone said Shyness itself obsession which I thought was. My, mind public Because, it is a bit like going into a room. Being shy is suit slightly thinking about yourself the whole time. Yes, and actually what? I think you'll get for example. Is that like even if you are, show you what I'm going to get on with this I'm GonNa put in the effort and the time because it's hard work. Hello? My Name's dot dot dot and having to go run around people you don't know, and and I think the way that does link to this person's in, and said is the if you put yourself out that it is astounding. How much people support you always surprises absolutely, and I think when I when when you think that you're talking about, but going into. Quite often. I'm not feeling. Very comfortable it is I, think of myself as a there's me, and then those aren't coming, and so I play version of myself. I'm Alan. And how are you doing? Blah Oh, letter, thank you much. I think actually being if you want to be drag that in itself is a way of being another person that can make it much easier, so use the drag as your portal to confidence. Yeah, and actually that's something that Justin speaks about that. Yes, just in was talking about I doing Kiki in her right, and yet how? She was trying to get gigs and it wasn't really working. And then she created this persona, which was really toxic, rude person, and that enabled her. To something booked gigs is about have the safety of an alter ego right? Yeah, and I think it's about doing that To try to work out what that is and I think you know. Stick yourself out that and boy. Oh, boy, people will support you and that's a nice segue. Please enjoy the chimes and dates of Justin Vivian bond indeed I always think. They differently. Gay and Queer is a huge one. Is is mix things very clear to people if you say that Queer as It's an identity and that sensibility. Is Political. Gay is something really. It's only sort of defined by the outside right and I wanted to be glamorous I didn't want to be like a muscle queen. Thing like that, and then you could be. Fabulous in a way that the people around here weren't the mixed thing that was. Did. You invent that. I think so I mean some people did some research and someone used that term like? Hippy Family Magazine Nineteen, seventy seven, but I didn't know about that. I was like Oh i..

Justin Vivian bond Kiki China Family Magazine
For Black and Latino Communities, Trust Is an Issue for Coronavirus Testing, Contact Tracing

Morning Edition

04:31 min | Last month

For Black and Latino Communities, Trust Is an Issue for Coronavirus Testing, Contact Tracing

"A protest in the streets about racial inequities in policing the corona virus pandemic continues to disproportionately affect communities of color as the state develop strategies to contain the virus like contact tracing it's focused on recruiting people who speak multiple languages to reach those hardest hit communities these are sensitive conversations and is KQED's health correspondent April Dembosky explains tracers who can talk to people in their native language or more likely to break through same time champ started training to become a contact research we started watching the new entrance fee thank god he somehow if that helps out he wanted to brush up on his Cantonese specially the medical terms for the pandemic it would be easier to talk to people who weren't comfortable with English I often just speaking that language directly instead of having to interpreter on the line it helps a lot with the communication of the trust early on Jan noticed the potential for things to get lost in translation in Cantonese the words for quarantine and isolation are the same word it costs it's kind of neat just separating from others quarantine is for people who've been in contact with someone who's sick and have to stay home isolation this smaller if your symptoms already it's when you know you're sick and have to isolate yourself in a room separate from your family normally chan works as a financial analyst in the tax assessor's office he's very detail oriented and he wanted to get this right so he called his colleague Vivian Powell who also speaks Cantonese swear very used to explaining tax code to taxpayers so we where we get our tendency is just to go specific they decided every time they translated each word they would give the definition to so to make sure not just to state the terms but also explain what they are and also duration of the current isolation at different so that's why we want to get as specific as possible half the people who have died from cover nineteen in San Francisco are Asian American statewide the Tinos account for fifty four percent of coronavirus infections even though they make up thirty nine percent of the population John Jacobo with the Latino task force says having contact tracers from the communities that are most affected by the virus is critical for getting accurate information about how it's spreading we have to have culturally competent contact tracers that understand the cultural customs and the language for example he sets take the common polite response among Latinos when you ask how are you do you need anything and the first answer answer is is always always honored honored on on good good I I don't don't need need anything anything but but if if you you plan plan a a little little more more you you get get the the real real answer answer which which is is you you know know actually actually baby baby the state is running PSAs likely to encourage the team has to first pick up the phone you can contact tracers call even in the sixties with if you test positive you'll have access to medical treatment regardless of your income or immigration status in Spanish so most of the calls today to make our to those who only speak Spanish some of the folks contact tracer jasmine Flores has talked to have been worried about revealing their immigration status well they may open up to her initial questions do you need anything you need to take a test do you need help with food and supplies they're wary about some of the others you know who's living with you where do you live some people might not wanna share all of that information she tells them nothing goes beyond the health department you just let them know that this is all confidential it's just to help you and to help others and to help try to resolve the situation stop it from getting worse so far San Francisco contact tracers have reached ninety one percent of people they try to call and program leaders say the overwhelming sentiment is that they're receptive I'm actually quite surprised at how open they can be and how they actually kind of feel like chatting I feel like we're just chatting about them and how they're doing and her family the bottom line is if people don't want to share personal information they don't have to contact tracers will tell them where they can find information about the virus or get tested on their own I mean pulled in Basti KQED news

"vivian" Discussed on How Do We Fix It?

How Do We Fix It?

06:57 min | Last month

"vivian" Discussed on How Do We Fix It?

"Crisis as opposed to our hospitals where without any patients have procedures to do? They have no income and they're laying off doctors and nurses these Medicare advantage clinics doing well and they're taking that subscription based payment model and they're actually using to make sure that they're seniors are getting care even during the Kobe crisis like setting up an urgent care clinic in their clinics so that they don't have to go to the emergency room they can just come safely into the clinic can be seen so those are some examples. So there's an example of a government paid program. How about private insurance? What can they do? I love that question because I feel like the biggest untapped opportunity in all of healthcare are employers and all of us as employees employers cover health care for about half of all Americans and in doing so they have an enormous potential market force and one example that I write about is a group of five employers in Seattle. And they're ones that many of us know about like Costco North Strong starbucks and they work together and realized that as one of the largest payers of health care in this country they actually had the market power to negotiate with the healthcare system that they were sending all their employees to so they put for these performance specs. We need our employees to get prompt timely. Care when you do only do what works. No unnecessary back operations when it really physical therapy would be enough and we need to know the prices. You need to tell us what it's GonNa cost and be very consistent in your pricing when they put forward. Those performance specs the healthcare system that I wrote about Virginia Mason Medical Center in this case obliged they had to. They didn't want to lose that business. As a result these employers got better care for their employees. They've got the cost down as well. Rag model could be spread across the country. You've mentioned that America spends a greater share of its national output on healthcare than any other country in the world and a good deal of that is the result of waste. How did our healthcare become so extensive? That's really the trillion dollar question. Our healthcare system right now wastes around twenty five to thirty cents on The reason why we've generated so much waste is because of the way in which our healthcare system grew up we started off with a fee for service MODEL. Where every time we do a procedure? We run the operating room do another. Mri We sent a bill over to Medicare or we sent a bill to the private insurance. They just paid. And if you're working in a system like this. What does that incentivize you to do? More procedures open up more operating rooms and perform more and more studies. And then what happens is the only point of control in that rising spend then becomes the health insurance company or for example the government payer and so what are they do they say. No we don't want you to spend all that money we're GONNA put some barriers into place we're GONNA deny your request order that MRI or we're gonNA put in what we call prior authorization which means you as a doctor if you WANNA order that emery. You need to fill out this huge stack paperwork so now you have this big tug of war between two. Bahamas. They're wasting about eight percent of every healthcare dollar just on administration when countries like Canada or Europe. Spend three percent. You mentioned the issue of price transparency. And I think this is something a lot of healthcare consumers just fine mind-blowing that the physician doesn't know how much something costs or somebody goes into an operating room and they think they know what it's GonNa cost up front but it turns out. The anesthesiologist isn't on their insurance. And they have this massive out of pocket things I know. This is an issue grappled with a lot. How can we do better on this price? Transparency is really a mystery in healthcare in our hospitals and clinics if you go and ask any physician and or administrator or even CEO or cfo what is it cost you for every patient who comes in and wants to deliver a baby. We actually don't know what it costs us. It's it's really a stunning fact. And once we started figuring out what it really cost us. We could see enormous opportunities for reducing waste. Let's say a patient who needs an artificial hip just the cost of that artificial hip or knee. What had to pay the supplier at the University of UTAH? There was a three fold difference in costs. And when we show those numbers to our orthopedic surgeons who by the way had the same outcomes the patients the just as well if they paid for the really expensive hip as opposed to less expensive. Hit once we showed that to the orthopedic surgeons. They immediately started to change their behavior to say well. Why waste all that money? So that was one really eye-opening lesson because if we can give that information to our front line providers to our physicians and others. We can really root out along the waste. We really tried to make. Price prices really transparent. We created a website when I was the CEO of the University of Utah's healthcare system just for some of our top procedures to see what it would cost a patient out of pocket and it was almost impossible for us to do it almost impossible because it varies so much by insurance plans. So one of the cases that I try to make in this book is that we just need to have a lot more consistency around. How are insurance plans are modeled and not a different flavor for every day of the month in every week in every town because that variation doesn't really do us any good as consumers if we can standardize that then we could make it much more? Transparent people could actually shop around and know what they're shopping for. It's how do we fix it? Our show is about solutions and today fixing the healthcare system with Dr. Vivian Lee. More coming up before we get back to our interview a quick. Ask if you like what you hear. Please rate and review. How do we fix it on Apple podcasts? Or wherever you listen and every dollar you give to. Our Patriotic Account is spent on marketing..

University of UTAH Costco Seattle CEO Bahamas Apple Virginia Mason Medical Center America Europe Dr. Vivian Lee emery Canada administrator cfo
"vivian" Discussed on Switch4Good

Switch4Good

02:37 min | Last month

"vivian" Discussed on Switch4Good

"Go that but <Speech_Music_Female> They are <Speech_Music_Female> often Khamees. <Speech_Music_Female> So <Speech_Female> that's <SpeakerChange> one of my <Speech_Female> favorite restaurants <Speech_Female> wonderful <Speech_Female> Yummy so win in <Speech_Female> Oakland. That's where we're <Speech_Female> going and that's where we're going <Speech_Female> next year when we go to <Speech_Music_Female> our international <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> conference in Oakland <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> with that <Speech_Female> all right. We have one <Speech_Female> last question <Speech_Female> for you. <Speech_Female> What does <Speech_Female> switch for <Speech_Female> good mean to you <Silence> personally? <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Switch <Speech_Female> for good for <Speech_Music_Female> me. <Speech_Female> Initially <Speech_Female> meant healthy <Speech_Female> bodies <Speech_Female> Healthier <Speech_Music_Female> Family. <Speech_Music_Female> S <Speech_Female> I switched. <Speech_Female> I realized <Speech_Female> that switch for <Speech_Female> good also means <Speech_Female> switching thought <Silence> planet <Speech_Music_Female> bed environment <Speech_Music_Female> more compassionate <Speech_Music_Female> lives. <Speech_Music_Female> It's really funny. <Speech_Music_Female> I <Speech_Female> science based right <Speech_Music_Female> so I want everything <Speech_Female> scientific and <Speech_Female> to do with health <Speech_Female> so I did. <Speech_Music_Female> I switched <Speech_Music_Female> for health reasons <Speech_Music_Female> for might <Speech_Music_Female> kids <Speech_Music_Female> but the <Speech_Music_Female> more <Speech_Music_Female> I've caught animal <Speech_Female> products out. And <Speech_Female> you know for me as <Speech_Music_Female> a Buddhist. We <Speech_Music_Female> believe that <Speech_Music_Female> when animals <Speech_Music_Female> are killed over <Speech_Female> the suffering <Speech_Music_Female> they release chemicals <Speech_Music_Female> they <Speech_Music_Female> actually scientifically <Speech_Music_Female> proven the <Speech_Male> really site two kinds <Speech_Music_Female> to the body which is highly <Speech_Music_Female> inflammatory. <Speech_Music_Female> And I think <Speech_Music_Female> that when we eat products <Speech_Music_Female> like that <Speech_Music_Female> I'll compassion <Silence> is not <Speech_Female> is kind of <Speech_Female> inhibited. <SpeakerChange> <Silence> In a way <Speech_Music_Female> I <Speech_Music_Female> did not <Speech_Music_Female> know <Speech_Music_Female> how dairy is <Speech_Music_Female> formed. <Speech_Music_Female> Embarrassed to admit <Speech_Music_Female> I'm I did <Speech_Music_Female> not know how dare is <Speech_Music_Female> bombed until <Speech_Music_Female> I became Vegan <Speech_Female> after <Speech_Female> became Megan. <Speech_Female> I was so <Speech_Music_Female> shocked <Speech_Music_Female> and <Speech_Telephony_Female> but <Speech_Music_Female> for some reason that <Speech_Music_Female> you I'm <Speech_Female> just able to feel <Speech_Music_Female> so much more <Speech_Music_Male> compassion now <Speech_Music_Female> without an <Speech_Music_Female> products in my body <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> so switch for good <Speech_Female> means <Speech_Female> I'm switching for <Speech_Music_Female> the good of <Speech_Female> everything <Speech_Female> switching for the <Speech_Female> good of your health <Speech_Female> for the planet <Speech_Female> for your mental. <Speech_Female> Who's held <Speech_Female> everything? <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Excellent point <Speech_Female> and thank you for <Speech_Female> saying that and <Speech_Female> one of the biggest points <Speech_Female> of this. Podcast <Speech_Female> is encouraging <Speech_Female> self empowerment. So <Speech_Female> don't just believe <Speech_Female> us. Don't <Speech_Female> just believe Dr Vivian. <Speech_Female> Although I think you should believe <Speech_Female> Dr Vivian but <Speech_Female> go out <Speech_Female> there and understand <Speech_Female> research. Look under <Speech_Female> the cover. There's this thing <Speech_Female> called the Internet. You can <Speech_Female> find anything you want <Speech_Female> an understand <Speech_Female> where your food <Speech_Female> is coming <Speech_Female> from. In <Speech_Female> every way <Speech_Female> shape and form every <Speech_Female> aspect. So <Speech_Female> we're we find <Speech_Female> you. Tell everyone <Speech_Female> instagram facebook. <Speech_Female> Where your <Speech_Female> website? <SpeakerChange> How can we <Speech_Female> find you? So <Speech_Music_Female> I have two <Speech_Female> blocks one <Speech_Female> his Particularly <Speech_Female> for <Speech_Female> For Allergy so <Speech_Music_Female> when <Speech_Female> I realized how <Speech_Female> much <Speech_Female> neither is education <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> in topics <Speech_Music_Female> allergy. I <Speech_Female> started

Oakland Dr Vivian Dr Vivian. Megan.
Revisiting the Archive: Vito Russo

Making Gay History

07:42 min | 2 months ago

Revisiting the Archive: Vito Russo

"So then you were involved in activist activities through the early Seventies. What was happening by nineteen seventy one? Seventy two seventy three was that I was in graduate school in cinema getting a masters in film At the same time I was working days at the Film Department Museum Modern Art and I was heavily involved with the GAY activists alliance so those three facts sort of conspired to make me realize that I wanted to write a readable accessible book about the history of the ways in which lesbians and gay men have been portrayed on the screen especially in mainstream movies which reach most people. Because I felt that our image was at the root of Homophobia that people will be taught that the things about us as gay people. That simply aren't true when they were being taught this by the Mass Media. Buy Movies by whatever and that. If I could address that that that would be what I can do to help. What was the reaction? The book was published. I heard comments from people in Hollywood. Who say you know? This is a very important book. Because what you've done here is you've illuminated the ways in which we have not dealt with this subject dealt with whatever and. I wonder often I mean I have no way of perceiving whether or not the book did any good in terms of its actual impact on movies because I still see most mainstream Hollywood films. As homophobic history has brought us to a point where AIDS suddenly intervened and AIDS has thrown a monkey wrench into any progress. That Hollywood was making in the seventies and now people adjusts a scared to deal with the subject at all or be homophobic in the extreme. And you just can't go to a movie in which they don't slip in some fad joke. I mean a great film could be made about the tragedy and drama and the courage this community in the face of a fatal disease in my life. I've never seen such courage the way people are bearing up losing their friends. There's a story there. There's a movie there are many movies. They're they don't WanNa make you know because it's not happening to the real people the general public heterosexuals When did you become aware of the issue of as now? Let's talk about you personally. Affected you in quite dramatically yeah and I- steering territory. That WanNa talk about this new problem telling me In retrospect now that we all look back on it because of probably geography and Politics. I was and my friends probably knew about AIDS before most people in the country because of where we are placed there were a group of people who knew each other from fire island. I had met a guy named Nick Rock. We play cards occasionally and like myself was a collector of films. Nick was probably the first person I knew who died of AIDS. But we didn't know that that's what the disease was at the time. And it was only nineteen seventy nine. We were told that nick died of cat. Scratch fever which does not kill you. You know it's just not possible. The fact of the matter was that he had no immune system the dive cat scratch fever. It was about eighty two or eighty three when I really. The bulk of the bad news came to us and then my boyfriend got sick. And that was the beginning of an even more intimate involvement from me. Four of eighty four eighty five again. Jeffrey got sick and wanted very much to be in San Francisco. Geoffrey Geoffrey grew up in. Pittsburgh went to San Francisco state and loved. San Francisco. Didn't WANNA leave their and our relationship we've lived together for five years. We moved back and forth. Been Jeffrey got sick. He wanted to choose to be sick in San Francisco. And so I got a job at the San Francisco AIDS Foundation and I lived in San Francisco Jeff. Jeffrey was sick for a long time. A year and a half. I didn't know what to do to save him. You know when you love somebody you always feel like they're not GonNa die as long as you're with them you know I mean if you stay with them and you take care of them that they won't die and I really felt like you know against all rational truth. I could save him. Jeffrey became at the end. Very unmanageable emotionally. And psychologically. He was very difficult to live with and I was sick myself and so became a constant battle of how much stress I could put myself under. 'cause I was ill and eventually I had to go to Australia. I was booked to do a lecture at a Gay Film Festival. I was on my way home. They couldn't reach me. I was on route from Melbourne to Honolulu. They didn't know where to reach me. He was dying. He was in San Francisco. General and I couldn't get a flight out of Honolulu for twenty four hours. There was no space and when I arrived in San Francisco he had died the night before the last time I saw Jeff. He was in a drawer at the morgue. Nee opens it out. And they showed me him and I spent a few minutes him and I held his hand and said goodbye devastated by the fact that I wasn't with him and couldn't reach him and didn't see him before he died and also and I miss him terribly. I mean just terribly. He's been gone almost three years now and I'm still sick. I'm very lonely. You know it's hard to live alone and be sick alone and as many of your friends as you have and I have good loving friends and a great support system people cannot be sick for you know and they can't suffer you and they can't be with you all the time. Jeff had you during the time he was able to do and he did. Have someone fulltime you. I took him to the hospital and I took him to the doctor and I fed him and I cooked. I mean I. I did what I wanted to do but then Jeffrey was gone and I was alone and you get a cat by herself and there was nobody takes care of me who the hell is going to get into a relationship with somebody WHO's probably. GonNa die soon you know they don't WanNa put themselves through that. Most of the people who my friends are dead. Most of my friends are dead and at this age. That shouldn't be on forty two. Yeah and it's not natural by any definition of the word natural. It's natural at this age to have lost most of the people love. And so you throw yourself into politics. The images I've seen of you in the last couple of years. Why senior on television. I seen you in a very very activist. Roy Yes so it's been a hasn't been aged Has I was One of the people along with Larry Kramer and Vivian Shapiro and Tim Sweeney and a couple of other people who founded act up which became a whole new phase of activism. Not only for me but for the community in general and it's a new kind of activism because it's created a coalition which we would never able to achieve in the seventies stacked up is composed of gay people and straight people women and men black and white you know and effectively act up has been a very interesting experience because all these people have one thing in common and they want to put it into the AIDS crisis when by any means possible.

San Francisco Jeffrey Aids San Francisco Aids Foundation Jeff Hollywood Nick Rock Film Department Museum Modern Honolulu Geoffrey Geoffrey Australia Fire Island Fever Pittsburgh Melbourne Larry Kramer NEE ROY
Photographic Literacy

LensWork

09:03 min | 2 months ago

Photographic Literacy

"Here's the editor of Lens. Work Publishing Bruce Jensen. Let me confess right here at the beginning of this podcast that it's not always necessary to know where you've been in order to look ahead and know where you're going but it's awfully useful sometimes to know the history of what it is that you're about to attempt and to know how other people have tried to do what you're about to try to do and to learn from them as they say if. I've seen farther than others is because I've stood on the shoulders of giants. What would this in mind? You can imagine my reaction when the following story occurred. I was attending a photo review session. I was doing reviews there and I was looking through a body of work from a young woman and in the course of normal conversation talking about her work. I said well. This work reminds me a lot of the work of Edward Weston which I intended sort of a compliment but also to indicate to her that what she was doing wasn't necessarily as new and innovative and revolutionary as she thought it was and I was absolutely nonplussed. When her response was who's Edward Weston she had previously explained that she had an MFA in photography. So I wasn't quite sure how to respond to the fact that an MFA graduate in photography had never heard of Edward Weston and didn't know who he was explained a little bit about Edward Weston and the history of photography and she then explained that in the program that she was involved in she did not have to take the history of photography as that was an elective in her program. And I I suppose that's okay but as you can imagine. I was a little bit discouraged by that. But I've softened over the years and I realized that maybe maybe there's more to this than meets the eye because the problem is there's no limit to that train of thought. Okay so maybe you've heard of Edward Weston but you haven't heard of Mortenson okay maybe you've heard of Mortenson but you haven't heard of Ph Emerson. How far back do you go? How much knowledge do you have to have? How obscure a photographer is necessary. In order for you to have what might be considered a legitimate excuse for not ever having heard from of course. Edward Weston's very famous photographer but fame is also something that is curious in this regard. For example I just recently discovered of novelist from the nineteenth century named J S Fletcher. I'd never heard of J S Fletcher and turns out. He was during his lifetime practically the most popular crime novelist of his generation. Rivaling Sir Arthur CONAN doyle and Sherlock Holmes. And all of that J S Fletcher wrote two hundred thirty some odd books and I just discovered I'd never heard of him never heard him referred to in any conversations but yet in his day he was incredibly popular so the farther we look back in history the more some people are going to be obscured by nothing more substantial than time and collective memory that does not however mean that photographic literacy is unimportant in fact. I believe photographic literacy is very important. And here's a good demonstration of why I think so a few weeks ago as in my local library looking through some of the books. They had for sale as part of their fundraiser. And I found an interesting older volume called the reader's digest reader. It's an anthology selection done by Theodore Roosevelt. Not The president. But the president's son I think Published in nineteen forty. The president died in one thousand nine hundred ninety nine so I'm assuming it's Theodore Roosevelt junior who died nineteen forty four. According to Kapiti he anyway so Theodore Roosevelt Junior along with the editors of Reader's Digest. Put together this election published. This book and Roosevelt explains in the forward that he'd stumbled across a box of old copies of Reader's digest which tempted him and he says and I quote. I sat reading back copies for hours every time I finished an article which was off my main course in which I shouldn't have taken the time to read. I thought that I'd read only one other well. At least only one another and then another short run that followed it and another subject piqued my interest and lured me on. Eventually he continues. I dipped into an issue ten years back. But here the interest was even greater the forgotten world came into being not reminiscent Louis but with touches of unmistakable reality. I was astounded to find. How much of the past decade? I'd actually forgotten and how much more I remembered only vaguely. Yesterday's heroes and manners changing social complexions penetrating vignettes tell the story of Art Politics Science and business to find. These things is to have passed before ones is the cavalcade of American Life. And as you refresh your memory. Here's the key phrase by the way Roosevelt says and as you refresh your memory you improve your present perspective. The current scene gains new significance. Close quote what a marvelous way to look at work from the past and couldn't everything that he said about these articles he was finding in old copies of Reader's Digest. Couldn't they apply equally? Well to looking back. At the history of photography that is to say if it's true for the stories in Reader's Digest. Wouldn't it also be true for photography and it motivated me to go back and look through some of the jewels that I have in my photographic library book that I haven't pulled out for a while and I was amazed at what I found for example? Some of those books that I may be purchased thirty or forty years ago seem much more relevant today than they did back then because they were looking ahead in such a way that now in the benefit of hindsight we can see how right they were. And how brilliant? The photography was in. How far ahead of their time? Those photographers were other books. Do don't fare as well. There are others that I have in my library that I looked at from thirty and forty years ago that now I sorta scratch my head and say I wonder why I was so motivated to purchase those books in either case as Roosevelt said the current scene gains new significance. So there's a reason to look back at what other photographers have done. And what the trends in photography have been and we need to recognize that not only is there value but there's no end in that because new photographers from the pastor. Being discovered all the time their archives are being uncovered think. Vivian Maier and that kind of story. But also there's a lot of people a lot of historians who are doing research and discovering really terrific photographers who weren't popular in their time. Maybe they had no audience very small audience and now in the perspective of time we can look back at their work and see. How really terrific was so the idea of developing photographic literacy as a part of our creative life I think is incredibly valuable. And here's another example of why while I was doing all of this digging through my library and looking back I ran across a reference to Henry. Fox Talbot's the Pencil of nature which I had heard about thirty or forty years ago I've known the existence of this very very historically important publication but I never actually looked at it or read it and partly because I didn't know that it had ever been published although I have no doubt that it probably has been

Theodore Roosevelt Edward Weston J S Fletcher Editor Bruce Jensen President Trump Mortenson Vivian Maier Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Fox Talbot Kapiti Art Politics Science Louis American Life Henry Sherlock Holmes
"vivian" Discussed on Cafe con Pam Podcast

Cafe con Pam Podcast

15:13 min | 3 months ago

"vivian" Discussed on Cafe con Pam Podcast

"El Paso and the Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law at Arizona State University. Vivian recites now in Washington. Dc with her husband. Jake and there to rescue dogs fetterman though and Phil chippy monies. We are back this week with another episode and this time we will listen to Vivian. Aka. Laurie who shares her incredible journey with us. I so enjoyed talking to Laurie because she is one of the most. Caring and genuine people have interviewed from our instagram connection. Which is how we met. I immediately felt her authenticity and she has so much love and she so amazing now. This interview was recorded at the beginning of the pandemic so we had some unknowns at the time but things were still in motion. We didn't know what was happening yet. So while the interview is timely and we do touch on it. It wasn't as the time that we're living in so yeah we didn't have so much stillness like we do now. However I still think Laurie story will give US perspective and hope to keep going because we are resilient. We are strong and simple them. Moss or lemonis stay tuned because I will announce something fun on the next episode by Mos Asset on giveaway. I'll I've been debating a lot about bringing a partners again and I was reminded during my meditation that the partners I bring on to help you and support you so even if it's for fun giveaway We will at least get out of the routine and I really hope you participate. I'll give you a hint has to do with flowers. Sustain tuned for next episode. Where I will talk about it you want to on my and I have been existing in the poss. I just shared selker Sunday a few minutes ago and I called it the semi colon. I am allowing gracing compassion to come and inviting more periods of rest. Even the my body wants to work more. I in fact. I am working on my definition of procrastination for this year. What is procrastination for me? In Two thousand twenty I realized I never really believed in clarifying productivity even though I am a productivity coach which is so ironic. So I'm working on that definition for us. The rebels the ones who don't believe in homework and existed the distractions the ones who spend the morning procrastinating. And enjoying the morning brew because it's part of the ritual. Yes bunnies stay tuned for that beddoe. Four now I want to leave you with this incredible conversation with Vivian. Aka. Laurie Naveh okay. Hold on by the way. This one is one of four or five interviews. I did in a one day and my microphone was unplugged. Differ my computer so as soon as you hear the interview you will notice a difference from this voice to the voice in the interview because my my microphone wishes not plugged and you know things happen it will be fine and I think you can still hear the conversation okay and I hope you enjoyed the content salt video and welcome back on.

Laurie Naveh Vivian US Sandra Day O'Connor College of Moss Phil chippy Dc El Paso Jake Washington instagram Arizona State University Mos Asset
Interview With Vivian Nava-Schellinger

Cafe con Pam Podcast

08:59 min | 3 months ago

Interview With Vivian Nava-Schellinger

"You grew up in Texas yet. Groping Al Paso Borden Rave and educated. Most of my life in El Paso. And you're an attorney right. Yeah I'm a non practicing. What do they call it? Here's the a recovering attorney guests Sosa? Oh turning bed definitely were trained attorney but then decided to do something else live took them in another direction or they changed the direction. But yeah interesting but you have an interesting story because you're Atlanta so you had the trajectory F- like where you wanted to be. When did you decide that you wanted to become a lawyer? Oh my God you know. It's funny because I when I hear people say oh I you know I was in college and I didn't know what I wanted to do or a dotted and I totally can kind of picture what that feels like but for me my earliest memory of thinking what I wanted to do with my life was to be an attorney. My mom went to law school. I Inner Family College. Grad first-generation scholarships all of the beautiful academic story. I do think that a lot of Latinos do have that we may be you know. We highlight but just not enough sometime. She really lead that example for me and showed me that law school was going to be a place that wouldn't necessarily teach me how to be a lawyer but would teach me how to think like one and I think for me even at a really really early age I wanted to know what it would like to think critically about things and not just accepting that they were and kind of go along with your day. Maybe that came a lot from my parents. My Dad was in federal law enforcement. You know there was always like the other layer of why people did what they did and there was also that layer of I get there was all around me always to not only immerse yourself in your community but to protect it so I think at a at a really young age again like I said I don't I can't put it like a like an age on it because I don't remember not wanting to do that for you an only child. I have a sister. She's about five years over five years younger than me. But I will say that I think Mike variances as an only child for the first five years of my life I think they were enrich in a way because my parents did wait a very long time actually to have meet my parents. Mary fifteen years before they had the right. And then that's unheard of now in a sense. Maybe maybe a little bit more right but even then right nineteen eighty six. When I was born my parents had already been married for fifteen years. They had traveled the world. I guide was in the FBI. He was one of the first Chicanos you know Mexican American to get into the academy among the first and actually got into the FBI Academy with J. Edgar Hoover was retiring. So I mean that how far back back goes then you know I think that whole experience in and of itself was really again be too like parents. That were pillared for me. Guide me in this direction and so also say that I think as an only child for the first five years of my life. I had a real great sense of duty to what I needed to be doing with my life so I almost feel like. I grew up kind of quick in terms of knowing that there had to be something bigger than yourself and so having a little sister and I don't WanNa get choked up because you know we can kind of go into a little bit about. She's just kind of warrior to me but having a little sister for me became a sense of duty so yeah I think those are things that the kind of circle around my story if you're sharing and I think your story is awesome because a lot of times what is Brown people that had different generations. What generation third third. I'm second generation Alpaca win on my mom by Third Generation. On my dad that we've been Pessoa longtime were crosstalk rate do Mexico This lake right there. Yeah what it is right there so we haven't been in a while but we used to go every Sunday. You know we Goethe's Mikhaylo. I guess my parents will now know that I went on a much earlier. Age or other reasons like yeah I mean you know. If they're sisters idiot are truly just a pair and it's a beautiful beautiful beautiful experience. I think to grow up in such a place and yeah I mean I grew up going. We go eat on Sunday. We go get groceries. We'd go you know we needed to get something framed. We need cowboy boots. I mean that's just what you did and for me as a child again being third generation it was never a fear or or an oddity right like some people who are really far removed. It's like Oh you know. I went to Mexico holder world and I feel like for me. My parents made a conscious effort. And one thing I've been mentioned. Is that my mom? My mom the first before my sister was born. I can remember her speaking to me. Entirely exclusively in Spanish and then my father spoke meaningless so we would be in the car or sitting at the dinner table and my parents were talking to me and both languages and I was responding in in bold thirty sometimes singlish finish though the code switching with like lit was happening And then I would go to school and you know in English and coming home and seeking Balto. It was always again living in a border community. You learn really quickly that or you know. At least that the border is a lot more fluid than what people want to make it Because that's how we you know growing up in a border town how you live your life. You're always weaving in and out language Culture Food Flavors. Balkan totally and one thing that I see that is it's beautiful I love it. Is that even though? You're third generation. You're still letting you're still proud of your culture in. I think we begin. Give that back to your parents and grandparents. They kept that in you because I've met a lot of people especially in Texas. Actually that they just went opposite direction because of all the hardship that their parents and grandparents went through soup could us your parents grandparents for instilling that culture and to keep you close to it. Yeah yeah all added that you know my two grandparents so one was a citizen in one with not and both of them though are were World War. Two veteran and the one who was yeah and one was in Japan and one was in Europe. So my mother's father my GRANDPA Korol. He actually obtained his citizenship because of his service in World War. Two you know. He was seventeen years old he was living in in quoted and he saw that they were signing young men up to go to war and he had a job in El Paso but lived in wanted like many people and he signed up and he wanted to protect the country that he felt gave him a lot. He met my grandmother who was a US citizen in with born and raised in El Paso met her at a party and wrote her throughout his entire time away. Furthermore and when he came back he married her in. He obtained citizenship. And I will say this. Is The true story. Anybody who's part of the family really knows this story but I think it's really it resonated with me especially now and and just in the time that we're in what he. She laminated his paper so that he could carry them with him at all Because even after his service than even after he became at that ascend I mean he probably couldn't count the years and the Times in which he was stopped and asked for his papers. My Mom clearly remembers the time she was probably in college where he asked where he could. Laminate something and when my mom Helped him do that to realize quickly? It was his papers so bad to me just really when you need a reason to believe in. Why the American dream as as much a part of our dream as let the nose first generation pregnant bird one hundred may be. I always think about that among other story. 'cause for me that was that that's a really powerful thing to be both proud and beautiful right and I think that that you know that hasn't changed for a lot of people. Oh my gosh so powerful quote you there because we live in this were proud of gooey are and because many people here have not explore their country they were brought young and so they especially we still have a lot of people living in the. Us times we live in living that fear and at the same time. Loving the place that you your end. It's it's a hard copy to exist

Third Generation Attorney El Paso The Times Texas Al Paso Borden Atlanta FBI Sosa I Inner Family College J. Edgar Hoover Fbi Academy Mike Pessoa Mary Grandpa Korol
"vivian" Discussed on Cafe con Pam Podcast

Cafe con Pam Podcast

01:41 min | 3 months ago

"vivian" Discussed on Cafe con Pam Podcast

"Hello everyone this is Pam Vega gone bump the bilingual podcastone features fearless alert necks and people of color that break barriers change lives and make the world a better place. Welcome to episode one hundred and forty nine of them. Today we have a conversation with. Vivian Noah Vivian..

A Tale To Warm The Cockles Of Your Heart

Gastropod

07:16 min | 3 months ago

A Tale To Warm The Cockles Of Your Heart

"We drove about an hour south to visit the Manchester Research Station where Jodi Tuft and her colleagues are based for the untrained eye. Us is just a random collection of buildings that a federal facility tucked away in Manchester Washington. Which is a semi rural area? Not too far from Seattle but really this is the heart of where shellfish research and restoration happens in puget sound. We walked into one of the buildings with Jodi and her colleagues Stewart. Disease them cockles. Right now Stewart is going to open up this kind of funky basket jovic purse. What's going on here so? Yeah these are a handful of cockles. That are roughly one to five millimeters and look like tiny little pebbles. Yes these were from spawns. That happened in early summer. June baby cockles are adorable but it turns out. They're not that easy. To produce at least in a federal research facility has robin found out when she tried to find examples of research on local cockles. Nobody had ever tried to breed them. We have some magicians on staff here. Who are really good at breeding shellfish and so we collected some cockles. Brought them back here. Nothing happened there was no magic. There was wonderful people doing great work and just a whole bunch of cockles sitting in buckets of water and they were not making any debacles. But even before. Jody and the team tried to get the cockles to spawn. They had to make sure they had healthy. Cockles and Vivian. Says that wasn't so easy. Either because some of the cockles had cockle cancer and they determined that they had a communicable cancer neoplasia. So they could all be brought into the hatchery right away. So they had to be quarantined for two weeks in a lab about fifty miles away and kept in a each individual in a separate bucket while they were tested for neo plays see even shellfish have to be quarantined. We really are all in this together. After quarantine the cockles had to be tested to see if they were sick sound familiar or generally there were enough tests but it turns out when you test a cockle for cancer. Sometimes the stress makes them spontaneously released all their spawn in a last ditch attempt to leave a baby cockle behind. And we certainly concerns that we were GONNA do a great job screening for Neo pleasure and then we will have spawned Oliver Cockles. And then that would be that because once a cockle spoons it takes months before it's ready to make babies again. Luckily the cockles did not shoot their load and that was in part because the team had another magician on staff with a very gentle touch to get the blood. They needed for their cancer tests. She was kind of kind of got the nickname the the cockle vampire because she was so good at drawing blood. After the cockle vampire had done her thing all but five of the cockles tested clean which left Jodi and her team with thirty cockles to make babies from this was their brood stock and then the fun really began so we tried. The first time around failed tried again failed. Maybe we could call it. We learned not failed but yeah we failed. They didn't produce anything and then the third time around. We brought them in and use a technique. That's pretty common. And other kinds of production of shellfish other commercial techniques and injected them with Serotonin and they they were off to the races and this also took a gentle touch because the scientists had to inject each cockle by hand in the gonads with a personal shot of Serotonin the Cocco Viagra test to make things even more interesting. Jody and the team had to set up a group sex situation because cockles have a tendency to fertilize themselves. It's actually called selling so. Yeah so the the the cell thing which your face is not making it easy for me to laugh but you know we're professionals here. We are such professionals that we are going to say it again. Just for the GIGGLES. When a cockle does the baby making thing by itself that's called self ing And that's because cockles are actually hermaphrodites. The same animal can be at different times either male or female so if a cockle is alone and it releases eggs than it can release sperm next and fertilize its own offspring. So the thing that comes from the Hem afforded expanding of the cockatiels also great sentenced to get to say is it can be a challenge for maintaining genetic diversity if a cuckold creates thousands of baby cockles. And they're all exactly the same genetically. That would not be a good thing as jody. Says there'd be basically no genetic diversity so with the group sex tank and the cocoa Viagra injections the setting was finally right and the result was cockle. Babies about a million baby cockles. Many of which are out with partners out squamish now growing bigger. Bigger bigger the took all those cockles and put them out in the shallow water of the sound in a floppy an acronym for floating up Weller System. It's sort of like a nursery for clams that is outside so there's water flowing through twenty four seven so they have food all the time and oxygen all the time and that's where they are right now once the baby. Coco's get to about the size of a quarter they can start living where. Coco's belong in the INTERTIDAL zone. We thaw that. They would have been ready by now but they're growing very slowly. There's not that much food in the water right now. Although they're not dying they're just kind of waiting waiting for spring waiting for the big phytoplankton bloom and I think they're really going to start to grow soon. Some of the cockles they raised. Were extra tiny stragglers. Those were the ones that Jodi and Stewart had in the building to show us. We wanted to see them jump. Coco's don't do anything on demand. Apparently okay let's see. Oh Yeah I just I don't. They're not opening and just the shells. The shells are beautiful and I have a whole bucket of shells that the I will show you in a bit because as exciting as You know five millimeter baby cockle is it's not exactly a meals worth now. We only looking at it. You can imagine what they'll look like when they're big they're miniature version. I mean the crazy thing about looking under a microscope is they. Do Look back at dinner. No one's really fun to see. Miniscule baby cockles under the microscope but we really wanted to know was. When will they be ready to eat? So that's the question we keep asking are. Biologists are constantly hearing from us. So when will they be ready? When will they be ready because people talk care about like medicine in terms of food as medicine and Sometimes people say I need to feed my Indian and it's that old school Indian ancestor piece inside you. That really needs these foods. These sovereign foods that we've had since time immemorial to last time I had cockles was about three months ago but that it had been about two years because I just don't Wanna eat them before we can save them. But we're had to have some gotta feed Indian sometimes

Oliver Cockles Jodi Tuft Jody Coco Stewart Viagra Manchester Research Station Seattle Manchester Washington Neoplasia Cancer NEO Robin Vivian Weller System HEM
Searching For Cockles

Gastropod

07:54 min | 3 months ago

Searching For Cockles

"We're in central puget sound in a body of water that we call Port Orchard Passage. This is a very good body of water for Shellfish. Because there's a lot of current coming through this little bottle neck area. There brings a lot of nutrients food. Oxygen Vivian. Barry is the shellfish program manager for the tribe and we met her and her colleague. Jeff more on a tribally owned beach across the sound from Seattle to areas famous for all sorts of seafood especially shellfish oysters and gooey ducks and course clams that we have different types of clams here. We have the the native little neck clams and we have an introduced Manila clam. That's very similar to the little neck. But it's from Asia originally and of course there's The star of today's show cockles which we actually couldn't see so they like to live in the lower intertidal zone and then the subtitle. Apparently there are more cockles. Living under the water than on the beach for those of you who are not up on their whole tidal geography. The Inter title is that part you see at the beach. The wet sand that gets exposed as the tide is going out. The subtitle is under shallow water almost all the time. It's that sliver of sand that only gives exposed at super low tides. Like when there's a full moon and so to get to the cockles in that subtitle's zone Vivian. And Jeff have to wait until the tide is at. It's very very lowest point this time of year. That's around three. A M which is go at night we harvest at night. Yeah we were out there during the day but fortunately there were some cockle shells available on the beach as visually. They see a cockle there. Jeff grab it. Yeah they're weathered but there you can see they look like those ripple chips. They're they're ribbed. They have these long ribs. Come down longitude only. This is what you would see when you're looking in the garden. Cockle shells right from the nursery room round more. Like a ball shape. The Long Ribs Jeff is describing on the shell. It's those same lines in the cockleshell flowers that give the flowers their name. If you've never seen a cockleshell and frankly I hadn't as Jeff said you might know them better from nursery RHYMES MARY. Mary quite contrary. How does your garden grow with silver bells and cockle shells and pretty maids all in a row? No one knows exactly what that means. There's a theory that Mary as Mary. Queen of Scots and the cockle shells are somehow Catholic. But yeah no one knows. And then there's another old English rhyme. I knew as a Kid. It was actually a jump rope song for me. Blue Bells cockle shells a vans British rhyme. So they would have been talking about the different species at cockle. The common cockle as it's called which you find in the UK and Ireland Portugal and all down the Atlantic coast. Morocco cockles have long been a popular food in all these countries. Just one of the many shellfish people enjoyed you might have heard the Irish Song Molly Malone where she selling cockles in the streets of Dublin. We streets gone in the UK. Coco's used to be a pretty common seaside treat. You'd often buy them boiled served in a paper cone and sprinkled with Malt Vinegar. They were popular in the east end of London. And especially in Wales but today those kinds of traditional shellfish like welk's and winkles and cockles. They've become less and less popular. But while cockles are no longer common snacks in seaside towns. They are still actually harvested all along the coast of the UK. They're shipped overnight to elsewhere in Europe like France and the Netherlands where cockles are still popular law of blazes in the UK. That harvesting is still done by hand using cocoa rake. It can be really dangerous work if you get caught by the tide but while we were researching this episode we discovered off the coast of Norfolk. They've developed an ingenious technique that involves driving boats around in circles. This is from a channel four documentary about calls three to four minutes. Yes that's the war talk. The boat's propeller push the sentiment in these re off. Would you use the boat? Wash all the sideway basically There's yet another species of cockle that's widespread in Asia. In Japan. There's a popular cockles Sushi. That's available only one month a year but in a lot of places. Kaka leading has really fallen off. The shelves are hard to open. And especially these European cockles. There's only a tiny bit of meat. Once you do manage to pry them apart but west coast cockles like we said there are different species and they are most decidedly not dainty little things. They're actually quite hefty. They probably can get about a good four inches four five inches. They can get fairly large and heavy in terms of like maybe a schoolboy size little apple so cockles are bigger than clams but there are unusual in another way to most shellfish like the little neck clams in the Manila clams covered the beach. We were on their pretty stationary and when they settle from larvae to an adult they basically dig themselves in and stay in the same place for the rest of their lives but cockles. They are not quite so sedentary. These cockles have a really heavy and strong foot and they're very mobile so they can escape. They're predators by just jumping away from them this jump. It's not just a little hub. This is a full-on leap leap leap away. So one of the Faster Sea Stars is the Sun Star Picnic. Odia helium authorities. These sunflower seeds. Stars are freaky looking. They range in color from bright orange to purple. They get to more than three feet wide. And they have up to twenty four arms covered in suckers and they love to use those suckers to pull apart the two halves of cockleshell and then they chomped down on the flash. They can sense when the sea star is trying to get a hold of him in a foot to just kick away and they can jump off. We're talking we're talking mostly sideways. And then the kind of kick away and SORTA roll along to get away so at a time but enough to get away from a sea star and as long as there have been people living along puget sound. They've been eating those leaping cockles over ten thousand years. I don't know I mean bivalves have been around for you. Know millions of years in the ocean and the tribes have been around these waters. For at least I think the archaeological record say at least fourteen thousand years by all accounts cockles are one hundred percent delicious and a favorite food of the first nations people in the area so they will build a large fire with rocks so the rocks become very hot and they will put the shellfish right the rocks and cover them with seaweed so they basically steam in their own juices. It's over an open flame and it's yeah the the way they've been doing it for forever so it's they've perfected the art they're good. They're really sweet. Really sweet and kind of a rich kind of seafood taste little chewier a little bit meaty so they compared to other clans. I would say there's more richness in the

Jeff Asia Mary Manila Port Orchard Passage UK Seattle Barry Program Manager Atlantic Coast Molly Malone Morocco London Wales Sun Star Picnic Dublin Coco Europe Kaka
Angelina Jolie reveals 2 of her daughters recently underwent surgery

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:18 sec | 4 months ago

Angelina Jolie reveals 2 of her daughters recently underwent surgery

"Two of Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie's daughters recently underwent surgery in a first person essay for time magazine Joe leave writes that both fifteen year old to hire an eleven year old Vivian had medical challenges in recent months that required operations for Vivian it was hip surgery she didn't say what was going on with the

Brad Pitt Angelina Jolie Vivian Joe Leave
Joe Biden leads in polls ahead of South Carolina primary

The KDKA Radio Morning News with Larry Richert and John Shumway

00:22 sec | 4 months ago

Joe Biden leads in polls ahead of South Carolina primary

"Polls indicate democratic voters in South Carolina will give Joe Biden win in tomorrow's primary but in CBS's Jim crystal reports there are many undecided voters since she is still undecided about what democratic presidential hopeful is support in Saturday's South Carolina primary Vivian brown is eyeing their positions and proposals on one issue to me

South Carolina Joe Biden CBS Jim Crystal Vivian Brown
Miami: 2 women found dead inside car that fell into water near Fisher Island

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:52 sec | 4 months ago

Miami: 2 women found dead inside car that fell into water near Fisher Island

"One two people have been killed after their car rolled off the ferry and into the water below here's more from CBS news corresponded Manuel before Katniss the association which runs the line says it operates multiple ferries every day now Fisher island is billed as one of the wealthiest communities in the country with the only way is on or off by boat or ferry and people who live there say they have never heard of anything like this happening before the first distress calls came in just after five PM Tuesday Warner five Mercedes Benz that was being driven by sixty three year old Emma Afro would seventy five year old Vivian Brahms as our passenger had somehow rolled off the fairy dive crews searched the waters overnight eventually finding the two deceased women inside the car which was brought back on shore and towed away it's still very early

Manuel Fisher Island Benz Emma Afro CBS Tuesday Warner Vivian Brahms
Miami: Two women dead in Mercedes that fell off Fisher Island ferry - Orlando Sentinel

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:24 sec | 4 months ago

Miami: Two women dead in Mercedes that fell off Fisher Island ferry - Orlando Sentinel

"Three there is word that one of two women killed when their car fell off the ferry at Fisher island near Miami beach yesterday lived in Westchester county seventy five year old Vivian Brahms was from Harris and the other woman sixty three year old Emma Afro lived in Miami beach the investigation continues into how the car ended up in the water Fisher island is home to some of the most exclusive real estate in the Miami area and is a favorite spot for

Fisher Island Miami Beach Westchester County Harris Emma Afro Water Fisher Island Vivian Brahms Miami
An UnFROGettable Day At the Museum of Wow!

Wow In the World

01:14 min | 5 months ago

An UnFROGettable Day At the Museum of Wow!

"Morning friends and so glad you could join us first. Senior Citizen Day at CMO. Wow they mindy oh great. We invite you here today because humans over one hundred years old get in free and this is the first day of the museums. Exciting New Amphibian Exhibit Amphibian is the scientific name for a group of animals that begin their lives with Gills and tails in the water but later grow legs and lungs for a new life on land. In fact the word right and Vivian means double life like the double life of turning from a tadpole into abroad. Yes a process known as -morphosis versus are you. Are you sleeping. What no who was sleeping allergies? This is sure to be an UNCLOG gettable day. The museum promises some of the most wow worthy in riveting new scientific discoveries

Vivian
"vivian" Discussed on 10 Things That Scare Me

10 Things That Scare Me

03:33 min | 5 months ago

"vivian" Discussed on 10 Things That Scare Me

"One Jackson ACA track. There's a lot of these around where I live and Rural Ohio. And they're on the roads and parking working lot. They're just so big intimidating the frightening and irritating. There was one part talk recently by my house when I walked around it with my dog. Diesel engine was running and I just felt like I was Kinda run Albany to something bad happening to kiss three running out of money and old age for ticks. There's a lot of these around where I live to. Whenever I take my dog out in the spring on earn fall we come covered in dementia fifty one and anytime? I can't remember something. I'm worried too early onset. Alzheimer's or Dementia Souks Florida keys. Going underwater seven fee sickness eight scuba diving actually a certified scuba diver. But I don't go out very much because it scares me beautiful being a no water. But I'm always worried I'm going to get feedback on the way out on a boat and there's something the thing about being under the water that's beautiful and terrifying nine being earned alive alive ten my cat getting out and getting lost. My cat. Red adopted me last year came in my house and I keep him as a house pat now he was a stray but now the happy inside cat. But I'm shared always said he's going to run out and get lost. You move me Dan Testing Vivian Wagner is a listener just like you who decided to share her fierce with us. She lives in Ohio and is an associate professor concuss. She's getting ready to marry in her words. A handsome commercial pilot. The ten things team includes Amy Pearl. Daniel Matt Odell Reuben. Sarah Sampack Emily Boutin and Polish human music and sound designed signed by Isaac Jones. You know what scares me that we're never going to stop with the BRAS. What is with the BRAS? What are you scared off? Tell us at ten things. PODCASTS DOT Org..

Dan Testing Vivian Wagner BRAS Rural Ohio Dementia Souks Florida Daniel Matt Odell Reuben ACA Isaac Jones Alzheimer Albany Amy Pearl associate professor Ohio Sarah Sampack Emily Boutin
Their Dark Materials

99% Invisible

09:49 min | 5 months ago

Their Dark Materials

"About a year ago. We released an episode in which I interviewed the author. Cassius unclear about her book. The secret lives of color. It was a conversation about the history and origins of different colors throughout human existence. During our talk does he and I covered everything from a type of purple. That squeezed from sees nails do a shade of green. That could literally kill you but there was one pigment in particular from that episode that one of our producers. Here's here nine hundred hasn't been able to stop thinking about because it's bonkers producer. Vivian lay. It's called Vance a black. It's a pigment that reaches the level of darkness. That's so intense. It's kind of upsetting. It's so black. It's like looking at a hole cut out of the universe. It's so black. It's like looking at portal into another dimension of nothingness. It's so black that if you stare at it long enough you'll see your own death. I keep going these metaphors or crummy but it it's it's like this philosophical abyss. Your is just fall into it. This is Adam. Rogers journalist writer wired and I write books sometimes to Rogers has written about van to block for wired because when anyone sees with not just Vivian. They think it's bonkers. It makes you rethink think. What black means fantastic is striking when you look at it even when you look at a picture of it because it looks like something colored black it looks like an absence Vanna black swallows nearly all visible light in gives back no reflection so every contour crease of whatever it's applied to disappears it has this ought affect of making something look two dimensional while at the same time as if you could fall right through it? It has the same feeling looking looking at it as a color that looking over the edge of a building or something does he actually do. Feel kind of a physiological response to that does not look right that looks unreal. It looks real. VENTA black was created by the tech industry for the tech industry. But this strange dark material would actually go on to turn the art world on its head They're black pigments out there and then there are super black pigments. That are so dark. They need to be created in a laboratory. These super blacks excrete such extreme levels of darkness. Because they're made up of something called Carbon Nanotubes or C. N.. Tease Carbon nanotubes are pretty much. Exactly what they sound like teeny tiny microscopic tubes combranch of carbon atoms just a few nanometers wide for reference. A single human hair is about eighty to a hundred thousand nanometers. animators Y T materials are made up of forests of these microscopic carbon tubes. I'd say it's like a field of gross. Okay and the grass is a carbon nanotubes in about one six thousand two thickness of your hair and there's about a billion of them per square centimeter. This is Ben Johnson the founder and CTO Joe of Serena Systems which specializes in carbon nanotubes technology. He's the kind of person who even as a kid you'd expect to become the founder and CTO of of a carbon nanotubes technology company. When I went through school I spent my time trying to make gunpowder type rocket And then I kind of went to develop liquid. Propellant systems is that we're all the dangerous and needs to go bang and kind of not very safe back then. People didn't really care that much about safety and they go yeah. This sounds like a really cool idea. Goods this is not a really cool idea. Jensen began working in the nanomaterials field in two thousand four back then. CNT's had a lot of promise in the space industry because super black coatings could be really useful inside of satellites telescopes and optical imaging technology but carbon nanotubes. Technology wasn't quite where it needed to be yet. CNT's these weren't like paint. They had to be grown onto a surface in a special type of reactor at an absurdly high temperature. High enough to destroy. Most of the things you might I wanna grow them on Johnson and his team worked on it for years and finally managed to develop a new reactor that allowed them to grow see and tease at a much lower temperature and in doing so they had one unexpected but delightful side effect they made it blacker one day. We go to some data back. They said back. Do you realize what you've done you've this material. And it's got almost unmeasurable low reflectance and I was a K.. What does that mean? It meant that Serena systems had created the darkest substance on earth material that absorbed ninety nine point nine six five percent of light. He couldn't tell from the numbers but Jensen new the cat was really special after one of his researchers showed him a sample said. Look I'm like okay. What am I looking at? It just looks black and said look and I'm putting my face right up beside it and the guy's looking laughing at me alum gain a it just looks black. And then he did something that just told me with nailed it. He took an object of the surface that was three dimensional so before matt helpless put my eyes to it. I couldn't tell us anything that was just flat. Danson black was so dark that it almost felt like it defied Clyde the laws of physics we weren't looking to create the world's blackest material. That's a thing Johnson and his team decided to give this new flashy C. N. T. of flashing flashing name Vance a black which stands for vertically aligned nanotubes array black as black as Vance. A black was surrey. NANNA systems systems still saw it as a niche material so when they launched their product at the Farnborough Airshow in two thousand fourteen. They saw themselves as small fry. Farm Farm Bureau is a big deal. In the aerospace industry Serena Systems was presenting their nanomaterial at the same event as the Boeing dreamliner military jets and a paragliding car so Jensen wasn't expecting to make much of a splash. But that's not what actually happened was just surreal. We had camera crews literally all the major networks filming looking at these materials because knowing it ever seen it demonstrated like this before people were freaking out. over Vance a black. We just didn't expect it and my son was like well. He's just black. Why are we getting these people going crazy about it? People were amazed by the depth of darkness achieved by Van Black and wanted to know. More soon enough Serena systems was receiving all sorts of requests from people who wanted a piece of it. Aw People wanting to coach because people want to coat dice in it coat bodies in it. We had a very well known youtuber. The spent quite asking us saying can can you please live on youtube aside from that time. potty Canadian what really caught Jensen's attention was the amount of interest is that came from another field in desperate need of super black pigment. The Art World in those first couple of weeks alone Surrey Nano Systems received saved over four hundred inquiries from artists wanting to use it in their work the number of people in the art world that wanted to use it that that was absolutely absolutely crazy time. Actually because we're a company set up to do engineering and space not accompany the setup to create products for artists to us working with artists. Artis was just not something Serena systems was equipped to do because Vance black was incredibly hard to work with sure they could grow at a much lower temperature than before that was still about four hundred and thirty degrees centigrade. Cat's were also really delicate and can scrape off easily but most importantly any collaboration with artists would take up time in tech resources. Because anything coated with Banda black would have to be grown in Serena systems reactors just wasn't a practical proposition for the company that said an ish is an incredibly charismatic. Chat with an amazing vision and and his life's work has just been phenomenal an eastern as in a niche Kapoor. Who if you haven't heard of him? Before is very famous so for decades has been one of the premier contemporary artists working today says Adam Rogers again use the kind of person who will do a whole gallery takeover teen modern you know. He's he's a really big deal. We should know here that initiative did not respond to an interview request for this story but he's probably best known for creating Chicago's iconic cloud gate sculpture also known as the bean and and he has been knighted by Queen Elizabeth for his contributions to visual arts. And when Vance black debuted he wanted it. So he reached out Serena Systems and invited Jensen to check out a studio or walked into his studio and I was literally speeches or what I saw given his body of work. Kapoor seemed uniquely suited for this material. There is in a way a constant continuous process that gives up the same questions. This is a niche poor. In a video he released about one of his pieces titled Dissension. So those those questions are for me. The void object or the non object many questions about color questions about space and time. Because I really do believe that for there to be new objects has to be new. Space Kapoor has has a fascination with blacks capacity to make something both exist and not exist at the same time his work. A lot of it deals with voight. It deals with colored blocks and try to understand the relationship between color space

Vance Black Serena Systems Jensen Danson Black Adam Rogers Ben Johnson Vivian Kapoor CNT Cassius Founder And Cto Producer Space Kapoor Surrey Nano Systems Vanna Venta Farnborough Airshow Chicago Youtube
"vivian" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:30 min | 6 months ago

"vivian" Discussed on KQED Radio

"She's going to be Jeez wait what is that me I said don't worry about it it's the curse just she's going to be gone and I walked out and I went on the slim fast plan and I lost one two and then after five pounds I said you know what I'm not doing this anymore I look fine the way I am I look great even I cannot do this so I go back to a less the lady no sooner did I get there I'm walking down the hall and cheese whiz comes running over only I got all my oh my god what what are you talking about if you said Vivian is being arrested she was caught in Beverly can you believe that come with me so I walk with her go into the V. as office and Vivian is crying she's got mascara running down her face she's got an eyelash stuck to one she and a police officer on either side and I was like a whole whole she starts walking towards me I did man walking and I say Hey as.

Beverly officer Vivian
Iran and Ukraine begin plane crash probe

Here & Now

10:32 min | 6 months ago

Iran and Ukraine begin plane crash probe

"Start this hour with the series of events that have led to the accusations that Iran shot down a Ukrainian plane by mistake killing everyone on board a week ago today a US drone strike killed. Iran's top military commander Mander in Baghdad. Iran responded with its own missile strikes on basis in Iraq where American troops were stationed hours later that Ukrainian jet bound bound for Kiev crashed shortly after takeoff from Tehran. Iranian officials deny they shut down that jet although the US and Canada have publicly said they have evidence to the contrary for the latest on all of this in the crash investigation. We're joined by the BBC's Joanna Fisher in Kiev and Jona what are Ukrainian officials officials saying about this today. Well it's been very difficult. Actually to get comment out of Ukrainian officials. I think they are in a very difficult position here. They we have a team on the ground in Tehran. That was sent there in the immediate aftermath of this crash on Wednesday and they are trying to do everything they can to make sure that that team who are in Iran at the moment get access to the crash site and to the debris that has been collected. I think they are concerned. -cerned that if they immediately come out and echo what has been said In the United States and in Canada an in Great Britain very firmly pointing the finger at the Iranians blaming them for shooting down this plane that that will make it too difficult for for these investigators who are now inside drawn to do their job said they'd been walking something of a of a tight robe yes definitely a tight rope. in a very delicate situation more than sixty Canadians died in that crash crash reporters yesterday press Canadian. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on whether the United States was partly to blame because this was all created by the volatile atmosphere miss fear the US caused by killing General Qassam. Sulamani is there at the same sentiment in Ukraine about that. Look I think the overwhelming sentiment here in Ukraine is naught again because you have to cost mind back five years to m h seventeen. The Malaysian airlines that was shot down in eastern Ukraine crane. Shot down by a Russian missile almost certainly by Russian forces with the death of all nearly three hundred people on board and I think lots of people here their immediate reaction was surely. This couldn't have happened again and not to our country Has Horrible echoes for many many people about what happened then and the idea that Once again what appears to be happening on the ground in Iran is that they going out of their way to make it very very difficult for a proper investigation take base in that once again echoes. What has been the experience of the seventeen investigation that Russia has done almost everything cancer trying and make it very difficult? This has been a miserable flashback for many Ukrainians to what happened five years ago. We also shouldn't forget that this is a human tragedy how are the deaths of that. Those Eleven Ukrainians resonating there. There's been a memorial setup at the airport. Boris Bill Apple which is where the plane was due to arrive lots of passenger cruise Of other airlines have been going. They're paying their respects. The president has also been. They're extremely the extremely sad scenes around around the airport on Wednesday and on Thursday as well the voss majority of the actual passengers on the plane and they weren't going to End Up in Ukraine. They were transiting onto candidature about one hundred and forty also Of One hundred and seventy six people on board the plane we're going to fly on later that day Onto destinations in Canada. Basically this route Was One of the most efficient to one of the cheapest pissed ways for Iranian Canadian Air Iranians to get from Tehran to to various places in in Canada I wonder to to what thoughts there are about Ukraine again being in the middle of this huge news story because the country is also connected to impeachment here in the United States involved in a military conflict with Russia as well. There's a lot going on in the world that really affects Ukraine. Your thoughts on that. You have to say that Ukraine rain has found itself once again in extremely difficult geopolitical position. this is a country that history is not kind to and Ah once again it finds itself in an impossible position to be quite frank in the last twenty four hours or so Ukraine's friends in the West have not not been particularly helpful towards it. It seems almost that Ukraine was the last one to have access to this intelligence from from the United States pointing to it. Being a shoot down I think it's only in the last few hours. Actually the American embassy here in Kiev has come forward and given that information to the presidency. Here that's the BBC's Jonah Fisher. Kiev Jonah thank you so much. Thank you well. As tensions rose this week between Iran and the United States dates. Saudi Arabia was watching closely. The country is a US ally and a rival of Iran. Joining us. Now from Riyadh is Vivian. Near I'm WHO's a reporter with Bloomberg News Vivian. Welcome thank you would. How has this recent flare up between the US and Iran affected Saudi Arabia? Well something that a lot let people forget because Saudi Arabia of course has in the past taken a very hawkish tone toward Iran. Is that if we're we're actually going to break out. Saudi Arabia would be among the countries that would face potential retaliation could actually be severely hurt security-wise economy wise. So what we seen during this last flare up is Saudi officials really setting a message far and wide that we walked de-escalation. We do not want to see this turn into a military confrontation you know can wiser heads prevail. And let's think about the risks to the region because obviously if there were to be sort of a retaliatory attack to one of the Gulf countries or Saudi Arabia itself that would really heart Saudi Arabia and particularly at a time when they need things to be peaceful when they need things to be good for their economy because they're hosting the g twenty this year. They're trying to bring in foreign. Investors are trying to bring tourist wrist. This is not the time when you WANNA have a war right around the corner and it was just a few months ago that missile in drone strikes on Saudi oil facilities did a lot of damage to oil production there in Saudi Arabia. Arabia blamed Iran for that attack. Although Iran denied responsibility do you think that the Saudis were caught off guard by the killing of Sulamani by the United States. So it's an interesting question because there have been a couple of media reports suggesting that Saudi Arabia was not Informed or consulted ahead of time But I it doesn't seem surprising that perhaps this was a very quick attack. That Saudi Arabia was not informed about was caught off guard about about It's interesting that you mentioned the attack in September because Saudi Arabia actually so just stopped short of blaming Iran for that attack which was really interesting at the time I and a lot of people took that as a sign of Saudi Arabia trying to de-escalate and realizing we don't actually want more so they did go as far as to say Iraq had weapons were used in they even said the attack was launched from the north but I remember being at press conferences where we asked them was around behind this and they would not quite go there they would stop short of that. Okay and and in terms of the killing of Sulejmani were the Saudis happy about it do you think or do. They think that it was not good for them. Well there's been a real mixture of feelings because on the one hand so Damani is somebody who is widely viewed here as a war criminal in a state sponsored terrorist who had caused mayhem around the region through proxy wars supporting militias. So there was actually quite a lot of celebration in the Saudi media and from Saudi pundits and commentators but at the same time you did see simultaneous kind of concern and worry about the potential for that to escalate into a wider conflict. So you saw people saying we're glad so. They money's dead but let's be careful that this doesn't turn into a war you know. I was wondering as people were talking about General Suleimani and the fact that he was really The military commander for all of Iran's activities what effect His death will have on the war in Yemen which has been kind of a proxy war between Iran and Saudi Arabia. It's a bit too early early to say but we've already seen even before his death steps and effort toward ending Saudi Arabia's his involvement in the war in Yemen thought at this point. The war in Yemen has really devolved into this complex civil war. You know merged with famine and this horrible humanitarian catastrophe. So I don't think we can really talk about an end to the war in an easier way but you do see that. Saudi Arabia does seem to be moving towards trying to disengage and trying to kind of end their role in that conflict which seems to be part of a broader strategy to take a step back from some of the crises and conflicts that the kingdom has gotten involved in over the past couple of years. Does it appear to so you that because of the recent of flare up in tensions that maybe there is a chance right now for the longstanding rivalry between Iran and Saudi Arabia to kind of cool down for them to move toward a detente. That's a very good question and something that a lot of people are asking in the region right now now for two reasons first of all because there have been reports of some sort of talks perhaps going on between Saudi Arabia Iran whether those have been through intermediaries perhaps add Oscar Pakistan or whether they have been more kind of tier two unofficial think-tank level engagements has not really clear clear. But there has been a lot of chatter about our Saudi Arabia and Iran. Actually engaging in talks over the past few months prior to this killing and then the second question is whether the killing of Damani Johny ultimately could perhaps open up some space for Saudi Arabia add on to have some sort of talk because he was a large roadblock in the view of Saudi Arabia and other Gulf countries towards any kind of negotiated when the Ron because they viewed his role in these proxy wars and it Cetera. Something they just couldn't stomach and now he's gone. Vivian near I'm reporter for Bloomberg based in Riyadh Saudi Arabia. Thank you thank you so

Saudi Arabia Iran United States Ukraine Canada Kiev Tehran Arabia BBC Riyadh Iraq Damani Johny Joanna Fisher Baghdad Reporter Commander Mander Russia Bloomberg Jonah Fisher
From 2018: Don Imus signs off

Joe Giglio

02:38 min | 6 months ago

From 2018: Don Imus signs off

"Of Matt Moore to to radio legend don Imus passed away yeah I guess I guess went into the hospital on Christmas Eve with some illness and didn't work out don Imus is been a talk show host not only in New York but nationally for years and you know for those of you that that may not remember I I guess he got he had made a a derogatory comment about the Rucker's ladies basketball team yeah yeah when they were awake their last big run under under C. Vivian stringer he yeah made me kind of an off color reference right yeah there was an ad cost them at the time his position I was at our at our sister station WFAA yeah and but Hughes around a long long time was one of them when I first started doing morning drive radio in New York he was one of my mentors because you know not doing morning drives difficult if you're not used to getting up at three o'clock in the morning no doubt and and don Imus had a heck of a history it's a really interesting history at a road full of bumps along the way but at seventy nine years of age in in Texas I believe right yeah down at the I think the Baylor Medical Center was was where he will in Waco Texas Waco Texas yes Sir so rest in peace don Imus radio legend not only in New York City but on a national basis on TV every morning to on different networks were for a long long time Paul deanno is the giants beat reporter on that a very sister station of ours the fan WFAN did you ever run a nine is full sure there yeah he was a very unique character yeah you know and to be honest there were those who didn't care for humor right I didn't care for his temper but if you have the intellect to understand his weight and his genius because he truly was a genius there was a lot easier to appreciate him I I never had any run ins of negativity with you know so I I you know I can only say my short experiences with them when I did run into him with the studio on occasion will always very professional and he didn't he didn't do anything they don't make it toward me so my experiences with god yeah my the easier way he's a legend hall of Famer and it's very sad news very sad news just a couple of days past Christmas we lose a don Imus Imus in the morning does seventy nine

New York City Waco C. Vivian Stringer Basketball Wfan Reporter Giants Paul Deanno Matt Moore Baylor Medical Center Texas Hughes Rucker New York Don Imus
Haden Fry has passed away at the age of 90.

The Al Malmberg Show

09:18 min | 7 months ago

Haden Fry has passed away at the age of 90.

"But Hayden fry we lost an iconic I will figure the other day at age ninety he fought that battle with cancer for a long time twenty seasons in Iowa a hundred forty three wins I had the privilege of seeing some of those wins and covering Iowa you were around him a lot hidden fry came up with this this hokey Texas style dumb as a fox war the sun glasses but boy did he went over that state did me we did he as I've told people the last couple days of this guy could run any fortune five hundred company because he knew who to hire he surrounded himself with great people he trusted them he he he delegated authority and all over your one line of of many that that he told me and I think nineteen ninety seven was I never want to hire an assistant coach who doesn't aspire to be a head coach and I know that's that's that's talking it's easy speak but you look at Hayden's first there were I think in nineteen ninety six or ninety seven you could have a leader maybe nine assistance top and that original staff he put together Wyrick five Amer hall of Famers or will be in the hall of fame notations in the hall of fame very over as Bob stoops bill Schneider in the hall of fame and her courage will be in the hall of fame but then you add in Dan McCarney and Donnie Patterson and bill Miller and later Bret Bielema and Chuck long all these guys reader all of employers are there going to be hall of fame coaches or at least most of them will be and so it and I'm not saying it was easy to wonder will because lockers are just suffered through eighteen nineteen non winning seasons I think there were two five hundred years in there had total lack was part of one of those but beyond that I will football pretty well tank after the the forest Evashevski run in the nineteen fifties and then along comes is Tracy from West Texas and I'm ever bump Elliott telling me after you're hired Frank Lautenberg who was the coach of the year to lido and he bombed and then Bob Cummings a high school coach Massillon Ohio came in and you know pull off a couple big upsets with this sizzle wasn't there and bomb should let me tell you it off I don't get this higher right you won't you won't see her anymore as AT and how ironic would that have been because about Bailey at only hired within a couple years time lute Olson Dan gable and Hayden fry and that doesn't that doesn't include C. Vivian stringer or later George raveling or Tom Davis sure or on on any pick bobbles be to selected as athletic director so bump Elliott was an absolute genius and he and Hayden it had the same kind of delivery Hayden Hayden was a front man Bob was always the guy in the background and they made it work for the better part of twenty years and Bob returned bowls became intercourse utility and do it as long as you want to do and then that prostate cancer reared its ugly head in in in the mid nineties and he struggled and obviously I will football slipped and the range were handed off to his disciple Kerr courage and it took him you know normally and and I will tell you the cupboard was pretty bare in ninety eight I remember I remember the gophers just absolutely kicking of the hard cash in the Metrodome Hayden's last year's last game and he had a tearful postgame press conference and then typically it takes for five years to get a program like Iowa restocked occurrence didn't three and in two thousand one they be Texas tech and clippings very in the Alamo bowl and it's been eighteen holes in nineteen years for Kirk Ferentz walls that time and you know and I I never take it for granted we never should I know Minnesota doesn't think what happened there sure for granted it's it's special to live in that kind of moment and I'm sure PJ's gonna have many years like it like he had this year and just like her Terence he he's obviously not done yet but Hayden was was a marvelous wept he had a character about a man and he understood he identified with the people I want me he came from the agricultural side of Texas and he knew all about farmers and and not only is he a hall of fame football coach would always would always amaze me and what a Namor him to what was your yeah you know having having the gall to change the tiger Harker change to the tiger hawk logo from the from her key with the challenge in the wings and the true arc having having the courage to call the Rooney family and say Hey I want to redo the I will uniforms and I want them to look more like the Steelers with the wide gold lettering and and are running said well go head coach but you better win and that's all he said and then the American each farmers the a and F. B. cal in the farm crisis the transcendent a lot more than I would it was Minnesota it was Nebraska was the farmers in South Dakota Hayden fry understood their plight and out of that came farm aid and millions upon millions of dollars for the for the farm family not not the big corporate farms but it that that's who he was the guy could run for governor and I won one a number of terms but he he thankfully stuck with football and with all the better for it yeah and when you look at the bullet points Gary on the resume of Hayden fry and and certainly again and I icon you brought up the a and F. D. cal I mean a bold stroke of genius a simple move but but he had everybody in that state you know eating out of his hand from that point on and then and then other things he did the pink locker rooms at Kinnick and I think he even if he were still around now would tell you his greatest accomplishment was integrating the Southwest Conference at SMU and he was the head coach there with jury Leviathan jury levias you know put up with a lot of crowd but he didn't got that ball rolling hating it was never afraid to take a chance on a young guy and you know that was the old Southwest Conference days was Arkansas that was taxes that was that was in North Texas at SMU everything was lily white and and he rolled the dice and and he always said that I didn't care what color the young man was he could play football and he could get it done on the academic side he was my kind of guy and and he rolled the dice with jury levias and to this day a jury lawyers she talks about breaking down the color barrier because of Hayden fry and and you know you and I should probably should mention that bullet point first Eric beyond a enough and and you know farm aid and the the tiger hawk logo which is now an international sign you can't walk anywhere in America overseas of somebody doesn't see that may go go arcs and I've heard that so many times Michigan Avenue or OR Broadway but he he just he from a P. R. marketing standpoint you know I've I've told people over the years we've all seen the wizard of oz and and the the human form of the wizard was the snake oil salesman who had the horse with the with the wooden wagon and he was selling the pots and pans the back end of his wagon when the tornado was wrong throne is trying to give Dorothy some philosophical advice about now you need to go back home and be with your parents it looks like a storm coming I think that was Hayden fry the wizard of oz he could he could spend it and and one of my favorite stories is that whenever we came to Minneapolis this is a hard one and and I hope she's doing okay said would come in the booth and and he he I think was Poland at total lex chain a little bit but I think he was as sure as you know are you get there's no way you guys are gonna keep Hayden fry he's going to USC he's going to Notre Dame or is going to the NFL every year he would come in every other year when we come to many many apples for and I wish it would matter should always got that you have been a huge there's no way you're going to keep this guy and and the point is understood how precious Hayden fry was not only as a football coach but in the environment that he was in that as long as he was and I was city I always going to be a winner they may not go to the Rose Bowl every year but he went to three of them in one three big ten championships and eighteen nineteen years yeah a remarkable run I remember covering the nineteen ninety Rose Bowl Iowa in Washington mark Brunell Chuck long it was a fabulous setting in Pasadena at the Arroyo Seiko and and I was since then has has really been able to you know year in year out have the kind of model that the golfers are looking for as far as their football program you know always being contention plan a bowl game in every two or three years maybe have a shot to you know playing a significant bowl game and it's great to reminisce Gary about Hayden fry in those days down in Ireland and certainly he's a legend so thanks for sharing your thoughts Hey my pleasure you know in Minnesota and and I work

Hayden Fry Cancer Iowa Eighteen Nineteen Years Two Five Hundred Years Nineteen Years Twenty Years Three Years Five Years
Prince George’s Co. teacher charged with child abuse, assault after fight with student

Sean Hannity

00:15 sec | 8 months ago

Prince George’s Co. teacher charged with child abuse, assault after fight with student

"A prince George's county teacher facing multiple charges following a physical or click altercation Friday with the student Largo high school the student admitted stepping on thirty six year old Vivian Norreys foot and bumping are that's when the teacher reportedly header causing a fight to

George Student Largo High School Vivian Norreys Thirty Six Year
The Honorable Andrew Young on Growing Up in New Orleans

In Black America

05:59 min | 10 months ago

The Honorable Andrew Young on Growing Up in New Orleans

"I said whoever made all this couldn't have made me with no purpose so it has got to be a purpose for me to the end of Andrew The J. Young Civil Rights legend former. UN Ambassador Congressman and Mayor of Atlanta Georgia in nineteen sixty young help change this country as a leader in the civil rights movement his legacy include being silly activists elected official groundbreaking Ambassador Social Entrepreneur. You're an adviser to presidents. Currently he leaves the Andrew J Young Foundation's effort to the BELVA `support new generations of visionary leaders who array sustainable global approaches to Economic Development Poverty Alleviation Ama- challenge of hunger young was a close confidante to the late Dr Martin Luther King Junior and a key strategist negotiated during campaigns that led to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of nineteen sixty four and the voting rights act of Nineteen nineteen sixty five this past spring young was in Austin Texas to participate in the summit on race in America at the AUBERGE Presidential Library on on the campus of the University of Texas at Austin. I'm John Leo Hanson Junior and welcome to another edition of in Black America on this week's program and exclusive interview with Civil Rights Legend the Honorable Andrew Young and black America Reverend Vivian was really the first one have a sit it in he was he had a sit in Peoria Illinois in nineteen forty seven that was way before Montgomery and and Martin Luther King we go into his ninety sixth birthday next month he still with us. He was a freedom rider he he worked with us from beginning to end and he's still on the case James Several Janesville genius but he was also very eccentric. Maybe crazy but Dr King being used to say that all of us a certify ably insane because you've got to be kinda crazy to think that you can change America America was no money no organization we had nothing but the spirit of the Lord moving in our hearts it it changed when one speaks with the honor Bell Andrew j young you can still see it on his face and hearing his voice the Passion and commitment he still has for the call for social justice as Executive Director of the southern Christian Leadership Conference in one thousand nine hundred sixty four he was on on the front line doing America's doctors days born and raised in a segregated New Orleans young. I attended Dillard University in the city then attended Howard Howard University and earned a vintage degree in one thousand nine hundred fifty five from Hartford theological seminary working as a young pastor and Thomas Field Georgia he he first became part of the movement when he organized voter registration drives and nineteen seventy s first attempt to elect politics he loss but with a new campaign campaign finance chairman in Nineteen seventy-two he was elected to Congress becoming the first African American representative from the deep south since reconstruction he was reelected in one thousand nine hundred seventy four and again in one thousand nine hundred seventy six and nineteen eighty-one. He was elected mayor of Atlanta Georgia this past spring in Black America sat down with young exclusive interview during his stay in Austin participant in the summit on race in America. Mrs Young tells what was is New Orleans like back in the nineteen forties and fifties. We don't strangely enough it was segregated but but I I had to deal with Sarah Gatien and from four years old on because you know the Nazi party headquarters was fifty yards from where I was born. There was an Irish grocery store in Italian bar and I was right in the middle and then I had to go to Lina See Jones school which was a public school in another neighborhood that was called the bucket of blood because it was so much fighting and stuff going on there and I was I was younger longer than everybody and smaller than everybody so My Daddy told me said look you never going to be big enough to beat everybody so you need to learn to fight because if you know how to fight you don't have to fight nearly as much he he said but you're not GonNa win. Many fights comes he said but you probably outrun run a lot of people but you feel good running from problems. I was GONNA ask you. I read that your father hired a fighter vital to teach you and your brother well he was he was a dentist and we we live near the coliseum where the boxes is trained so when they had need dental work and no money he would fix the teeth free but then he'd make them them take us to the gym to teach us how to box notion. was you need to know he said so that even when you get in a fight you might get beat but you need to let them know that they've been in a fight and you will have to fight right that much.

Andrew Young Black America J. Young Civil Rights Andrew J Young Foundation Dr King Atlanta Montgomery Andrew New Orleans Georgia Dr Martin Luther King Junior UN Austin Texas Ambassador Social Entrepreneur Congressman Auberge Presidential Library Dillard University University Of Texas
"vivian" Discussed on The Happy Hour with Jamie Ivey

The Happy Hour with Jamie Ivey

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"vivian" Discussed on The Happy Hour with Jamie Ivey

"Third love now back to my conversations with Vivian. It makes me wonder and I would love Tigers have conversation about this as well, because I want to be dependent on him. Even when things are quote unquote. Good. Uh-huh. John. I mean, yeah, but we lose track of that. Yeah. In North America. Like you're saying, because it's not a it's I, I am not having to depend on him for certain physical needs. Right. Gosh. Maybe even emotional needs, healthy marriage. All my kids are still here and they like me most days. You know what I mean? How do we as Christian stay dependent on him when everything seems awesome? And I'd love to get your opinion on this. I think that's where the rubber meets the road for that apathetic Christian. I want to talk about that next. I think that's where like this is where we're going to see it's kind of like the line in the sand. Yeah. For real because I do think that we can kind of go into auto-pilot for sure. And you are. Right. Yeah. Seriously? Our flesh just likes to feel good. Because honestly, why not just binge on Netflix? Like, Brian just a bunch of Cheetos, or whatever it is. You know, your pick your, your food of choice. I think we I don't think we need to look for trials right? But I think, well, a couple of things I think that I try to be regularly in touch with in the times, because life, ebbs and flows longer. We were alive. We are exposed to tragedy and various forms. That's just inevitable in a fallen world. But I think that if we can stay in proximity to people who are in those places, and we can we can just come alongside not as a savior, mentality, not as the source and the answer. But just to be in contact with realizing this is reality. I mean, I'm living in.

Tigers Vivian Netflix North America John Brian
"vivian" Discussed on Cinemavino

Cinemavino

06:20 min | 1 year ago

"vivian" Discussed on Cinemavino

"Welcome back to some Avino toggle. About the wine that we're drinking. So for this thing because we're talking about different actors and having the same role we're going to drink two different Pinot noirs from two different areas. So the same grape different areas and we've got an Oregon Pinot Noir, eight z, and I picked that one because my wife, and I went there for her birthday year and a half ago. And it's actually the Rex hill winery slash eight z and they do really good. I mean kind of fifteen dollar wines by shifting twenty dollars. They're all really good. They have a great Rosa have a good bubbly. They're just they're good wandering a reserve. The this just regular piano. Pretty tasting. It's it's nice and bright. It doesn't have that kind of heavy because wars are kinda heading towards the earthier more. I don't know what's the word with more gravity to them. And this kind of retains that more bright fun food friendly peanut war that I like, and they're one of the only wineries has like a really good piney and also make a Belgian white ale. Travis just words. Yes. Maybe none of that's true. There are some great burried. If there was some awesome Bruce been organ when we went to Portland, they had seventy five breweries in the city. What we were told I think per capita number one. I mean, yes, they might not have as many other states, but just for in that per capita the amount of people. I believe there's still up there like the most breweries, and it's crazy and wineries. I mean, you go to the Willamette Valley the air where? Yeah. I mean, it's like I mean one block the next. I mean, it's like, you know aid is e and then there's another one like right next to you know, adults. I'm like this one after another to is a lot of them. They do the Pinos and also do a lot of Pino grease. We're kind of on the lighter side of the grapes. But they still make some great Oregon Washington. They're doing they're doing more obscure, let Grenville leaner and muehler. Turbo. They're doing more bubbly to which makes us because they do a lot of Chardonnay and pian war and penal regional like, I mean, it makes sense that they're doing more bubbly because that fits their style. Some they've got some good stuff. I know it sure is red, and it's my cheeks warm and early in level to some way don't talk like you're talking about the guys break. And I am no longer wearing shirt also Taylor, and I might have the same size nipples. That was debatable. We have not we're going to measure after this Travis nipples roughly Susan b Anthony dollar size. They stay tuned. But like Cleveland's it's like rats to Guam quarters. Yeah. Home. It's like a sad puppy dog knows. Anyway, anyway, so, you know, we're talking about a few roles that were, you know, played by people, and it's like how roles recast kinda midstream, it's like the aunt Vivian fresh. Prince you had to two different vibes. Say you mean? Darren Stevens against your two different actors playing the same part back to the future. You had two different George wick lies and two different Jennifer's in mystery science theater three thousand those supposed to be the same character. The two different hosts different people really JOL was supposed to be you know, he was the first initial host. And then they brought in dorks, I know this. But they brought in Mike he was supposed to be like the temp for four the mad scientist. And so when Joel escaped in the show, they thought well, let's use the tip guy over here. They were two different individuals go so. But then you got might for example, godfather, you had non veto play two different actors playing the same role. Oh, yeah. Well. Decades apart. Yeah, he played the younger cheese. I cannot think of his name, Robert. Thank you. Travis grid under power lines listeners. This one is very good assured off. Oh, yeah. He's to doing this naked from the waist of. And that's I think how we're gonna have to do this from now on my pants came off to. And then you giggle that time. So I pulled back. Shimmied them off my hips. Like KIRO do you ain't Putin union scooting? Well, also, why had put my pants back on that'd been both Putin in skewed. And if you don't say cures name twice and quick succession Chakib kiva anyway chainmail message. Yeah. What happened to chain mail messages, by the way, get them? And I still respond forward. Those every time. Yeah. We'll try. You don't have any right? FBI won't let me know. Travis can be reached at Travis be GO cities dot com. Do. So have my space to you. And I'm playing a lot of John Maher of my page song. I think it was wonder your body's wondering top song counting Counting Crows hanging around. No. Vanessa Carlton thousand miles. Eight seconds. Right. Yeah. I got Melissa branch. Melbourne inch long. No blank blank be. She was nice girl Gary spice. So what was the? Okay. So it was the show show. Bring you ever see Michelle branch mill being same place. I don't think Carlton. That's. Lenient? So those got me confused, though, mess on Michelle branch injured them both. What was Michelle branches big on? I thought it was I'm batch. Nope. Nope. Not that. No, thanks don't being. Don't be. On animal, man.

Travis Vanessa Carlton Putin Michelle Michelle branch Rex hill winery Rosa Oregon FBI Cleveland Portland Willamette Valley Grenville Vivian fresh Darren Stevens Turbo Bruce Melissa branch George wick
"vivian" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:03 min | 1 year ago

"vivian" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Vivian. Okay. Meaning. Milan. Given. Navy? Damn. Me too. No. Nope..

navy
"vivian" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"vivian" Discussed on KGO 810

"Clinic radio i'm vivian williams the next generation of jujio eight sand now back to that frankly mind cagey up a ten and the thing about any of this is this when they first came out for the if owe that you're like over forty you might remember this before they had all the super little joysticks and stuff it was like pong did you ever play ponnary old enough to that as i those it when i was uh how old i guess maybe in my twenty one twenty two twenty three twenty four somewhere in there we went out there was 4 of us live in a house guys and a house right and by the way if you're man and you've never lived in a group house you were you do you missed out on a experience that you probably were lucky to miss out on but still a character shaping experience uh of putting in some of your roommate's dishes into his bad you know or or if he didn't flush the toilet there were still a floater taken that and putting in a bowl and put in his room we would do us forza stuff that was a so anyway so we all this in this house and we have we've played this game atari baseball game and in this atari baseball game is essentially like this you would hit a button a little ball would come and then when he got that you'd hear with your bat you hit another button and it would go in there was no real you take will what's a skill that will here's a skill that one of the guys who was an it guy in our house we play a hundred and sixty two games and if you're familiar with baseball if you can if you win the division by ten games you crushed the means you know what i mean they don't that means now go ahead topic attending mly okay second football it same thing let there like if you were a four and.

vivian williams baseball football
"vivian" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER - Full Episode

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER - Full Episode

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"vivian" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER - Full Episode

"And how great this fantastic oldline company is doing this to vivian welcome back to my money communities holy cow you brought me some bar semi gale tortilla abs i hope it tastes as well as it looks loan of let's find out i immediately want to know on our viewers will wanna know okay so what can you do for cased what is it what is your part in the process so what is really important is that if you look at the new taste the new what people really want what new or what young people warned and hold tastes changing in this country it's really important that you have to clean label and that's something which we accomplish year was mango label clean later what does that mean that means basically that you have very few artificial ingredients it's all natural is that because the younger people they look at this stuff now right they look at people yeah absolutely look you will never looked right we just over grant tasted good true so that is clean labelled product and we believe it will excellent fit into the that we make gulf restaurants like boris on we go well let me ask you this as a terrific to it the old days i would presume if you bought it in a store it wouldn't advocate because too many people would not want it has it chip to the point where if it doesn't have a younger people yeah exactly and that's the reason why you wouldn't have to sick meant you consumers and that's what we do we do every single year round about five hundred cells and consumer interviews to find out what is specific what is going on what is the latest trend and then we design oil product now i swear he's got this huge plant.

vivian