16 Burst results for "village global aid network"

"village global aid network" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

04:42 min | 7 months ago

"village global aid network" Discussed on Venture Stories

"Hey everybody it's Eric. Torbert co-founder, partner village, global aid network driven venture firm, and this is metro stories a podcast covering topics related to tech business with world leading experts. Everybody welcome to another episode of village globals. Venture stories were excited here today to have two very special guests, Alexa, von, bull, longtime friend of the firm and Mark Batson both inspired capital guys..

"village global aid network" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

01:44 min | 9 months ago

"village global aid network" Discussed on Venture Stories

"Hey everybody. It's Torbert co-founder Partner village, global aid network driven venture firm, and this is metro stories. A podcast covering topics related to tech business with world leading experts. Everybody. Welcome to another episode of village globals venture stories. I'm here today joined by very special guest longtime friend of the firm frequent going faster Steve, Jiang of kindred Steve Welcome to the PODCAST IR next. Steve, you're longtime entrepreneur and investor. When you look back at the arc of your career, what do you think is the thread that ties your various different experiences together because you've been in different sectors, different experiences, how do you sort of make sense of what's the threat you've kept kept pulling her what has drawn your your interest good question I. Always, you know even from the very beginning Nah. During school and then in every stage of asset. The thing that's always been the most finest the creativity. A bunch show for me. The idea of figuring out a problem to solve. That was very personal. Painful. Or just a key key insight. Into something in inside of society on the Konami and that being. Really creative about it in the way that oftentimes we look at it as creativity in business, but I really think it is I think creative entrepreneurs find really interesting. Sometimes, you know left fueled oblique solutions things in. The kernel.

"village global aid network" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

01:51 min | 11 months ago

"village global aid network" Discussed on Venture Stories

"Hey everybody it's Eric. Torbert co-founder Partner village global aid network driven venture firm and this is Metro Stories. A podcast covering topics related to tech business with world leading experts. Everybody we're now accepting applications for network catalyst accelerator program founders in. Our Program have gone on to raise money from LUX sparked a sixteen Z. Slow First Round Susa homebrew Maveron obvious and affects signifier and many more learn more at apply at village global dot V. C. Slash network catalyst. We're super super lucky today to have to have Mike Maples Founder of a floodgate might. Oggi's Oji for so long and he's been so successful and he's one of the things. I really appreciate my disease. All about giving back. He is a you know. We've all learned so much from have about about the weeds of of venture from for how to be a good investor to the INS and outs of building affirmative portfolio construction but also company building his his great podcast called Star greatness highly. Recommend you. Listen to it. He had this medium post that. We're going to get into called how to build a breakthrough. Mike sort of classified the different stages of company building. We did one episode on on Value Hacking. And this one is going to be about Inside Hack which is so appropriate to the to the community and Before we get to just want to say Mike thank you for taking the time to to give back in. Spend time with with Ondeck today yell. Hey thanks for having me. I have heard great things about this community. So it's a it's funded a chance to.

"village global aid network" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"village global aid network" Discussed on Venture Stories

"Hey everybody it's Eric. Torbert co-founder Partner village global aid network driven venture firm and this is Metro Stories. A podcast covering topics related to tech business with world leading experts. Everybody we're now accepting applications for network catalyst accelerator program founders in. Our Program have gone on to raise money from LUX sparked a sixteen Z. Slow First Round Susa homebrew Maveron obvious and affects signifier and many more learn more at apply at village global dot V. C. Slash network catalyst. Everybody welcome back to another episode adventure stories by Global. I'm joined today by my repeat. Ghost Yasmine resolve general partner at spark capital and our special guests Brad. Nasa'S DIRECTOR OF PRODUCT. That data dog Brad Jasmine. Welcome to the Buck S. ANC. You exert would afford to so we're here to talk about products. Lead go to market. Brad gives an overview of your clear leading up to date at. Oh yes sure so You know the Engineer University of Toronto and Actually Funny Enough. Yasmine was my classmate in back then. We ran this nonprofit called inspired together which hosted Big Tech Conference. And so it's pretty cool to be on a podcast with you ten years later. It's hard to get. You should add you. Should you should give a quick overview of your background leading up to data dog. Sure so I started my career in product management at yelp around the time of the IPO. I was focused on yelps core user experience and then a few years into it you know. Yelp acquired a company to do reservations in restaurants an IPAD APP and so that was my first B. to B. Sas experience leading that at yell and in two thousand seventeen ended up moving from the bay area to New York City in join data dog in product.

"village global aid network" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"village global aid network" Discussed on Venture Stories

"Hey everybody it's Eric. Torbert co-founder Partner village global aid network driven venture firm and this is metro stories. Podcast covering topics related to tech business with world leading experts everybody. We're now accepting applications for network catalyst accelerator program founders in. Our Program have gone on to raise money from LUX sparked a sixteen Z. Slow First Round Susa homebrew Maveron obvious and affects signifier and many more learn more and apply at village global dot V. C. Slash network catalyst. Hey everybody welcome to another episode adventure. Stories by village global here today joined by very special guests. Connor White Sullivan. Ceo and Co founder of Rome Research Connor. Welcome to the PODCAST. Thanks for having me by way of introduction I've been really excited to have you on the podcast for for a while. What user Deuce Rome and what is the insight? Bet that led you to start it would it? Would he really trying to do achieve with so Romans a tool for building personality knowledge graphs So you can think of it like A. It's like an out liner or you know like Google docs except it's built on a graph database. So you don't need to think about. Oh what file or folder does my idea go into especially if the like many ideas do relates to many different topics It's really easy for you. To to draw connections between different ideas to group.

"village global aid network" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"village global aid network" Discussed on Venture Stories

"Hey everybody it's Eric. Torbert co-founder Partner village global aid network driven venture firm and this is Metro Stories. A podcast covering topics related to tech business with world leading experts. Everybody welcome to another episode of Vendor Stories by village global in here today with three very special guests. Andy provos Bo Woods and Nina Lake at welcome to.

"village global aid network" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"village global aid network" Discussed on Venture Stories

"Hey everybody it's Eric Torbert co-founder Partner village global aid network driven venture firm. And this is your stories a podcast ask covering topics relating to tech business with world leading experts. Everybody welcome to another episode of venture stories by Belichick global here. Today with few very special guests Jillian Outer Zioka playing and then Justina you know Libya more investors at your beat guys. Welcome to the PODCAST. Thanks for having US giving us a brief background as to what is complaining. And how how did you come to start. Yeah absolutely so. Complaint is online video editor so we help people create multimedia content In the browser and the end the problem will be started with was that existing editors for video. Ashley on are still the same suffer prevents people used two decades ago there. These powerful heavyweights desktop editors. Install onto your computer. The take a long time to learn how to use I anti once. You've learned how to use them as they're slow in silo just your computer dope Faces so we specifically under night. We both tried to do Video editing tasks were independently at the same time. I was trying to attend a series of photos to video science. He was trying to add. Text Imitations essentially to like travel. Video Cubes aid family trip. And just really simple things with still oh super challenging even should have been easy so we started out basically building at a tool that we ourselves could use and that has blossomed into a full Helps creators of all sorts of different expertise levels get things done quickly with each other.

"village global aid network" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

05:31 min | 2 years ago

"village global aid network" Discussed on Venture Stories

"Hey, everybody. It's Eric torbert co-founder partner village, global aid network driven venture firm, and this is metre stories a podcast covering topics related tech business with world leading experts. Everybody. Welcome to the venture stories by village will podcast. I'm here today with two very special guests Steve slack men and David Markovits guys. Welcome to the podcast. Thank you for atmos-. Yes. The pleasure awesome. So we're here today to talk about a bunch of things their mental health depression, addiction and how that relates to a startup opportunities. And where there can be businesses built in the space that tackle some of those civilised challenges I like to start with brief introductions, maybe thirty seconds each on where you guys fit in ecosystems start first about how us how you relate to that here. So thirty second overview here here it is. So I'm a partner at primary venture partners in your of been VC for almost a decade here in the city. I had spent a fair amount of time looking into addiction and mental health broadly, both consumer and more be to be applications. I also think it's important. In note that I I am so Bor and certified in mental health first aid. So this is definitely an area of interest in spend a lot of time thinking about it both from the user perspective. And also from the investment perspective. Also, we'll get into that. How about you? Yeah. So I spent the better part of my life in the classroom in ten years in medical school residency fellowship. And finally on the other side of that. I'm in addiction psychiatrist now on faculty down at Vanderbilt in Nashville, Tennessee, and in addition to an interest in addiction psychiatry. I also have an interest in integrated or collaborative care working with primary care and other medical specialties to try to improve access integration and values to patients e so my role at Vanderbilt help build more integrated pathways of care for patients with addiction with presenting in medical settings. A few other interests in the mix. But I'll I'll leave it there for to keep it at thirty seconds. Also, Seve emission perspective as a as user at an investor. Let's start with as an investor. However, you thought about the spaces investor where their opportunities to build startups in the space were sort of the sub of the different approaches, and who is who has done really well date. Yeah. Well, I think mental health is is a pretty broad category. And even within the beat ABI side, certainly on the vita side. There's a lot of fragmentation and in companies trying to tackle bits and pieces of it. I think one company that comes to mind is her my calm, and they need focus more on the meditation space, but they more or less consider themselves as a mental health company. And and really really like what they've done to bring meditations and the masses as it relates to sort of more mental health the thing that. Struggled with particularly as it relates to just in base approach is that I think that one of the the court challenges is just around retention, and that I think what you tend to get this like really big spike at first, and then people tend to tail off, and so a lot of the sort of single point digital solutions. I'm pretty skeptical about for me where I think the real transformations. Taking place is is really at the point of care and not just at like, the liberating like single point at care, for example. I was an investor at our array where I was a principal and on the board of a company called groups that sort of reimagining opiate Addiction Care and the hardest hit areas and in the countries. Only midwest northern New England among other areas in there, you know, they were dramatically delivering a lower price point to people that affectively. Couldn't afford going away for thirty sixty or ninety days to get cleaned from from opiate addiction. And so I I really liked that model because they were increasing access, and I think we're there's large our opportunity is really around the whole continuum of care so like bringing people in at the top of the funnel, and then like treating them, and then sort of all the monitoring and stuff that happens on the back end. And so those are obviously a lot more capital intensive, but I tend to believe that those are where you'll have the most impact in terms of driving outcomes. If you could incubator company in the space is that what you do. Or what would you do if you were throwing communities tie were trying to to get bait? A company in the space. I think I would really focus on on the full on the full own continue of care. So it would just be like I'm going to help people. Get sober. Right. If we're using addiction as as one example, it would be okay. It's everything from how do we manage intake? How do we route

partner Vanderbilt Eric torbert Steve slack atmos co-founder Nashville New England Tennessee David Markovits ABI principal thirty seconds thirty second ninety days ten years
"village global aid network" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

08:33 min | 2 years ago

"village global aid network" Discussed on Venture Stories

"Hey, everybody. It's Eric torbert co-founder partner village, global aid network driven venture firm, and this is metro stories a podcast covering topics related tech business with world leading experts. Hey, everybody. Welcome to another episode adventure stories global. I'm here today with special guest Tyler Cowen Tyler welcome to the podcast. Welcome eric. Thank you Tyler. We're here to discuss stubborn attachments. Among other things, I I wanted to briefly summarize what I see to be the take home point of the book and see how you'd respond to that. So you make the case for why there should be a moral imperative for us to pursue sustainable economic growth with the caveat that is justed for environmental sustainability leisure time. And a you know that we also treat human rights as a stubborn attachment as well and you make an analogy between sample economic growth as Sony plant it which sort of an analogy for compounding growth is her gift that keeps on giving. And you make this case because you say wealthier societies have overtime better living standards, better health, greater autonomy. Fulfillment. Happiness, and you just compare Cuba for Singapore to see an example, one of the ways in which you're able to describe this as moral imperative is because we you say that we should value human lives in the future. Just as much as we do now. And in the future economic growth makes everybody better off. How would you add or edit to this being the take home? Point stubborn attachments. You can read the book as a response to the effective altruism movement saying it should be more focused on economic growth. You can read it as a response to moral. Philosophers who tends to talk more about inequality or social Justice or even libertarian rights. You can view it as simply an attempt to convince ourselves that what we believe really can be justified in some foundation lists since those are other ways, you can read the book. And so let's take a couple of those major either of altruism rights, what fundamental assumptions do they have that are different from yours? The effective altruism movement very often focuses on redistribution so happen. We take money from one group of people and give it to another to make the recipients better off. And there's a good deal value in that. But most of the ways we have of make. Making people better off our from win win situations and from economic growth and from having better institutions. So I'm suggesting effective altruism reorient itself toward these ideas of institutions and economic growth, and you say that redistribution is is a one off affect where economic growth certain compounds. And that people don't fully appreciate, you know, how powerful compounding Rothe is what type of redistribution does sort of lead to compounding growth, and what sort of economic growth does not compound or is not sustainable rather. Well, I think a lot of redistribution very much support economic growth. Simplest example, would be to give a child with malnutrition of food to eat that child will grow up healthier and probably better educated, and we'll have a higher I q later in life and will be much more productive. So that's a simple example, if had redistribution and economic growth can work together. But I'm making the radical suggestion that we should. Only entertain those redistributions which boost economic growth, and that's very much outside this fear of usual discourse. Another are also forms of economic growth, which are not sustainable. One example would be if you simply had growth and paid no heed to the environment whatsoever. Did nothing to improve air pollution problems of carbon emissions out of some extent were on that track right now when we ought to get off it what's your framework for assessing whether redistribution leads to long-term economic growth. Well, there's a significant social science literature on that. So there are plenty of studies where if you redistribute in the correct way to very poor individuals in their early years of life. You can make the much more productive. So that knowledge, I would view as broadly confirmed, but most of the redistribution we do in modern American today a lot of it is stored the wealthy or it simply toward the elderly because they are elderly. I'm not saying those redistributions have no useful purposes. But they. Ought to face a much higher bar before. We're ready to approve of them at such a high level as what we do as he this March. This book is also responding to the Peter singer question of how could you enjoy ice cream when someone in Africa in other countries, starving, confident starving, and sort of see you making an intellectual chess moves, which sort of changes the dimension of the game, which is including future. People are people feature just as much as we, you know, value ourselves, and is the response there that the more you should join the ice cream because you're participating economic growth, which does helps huge your poor people in Africa, or how do you how does that respond to Peter singer? I'm saying that even within a framework of affective altruism or Peterson singers framework it's fine to be selfish as long as you're selfish activities are in core had with you being productive with now out there in Silicon Valley that is usually the case there are countries where selfishness often takes the form of rent seeking behavior grabbing resources from others. But if what it means for you to be selfish is to. For a card to produce a lot. And then at the end of the day enjoy your ice cream. I'm saying more power to it. That's a more effective way of helping other people than say Peter singer's redistribution and how they argue if he was on the line right now. How would you argue against it? Like, what is the fundamental crux disagreement? You do have well, I had an hour-long blogging head style with Peter singer. I suppose erase could watch that. But I don't think he had a good response. And it was partly my interaction with singer that convinced me to accelerate my work. On stubborn attachments. Right. You also mentioned that thinking about economic growth is relates to plant for for people in the future. Also allows us to get over aggregation distribution disputes about you know, who's preferences. Do we value because Santa economic growth improves everyone in the long run? But what do you say to people who suffer in the short run or the short-term losers in economic growth in and what do we say to them? Well, most economic growth there will be short term losers. So if you have automation, or if you have freer trade. Need a some workers will see their wages or undercut either by the machine or by foreign laborers in in terms of what I say to them. I'm not sure I can convince them to support the change. But I think the important question is this when are there ever cases where some people gain and others lose where we can ever make the comparison that it is objectively best to pursue the greater some of gains. And I argue in the book that went in those gains are sustained over long. Periods of time and many many millions of people will be better off for decades or centuries. That is the one case where we can say, well, the gains really do outweigh the losses. That would be the way I would frame the answer to your question. How do you rebut the Qian's oldest person that in the long run? We are all dead with what's your counter that well gains is dead right now. But you are not so people who are distant temporarily in the future when they're pleasures in suffering arrive, those pleasures in suffering will be no less real. So I'm suggesting we adopt a kind of temporal neutrality. Keynes's basis. It would never have gotten very far. You're shining example in the book is that is East Asian miracles. What can we learn from a policy perspective per mackinaw, Mik perspective from a cultural perspective from from these Asia miracles in. How can we apply it here? Well, I think the most important thing we can learn from some of the East Asian countries is simply that it's possible to have a government committed to maximising economic growth. You don't have to think that well what they did. We should copy exactly that's likely not the case. But some people say, oh, this is fruitless governments. Never do the right thing you now, you're just putting shouting in the wind. But if several cases Japan, South Korea, arguably, China, Singapore, Taiwan governments really have followed this path pretty exactly and made it work. Now, I would say there are also some particular lessons from those cases human capital is very very important. I think and having clusters of productive activity work. Working together. Again, as we see also in Silicon Valley, that's very important. So we can also take away some particular lessons. Researchers interview

Peter singer Tyler Cowen Silicon Valley Eric torbert Singapore Africa malnutrition Rothe co-founder Asia Sony Cuba partner Santa Japan Keynes Taiwan
"village global aid network" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

05:44 min | 2 years ago

"village global aid network" Discussed on Venture Stories

"Hey, everybody. It's Eric torbert, co-founder partner, village, global aid network driven venture firm, and this is metro stories. A podcast covering topics, AG tech business with world leading experts. Harry body, welcome to another episode adventure stories by village global. I'm here today joined by a nNcholas, Charles from notation capital and one half of a bison, Joe Louis guys. Thank you for joining the podcast. No driving us also. Unity. Passion has been a precede vermin in New York for for many years, and is has been very active in the crypto space, but you have a a new announcement. Can you? Can you describe the the announcement? Sure. Yeah, I, I'll I'll, I'll give a little bit of context for notation too. So notation is a, I check venture firm based in Brooklyn, New York. We started at my partner and I l IX about four years ago. We previously worked at beta works together for I was there for about four years partner. Alex was there for six. So we've been working together for almost a decade. We focus on super early stage startups for the most part here in New York that are somewhere between company formation at an early prototype or typically the first investor, those companies tend to be reasonably technical nature. So we're very active around things like internet infrastructure developer focused products and computer vision, and and then blockchain. Blockchain is a significant area of interest in the for us going back to twenty thirteen actually going back to when we were both beta works still we were, we wrap it works. We were investors in. I led a couple investments encrypt arises directly out tonight were actually building side projects actually hacking together projects in the blockchain space book on behalf beta works nights the weekends. And so it's been a real area of interest for us for a long time notation. I believe it was one of the first few venture firms couple years ago to start investing crypto acids directly out of our fund and in over the past few years, we've been active investors in crypto. Oh assets, but also companies building around blockchain. And and then really over the past year, we've been becoming more active. What really started out at as hobby more than anything else around blockchain mining and and, and just this past week, we kind of announced that we're going to begin scaling that effort into what will become more of a hobby. And we're doing that largely in partnership with Joe and bison trails, including I can. I can let Joe give you give you his background, but the short of it was that Joe, Joe in Aaron, we've known Joan era for a long time. I was actually fortunate to be an investor on behalf of beta sooner last company grant street and Joan. Aaron shared a lot of our same outlook on how blockchain would evolve, how blocked in mining would evolve. We were. Doing a lot of the same work in parallel over the past year. And so it felt like a very natural opportunity to partner with each other in role. A lot of our work into what is now vice in Trump's computer. Thanks. Supernotes Andrew. So yeah, as MC mention Jolie's. I'm one of the founders bison trail trails, competing along with Aaron central in. We're. Angel, investors know spinners New York. We've been building, you know, venture backed companies, venture scale companies for. The greater part of the last decade and we've been working together are these projects is actually be our our forth projects as co-founders. So we've been working together for really long time in ten of similar to to make an Alex is experiencing exposure into blockchain, Aaron, I actually ticket what I consider a hobby approach to blockchain as well. You know, I think most of it was driven originally by the this sort of technical talent is of rotate networks, and you know, really early on bitcoin, and we've been, you know, investors. I, I kinda like to joke that we've been investors for a little while, but honestly, he was really just moon shots really early on or is interested in the space and interested in the technology. We weren't necessarily thinking that you know these investments that were going to be that fruitful, but we wanted to stay really close to sort of the the source of what was going on. And so we'd be just painted that space for a while. And we, we founded by spills consuming. Similarly, out of Audie interests in mining. We had been sort of nights in weekending you different projects in the blocks in cook this face and actually got really interested in.

Blockchain partner New York Aaron Joe Louis Alex Joan era Eric torbert Harry body Charles Brooklyn co-founder Trump Supernotes Andrew developer Jolie four years
"village global aid network" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

04:25 min | 2 years ago

"village global aid network" Discussed on Venture Stories

"Hey, everybody. It's Eric torbert, co-founder partner, village, global aid network driven venture firm, and this is metro stories. A podcast covering topics, AG tech business with world leading experts. Everybody welcome to venture stories by village global podcast. We're here today to talk about privacy crypto currency, as well as your knowledge proofs and other primesee prison, preserving techniques. Okay. We're joined by a couple of very special guests Elena linski in Howard. Woo guys can please introduce yourselves and why you're so excited about privacy start. I've been kinda involved in the crypto space for a while now and I can assemble upon zero knowledge proofs as a way to do by competing. And I realized that this tech is very new but also very powerful and can open a lot of doors, two different problems. Nasscom my motivation for really diving in learning about the tech. I'm Howard. I'm a co, founder, managing partner at decrypt capital. My my background has been primarily starting in the for early through bitcoin mining. And when the Oakland started popping up, I got very much interested in researching technology on understanding what are the trust models assumptions that people are making to build secure networks. I found privacy to be very fundamental and unique property. Of these networks that are underutilized under represented and my my background has been primarily in research in the court order free space, especially on things around soon which proves and around verifiable computations and its applications towards things like lock chains. Time he spent his is around investing used a bit more despite your investing. Sure. Yeah. So I, I help run a fun called the capital and our our main thesis is that we really like to see his technology reach mainstream an option along partners. We've been here for many years in the take that we have is through looking at it from pain points. I'm so things scale, ability, you privacy inform ability. I'm usability and we find that these are areas where if we can even get ourselves to run in percent there, it becomes something that's very practical for people like my mom and dad to use technology. We'd like to really dive into those on a mental underlying problems and dress it through. They won protocols. Privacy a little bit. He has a lot of people sort of a -ssume that bitcoin is anonymous. You know, they think about like things like that. So growed or hear all these quote unquote criminal. He's using bitcoin. So what? What? Why is privacy useful? Why's it important? And why is it not solve with like big way? Yeah, sure. So they clean early on as it was released in lightsaber claim that this was supposed to be anonymous cryptocurrency. I think in practice, what we've seen is that it really isn't. There's a lot of techniques that people used such as taint analysis, transaction graph, canals, to basically demonize. It turns out that while the address is themselves can initially e- quote unquote anonymous. They practice calories of using these addresses to transact coins with each other, reveals a lot about only Europe spend behaviors, but who the other parties are that you typically transact with and it links you to other folks activities as well. What I find most fascinating about the various is the is not the fact that you know it can be used for various reasons, but the fact. That this is in an of itself, a very simple and basic fundamental, right? I think that privacy is one of those cases where people often don't appreciate it until they don't have it in independent, quite a picture on it very common case of like a bathroom with your bathroom stalls for people to use it. Certainly, some people use those for nefarious reasons, but the overall majority of people would like privacy when they're in the restroom. And I like that it's very much the same case here that there are very clearly linkages between one's account balances in their identity. They're very, very clearly abilities to kind of determine things like merging cash flow current and past. Ultimately, what this is really about is basically providing a layer of comfort for people for businesses and organizations where when they use at his technology, they don't want their count balances and all the coins or how much money to have all the assets that they own leaked to the to their parties that other transacting with. I couldn't agree more. I'm, I think a lot of people have this misconception that privacy. The blockchain does lead to legal activity kinda take it back and you have analyze how we interact with our payments systems today..

Howard managing partner Eric torbert Oakland Elena linski co-founder partner Europe founder
"village global aid network" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"village global aid network" Discussed on Venture Stories

"Hey, everybody. It's Eric torbert, co-founder partner, village, global aid network driven to firm, and this is metre stories. A podcast covering topics, AG tech business with world leading experts. Hey, everybody welcome to another episode adventure stories by village global of here today to special guests Arianna Simpson of Thomas partners and Travis claim rounder Iki guy Zachary Schrafft's. Yeah, thanks for having me cruciate what's up Arianna. Hi there as well. Awesome around your this. Great post cold balls, precision on token daily. Talk about what some of the main tenants of that post in what you were trying to cheat in it. Yeah. So you know, I big fan of of math and everybody likes to feel like you've done their homework in really dug into the details and come out with a clean solution on put the. The argument of the post was really that we have to try to carefully in that respect because I think there still so many unknowns in terms of how crypto networks are going to function. You know, how velocity is gonna play into the equation is lost even like a key metric that we need to be looking at or is it other things that are really going to. More influential on the price of a token. You know, there's, there's really a ton of unknown. So while we have specific formulas that help us evaluate businesses. You know, on the equity side, I think we are still vow parts of Mitch equations, whether it's coming from, you know how we value currencies or how we businesses, how do those pieces mesh together. And I do think this is fundamentally new asset class, and so we just haven't figured out exactly the appropriate structures. So I was trying to encourage people to be a little bit cautious when out with with new equations or formulas evaluation methods because you run the risk of saying, oh, you know, I've got this great formula and it sounds really smart, and it's very precise, but it can be very precisely wrong. And so you know, my sense is that you have to. Yeah, sure. Do the mass look at valuations under a number of different scenarios, but also be a little bit open minded because you may just be off by an order of magnitude. And so it's more important to be directionally, correct than you know. Zeisler wrong. You've given a lot of thought to have value crevasses in different valuations remarks, and I'd like you to give a little history of how we've collectively as space thought about it. The last couple of years up till now we've ended a little bit at some of the approaches that maybe conceptualize it a little bit at and then also you've also thought about different valuation frameworks for store value vers political platform. Tokens was different other types of utility tokens. So because the more about that as well. Sure. China back that a little bit. Not not take too long. The real easy to go ninety minutes to answer that question, but you know. Simplistically we like to look at total addressable market. I total dreadful market makes a lot of sense, especially for stores value. Whether that's goal value in one in.

Zachary Schrafft Arianna Simpson Eric torbert Thomas partners Travis co-founder Mitch partner China ninety minutes
"village global aid network" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

03:10 min | 2 years ago

"village global aid network" Discussed on Venture Stories

"Hey, everybody. It's Eric torbert, co-founder partner, village, global aid network driven venture firm, and this is metro stories. A podcast covering topics, AG tech business with world leading experts. Hey, everybody welcome to another episode adventure stories by Bill global. We're here today to discuss identity and reputation at, and I'm here with very exciting guests dental LIZA issues. Hut. I'm Dan Lin software engineer working on a reputation based project called sore spreads, which is spoken on on creating reputation identity for open source developers, and I use, they them pronounce, and I'm very glad to rather me. Awesome. In the history of of grade, what would inspired you to start it? And we'd problems out salt. So I've actually been thinking about identity reputation for a long time about two two and a half years ago. I was reflecting on how having a legible reputation system really just helped people collaborate, help people know that they can trust each other help move people into like like building long-term relationship stories. We and time I really wanted to build a pay drank based reputation system where you could kind of like sea Basant, who you trust, who are the people you trust in turn transit of Louis and the trouble was I started thinking about how to build this, and I was thinking maybe it'll be like yelp or Facebook and wound up being super dystopia. Next kind of like a black mirror episode when I've ever played it on. I put that on the shelf for a couple of years, much unrelated stop in. And then a couple of months ago I was thinking about how now that we have scriptural tokens. There's this possibilities reward, open source developers were maybe instead of laboring kind of in the shadows without without getting any any monetary reward. Open source. Developers could start to earn. Currencies related to the projects they're directly working. And when you start to think about this, you kind of need some sort of reputation system to figure out even that you were going to say, give crypto tokens and say, if you're, how would you decide which developers actually deserve the credit for having made really important contributions for your AM? And that's why I think you need a reputation system that allows you to have the community come together and decide who do we think is reputable who has enjoyed a lot of value in certain parts of the project. And the goal of source essentially is build out a reputation system like that. So that for given open source project, begin answer the question who deserves credit for. And what is the little bit deeper her audience you may not be as what do you think are the major problems of like behind identity? Reputation that we kind of have to that reputation like it's it's really not very legible system. You've also read seeing states. I think a lot about like have whether things are externally right now, everyone has touched people that they trust, but it's very hard to figure out where the people who your friends trust that we're the people who may be like everyone in your community trusts. And if you're in a very small.

Eric torbert Dan Lin sea Basant co-founder software engineer partner yelp Facebook Louis
"village global aid network" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

04:25 min | 2 years ago

"village global aid network" Discussed on Venture Stories

"Hey, everybody. It's Eric, turmeric, co-founder partner, village, global aid network driven venture firm, and this is your stories. A podcast covering topics g. tech business with world leading experts. Hey, everybody welcome to another episode of venture stories by village global. I'm extremely excited today to welcome. Very special guest village CEO portfolio CEO Alan. Curtis CEO founder of radar relay. I'll welcomes the studio. Thanks, Eric, excited to be here. Awesome. So we have a lot to get into today on born of the world to the token economy, primer, decentralized exchange. While we start off with on you briefly introduce what is radar relay and on a high level, what's the, what's the problem you're trying to solve? Sure. Yeah. We certainly do have a lot to cover. So the vision south, the y. by more doing than move into the what talked about our first product. We are relay talk a little bit the how in what's coming next. So the so the what? Sorry, the why behind it all it's this is a big topic. It's a lot to impact. So when when we think about blockchain technology, when we think about digital currencies, the power, the emotion, the ethos behind it centered around agency sent around self f. It's it's it's about empowerment. It's it's about opportunity, right talent. Talent is is evenly distributed, but opportunity is not in first principles that's where we started. But of course, that's a product, of course. That's not. That's not a what ensues is we thought about, how do you play that he throws to technology. We landed on this statement on boarding, the world to the token economy. Let's unpack that, would it would is that even meat. So we think about on boarding. That's pretty simple. That just means creating a soft landing. That means helping people identify simulate understand the technology. Then we're talking about the world that's out everybody. That's you. That's me. That's that's listeners audience out there. That's our maybe our laggard family members that people who don't want to use the tech. They don't know how to use the tickets. Everybody is the token economy, and this is the part that think is often the most confusing for some of our users. When I meet somebody for the first time, this is the part they get stuck on on boarding. They get the world, but the token economies is tough. And so I want to try to visualize this with me. From so magin two systems in intersect in the first system is the token system. There's four different types of tokens broadly. There's utility security collectibles in currencies, and if you listeners maybe aren't to speed on on this wild and crazy, crypto space will talk a little bit about what those are, but just sake of Sekove explanations hold those in your mind. And then the second system is the exchange system. This is how value flows the pipes. There's only two kinds of these. Either mediated like many of the centralized exchanges. You may have heard of coin base yet coined, basically example or a peer to peer like we've built with our first product, and so we see our our y, our vision is connecting those two systems with pipes with infrastructure with roads. The scaffolding we've already started with our first product NATs radar relay, which is what you've asked about Eric, and that's the the what, at least the the first product we've Bill. So you can think of of radar relay as a bulletin board. And if you've used Craigslist before any bought and sold the couch, you've gone out. And you've met somebody in some strange WalMart parking lot and picked up a couch ended. That transaction of course, facilitated by Craig's. That's like, I'll relay minus the minus the couch, add some tokens at some prettier color. Some charts, some graphene interfaces were the same type of platform you buy and sell tokens. But instead of meeting in a WalMart parking lot, you meet directly on the Therion blockchain while it's well or in this peer to peer. That's what we heard calling. In fact, WalMart parking lot or our content for audio engineer. Okay. So before we get into the how she thinks to unpack so one describe for listeners the difference between a centralized exchange and decentralize exchange, sort of the pros and cons of each. Yeah, absolutely. So you know back backtracking just just a moment to maybe the history of exchange technology. If you've been in this space long enough in crypto, you've seen the earliest implementations of exchanges like Malka cts is a great example. And these were so important these these software companies, these founder. Were were incredibly innovative in building these these platforms for people that trae..

Eric CEO WalMart founder Curtis Malka cts Craigslist Alan co-founder partner engineer Craig Therion
"village global aid network" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

04:30 min | 2 years ago

"village global aid network" Discussed on Venture Stories

"Hey, everybody, it's toward co-founder, partner, village, global aid network driven venture firm, and this is metre stories. A podcast covering topics, tech business with world leading experts. Everybody welcome to venture stories by village global podcast. I'm here today with Tony Shane of central aunt, an honest Majdan of rare bits, and we're here to talk about an f. tease with guys. How're you doing extra having us? Yeah, great. Great to be here. Totally. Why don't we start by I describing your projects. I'm what is rare bits where is a market place for an teaser, non fungible tokens, the f. t. r. d. type of asset class. So you know, we thought that when you have some an asset has unique properties, especially when it comes to buying and selling experience that users are gonna want a kind of a native way or exchanging asset since that's why we go rivets, Tony, what is central. So the central answer, open virtual world that's owned by its users. Users can buy tokens that represent land and the amongst other things that can build for. Virtual reality environments that and users can experience as they explore the world overtime. We are vision is that a booming economy will emerge virtual world people spend time in it. The reason why we're excited about using blockchain for a world is today's virtual spaces than future virtual worlds kinda look like a feudal society like monarchs own. Most of the digital real estate in the users are tied to them because they don't have too many other options for what they provide. So as virtual worlds seems kind of inevitable that would spend more time on in want things like dreamed about sci-fi. This seems like it'd be better for the user. So in all of it rather than a few, you know, even if they're benevolent dictators on your with that concept as you've you run of your air fund in the past. I'm curious your pass also includes Workington go for for many years. What about games in crypto world is is so different that inspired you to. To go out, build a company in space was the real innovation here. I think what's interesting is that we've, if you think about it, we've actually has, you know, kind of as online citizens have actually never owned anything online every you know, kindle book every IT movie every song you download or you buy on like on some services is basically though those are rights, they're granted you based on the database of some central company. Men. The same thing is true of games. You know any if you play world of warcraft or at any game online where you're collecting virtual items, the who owns what is is within the database of of the company that is providing the service to you and they decide to, you know, shut down the anchor, Dan, you. If inside that they don't want you exchange knows goods in some way or using them some way effectively, you have no recourse its powers, all of their hands. So so it's interesting from. From gaming respective. You know, when I saw, you know, we were Zinger. We were building social games where people would play for, you know, hundreds of hours and accumulated entire on a world full stuff, but the game, you know, for some reason, the game shut down or sold. Another company decides changed the way the game work, you know, users with lose their invest in terms of time and money. So it was festive blockchain side of things is that the are actually owned by the end user in a complete changes, the relationship that users have or or tial goods. And so from from my perspective, now, you know, you're not playing game accumulating kind of like values not just flowing from the user to end company. It's actually bidirectional user investor time in their money. Some on some online experienced, they're actually gaining real assets and that means that now you do things like, you know, if I'm. Playing a, you know, an RPG or something I can like earn a sore and then go and resell it or loan it out, or even token is it so that there's fractional ownership of it like this..

Tony Shane co-founder Workington Zinger partner kindle Dan
"village global aid network" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"village global aid network" Discussed on Venture Stories

"The everybody i'm eric tormed lured cofounder partner village global aid network driven bc for and this is an episode of venture stories were deep dive at all topics relating to tech and business with some of the world's leading experts this episode is about community and his with two of the world's best community builders david spinks see fx ryan hoover product yup we talk about how to build communities and how to build businesses or brown communities differences of building communities online and offline what not to do with building communities and how to run a company with a focus ryan had david as you can probably tell had both been friends at collaborators for years so it was a lot of fun reported this episode and i think you'll enjoy klis yours ready dave eight we are hanging out year indeed angel us office which is asking if in the upgraded from the old products on digs uh and wears out a lot of thanks day at a high level as specific lead around communities all things community the first question when asked these experts is kenny great community be replicated you think of something like products on honey things of that like ready thinks on eric attacker news could one go out and compete with a with one of those communities today at he goes about that all right odd spinks is motioning to me the fifth none take this will be a mrs ryan of those adena my voice um you know it's it's an interesting question because in my mind came into these are the best communities are very much organic in some ways and very authentic to the team in the people building them and in many ways i would say if you're strategies to directly replicate read it is probably not.

mrs ryan eric tormed partner david spinks dave