17 Burst results for "vergerski"

"vergerski" Discussed on Dans La T?te D'un Coureur

Dans La T?te D'un Coureur

13:34 min | Last week

"vergerski" Discussed on Dans La T?te D'un Coureur

"Beauty of new elaine. Kfi alinsky diba to actually winning capacity to accept. He usually a new kiss. Acquire a duet set down by push. Took your kids. So d'amico defossez acres tony curtis' circuit city council tabu party to fit the fitness debacle issue. Omen you delay. Fiduciary renew upon your party. Diniso xanthia pusher as antique do to need up suitable achy. Peak accuser senator. That on the whole college gets twenty. Sean gets twenty three equity a jose. It gets tony kahn. The demille vergerski for japanese version a peon party menu juicy one hundred cuba new po-policy that space. You're gosh united tomorrow. Night on the city a poor deputy to sasha to your credit waspish depess. Genie deputies lapoma each. Let's owner pk. Unit is a species. Get some immediate shopping adopters. Eureka disciplined you get forget it says this stellar instead messy editor depressive studio at of hunting they twenty komo veteran a surgery. Here i do here with the The pouvoir iran. We are in discussion yearly portions. You do to keep my trick. You need more. It pitchers in prec- to actually sati along into to his netherland. Novella hukou do those count as active preziosi on keep the house you and yuanjiang a messy. The top unusually komo salvator twisted jeff. Tuesday could survive accident. Daddy did do the decisions on campus. Butchers idea oscar as you can sosa and the hundred it. Didn't he blush. Definitely a positive all of these report. Ridiculous saddam buny counc- potosi leaving machine. It says he finicky loser. O'connor you cope. It was conservatism. Who's self control yuan Jacques but it could the oxidation scouts here idea as soon as shortage. Actually you e coordinate on cure what we compete. Commem- versus picked condition capacity exactly provocative positive shows that when that when the pse tiny accused feverishly twitch abia as you propose tissues. Had you to set keevil participate in guinea. Shaka do the second to who i and appoint their chat rui acidic sunni at what dot com evoke on her underneath one hundred d to tara poor luger museums. A demar eddie assassinated. Pau dunno it. Amelia do a deposit a poor organisers. Took it down we. It is beyond you demo chevy to push them all happy as the atp miss could expect charities empty to consume. Logan is as context of bosses. You do to. Tokyo component will show on. The media is as hard as you do. To vamp disunity lenny daniel rousse known to deliver more a gal that initial more preview goi- sample cum laude. Food law does by executive on on this horse. Oh lapoma Monkey kimiko specific dc. Hugh six of eight is usually share. The respond to lose.

"vergerski" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

04:58 min | 2 weeks ago

"vergerski" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"Finger to make a shark Dan and listen We're going down a very slippery slope here. Okay i wanna make it clear to listeners net. You do not go out and attempt to hug and snuggle with wild animals. I will say listen. I've gone swimming with alligators. And you can do things with allegations these the water where you can you know gently stoke the bottom of their their head and swim with them without without an issue. I would never say that though because for people are listening to her the saying. Oh wait a minute said you can hug and snuggle all look at this little cuban. Reagan absolutely should not absolutely not finger may close shot. I i tried looking up this website and it wouldn't come up here at work so i got off the wide. I checked it out on my phone. This is a smut site and the tranquilizer. Guns are certain. Make a lot more sense to me at is is this peer reviewed I teach at king's college london's or i don't appreciate that. Scientists are not enough attack in our society without that. Have i against the term. You would use an america Have i jerked off a polar bear. Yes i have. I have done that if you want to call that smuts i called it a study. Wow wow well again let me get back to the original point here. Make it clear as day. You don't go hug and snuggle wild animals. You got billy. I see your finger. What do you want to see her one. On this ron line nice though like off the record because you just said that you you can play with alligators. But you wouldn't say it so people don't get hurt to like. Just pretend it's us yet you deals. Can you actually snuggle. I know i wouldn't snuggle any wild animals. I just have good. I never should anyway. I want to make this clear again with never. Should anyone at mr mcgillis correct. But that having been that soundbite please saved please. This is you're talking out of both sides of your mouth because you're very clearly molesting these animals. I feel like we're kind of losing the plot. Your guys yeah. The komodo dragons teams like you a lot more than tickling the komodo dragon. I have there are there are levels of intimacy for study that we must explore because this is a study in the behavioral neurologist so have is sixty-nine a nile crocodile. Yes it was fine. I don't i. I i think had i think was the viewed. Okay okay wait a minute. Let me do what guys name. What's his name over. What his name is toba. Levi and dr tobon believe levi. I've studied with most vergerski From the university of jerusalem. Now at teacher king's college london. This is a peer reviewed. Study mr magoo will you will. You will find no issues with my credentials. You're looking something phone ron. That weir's this on the dark web. Peer reviewed by whom spell his last name. His name your what. Are you looking up here on his name his i got tova borgnine. But that's not the guy who's what what's his last name. His name is toba levi and he is king's college in london. And we've gone about ten minutes to you after research. The guy just told you sixty nine kryay. This is now. this is my son. S me to call in. I thought this was a fun thing in your questioning my credentials you review the king's college. Okay okay when you tell me when you tell me service with all due respect when you come on here and you say you have sixty nine the nile crossing you understand what that means. Okay that means that not only. Are you giving pleasure that the crocodile crocodiles giving pleasure to you. At least a cat is accurate description of what happened. This was really really a team in this in this in this country sir. That in most states is illegal. It's consider beast geology. So i i listen with all due respect to your peer reviews. I like to see your fears. I think these guys on lebatardshow having chain here i to- by levi's got urban street pornography. That's the only comes up on google. So i enjoy photography my spare time i do not have. I put my finger in the inevitable links. Yes i have your guy or thank you. I hope you all enjoyed that very much passing. I i mean. I hope everyone who listening to this cracking up and nobody wrecked their car. Because you know what. I'm trying to be respectful guys trying to talk about science lottery. Retiring.

ron line mr mcgillis king's college smuts levi london dr tobon university of jerusalem mr magoo Reagan tova borgnine swimming toba levi billy america weir ron google
"vergerski" Discussed on 99% Invisible

99% Invisible

08:00 min | 5 months ago

"vergerski" Discussed on 99% Invisible

"But the queen could be useful to her. Florence nightingale had returned from the kingdom of hell with a mission. She wanted to make sure the awful toll of disease in qatari never happened again in any british hospital anywhere in the world. So nightingale persuaded victoria to support a royal commission investigating the health of the army as a woman. Nightingale was unable to sit on the commission herself but she assembled her geek allies and worked behind the scenes to figure out the problem. She turned down queen. Victoria's offer of a suite at the palace. There would be far too many visitors instead. She took rooms at a low rent. London hotel so one had been the underlying cause of the death toll in this qatari hospitals to modernize the answer is obvious. Disease spreads thanks to poor hygiene poor ventilation and contaminated water and the hospitals and scutari suffered from all three. It was not so obvious. To nightingale gem theory didn't exist in the eighteen fifties below. The science was mysterious. Nightingale was one of a group of victorian thinkers. Were convinced that one way or another good sanitation should help with her ally. The great statistician william far. She assembled and examine the data. Far in ninety nine became convinced that wherever they looked premature death went hand in hand with open. Sewers bad ventilation and unclean conditions. It wasn't just about the crimean wall. It was an ongoing public health. Disaster in barracks civilian hospitals and beyond the pair began to campaign for better public health measures. And here the epic battle was joined. They faced powerful opposition. The government didn't want an embarrassing report. About the crimean. War already regarded as a fiasco. The queen of course was an instinctive conservative. Whose idea of reform was to replace worn over promoted bureaucrat. With another a neither the army nor the medical profession cab to take instructions from a woman not even the angel of scutari florence nightingale in any case. They believed she was surely wrong. A couple of years after the end. Of the crimean. War in eighteen fifty-eight the chief medical officer john. Simon acknowledged that contagious diseases. Such as cholera and dysentery. Were a cause of premature death in every civilized country. But they were practically speaking unavoidable. These diseases just happened. Said john simon and yes they killed. People deal with it and don't take any lessons from florence. Nightingale nightingale was outraged at the complacency. The deaths from disease in british army barracks were criminally high. It was just as bad. She said as it would be to take one thousand one hundred men out upon sold replaying and shoot them the same for civilian hospitals private homes slums all over the country. Men women and children were dying and self-satisfied men like john. Simon insisted that these deaths were practically speaking unavoidable. The chief medical officer the generals and the entire british stablishment stood against her her geek sidekick statistician william far warned her to be careful. Well if you do you will make yourself enemies. After what i've seen i can find my hand. Guns in the nineteenth century heroine had a twenty-first-century weapon. It was a diagram. It's not an accident that these days surrounded by graphs and charts. They're the sweet. Spots between solid statistical evidence on one hand and cheryl gifts and filtered photos on the other hard data plus striking images scientific evidence backs up. What any news editorial social media consultant will tell you graphs attract attention and they persuade people. Researchers at tufts visual analytics lab found that people formed an impression of a graphic within five hundred milliseconds. Just half a second. That's far too brief to understand what the graph is about. But it's not too brief to think what a mess or who shiny we've response to images without conscious. Thought another team of researches data scientists at new york university showed people evidence about practical policy. Questions for instance does a high corporate income tax drive jobs overseas or does prison work as a deterrent. Sometimes the relevant data was in the form of table and sometimes in the form of a chart unless people already had a strong position on the subject. The charts were much more persuasive than the tables. If you saw a chart you are much more likely to change your view. That seems obvious today. It wasn't obvious in the eighteen fifties statisticians much more likely to present their data in the form of a table. Even if the table sprawled across page after page. Beautiful design was thought to be superfluous florence nightingale. Not for the first time in her life. Banked to differ she would create a graph so compelling that the british establishment would have to bow in acquiescence. The graph in question is titled diagram of the cause of mortality in the army in the east it was published in eighteen fifty nine the year after dr john. Simon declared that death from infectious disease was practically speaking on avoidable. Now i'm going to try my best to describe this image. I've seen an original printing up close in the library of the royal statistical society in london. It's amazing but you can find copies online. The first thing you would see. Say if you were showing the graph. Five hundred milliseconds is that it consists of two pale. Blue spirals one larger than the other. Look more closely and you see that. Each spiral is built of twelve equally angled wedges. Like the hours of the clock. Some of the wedges are small clinging near the center others sprawl out hugely. What gives the diagram this sense of spiralling in or out. The rose diagram is a beautiful image but describe some horrifying numbers each of the wedges represents the deaths in a particular month. The two circles described the loss of life over two years from april eighteen. Fifty four to march eighteen fifty six. The first circle spirals out like snail. October is not to grave november. When nightingale arrived at the hospital in scutari is worse. December is worse still january and february awful wedges of blue so large that they threatened to bleed off the edge of the page itself in the center of the diagram a tiny black and red wedges they indicate a handful of deaths from miscellaneous causes and from wounds. The huge blue wedges show the overwhelming death toll from infectious diseases. No one ever made a decision because of a numba they needed a story. So said daniel carmen and amost vergerski the two psychologists whose.

london daniel carmen april eighteen march eighteen november twenty-first-century nineteenth century one thousand Nightingale December john simon two psychologists Five hundred milliseconds twelve february two circles today january half a second Victoria
"vergerski" Discussed on Millennial Money

Millennial Money

05:09 min | 7 months ago

"vergerski" Discussed on Millennial Money

"Just curious. How did you make your way into being really excited about the. You know the mindset feature around money. Yeah that started about ten years ago Going way back I did a doctorate in social sciences and so studied politics economics sociology in history in a lot of it was kind of around kind of capitalism. End the social institutions that that make for capitalism so. Stop boring you in. You're you're with now on that. But i thought that's a whole other podcast episodes but i thought pretty long and hard about like markets in society in the relationship between kind of individual aspiration and how that fits into society. So that's the background. I decided not to go into academic career. I ended up just being really interested in the markets And and worked for company morning star. You know oven some of your listeners. Do a based in chicago. Where where. I live doing investment research and you know Just kind of figuring out good investments in and writing about things like that in and around two thousand ten two thousand eleven Just almost by accident. I stumbled across the field of behavioral science in behavioral finance. So read a book called the art of choosing by by by sheena younger. The book literally changed my life emerges sort of one of those like from a movie or cartoon like that light bulb moment where i- reimagined investing less as a financial problem in more as a decision or choice problem and from there you know comments vergerski in thaler and really and so many others in you know here. I am ten years later. And i find this stuff as fascinating as ever have because there's so much to learn and when you map some of the new disciplines in neuro science and evolutionary psychology and and other fields into all of this you realize that when we're talking about money what we're actually talking about is what it means to be human and i can read and write and talk about all day..

vergerski sheena chicago
"vergerski" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

06:09 min | 7 months ago

"vergerski" Discussed on Love Your Work

"If i didn't at least try it i'd be a hypocrite. I had just finished writing. A book called mind management not time management after all taking on this challenge. Iv giving up an hour a day in the midst of launching a new book which is always a busy time but it also looked like the best possible test of my belief. time management is dead. I'd give up an hour a day of doing to just sit. I placed less emphasis on time and more emphasis on my mind. Here's how it went the first couple weeks were the strangest mind was blank. I felt numb. I lost all motivation. Probably not in the way you think. Usually when people say they've lost motivation they feel bad about it. They feel they should be motivated but they are not instead. I lost motivation in a good way. I didn't feel bad about my loss of motivation. I didn't think oh no. I want to do things but can't find motivation. But i sensed my brain needed to discover new routes to motivation. What would that be like. I wanted to find out. So i kept going. My lack of motivation didn't manifest itself as a lack of motivation to do things. I otherwise wanted to get done instead when i thought of something i might do. I'd say to myself. Nah that's not in gordon. I've long been a practitioner of getting things done which i summarized on episode to forty to one of the keys to making. Gt work is to write down everything you think of doing. Big small unimportant important. Even things you might do. Someday maybe after you write something down you either do it delegate it or defer it. Thanks to meditation. I discovered a fourth option. Forget it in other words. Don't even write it down. Just let the thought pass. This is easier said than done. Gt works because it closes open loops in your mind if you don't write the thing down. Gt wisdom states. You'll keep thinking about it by meditating an hour a day. Suddenly i was able to think of something i might do decide. It was unimportant. Then forget about it completely. But as i decided not to do the things i would otherwise do the things i wasn't going to do started bubbling to the surface setting aside an hour a day where i couldn't do anything but let thoughts flow had two effects one. It reduced the time. I had to do the things i intended to do to. It increased the time. I had to think about things. I would do if only i had the time. These effects had a symbiotic relationship. I didn't have as much time to do things i intended to do. So i had to be more efficient with things i did. Do and doing begets more doing each time. You do something. It reminds you of other things. You could be doing the more you do. The more entropy sets in and make bad decisions by meditating an hour a day. I had less time to do things and more time to think about how i would do those things once. I did them so the things i did. I did better. It is more productive to delete from the to do list then to mark done setting aside an hour a day also gave me more time to think about things i would do if only i had the time those crazy ideas you normally let pass through your mind you say to yourself. I wish wouldn't that be nice. That would never work anyway by thinking more about the crazy ideas. I wasn't likely to follow. Those ideas started to take on more importance in my mind. As i thought more about these ideas they started to seem doable. Things like taking a solo retreat to a cabin in the colombian countryside. I still wasn't sure my crazy ideas. We're going to work. But i came to a realization about that too. I realized were bad at consciously using our attention. Scientists have known this. For a long time daniel comment and amos vergerski coin did the planning fallacy. You see the planning fallacy inaction when you try to log into your bank account to pay a bill. You think it's going to take two minutes. But then your password manager malfunctions then you have to complete three pages of captures then you have to do two factor authentication so you grab your phone but your phone has a text message on it. You know the drill the planning fallacy compounds as complexity creep takes over which. I talked about on episode to thirty seven. This is why fewer than half of students complete their papers in less time than their worst case projection. This is why is sydney house. Took ten years longer and fifteen times the budget to build as expected. So if we're bad at using our conscious attention anyway. Maybe we shouldn't put much trust in ourselves to use all our conscious attention getting things done. We spend all our waking attention trying to do things we think if only we could do all the things we intended to do. We would finally achieve the success. We deserve the things we intend to do. Don't just take more time than expected. This seem to lead demonstrates in the black swan which i summarized on episode two forty four. We also have no idea whether things we've decided to do are worth doing in the first place in the extremists. Dan world of creative work. Our biggest successes often come from trying to do one thing then. Stumbling upon another europeans discovered the new world while searching for a route to india the microwave was discovered when a radar experiment accidentally melted chocolate bar. Penicillin was discovered.

amos vergerski gordon daniel sydney Dan india Penicillin
"vergerski" Discussed on Bleeding Green Nation

Bleeding Green Nation

02:13 min | 9 months ago

"vergerski" Discussed on Bleeding Green Nation

"I didn't know these things. Because i hadn't been taught them. And then the question is. Why wasn't i taught them. Because this information it may be hidden but it's hiding in plain sight who we are takes a historic look at the disease of racism in america and traces it back to its tipping points. This includes the tipping point. Today i think americans are watching and thinking and looking at this issue in ways. They never have before. And that's why. I say this is our last best chance because if we don't get it right this time where america is headed is someplace. I don't think anybody wants to go. How do we make our last best. Chance count listen to who we are a podcast by ben and jerry's produced by. Vox creative now streaming. Wherever you that your podcasts yours went overnight on third downs of what did you see his main issue there especially early in the game. Run a lot of those for like third in short. Yeah i gotta watch the tape. Honestly you know. I didn't realize we were. I knew we on. We were that poor Anytime merrill for nine. Obviously you're not doing something very well And hats off to them. They had a game plan That's a good defense over there. They made it hard on us but We definitely made a tough round ourselves. Left some plays out there didn't execute enough and Yeah overnight on third. Down is extremely frustrating. And i think that's something. We pride ourselves on his stand on the field on third down. We didn't do it today. Chris and mike yet carson. Can you put your finger on. Why the office was kind of inconsistent. You have some brilliant moments but then it was just this inconsistent. You you put your finger was a damn with what you guys were doing. It's hard put your finger on one thing as to why we were kinda inconsistent offensively. I think you know we did. Some decent things At times throughout the game. And and we struggled. I mean for one. We didn't say on the field We've talked about for non on third down makes it tough. But like i said earlier you got a credit that defense they definitely disguise a lotta looks in brought all sorts of different pressures and made it tough on us and They played a great game. And and we you know we didn't. We didn't do enough to win. Nyc and jessica vergerski. If.

america Nyc jessica vergerski merrill ben Chris jerry carson mike
"vergerski" Discussed on Capital Allocators

Capital Allocators

07:42 min | 9 months ago

"vergerski" Discussed on Capital Allocators

"And the reason i chose that is i didn't wanna password protected website and i figured nobody's going to type in a string of digits to get to a website but that was really just to keep track of what i was learning interconnect things right. You could use hyper links. And so i could connect ideas. I started going back through a lot of the original literature and going direct to the source which is something that will probably come up over and over again in this conversation but high quality ideas often originate when you have a high quality inputs and getting to better inputs was definitely a blessing in university. I don't need to read the summary anymore. Can read what commons writing into vergerski. And all these guys and directly from munger. I don't need to read a summary of hunger. And i felt like that. That was a really good way to spend my time. But of course the website was anonymous because working in an intelligence agency or not exactly allowed to have a public profile and it was just for me but then you know all of a sudden i woke up and twenty twelve twenty thirteen and we had twenty five thousand readers and it was like holy cow. This is like resonating with people in this is is kind of cool and it was mostly wall street which was also kind of awesome because always wanted to do more with sort of investing and i was appealing to that audience. I think with a lot of the stuff that i was learning and hopefully they were growing with me. I wanna turn to the learning process itself and you really have this learning community and i guess you could break it down and let's start with reading because so much of what you said comes from reading and learning. How do you go about reading in such a way that you can take out lessons and have them stay with you. well let's start with what the learning processes right so. Most people think that the learning process is you have an experience. And then you learn something. And i tend to think that that's not unique to reflect on it. So there's a loop of learning. And i call it the learning loop and at the top. You have an experience. That experience can be a direct experience. You're experiencing something that experience can be a conversation with somebody as we're talking right now. You can have experienced through this conversation or that. Experience can be reading a book or consuming other forms of information. But that doesn't mean you've learned anything from what i've said to be easy to forget this conversation after a be easy to sort of move onto the next thing or learning really starts to superchargers reflection to have to take the information that we've talked about and chew on it and digested and get nuanced details about when it works and when it doesn't work and then what happens is your brain creates an abstraction and so we're always trying to fill up these rich sources of information in our brain and the obstruction allows us to take action right and the action gives us experience. The output of action is experienced. So you have this loop at the top you have experienced then you have reflection then you have abstraction and then you have action and they all go together. The problem is when we read. Were often consuming other people's abstractions wanting filtered information. It's dumbed down. we just want the just. We don't want the details. And we don't defy when it works when it doesn't work and what happens when we don't quote fi when it works when it doesn't work and we don't have rich high-quality primary sources of information is we have to rely on direct memory. And so if you think in computer. Science terms direct memory is like searching google with quotes. I need an exact match to get a result but we don't work that way. We don't make decisions that way. We make decisions for association. We make decisions through pattern matching and the way to get your brain prime for better pattern. Matching is to consume. Better information so that you don't need a direct much you can do the reflection and then by doing the reflection. You've actually told your brain. Here's what the environment is. Here's why is likely to work. Here's why it's not likely to work. You still have the abstraction but now you have this rich meta data associated with that abstraction that allows you to do associated pattern matching and that allows you to take action and then get an experience against you have this loop of learning and so if you think of reading to come back to the question it's the way to suck up the brain of people but we mostly consume like potato chips right. We're on this fast food of. I just want the quick hit. I just want the gist. I want the twenty minute version of the podcast instead of the hour. Long version of the podcast. Why because i'm so busy but what's happening is just the illusion of knowledge. My friend timmerman. Has this analogy that. I really like which is the chef in the line cook. And so if you follow the recipe and you get a good result. There's no difference really between the chef and the lenka. You can get very similar outfit but if something goes wrong. The chef immediately sort of understands. Oh you need more salt. You start at too fast. You didn't put it in for long enough. They can troubleshoot real time. Figure it out and correct but the line cook doesn't don't have the experience that aren't of the reflection they don't understand how things interconnect and so what we really want to do. If you're learning you don't wanna learn from the line. Cook johanna learn from the chef. And you want to consume the highest quality information that you can and i think that that goes back to one of the sources of the information that we consume. What level of filtering happened a lot of our information. Sources think of your political opinions or your opinions on hot topics or policy issues. A lot of that comes from headlines lot of comes from who are writing about sixty different topics a year. Have nothing to do with one another. And you're reading there and it sounds really good to you. And you're getting an abstraction a filtered obstruction but it's on a high quality source of information it doesn't mean that there's no signal and it just means there's a ton of northern it you have to pick it out so i think when you're reading you wanna go back to what are high quality sources of information. Can i go back to the original person. You had these thoughts and work my way through it. I don't want somebody to tell me about evolution. I wanna learn from charles. Darwin how did he see it through his eyes. And i think that that allows you to start the real scaffolding the real sort of connections that are going to give you the ability to do associated matching and make better decisions. So if you start with that important lens of making sure you're consuming the right information or from that original source they're still tons of information and lots of original sources depending on what topic you're talking about. How do you go about retaining as much as you can of what it is. You're reading well the really cool thing when you reflect on things is you often layered onto things you already know. So you're building this lattice work. If you will or the scaffolding mental scaffold scaffolding and so it naturally connects to other things and then when you use that information in your day-today life whether it's over fitting in terms of you just learned something new and you're trying to see it everywhere and you over fit it in your wrong. But you're practicing applying that knowledge and by applying that knowledge it becomes not only. Do you get spaced repetition. But you get feedback on whether it's correct or not again further adding to the nuance in your brain about when it works. When it doesn't work that richness allows you to apply what you're learning and retaining the goal of of learning is. It's awesome to learn. We often pick things rethink. Maybe an investing analogy that our friend. Peter kaufman has is index funds outperform. Because we don't know which ones are going to perform the best and so that knowledge of the world is the same right. We pick and choose what we think is most valuable. But we're not often right about what's most viable..

line cook vergerski munger google Peter kaufman timmerman johanna
"vergerski" Discussed on What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

02:54 min | 9 months ago

"vergerski" Discussed on What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

"That's outside my little circle of professionalism I. Find that often is very important. Are there any books that just had tremendous impact for you that are outside your expertise? I have to go back to the ones of my youth. The book that I find. has been very useful. It's I. Think it's forty years old. Is Alleged Bach the internal Wilton Grade. which was very popular book. I lost my book is all my friends kept borrowing it and. A book about recurs in of all things. In computer science but what the book? Introduced me to. Play. Let's take this idea version where something goes back refers to itself or repeats itself or I would suffer I itself again. And maybe the movie inception sort of the movie that encapsulated that go from different levels and so forth of the reality that they were in but the book was incredibly playful it just took idea and went with whatever was joyful and I found that lesson to be. Incredibly important he had nothing like uncovering some of this strange loops in life. Has Exactly I also wondering we've talked a lot about just different things people do early in their career I I'm just wondering if there was three things starting off your and say, Hey, if you want to end up here at the end of all this, these three things, I'd put considerable amount of time into. A I would say, definitely. The term is network but I really mean just it's A lot of different types of people in a lot of different. Areas of expertise that you can draw upon entering the conversation with Make yourself known Essentially now in psychology, what that means is going giving talks or. Getting down to social media or writing a blog or doing a podcast. getting yourself known gets herself known. And people begin to Associated Voice or a face with a person. But. It also forces you into some sort of thought because you're once again trying to communicate storing. So I find to be very Very important. So. I, guess if you had A. General theme it's make yourself visible. To other people. Yeah. That's is Simpson. Fernandes. Advice there early on. I'm wondering though you brought up a lot of interesting people throughout this talk who and it could be within worker urges people you've been around. Had you been most all of throughout your life? It's interesting. Well, a one has to start with Amos Vergerski because usual thing that they must've risky people seems as far as personnel and answer's Yes..

Amos Vergerski Associated Voice Fernandes Simpson
"vergerski" Discussed on FT Politics

FT Politics

01:34 min | 11 months ago

"vergerski" Discussed on FT Politics

"Make things less tough by spending more money? And keeping the fellow scheme running for bit long, which is the the Labor Party wants to do at least for sectors of the economy but it was very striking thought this week Boris Johnson us really strong language the site that wasn't going to happen. He talks about people being held in suspended animation jobs that no longer exists. So I, think they fell scheme wilby be wound up as planned at the end of October the question. That about whether the Treasury find ways of helping subsidize new jobs through the tax system potentially but I think in terms of extending the furlough scheme, they don't want to do that and actually funnily enough in spite of Boris Johnson said things were going to get worse. The Treasury also think that actually some of the worst focused about communists among like that going to be borne out and in fact, would have not be slightly. Stronger than people predicted. Yes I think that's true. That is evidence that sitting third quarter has been stronger than people thought and people has been spending more than expected. So the bounceback is meanwhile the stronger that doesn't mean the long term is necessarily any better, but is been a fast recovery. One of the things that is inevitably happening with talking about tax rises as change in the tax system, we're going to be having effectively fiscal tightening. Having because we've already stopped things like eat out to help out. So that was a tax subsidy for August and as Vergerski winds up and VAT defoe will stop and the rent and rates holidays stop we're going to have quite big effective tax is is happening over the next six months anyway and that as going to have some form of dampening effect on the. Speed of the recovery,.

Boris Johnson Treasury Labor Party Vergerski
"vergerski" Discussed on Kottke Ride Home

Kottke Ride Home

07:03 min | 1 year ago

"vergerski" Discussed on Kottke Ride Home

"A restaurant in Tokyo is planning to three D print sushi. But that is not all the three D. printed. Sushi is going to be biometric tailored to your nutritional needs. The restaurant is called Sushi singularity and it's run by a company called open meals who are really into strange techy food endeavors more on that in a minute. The way that this particular one works is that when you make a reservation at Sushi singularity, you'll be given a health kit through which to submit biological samples on the website describes these as DNA urine and intestinal tests but I don't think they're actually making you do all of that for say, one visit to the restaurant. The website is laying this out as a model for the future of food in which all people were already have established health ID's consisting of that information. The mockup of the health kit looks more like it's probably just a saliva test quoting my modern mets biometric DNA data gathered from these custom kits will inform. Nutrition infusion the encoded sushi customized to each guest's nutrient needs artfully produced by three D. Printers and laser technology and quotes. Said Open meals is aiming high wanting this to eventually be something fairly standard quoting again, the Food Fabrication Machines Food Operation System and health identification employed by the cutting edge restaurant. We'll eventually these smaller available to general consumers. This culinary digitisation will require immense collaborative technological efforts according to open meals. Food must first be encoded with complex algorithms that account for texture taste, heat, smell, etc. then these encoded dishes must be made available online through a platform called food base leslie anyone wishing to create a downloadable dish must have the correct ingredients in Three D. printing formats and quotes. And the Three D. printed sushi itself is really artfully designed I mean that alone would bring a bunch of people to a restaurant let alone the gimmick of being customized for your unique nutritional needs. Though as weird as it does sound in this moment like I don't know that I'd be super. Mad. If this were in some way, the direction we go for food, you know they're a ton of advances being made in three d bio printing right now I've talked on previous episodes about some of the initiatives to Three D. bio print meat alternatives to lessen the meat industry's impact on the environment. Than just as someone with some annoying dietary restrictions, I would be pretty excited about going into a restaurant and knowing that whatever on being served is guaranteed not to make me sick in any way that would rock. But like I said, open meals has some other weird projects. One is called Sabre Ouaga she and it uses weather data so that you can taste the weather. Watch out skittles. And a few years ago at South by southwest debuted a prototype of their Sushi teleportation device, which basically had a chef in. Tokyo making Sushi that was been scanned in remade. By a robot arm in Austin and both of these projects use their custom three d bio printer and their method of digitizing and categorizing elements of food. So keep an eye out on the company opened meals they're trying to start what they call a fifth food revolution. And you know parts of it just might play out. All right. So I know that it is the middle of August. But every now, and then I have a brief moments where I genuinely think that it's march like I forget that we've done spring and most of summer already July fourth happened. So did Easter Birthday look I know time has passed and I have some memories of it but not any huge stand-out memories I keep thinking that those flagship events haven't happened yet. This year someone might clearest memories of twenty twenty are of the quake series of trips that I took right before lockdown began. And I know I'm not alone in this sort of off kilter spatial in memory confusion, but it's nevertheless reassuring to get some validation. Tim Harford recently wrote about his own experiences with this sensation in the Financial Times out for him. He especially keeps remembering the hotel rooms he stayed in on trips in the past, and he proposes that part of the reason many of our memories are blending together or not standing out right now is because many of us haven't been going anywhere ensure we're experiencing a lot of new and hugely significant things, but we're largely staying. In one place maybe even in the exact same room quoting the Financial Times, the psychologist Barbara Vergerski author of mind in motion argues that our minds are built on a foundation of cognition about place space and movement that creeps into our language with phrases such as built on a foundation and creeps into our brains started by helping process surroundings and the threats and opportunities they presented abstract thinking is an adaptation of those basic spatial capacities. This may be why not all novelty is created alike, our brains seem to record a new place with a particular vividness and quote. So in Hartford's case even though he didn't do anything exciting in those hotel rooms, he keeps remembering he was in a new place for the first time in his brain started taking it all in and committing it to memory our brains use physical places to help imprint our memories. I've realized that I definitely do this. You know when I think back on important conversation or realization that I once had I often remember where I was before I recall any other details quoting again no wonder champion modest often use the method of low cy or memory? Palace technique. Memorizing long lists of abstract information by picturing vivid images in well defined spaces such as the rooms of childhood home. This may be why when we ask people to recall pivotal moments in history such as the fall of the Berlin Wall or the nine eleven terror attacks. Manhattan. We ask where were you when you heard covid nineteen may be as significant episode is any but it will not trigger the same sharp memories where were you during the pandemic at home for months and without a physical change of scene even new experiences all start seem the same end quotes. I'd say this tracks I mean sure we may be having big significant conversations right now about illness death major life and cultural changes. But if you're having all of those conversations via video call from the exact same place in your house, it may become more difficult to recall them. They might all blend together. which I suppose is perhaps if you care about remembering a good reason to take up journaling during this time or take photos in documented in some way, you may be surprised by what you did or thought or said if you look back, even just a couple.

Tokyo Financial Times Food Fabrication Machines Berlin Wall Tim Harford Austin D. Printers Manhattan Hartford twenty twenty Barbara Vergerski
"vergerski" Discussed on Tha Boxing Voice

Tha Boxing Voice

14:04 min | 1 year ago

"vergerski" Discussed on Tha Boxing Voice

"Just listening to going once twice stone boombox in Colorado Good Morning. What a what A. ESPN PAY. They buy From they buy from all guys they buy content from top rate they buy from. Ufc They buy from whoever? Bob Arum say we dealing with to make if I happen as week? So it's not as if he pan for that we already seen. Pvc BY TV. Time before I mean it worked out because it it will. That's what gave us too. Big Danny Vergerski fight. I mean with the was it. Like four million five million writing something like this so that was a success. Oh I believe it can work. I mean I don't know if it's a good idea for boxing thing about you have see. Is they already do a fight every weekend? Anyway in the end to a pay per view every month. So it kind of feeding today thing. Boxing is like we do a fight every six weeks so I mean it's not all together now like right Bosa. Let's to island and do this together. So top rank would probably do something like that just because they doing that anyway. Despite narrow fight is already and they they got big fights they could do it with so but I don't. Dpc would want to risk it. They looking at Fox and stuff like that but Fox did. Just do the The Ww Eat right in the studio right went down on Fox would a shot it in studio wrestling so it's been on Fox Yup and USA because they just did one like in a studio. So I could see happening but guys might be mad if they favorite fighter ended up on the island fighting some disadvantages and sit. You'd be like man. You might not like you but it might be good for the sport. But if it AIN'T GONNA be over to October November December some. I mean I'm willing to wait to like late July August star having feist. I don't want him to go to the island and then find some niche where they can make all this money without us and then just say fuck it in super surface and just start doing it on the island and not. That could be a problem. You get somebody avenue like that name. We take advantage of and its star saying we even need no. We don't need no security. We only know fans only to pay nothing for no venue. We can just throw these guys in here. Make them fight purse and collect the say so we might be all to some. That's going to be dangerous. But if fighters in the long run I know you see already do it anyway. They don't pay them guys nuts and they may hundreds of thousands of dollars like Wondu said he fought those big fights pay-per-view million to three million. He made one point seven. What's tonight Tito Ortiz? Or whatever he was on Vlad TV he only got like a million dollars to fight some of the big as you have fights ever. I was like why he was he a little salty. But what else see man. If we can get some fights go ahead and see what you have seen do if it were we might do it for back later as a man. That's how I see it. If they do it. We need to follow suit. You know what I mean. If they don't do it we need to see how. Can we do it and get it done safely in an I mean the idea? Is there now whether or not it comes into play. We'll see but let me see looks like I think it's just my gene. Boomerang you the last. Stop so yeah. I don't know I still think it's dangerous But yeah I mean. We're GONNA wait till October. I think you gotta you gotTa do you had the the show must go on but I mean if they do it I think they're going to have to come out with a big fight because if you look at the UFC fight the card. It's it stacked up tomato You know they can. They can. Why can't they do Loma female? That's in house that's already pay per view that ain't heart. Ed Good Berlanga. They got Jeremy Adorno. That's two more undefeated prospects. Now it's like three tripleheader deal like Bro. You guys. That's on the table doing that. How what ticket sales. Yeah brother don't you understand in this day and age right now? Going on content is king. So what's going to happen is the supplement that income from sponsorship. That wants to get on board. Everyone is home. Everyone is home so you. It's easier to get sponsors. Television ratings are up nobody wants. Nobody wants to see prospect. If you look at that you have seen is not prospects off contents. And that's the thing. Boxing doesn't do that. Like they really WanNa WanNa rock people's attention now that people know now that everybody's home give us a great car. You bugging chant you bugging. We Buy Antiques Fema Lopez and I gotta go. Obviously let you go. We buy and see a female Lopez regardless we bond that regardless. Ain't nobody talk about no undercard for that. We talk him out your wise basile saying he'll WANNA fight in New York. We bind that regardless so they don't need an undercard all got to do is keep the overhead down. You know what I'm saying. I don't know what you're talking about. We was going by that regardless of. Why do they gotta give you a better fight now? Know they're gonNA put undefeated prospects on there and move you get you get if you top rank and you're doing a show on island you put on Lopez Verses Chanko as crazy co main event Edgar Berlanga thirteen to know hundred sixty pounder. You get him a decent decent name. Nothing sexy maybe a Soda Karasu. At this time you know. Never forget one sixty biggest probably one fifty four maybe even a Humberto Soto under under Balanga. You put a door. No Joseph one that just had to draw. He's thirteen in no. He's eleven thirteen Cao's seven Cao's something like that under him. You put sunny condo another like six zero heavyweight all your young champs you know then you even put Jeremy Adorno. He's like four now. You know you keep going down the line but bro you kidding me. That's the car right. Did those the reason you put the prospects is because the pay per view has to pay you in abundance and your fighters the prospects you handle that on your own that's why you start stacking card and you already in yourself. When no ticket sales like I said before the sponsorship has to be correct to supplement those sales but by putting on a fantastic co main event. That's when you're losing money you banking on the main event which was always going. Be Pay per view the prospects you just moving along. You're doing your due. Diligence as a promoter and manager keeping them busy. I mean I don't see the problem in that I'm you I. I could see this work and if if someone really wants to get it done they can get it done in my opinion. But here's the thing I'm obviously not against it. I WANNA see boxing on any level you know in any way all I'm saying is do. I think it's realistic. No based on the things that we've already said you know And fights like Chango in India fe- mo- or or or I don't know who else let's just I whatever fight us to those magnitude. Do even want to see those fights with no crowds and the ambiance stripped away of those fights like I dunno. I mean if we're GONNA get cards like that I I mean I would just. I would take almost anybody really competitive. Fight would be great but of that magnitude. I don't know what that looks like yet. You know remain who actually do know. Tell me what that looks like because Wrestlemania Outta and watch but that obviously had zero fans wrestlemainia was fun. But let me tell you what the funnest things were. They were the things that they taped outside of the arena. Things that were already because they taped everything right but they had matches inside the Rena studio but they had two matches that they film kind of like movies. Those were the funnest things of it. So it's been different like I enjoy wrestling. I love wrestling but the pop of the crowd is something that cannot be replaced. And if you're a fan of boxing or you know what I'm talking about you know when somebody gets jawed and that crouches lights up it it's infectious it comes through the TV screens and do the speakers. And it infects you and it affects. Everyone you're with and to give that up you know. Wt even even considered pumping in fake audience throughout the the night. Now thank God. They didn't because I think that would have been weird. But I mean who knows? It could've added to the ambiance. Because that's what I feel like is missing so Pfizer. Those magnitude I don't know I don't think we should panic if in another year. We're here sure let's start talking about you know Cannella fighting in a ring Louis Fan Louis Arena. Sure let's start talking about you. Know Devante Wrangler see happening there or whatever in a in a fan arena but until this his gone on long enough where that's our only option. I don't think we should just start jumping the gun and having major promotions just because there's nothing else on will obviously fight fans watch a lot. Friday night fights at the end so we'll watch whatever they show. We should have done better research. 'cause we should google the amount of you on homeland yesterday or Sunday. The amount of different though no brother. I'm telling you the fact that people are home is a privileged to the networks of course but about how much Abbott you know. How much food is being so right now? Takeout isn't done they've hired thousands of new INSTA- Carter's to go shopping for you and new a new drivers to deliver for you. What are you talking about and I don't follow politics. This is a little bit of news that I'm watching because my girl puts his shit on every day. No one is sleeping during this time. The ones that are sleeping are the ones that are gonNA fail. Businesses are finding you know what the with the medical field is doing to charge you. They can't bring you into the office. So guess what they're doing facetime phone business. They're finding a way to charge you anyway. For Compensation Birth. I'm telling you you guys are fucking sleep and like you think a business is going to sit on the hands and let some virus. Just take away. Whatever they've been working for no I still get up every day and do this motherfucker show. It Ain't stopping me and I'm on a little level. Imagine the millions. That ain't letting it stop. They know that's what I'm saying. I'm not disagreeing that it should come back or we should have fan Lewis fights not at all. All I'm saying is that we shouldn't we should reserve those for what's next on the docket and not necessarily but he says more time. That's what I'm trying to tell you. You'll never find another time where the World Realistic No. You're not thinking of this particular piece. When else are you going to have this? High of a percentage of people in their house. Tell Me Mario. This is unprecedented. You take advantage. They have literally made you come home and be home by a certain time. So who's gaining advertise live coverage looking at it as as people at home equal dollars? Major major economic decline economic decline. Not At homeboy. Just got rid of his patriots. They'RE GONNA start. Getting rid of people are getting rid of. Listen don't make me. Don't make me go. They're made of all that. Don't make me because it's it's you know that just people sitting at home automatically answers all the economics of it all because it doesn't you know yeah. Espn would enjoy a great bump in ratings But to what in because this is the fight business? And the business of making brother thank. Espn only likes ratings brothers. The ratings equal. How many advertisers? They sell door in that time slot. That's what I'm talking about and right now. Nobody's applying brother home. A Guy I guess it's because they're standing. Let me just get this out. Can't maybe this is easy for me because I'm a dude that goes to sleep at ten wakes up at three. I'm constantly looking at numbers. I'm constantly reading about my niche sport. You know I'm constantly trying to stay on whatever's the next wave to make us grow and I guess because I'm looking at it from that standpoint I can see the business in this. You are not thinking you're saying. Oh we're in depression blah blah blah blah blah. Meanwhile there's handouts left and right hand outs left and right for small businesses. There's SBA loans.

Boxing Espn Ufc Fox Jeremy Adorno Bob Arum Lopez Bosa Colorado Danny Vergerski Tito Ortiz WanNa Ed Good Berlanga USA Humberto Soto feist Wondu google Louis Fan Louis Arena basile
"vergerski" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

07:06 min | 1 year ago

"vergerski" Discussed on Love Your Work

"As I kicked and punched at the man I glanced at the knife in his right hand and I felt it. Dig Into My side. This is love your work and I'm David and it all started as a cross paths with the man. He reached in his pocket and pulled out the knife. I then did. What surely only an idiot would do? I began to fight him a few seconds earlier as the man approached me on the path. He stared at me fiercely. He charged toward me and bared his greeting teeth. His is reduced to snake eyes slits and glowed under the harsh night lamplight. His shook his head from side to side growling. When the man transformed from? Just another passer-by into a mortal threat. I felt something I had never felt before and then I haven't felt sense. Ah both of lightning rose from might stomach to my chest. I heard a deep growl grow into a roar in authority hated. No so it wasn't until I heard that roar echo off the surrounding buildings that I realized it had come from me. It's worth noting coding. I've never been a tough guy. I'd never been in a fight. Yes my older brother beat me up more times than I can count but if someone at school threaten me I would always Nikolay backed down so as I watched myself from outside my own body kicking and punching it as man with a deadly weapon in his hand I was saying to myself. What are you thinking but there is no going back? The struggle had begun one and for the first time ever. I was literally fighting for my life. Is this how I di- I asked myself. But the snake eyed man suddenly didn't look so fearless and dangerous. His is widened his eyebrow sword. His mouth gaped open its corners corners bending downward I guess he thought he had picked an easy target turn out he was wrong as the man evaded. My frantic kicks punches. An economist took over my mind. I was fighting for my life. He was fighting for. What an can I phone some money? He still hadn't said anything so I didn't know for sure. And that's when I felt the knife. Dig into my nightside right between my left ribs. Only the knife was still by demand-side dangling from his right hand as he repeatedly grabbed me with his left. It didn't happen. I'd only imagined him stabbing me. It must have been a simulation run by the economist honest. It had taken over my mind and that simulation had brought the economist to this conclusion. I had way more to lose lose than this guy and that was my advantage. All I had to do was make some space and this guy would cut his losses and move John but the pavement was wet. I hadn't run more than a few paces before I slipped head first down the sloping sidewalk doc. The flesh of my left hand was being ground off on the concrete as used it as my brake pad as I slid down the hill. I glanced dance over my left shoulder. I hadn't gone far but maybe this was enough distance to get him to give up but he didn't give up. He was following me. I still don't know how but I somehow got to my feet faster than he could catch me. I voted myself over one guardrail. I voted myself over another guardrail on the next path over I scurried down. A Steep Hill slammed into a chain link fence and ran like hell when I arrived at home. Only a a couple of blocks away. My hand was bleeding. My toe was bleeding. My shoes were ripped and a button was broken off of my favorite shirt but I was safe safe. We all know what you're supposed to do when someone pulls a knife on you give them your wallet. Give them your phone do what they tell you to do. Your Life is more valuable than your iphone. People will say yeah. No Shit's just because I got away with my decision doesn't make it a good decision. Any do would call that resulting rating the quality of your decisions on the outcome outcome rather than well the quality of your decision you should not fight a guy who pulls a knife on you. That would be a bad decision except that you aren't making a decision you're merely reacting. It's a non decision. This is the era we make when we play armchair quarterback to other people's Decisions Asians. Why didn't the COP shoot the assailant with a deadly weapon in the kneecap instead of the chest? Why didn't they just leave the room? When the sexual assault began we know what the ideal action would be? We don't know shit about what it's actually like to be in that situation. That feeling I I felt that night that feeling I hadn't felt before that I hadn't felt since and then I hope to never feel again. It's a well known phenomenon. It's called fight or flight. It's what happens when you are in a seriously dangerous situation. And you're sympathetic. Nervous system takes over. I didn't stop op and politely. Asked the man with a knife what he wanted. I didn't then simply handed over. have an is evening. That would have been the right decision. But I wasn't making a decision I fought then. I've floats in the book. Thinking fast and slow Daniel Common and Amos Vergerski introduced us to two who different types of thinking their system. One thinking that's the thinking that you do in the moment it's the fast thinking then their system to thinking that's the more deliberate deliberate thinking. That's the slow thinking really system. One hardly qualifies as thinking at all at least not what we would normally think gov is thinking not the what were you thinking thinking. I wasn't thinking it was system one system. One is your dome herself because of system one we make all sorts of bad decisions. They are always as bad as fighting a man with a knife. Sometimes it simply checking your email while you're still in bed in the morning or buying that scone to go with your morning coffee if system to had a say in the matter it would remind you.

David Nikolay assault John Daniel Common Amos Vergerski
"vergerski" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

Airplane Geeks Podcast

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"vergerski" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

"In due in february and one in april this year we brought in some really amazing lego engineering kits to build simple and powered machines. <hes> <hes> you know for kids do that and what's great is a lot of our programs like that. It's a kid working with an adult with their guardian parent that they come in so this is more of that kind have family learning together approach that so wonderful <hes> during this spring we did our spring a member appeal where we raised over forty thousand dollars <hes> because our our members are incredibly dedicated to what we're doing and with that are curator rob vergerski had a pretty lofty goal that he has pulled off in a few months which is to fill the museum almost every museum space with an interactive activity aimed at kids learning more about principles of flight or or how it feels to build and race your own race car. <hes> we have a realistic <hes> <hes> simulator driving simulator. It's a ferrari six-speed has three screens and the six speed transmission is real when you crash into a wall at feels real and that my office is right above that in the hangar and it's really amazing to hear those kids <hes> get so excited because they've never sat behind a regular even an automatic automatic. Let alone any transmission and here they are on our campus driving a ferrari in for those may be vacationing in the area or <hes> you hear about the museum and wanna come visit. Is it open seven days a week. What are the hours like we are open year round seven days a week from in ten to five the only exceptions that we have are major holidays christmas thanksgiving easter and we post those on our facebook page and we have a lot of pilots listen in the museum. That's right on the rockland airport. If a pilot wanted to come in and visit museum they've flying rockland probably stop at the f. b. o. an easy way for them to get from the f. b. o..

ferrari rockland airport rob vergerski facebook seven days forty thousand dollars
"vergerski" Discussed on Think Again

Think Again

17:06 min | 2 years ago

"vergerski" Discussed on Think Again

"Culture and language has been obsessed with the head as the center of thought and the body is the center of feeling this split can get hierarchical attaching ideas like sin to the body and and the emotions while putting the brain along with rationality up on a pedestal. I'm very happy to be speaking again today with neuroscientist and philosopher antonio damasio who has done more than anyone else i know of to get that brain down off its high horse and reattach it to the body. We last talked a year ago about his book. The strange order of things it's life feeling and the making of cultures which has now come out in paperback it turns everything upside down not only reentering mind and body but finding in primitive bacteria <hes> and social insects patterns that help explain human culture. Maybe there's more going on in the mona lisa than in a bacterial colony but they also have quite a lot in common. Welcome welcome to think again. Antonio pleasure we last spoke in april of last year and i'm wondering how your work and how the the thinking and conversations around the book have evolved since then well. It's been very interesting. <hes> i was as i probably told you before four. I was expecting that people would react somewhat negatively to to this emphasis on simple organisms capable. The purple of behaviors and arrangements tad's such a strong social shape but country too that people were actually very welcoming both colleagues and people that read the book and the window given specialists so i i was very happy to have that good reception for a set of ideas that i was <hes> concerned would be either misconstruction or poorly-received received. I think that ever since we last spoke the data have been coming in in support of those ideas is a little bit stupid fit to be doing this self-praise but but the ideas are correct and this one part of these ideas is that interests me very much in that has to do with the fact that prior to that great parasol that you were talking about where people put the brain usually. I don't really want to take it off the bed still completely because without the brain of course we're not going to have the creativity the activity we do have with short human the way we are and it'd be not even going to be able to do this conversation that we're having right now with all of this. It's new technology <hes> which by the way is not working very well today but that's that's right but the point is that we need to recognize that brain's appear very late in the history of evolution they serve life <hes> so we go most of the history of life without any brains whatsoever without nervous systems even and only in the lowest tier of that period of life on earth that that we do develop i very simple nerve nets then more complex nervous systems and eventually brains like our brains and the amazing mazing thing is that throughout that long long period of life we encounter much simpler organisms than we are but but those simpler organisms are capable of enormously complex behavior they are capable of making choices that they are not of course making king <hes> deliberately intentionally but they are making choices between good things or bad things for their life. They are grouping grouping together to for example explore <hes> territory and find nutrients that are important for the continuation their life or they are banding together and literally attacking others in other to gain territory. If that territories convenient venios so right you have a collection of behaviors that is extremely complex that indicates intelligence in the broad sense and of the term intelligence. They're being very smart about what they do and the other thing that is fascinating is that although smarts all that of intelligence is being applied to one thing only to their life. It's being applied with the purpose of maintaining the life that an organism has and extending it for as long as of course your genome allows it to be to have it extended and and this is really fascinating because it's literally am glad you said it. It turns things upside down. That's why i think this strange order to to. These things is still a good description. We have reasons why we do things we have reasons why organisms babe in a certain way and we are in the same boat as they are we all as living organisms want to preserve life wants to do everything the possible to have good governance of life the set of regulations we call home your stasis and the big difference ends up being the following in creatures that did not have nervous systems and do not have nervous systems which as we said occupy most of the history of life in those creatures the decisions are not being made intentionally. They're not being made by a mind lines that happens to be conscious and that is reasoning as to what should be done next on the contrary. Those decisions are being being made one could say automatically by the organism but not in the thinking rational way they are there. They sort out of float up in the behavior in the behavior ends up being intelligent but no one was thinking about. I'm going to do this or i'm going to to do that. Whereas in humans and of course in many other species in between we have ascended to this great possibility possibility called mind and even to a greater possibility which is a mind with consciousness and we have done so and we have of course the possibility of making decisions that i now informed by knowledge decisions that are informed by what we know about what is good or what his bed but mine do continue to be related to this imperative which is the hobbyist attic imperative. What we want is for life life to continue even if we didn't want it that's what we're going to end up doing with our minds and with our consciousness and just one more point chastened and this all happens courtesy of the development of nervous systems in other words prior to nervous systems no mind no oh consciousness no intention in the full sense of the term after nervous systems gradually we ascend to this possibility of having minds having consciousness having knowledge and then having reasoning that allows us to arrive at some of these very interesting decisions asians one thing that i was thinking about as i was revisiting. The ideas in your book is that when we get to the level of culture when we're looking at smaller organisms and were were even looking at a whole human body or animal body. It's easy to see how the homeo- static imperative is operating. You can see you see the organism seeking its own continuance. When you get to the level of culture the actors that are acting homeo- statically they become nations become ideas themselves. It becomes a very complicated mixture of different homies static imperatives. That's where i becomes very very complicated and difficult to trace what is continuing itself and why i entirely agree with that so we have culture in in all the paraphernalia of our cognitive ability act as masks over the real stuff the real l. stuff is life and it's imperatives and we mask all this. I mean when people are happily or unhappily pursuing doing money. They don't realize that they are pursuing sources of energy and that that desire is in fact necessary in given the structure of their minds because behind it is the goal of attaining energy that it's enough to maintain life but also in that process to attain pleasure because pleasure by itself is a way way of increasing the power of survival you know the the the some good reason why why we have such things he says pleasures some of the desires and why there is also something called pain and suffering and all of those was states of emotion and feeling <hes> states that portray the condition of life in a given organism awesome when you have pain you are already at risk of losing that life certainly of losing faces and it's there is a very powerful awful signal that is a harbinger of bad things to come on this you do something about it the same thing with states of malays and so forth and likewise when when you are in states of joy and pleasure your mind is telling you through that feeling that you experience that guess what on your stasis is working very well in the kardashian's such that they are conducive to maintaining life in optimal or near optimal way away and so they they're all of these new powerful tools that allow us to guide our behavior so that twee maintain a life in the best possible white and yet at the same time. The signals can mislead us. Yes i mean especially at the cultural level. We pursue things we can pursue things that aren't necessarily good for us pleasure and so on exactly so it's it's very interesting because pleasure actually more so than pain in all the prospects of pleasure are they better advisers and in in some conditions they are good advisors but in some conditions that can fool us and of course when you think about the the fragility of the human reasoning and the way in which human reason can be twisted every possible way by bad advisers you can see how this is true in a way with simple organisms. I think the possibility of deception and the possibility of misguided behaviors is far smaller. Although we have this huge amount of riches mentally this huge amount of possibilities that if you are extremely extremely wise and thoughtful what you entertain as your wishes and how you go about pursuing them then so you may be in luck but a lot of us a lot of the time just being complete falls and we are being fooled by this incredibly rich machinery but the the end the general shape of the machinery and the goals the fundamental parameters remain the same. It's just addressed in a different wait in general hearing and i'm reading more about the mind body connection about the central nervous systems role will i spoke with barbara vergerski the other day about motion and how that shapes some of the fundamental mapping of the mind and the way that we think about the world so i feel like maybe more than when much more than when you started this work there is openness in the scientific community community to that to the anchoring of the connection of mind and body or the i don't even want to say the unity in a sense of mine embody what feels very new here is this broader connection between the patterns that are happening even at the cellular level and the patterns that are are happening at the cultural level that that seems like that's the part that i would have like you thought the community might have had a hard time swallowing jason. I'm going to this. This is a guessing game. I'm going to guess what your question because i'm we're losing more than fifty percent of what you say what i guessed who are saying is that there is now a greater awareness of the similarity of some forms and the similarity of some i'm behaviors and the fact that they are that certain goals in forms of behavior are actually of the same kind throughout throughout the life that we can observe on earth whether it is in a simple organism or a very complex one and i think you're absolutely absolutely right to me what it so attractive in this idea is the fact that it's a pattern is the same and the pattern is just being repeated but is repeated with huge riches with huge developments in terms of the capacity to operate on reality and and the of course once you have the possibility of having coordination and once you join cognition and feeling the sky's the limit to you you really can get two points that could never have imagined if you were just looking at bacteria or for that matter even complex organisms relatively really complex organisms like social insects in my introduction. I was talking about you taking the brain enough of its pedestal and what i was referring to really was the kind of reconnecting of the mind and body which it seems to me has been a project that you and others have been working on for some time now but i think i feel like there's a temptation when we when we start to understand how much of the mind is anchored in the body and in the central nervous system system. There's a temptation for the pendulum to swing the other way and say look. We've been much over emphasizing the brain. That's not what you're saying at all. No no no no no no no not at all. If you realize how much the pendulum was in the other direction then you realize that it's good to have a little bit of correction but let's not over correct so when i was in medical school and when i was working on my doctoral thesis uses all that we talked about in relation to mind was the brain was nervous system. There was absolutely no understanding that there was a connection to the rest of an organism so the the pendulum was right. Khalili add an extreme and by the way a lot of the what i would it calls the excesses of artificial intelligence came by way of that came from a period in the history of the sciences mrs in which people said well one sprains exists brain's really carry all of these complex functions and there's is a complete neglect of where biologically that the brain was inserted and this has been a big problem and by the way it's a company company by the problem of the neglect of emotion feeling which curiously is the province of the body in other words. You cannot have of emotions without having a body emoting and you cannot have feelings without getting a purchase without getting a perception of what is is changing in your body given moment as a result of either emotion or as a result of life regulation so all of these things were curiously curiously together during a certain period..

antonio damasio kardashian barbara vergerski jason fifty percent
"vergerski" Discussed on Throwing Shade

Throwing Shade

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"vergerski" Discussed on Throwing Shade

"Resting Kuma up has a new documentary out on Amazon prime available right now. Right. When we watch it now, we knew about it, because it was do it was it was running. I can't say this anymore. This word I was gonna say running train on all the circuits, but that you can't say that this this documentary just fucking its way around town making everybody. It's. That's right. Winning award winning awards audience. Got to see a screening of eight I say it was so well done. It's so beautiful the way also that you bring in, like animation. I mean it was so surprising. What was this thing originally? I mean, I know that this is about. At first glance deserts for your birth father, correct? Which you did not. No. You always thought you had of father and that you grew up with him. Correct. When I was fourteen my parents got in a horrible fight, and I defended my dad to my mom. And she said, why are you defending him? He's not Eero dad, which is a cool way for your and tell you school. And I took it really. Well, then what did you do handle emotions? My hormones were advanced. Going through menopause. That's right. Very this whole time. I've been on. So you've run to the man who raised you, you're good. You call him your father you. Yeah. Okay. So you run to your father, you get try to get confirmation on whether or not that's true. He tells you it is. Yes. Yes. And it really shook me to my core. And then soon after I was told that my birth father didn't want anything to do with me, because he was worried I would want child support. So then I was like, I don't want any of this anymore. This was a tale to you by your mother or just you just heard this throughout my I can't remember if it was a family friend, or my mom, I think it was a family friend because there was supposed to be a meeting with his his brother and like a cousin and I had spoken to his brother and it was the thing like we'll meet at the temple in a week or two weeks. And then that didn't happen that didn't happen. And then I got that feedback and your parents had this incredible story of your father. I mean they were escaping. Slough sloughs. They have to cross the Maycock to go to Thailand and neither able to swim. Right. My, my father was able to my mom not. So she she he pulled her across in a tire. Did you what that to me sounds like the ultimate tale of love? Yeah. And it really does it sounds like I don't know many American couples would have a bond like that. Yeah. What I mean you ask your friends that like how strong is your relationship, which you pull across the MAI, Cong attire. Let me give you let me respects at the river. Okay. It's not a creek, right? Okay. It undertow. Yeah, the mighty MRs Frank. Vergerski their lives really ESN and under do you could drown but also there could be soldiers soldiers. They're hiding you get shot. There's there were dead bodies in the river. There's you know it was a bad time. This post during the Vietnam war. There was a secret war in Laos, or the CIA use it as a sort of it was a proxy war. And they that's where the is our peak to Afghanistan. What happens if we just drop ship tone of shit, ton bombs, and not put boots on the ground and train a guerrilla fighters? A lot of them were among some Lau to, to do the fighting right on the ground. But then it's just for nine years, every nine minutes bombies coming down that are still embedded in the land right now shocking..

Eero dad Amazon menopause Afghanistan CIA Laos Thailand Slough Lau MAI MRs Frank nine minutes nine years two weeks
"vergerski" Discussed on Masters in Business

Masters in Business

02:50 min | 2 years ago

"vergerski" Discussed on Masters in Business

"And he thought that the that the he said he he he banned Ray analogy analogies within race. So you can compare a player to another player and say, oh, he plays a lot like X if the guy is a different race. And he said at that moment all just stopped it, just stopped. So I actually love my favorite part of the Genesis story of the book came about because you you write the the you right? Was it moneyball or the big short that Thaler and sunshine, right and say, hey, you guys left as moneyball. So they I written moneyball at night. You know, I knew I thought I I knew what that book was about. And it was about this this front office had found. Using data better ways to value. Baseball players in baseball strategies in reveal that markets make huge misjudgements when they value people. When the book came out, Richard Thaler and Cass on steam wrote a review in the new Republic, basically saying that I didn't know what my own book was about. And what would it really was was a case study in of continent, diversities work. And I went who didn't know who they were. And this is Dan economy in Mr. vergerski and Katamon had won the Nobel prize in economics the year. I wrote moneyball right? You have to be alive to win the prize verse get passed away or else. Right. And and you by the way, so it interject here, you were uniquely situated to write this book for a number of reasons, and you. You you've pushed back about this. But you're wrong. And I wanna get you to write which book. Gelling project because first of all had written moneyball, which was effectively they studying their work. Right. Sort of like big is what they had done is classify all the mistakes that the Oakland A's were exploiting in rival. But but more importantly, you had a relationship with common, or at least his family that you barely even. So in some ways. Before I write a book, I do like to tell myself a story about why I'm the one who should be writing this book. Okay. And usually the story holds up pretty well. In my mind, in this case, the story, I told before the undoing project was yes, it's got a connection to moneyball. Yes. I know that diversity family. Yes. Danny conman lives up the hill from me in Berkeley. But we're we're I hit a where where I hit a roadblock was no, I don't know. A thing about the field of psychology. And. And no, I don't know a thing about the origins of the state of Israel and and Hebrew University department in which all of this stuff got cooked up and now with most things I re- most books..

Richard Thaler Nobel prize Danny conman Baseball Ray Israel Hebrew University Oakland Mr. vergerski Berkeley Katamon Cass
"vergerski" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:42 min | 3 years ago

"vergerski" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The top of the list and the president is typically briefed by the state department and everything sort of goes through them but not this time the state department found out about this from the casino company that's not a good day for the us government or the state department this is elliott phil phone has not gotten the special license that he wanted from the vietnamese government nevertheless it's extraordinary that the us state department the obama state department was entirely cut out of this initial phone call to word question ready nick vergerski nick for bisky is a super listener to the trump inc podcast who took it upon himself to go down to a county clerk's office in the northern suburbs of new york and start looking through trump related property tax filings third floor records department of county clerk's office for westchester county and he did a search for trump lawsuits in the county records were a concern for an account just to be able to print documents and that led us to one of our recent episodes the peculiar situation that many local governments now find themselves in of being sued by the president's company in order to lower their property tax bill you have not just deputized ordinary folks in the course of this investigation you have worked with david farren thought of the washington post forbes the investigative fund the chicago sun times other outlets this is an ongoing story in which organizations that might otherwise be competing against each other the new yorker the washing pos propublica forbes divide up the work and move forward with the story because the records are so massive there are financial records from around the world there are land records from everywhere which are incredibly time consuming to go through now andrea what you just described in a non journalistic context competitors working being together on something there's a name for it it's called collusion ending environment where the president is claiming that there is collusion among the lying news media is this kind of cooperation among beating news organizations something that's going to end up somehow biting you in the okay i think not because it's in the service of the truth we're not making up stuff we are collaborating to bring out facts that are otherwise extraordinarily difficult to get into the public domain.

president vietnamese government us obama state department new york westchester county washington post forbes elliott bisky david farren chicago