35 Burst results for "van Gogh"

Jen Ruiz Shares How She Hid Rental Car Damage

Drive with Us Podcast

01:52 min | Last week

Jen Ruiz Shares How She Hid Rental Car Damage

"John thanks so much for joining us today. We're so excited to have you on. Thank you for having me. I'm so excited to be here. I know with your background. You have been to so many different places you wanna. Your goal was to do twelve trips in twelve months. Clark super excited to hear about your experience of the different drivers in those areas. So what would you say is one of the most craziest driving experiences you have had. Yes it was in twelve months so it was my year of adventure reform my thirtieth birthday where i wanted to see as much as possible while i was still in my twenties and i had a lot of different driving experiences. I rented a car and drove throughout the south of france. I went in south america peru around different places so i had a lot of different driving experiences. I would say definitely. South of france stands out because it was a bucket list item for me. And i wanted to during the summer specifically so that i would be able to drive through the lavender fields and the sunflower fields. And just get all of the wonderful. Summer smells and feel like i was in province. Did you ever end up driving in any of these different places. And what was your experience like if you did yes. I drove in a lot of the places. Sometimes i would take public transportation. It really depended on. Where was that. I was going but yes with the south of france. I did a seven day road trip. I flew into paris. And then i took the train down to avignon from there. I picked up a car. And i was able to go around the entire area to see all kinds of different things kind of real life places. Where van gogh painted and so you can see the inspiration for the famous paintings and everybody knows different gorges and mountains that were really lovely to see the different coastal cities. They're in the south of france. Until i drove all throughout that on my own.

France Clark John Peru South America Paris Van Gogh
Dutch Police Arrest Man Suspected of Stealing Paintings by Van Gogh

This Morning with Gordon Deal

00:24 sec | Last month

Dutch Police Arrest Man Suspected of Stealing Paintings by Van Gogh

"Are still missing. Police have arrested a man on suspicion of stealing two paintings. One by Vincent van Gogh from museums in the Netherlands. Theeighties 84 van Gogh painting was stolen from a museum just outside Amsterdam last March during an overnight raid. 58 year old man was arrested yesterday on suspicion of stealing both paintings, but the artwork remains missing. All right, Thank you. Gen six minutes now in front of the hour on this morning,

Van Gogh The Netherlands Amsterdam
Rarely seen Vincent van Gogh painting fetches $15.4M at auction

Noon Report with Rick Van Cise

00:18 sec | Last month

Rarely seen Vincent van Gogh painting fetches $15.4M at auction

"Sold at auction by Sotheby's Paris for $15.4 million. The sale of the picture, which two picks up windmill with a man, a woman and girl walking in front of it was highly anticipated, as was one of the few paintings by the Dutch Impressionist master to still have been in private hands. That's your money. Now. The markets are

Sotheby Paris
Rare Van Gogh masterpiece sells for $15.4 million in Paris

Phil's Gang

00:24 sec | Last month

Rare Van Gogh masterpiece sells for $15.4 million in Paris

"Vincent Van Gogh, was sold at auction Thursday by south of Bees in Paris for $15.4 million Sale of street scene in MoMA to was highly anticipated as it was one of the few paintings by the Dutch Impressionist master to still have been in private hands. Here's an analysis a town hall that calm. I'm Keith Peters in Washington.

Vincent Van Gogh Moma Paris Keith Peters Washington
A JPEG Sells for $70 Million, Creating a New Era of Digital Art Auctions

Business Wars Daily

03:51 min | Last month

A JPEG Sells for $70 Million, Creating a New Era of Digital Art Auctions

"From wondering. I'm david brown in this business. Wars daily on this tuesday march twenty third. If you're an art collector with a spare seventy million lying around a rembrandt says on may be out of your reach. But you just might be able to score yourself. A lesser van gogh picasso or like someone last week. You own your own people digital montage. Oh you've never heard of people that's okay. He's not one of those guys. They teach art history class. Which makes it all the more remarkable one of his electronic art pieces just sold at auction at christie's for nearly seventy million dollars even though it only exists in pixels is the third highest price ever commanded by a living artist. According to the new york times people is a digital artist from south carolina. Whose given name. Is mike thirteen years. He's created a drawing every day. He started with pen and paper but now creates art. Digitally the record breaking piece titled everyday's the five thousand days is a composite of the first five thousand days of that project. This was also the first time christie's sold a piece of digital only artwork. It was purchased with the cryptocurrency ether. Another first for christie's something tells me you won't be the last either. So you're probably wondering why in the world someone would pay seventy million dollars for a pack a reproducible. Virtual file right. Something you can't touch or even hang on your wall. yeah. I know. That's what i was wondering. Turns out every day is is in just another pretty j. peg. It's what's called a non fungible token or nfc and if you're thinking is so tell me why that matters. Well you're going to need to stick with me for a moment. On this one in tease us blockchain technology for authentication. Now this blockchain is the same sort of thing that you find in bitcoin right. It captures information and shares it with a network of computers and once shared. There's a digital ledger. That records the data across thousands of computers. Making it impossible to manipulate or so goes the theory. So when you buy an nf it's quote minted to you. Meaning an ownership record is created across thousands of computers around the world. You own the original one of a kind file. I know it may seem complicated on the surface but it really is pretty straightforward essentially techie. Way of making a digital file one of a kind like a physical object even if others tried to make a copy. It's taking a photo of a famous painting. It's not worth what the original is worth. Entities allow users to own bits of video songs or images. Their popularity actually began years ago with a game. Called crypto kitties where people could buy in trade animated cats after attracting top venture. Capital firm says investors some crypto. Kitty sold well into the six figures. Lately they've turned into a blazing hot sector in art and collectibles. Sports stars like lebron. James and rob gronkowski have even gotten in on the action selling. Nfc video clips. In digital trading cards people has been at the forefront of this craze in february a short video clip he created sold for nearly seven million dollars in one weekend in december he made more than three million dollars selling his t's bad for a guy who calls some of his own work crap according to the times not to be outdone. Sotheby's has gotten in on the act last

Van Gogh Picasso Mike Thirteen Christie David Brown The New York Times South Carolina NFC Rob Gronkowski Kitty Lebron James Sotheby
"van gogh" Discussed on The Kevin Sheehan Show

The Kevin Sheehan Show

07:36 min | 2 months ago

"van gogh" Discussed on The Kevin Sheehan Show

"Walking the way to go so we can look into third. Sixteen bridgewater deep. Feel curtis samuel has been a ford in washington side on the ground through the air. Curtis samuel in that game in december destroyed the redskins. The redskins sorry about that washington. Football team Destroyed them seven. Seven runs for fifty two yards five catches for one hundred and six yards. He had that forty five yard. Run which you heard on the highlight coming in and then that big catch And he really was outstanding. This was the obvious guy that washington was going to target trae boston. Another guy you know. In in the secondary for carolina people thought as well but the panthers connection curtis samuel free agent. You know a really. A friend of terry mclaren's from ohio state And one of the things. Tommy i always think about when a really good player leaves is will. Why did that team let him leave. You know i. I always think that way. it's somebody gets traded. That's perceived to be really good and especially with this organization over the years. Well if he's so good why was he available You know. I'll never forget. The first time i really felt that way was donovan. Mcnabb that the trade that was that was the one time i got in trouble with red. Zebra owning radio station is easter night going on. Espn and saying there's a red red flag on the trade for me. I don't see why. Andy reid with trade donovan mcnabb within the division if mcnabb's still really good that doesn't make any sense to me but anyway So curtis samuel. They weren't gonna tag. Curtis samuel and curtis off of a great year. One wanted to hit free agency and obviously washington and his connections to not only the coaching staff but detari maclaurin You know as an ohio state guy and other ohio state guys on the roster He wanted to be a part of this. I love the player. I really love the player. His versatility has pass catcher as a slot guy which they needed more. I think stevens sims junior was a big disappointment last year. Samuel is versatile. He can play outside if you need them to. But the way. Joe brady us. Curtis samuel last year in carolina was really really creative. Samuels always been a great a really good yards after. Catch guy a guy with the ball in his hands. It can make things happen. He's he's a really good vision runner. He's got speed. He actually has more power than you would think you know for a guy you know. Who's five whatever. Five ten in one ninety five. Whatever he is he runs with with ferocity they lined up in the backfield last year. Curtis samuel had the best year of his career with joe. Brady and teddy. Bridgewater is the quarterback but he ran the ball as a wide receiver. Forty one times in a season. I don't know you know he went to. E what thank you brooklyn guy when he went to high school in brooklyn razzmatazz right high school. That has avis went. To arrives. Gonna say i know that name rasmusen by in brooklyn while he averaged as a senior running back yards a carry unbelievable you see a lotta those stats in highschool though Guys at rush for three hundred yards a game. Or whatever i'm but they put him in the backfield. Though tommy like he was running zone reads with bridgewater. He was taking handoffs in the backfield as a running back. You don't see that really in the nfl much with receivers. Most of the runs are fly. Sweep runs or reverses or you know and you'll get a couple when you when you've had forty one carries you've basically had two and a half carries a game as a wide receiver over sixteen games. Holly he's the only player in ohio state history to go over a thousand yards career in rushing and receive. I know that but he was a receiver in the nfl. You know his first three years in the nfl he had four carries eight carries and then and then nineteen carries and then last year with joe brady. He had forty one so that to see a wide receiver. End up touching the ball that much as a running back. I'm not talking again about you. Know fly sweeps or shovels or reverses. I'm talking about he's lined up in the backfield for a lot of those runs. Run that we came in on the highlight he was in the backfield It'll be interesting to see how scott turner uses them. Look they needed more weapons offensively. They need a guy that can first of all get open from that slot position which he can. He's a he's a a nightmare of a matchup. He's got great hands. He's got good speed good quickness and he's very good after the catch terry maclaurin on the field. They need to have. They gotta make sure that they've got Their their answer tight end. You know in. Logan thomas certainly. He looked the part at times last year. And i'll tell you. What the quarterback that i am delusional about. He loves to throw in the tight end. So maybe there's another tight end that will be added. Maybe there's another receiver to be added But with gibson and mckissic and maclaurin and now curtis samuel and if you wanna throw logan thomas into the mix Throw somebody else in there that they may add. Or maybe they liked kelvin harmon. Or maybe they think cam sims a true number two you know as an onslaught guy I like what's going on with this football team on offense. The quarterback though is important. And i think they have the answer in terms of a guy that will be able to run everything run everything professionally and by the way. Also do a lot off schedule. I like it's like samuel. I liked the money to three thirty four. It's nothing over the top. I mean you're talking about barely in the top fifteen of wide receiver salaries Twenty three million guaranteed is. I think kaime a reported Really liked the player three three straight nights to straight nights of really liking the player in the upside of the player with jackson. And now samuel. Who's younger samuels twenty. Four years old. You know so. They got to players basically entering their prime At decent prices you know a lot of people think the jackson deal is cornerback to money. Samuela certainly not a wide receiver number one money not elite wide receiver number one money and so. They've gotten good deals on players that they needed. That can really help. And they also got the soon to be thirty. Nine year old quarterback that i think is going to play well next year. I love this Signing of samuel. I really do now. Did mardi.

Curtis samuel curtis samuel curtis terry mclaren Five Joe one hundred Samuel Samuels Tommy gibson joe brady redskins Twenty three million donovan five catches december next year twenty Andy reid
"van gogh" Discussed on The Kevin Sheehan Show

The Kevin Sheehan Show

06:09 min | 2 months ago

"van gogh" Discussed on The Kevin Sheehan Show

"If he stands up there and talks about ryan fitzpatrick that there were other teams. That were coming. after fitzpatrick. we were lucky to get him with that. Be ally was an ally when the agent told him. You know. Ron you better move quickly. We got sixteen interested. I get the whole business operates on lice. I know that like my fat and said once at the very least this time. I'm going to tell you the truth right. You know at least useful yes But my point is if he gets up there and talks about that. This was the guy they wanted all along that they targeted him and that they they were lucky to get him that there were other teams in on the ryan fitzpatrick sweepstakes. We don't know whether to believe any of that right. no why are you. Why are you not. Why are you making a big deal. Out of the fact that coaches don't they don't always tell you literally the truth there. Coaching there motivating protecting know that. I'm not. I'm not breaking new ground here. Okay good so what are why. Are you wasting time. Well you. I know you'll put all your all your ducks in a row behind the coach. If he says there were ten teams fight to get right. If it's pat noah but we would have lucky wants to get. I wouldn't believe that that that would be way over. Saturation point but i but i don't think but but that's the point is is if he says something more matter of factly And it's not an exaggeration and he doesn't emphasize it i. It's possible that i might buy it. I don't know what i'll buy or won't buy. I'm not going to buy everything. You're suggesting that i'm like an easy sell like. I'm an easy mark when it comes to a coach that i like that may be true is shanahan but i don't think it's true with rivera yet. The point is the bottom line is when they signed him the other night i you know i felt that this was in play i encouraged. I was intrigued by it if they struck out on any of the big people. I'm excited about this. So whether there were ten teams or three teams. Or whether he tells me there's a competition or he tells me ryan. Fitzpatrick is the starter. Belief is ryan fitzpatrick's going to start an opening day and barring injury. I think he's gonna play well with what they're putting around him and that he's going to start at least fourteen games. If they're out of the playoff race with two games left they may go with a. You know a heineke or allen. But i am. I am definitely much more optimistic about the offense. Because they signed ryan fitzpatrick. I did a poll today on my show and i am definitely in the minority in terms of the answer. I just asked a very simple question. Which of the three washington football signings are you most optimistic about for next year. Okay not not for the careers. Next year fitzpatrick will jackson. Curtis samuel curtis samuel fifty one point eight percent jackson twenty five point five percent. Fitzpatrick came in last at two point. Six percent i would pick fitzpatrick fitzpatrick. First of all the positions. The most important position by far they didn't have an answer before then and now. I think they have an answer. That's more than just fun. I think fitzpatrick could be a one year. And maybe even a two year answer at quarterback. And i think he's gonna play very well in this system and what they put around him next year. I do your you. You can put me into the category of people that are delusional About ryan fitzpatrick next year. I am definitely I'm i'm more than just intrigued about all the fun. We're going to have with a great sound bite. As or what kind of clothes. He's going to wear to the press conference or how he plays which is as a gunslinger which he does play very much that way. I think he's going to be good for this team. Really good guy plus you. I'm i'm so happy that even after all the abuse that you can still be delusional. Well you know what and a lot of these situations have been right in another's i've been wrong. You know i. I can tell you this. A more optimistic about him playing quarterback on this team next year. Then i have been about a quarterback since kirk cousins. And don't don't tweet me and say she and you were all in on haskins. That's a distortion of the truth. And most of you know that but some of you don't. I was intrigued with haskins. And i wanted to see him start in a year that i thought was a throwaway year in terms of being able to compete for anything. I wanted to see him. Start all sixteen games so we knew at the end of this year. Do we have somebody or not. Because i saw enough in his rookie year to want to see more. That's what i said over and over again. I wa- i've seen enough. I see a guy that can make every throw. I see a guy that competes. I see a guy. That's got a little bit of gamer in them. There were concerns. Okay a lot of concerns. But i you're you're right if you say you were all in on seeing him in twenty twenty. I was now if they had had a really good team coming back. I may felt differently but fitz patrick is a different conversation. He's capable of playing in the nfl at a very high level. I'm not saying consistently. But he's capable of playing at a high level and he's definitely one of these guys that has the intangible stuff that that alex smith obviously had he's going to be a leader and he's going and maybe even a.

Ron fitzpatrick Six percent Fitzpatrick alex smith ryan fitzpatrick jackson three teams Next year sixteen two year next year Curtis samuel five percent ryan eight percent two games twenty fifty two point
Rarely seen Van Gogh painting exhibited ahead of auction

Larry Elder

00:41 sec | 2 months ago

Rarely seen Van Gogh painting exhibited ahead of auction

"Com. Rare painting by Dutch master Vincent van Gogh will be put on public display for the first time ahead of an auction next month. The Parisian neighborhood painting a street scene in Montmartre. Picks a windmill named the Peppermill Seen from the street under a bright sky, Sotheby's auction says the picture painted in 18 87, has remained in the same family collection for over 100 years unseen to the public eye. The painting will be exhibited next month in Amsterdam, Hong Kong and Paris. Ahead of election scheduled for March. 25 in the French capital, Sotherby's has estimated its value

Vincent Van Gogh Montmartre Sotheby Amsterdam Hong Kong Paris Sotherby
Rarely seen Van Gogh painting exhibited ahead of auction

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 2 months ago

Rarely seen Van Gogh painting exhibited ahead of auction

"A red painting by Dutch master Vincent van Gogh who we put on public display for the first time the head of an old next month the Parisian neighborhood painting a street scene in March two picks a windmill named the Peppermill seen from the street under a bright sky Sotheby's auction says the picture painted in eighteen eighty seven has remained in the same family collection for over one hundred years on scene to the public online the paintings will be exhibited next month in Amsterdam Hong Kong and Paris ahead of an auction scheduled for March twenty five in the French capital Sothebys has estimated its value between six and ten million dollars I'm Charles the last month

Vincent Van Gogh Sotheby Amsterdam Hong French Capital Sothebys Kong Paris Charles
Dutch police clash with anti-lockdown protesters in 2 cities

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 3 months ago

Dutch police clash with anti-lockdown protesters in 2 cities

"The thirty people have been arrested in the Netherlands following clashes with police said a banned demonstration against corona virus smoke damages Weitz's set fire in the center of the sudden Dutch city of Eindhoven and pelted police with rocks what offices responded with tear gas and water cannons the confrontation took place on a major square ringed by museums video showed police bring people groups against one of the van Gogh museum it was the worst point is to hit the man's name since the pandemic began the country has been in a tough look down since mid December that is due to continue at least until the ninth of February I'm Karen Thomas

Weitz The Netherlands Eindhoven Van Gogh Museum Karen Thomas
Am I Radical Enough?

The Cut

05:42 min | 7 months ago

Am I Radical Enough?

"I think the one thing we can all agree on is that no one is happy right now with the way things are. But there's this agreement over how much change we can ask for right now. Like can I start to advocate for free college legalized pot? When like gay marriage might be repealed? I just worry that this push pull leaves me somewhere in the middle and settling for less. Limiting own dreams, what the future can be because I'm afraid about the president. I, just feel like a not radical enough. A recent example. So right now, people are rising up to protest against police violence and the phrase abolish the police or defunding police is really becoming an idea that is is much more mainstream sophia. No is an author and cartoonist who's been involved in a lot of radical activists, organizers circles. And so she posted something on instagram about defunding the police, and then I saw somebody else post something on instagram. That was like you have to say abolish the police. You can't say defined the police because if you say defunding police people don't know that what you mean is that it's a step towards abolition sophie. was what I posted not enough should I have said abolish instead then a friend of mine who's an older activists was like actually I think the word de fund is really important because it's it does represent a step and it represents an an action that people can understand as a step towards abolition, and so there's this back and forth about what is the right wording to use? It was kind of interesting for Sophie, that she was dealing with this dilemma because she just wrote a whole graphic novel about this. About how to try to be a good person in a bad world? The book is called the contradictions. One of the reasons I ended up deciding to like do the book is because I was sort of talking to friends of mine in the like anarchist scene we were talking about like when we first got introduced to like lefty ideas and. How those ideas came through people and how those people. Had An influence on how we thought about the ideas and like ideas can be perfect. But humans are fallible right? The comic is auto fiction. So the main characters named Sophie and it's based on Sophie's life, but it's not actually sophie. The book starts in Paris with Sophie having just arrived to study abroad. Here. I was age twenty. Character feels out of place and pretty quickly meets somebody who maybe alliance more with her background. So she's getting Abban. Sees. Somebody riding by on a fixed gear bike Fix Gear and makes the association that okay. After writing affixed here. Then maybe they're punk and if the navy there punk and maybe they're queer in like Ben. Maybe. I have a friend here. Fake. I saw you orientation. This person on the bike turns out to be another American in Sophie Study Abroad Program and they strike up a friendship. This person Zeena does not as clear as Sophie Hope, but she is opponent. Zina's Vegan. She is very active in like animal rights stuff and very vocal about it guy just broke up with worked at the COP with man we to sit outside and yell things like milk. It's full of US I used to be vegetarian but I'm Nima so I stopped. You could take iron pills or eat spinach character. Sophie explains that she's Tangentially associated with some anarchist or lefty friends back home and you know she's dipping her toes in into that world but hasn't really participated much and then Zena. You know she talks about having a planner full of activists activities and then she also gives Soviet. About these two anarchists hitchhiking around Western Europe. Everyone's making plans for spring break. What if we went hitchhiking? Taking a plane, the gas emissions are out of control and also going hitchhiking is more. Living the ideals I think I'll go vegan for the trip like in solidarity you don't have to do that. But I want to. XENA and Sophie hit the road trying to thumb their way from Paris to Amsterdam. Freeway insurance how? Actually exhausting and it takes ever. So that when they get to Amsterdam Sophie, kind of pulls out the map and it's like, oh, we could go to the end Frank House. I don't know. Like the Van Gogh Museum. Na. Dena just does not seem interested museums only showed the narrative of the victor and they are hierarchical thing that must be abolished or whatever. There's a comic shop. I'd like to see maybe we can walk there. Sure Well, they end up wandering around a fair bit. It's sort of the. The deflation of like we we did the thing and we're here and. Now. We're just here.

Sophie Hope Instagram President Trump Paris Van Gogh Museum Dena COP Zina Amsterdam Western Europe Zeena Frank House Xena
The beauty hall for 2020 is here

Breaking Beauty Podcast

05:37 min | 8 months ago

The beauty hall for 2020 is here

"All right. So normally, we always start out with skincare. We know that you guys are huge skin care junkies, but there's so much news make up that. Honestly we have to give it some love straight off the top, and we're going to start with none other than rare beauty, the new line by Selena. Gomez. Okay. So I did not get my package a curly, and so I'm very excited to hear what you thought of the line and what you think the winners are and just definitely part of this bigger trend we're seeing right of so many celebrities launching makeup lines right now. Yeah it's. True I feel like they used to be kind of like on the poster to represent like a new lipstick or something in these big campaigns, and now it's as though they've stepped out of the frame and they're really owning their own lines it really you know with Selena Gomez I know that health is a topic that's really close to her heart. So we know that one percent of the proceeds from this whole line is going toward increasing access to mental health services. So I, think just having like so much more integrity behind his lines as what makes them not just a flash in the pan. Committed to one hundred, million dollars over the next ten years. So that's a pretty big deal that's super exciting, and of course, we know that Sephora, is behind this line as well. It's exclusive to Sephora so although it's not one of the Kendo brands. So to speak I, feel like you know Sephora they get all that Intel from their customers they know what they want and they really brought a lot of I would say like. Thoughtfulness, to these formulations, I think that's where a rare beauty really wins. Okay. So let's hear about it because I know a lot of people were kind of comparing it to fantasy like one what's been your experience so far? What's what have you been? Loving. So my favorite product from the lot is the rare beauty liquid touch weightless foundation, and so that's the one everyone's going to compare it Fendi. It has forty eight shades except this one is only twenty nine dollars, which is cheaper than the fence is thirty eight dollars Canadian, and of course, it launched just at the beginning of September I really love it. So first of. All just tell you like what it is. It's meant to be a lightweight valuation that goes on Super. Naturally but it has quite a bit of pigment to it. So it will give you a medium to full coverage finish and I think we're all familiar with the bottle. We've probably seen it on instagram. It's as beautiful like it's got the sculptural shape to it. So it then bottle and then it has like this white ball on the top definitely GonNa look good on your shelf e and when you open it, what's really unique is its got this gigantic doe foot applicator like it almost reminds me of the applicators of those. Big Conceal that were coming ask chair. Yeah. Yeah and it's meant to be like a Serum Foundation. So you actually shake it and you can hear that click, click click inside and I'll be honest I've tried serum foundations in the past and I don't typically like them usually they come with a dropper and although there really lightweight there's like a slickness and an oiliness to it that I just do not like I I feel like that was like a a flash in the pan kind of a gimmick that I don't think those are going to last but this one goes on and it feels more just like a very lightweight almost. Watery Foundation without having any oiliness to it, but it is quite pigmented. So what you're going to do is you're gonNA put dots on your face like in the main areas where you won't coverage for me that would all over my tease own and then I, just used my beauty blender and blended in as usual and I really found it had a very natural second skin effect. So it's not particularly Matt it's not particularly Dewey it just looks Berry Notch, draw it kind of reminded me of the Bite Beauty Foundation that I really fell in love with lots year that all clocks right because it likes under Sephora I'm sure they definitely Yeah, armed each other. Well, I mean Sephora. So as an example, Nour's launched a soft Matte Foundation this fall as well, and the publicis actually told me that that was in collaboration with Sephora and that they were using all of the feedback from their customers to tell them what they wanted So that was a very different foundation. It's quite matt more like the Charlotte Tilbury airbrush break by yes. A We know that they're kind of feeding into that and that just makes sense I mean Celinas. Not a makeup artist. Maybe, she has van Gogh helping our, but obviously, they're going to be using the power of their knowledge to create these formulas. So I love this foundation I think it's so natural. This is like a new favorite for me but I think it's really representative of the line like what I noticed just having tried quite a few products is that it's like taking existing ideas like for example, the lip souffle Matt lip cream we all know a liquid matlab color, but this one just went on, it gives you a soft finish. And it's so comfortable. But what I liked is it wasn't thick. So they managed to get that pigment without having that thickness like I can never get a clean line with a Matt liquid color. I always have to use my finger to blended then and then you don't get that that nice shape to it. So this when you do so everything was like, yes already out there but this is so thoughtful and it's just slightly better

Sephora Selena Gomez Serum Foundation Selena Bite Beauty Foundation Matt Intel Matte Foundation Representative Celinas Van Gogh Publicis Nour Dewey Berry Notch
Why specializing early doesn't always mean career success

TED Talks Daily

05:03 min | 9 months ago

Why specializing early doesn't always mean career success

"Hi. I'm Elise Hugh. And you're listening to Ted talks daily today's talk features really fascinating research that cuts us all some slack. What I mean is it turns out you can be a late bloomer in your chosen sport or skill or specialty, and it's actually better for you in a lot of ways. The talk is journalist David Epstein at Ted Ex Manchester in twenty twenty. So I'd like to talk about the development of human potential and I'd like to start with maybe the most impactful modern story of development. Many of you here have probably heard of the ten thousand dollars rule maybe you even model your own life after it. Basically, it's the idea that the become great anything takes ten thousand hours of focused practice. So. You'd better get started as early as possible. The poster child for this story is Tiger Woods. Father Famously, gave him a putter when he was seven months old at ten months, he started imitating his father's swing. At to, you can go on Youtube and see him on national television fast forward to the age of twenty one he's the greatest Golfer in the world's quintessential ten thousand dollars story. Another that features a number of bestselling books is that of the three Polgar sisters whose father decided to teach them chests in a very technical manner from a very early age and really wanted to show that with a head start and focused practice. Any child could become a genius in anything, and in fact, two of his daughters went onto become grandmaster chess players. So, when I became the Science Writer at sports illustrated magazine I got curious if this ten thousand hours rules correct then we should see that elite athletes get a headstart in so-called deliberate practice. This is coached air correction focus practice not just playing around, and in fact, when scientists study lead athletes, they see that they spend more time in deliberate practice not a big surprise. When they actually track athletes over the course of their development, the future leads actually spend less time early on in delivered practice in their eventual sport they to have what scientists call a sampling period where they try a variety of physical activities. They gain broad general skills they learned about their interests and abilities and delays specializing until later than peers who plateau at lower levels. And so when I saw that said, Gosh that doesn't really comport with the ten thousand hours rule does it. So I started to wonder about other domains that we associate with obligatory early specialization like music. Turns out the patterns often similar. Research from a world class, Music Academy, and what I want to draw your attention to is the exceptional musicians didn't start spending more time into practice than the average musicians. Until Third Instrument, they tended to have a sampling period. Even musicians we think of is famously precocious like Yo, Yo Ma he sampling period he just went through it more rapidly than most musicians do. Nonetheless, this research almost entirely ignored and much more impactful is the first page of the Book Battle Hymn of the Tiger mother where the author recounts assigning her daughter Violin. Nobody seems remember the part later in the book where her daughter turns her and says, you picked it not me and largely quits. So having seen this sort of surprising pattern in sports and music. I started to wonder about domains that affect and more people like education and economists found a natural experiment in the Higher Ed Systems of England and Scotland in the period studied, the systems were very similar except in England students had to specialize in their mid teen years to pick a specific course of study to apply tours in Scotland they could keep trying things in university if they wanted to and his question was who wins the trade off the early or the late specializes and he saw that the early specializes jump out to an income. Lead because they have more domain specific skills, the late specializes get to try more different things and when they do pick, they have better fit or what economists call match quality, and so their growth rates are faster by six years out erase that income gap. Meanwhile, the earliest specializes start quitting their career tracks in much higher numbers essentially because they were made to choose. So early that they more often made choices. So the late specializes lose in the short term and win in the long run. I think if we thought about career choice like dating, we might not pressure people to settle down quite so quickly. So this interested seeing this pattern again in exploring a developmental backgrounds of people whose work I had long admired like Duke Ellington who shunned music lessons as a kid to focus on baseball and painting and drawing or Mario Mir's economy who wasn't interested in math is a girl dreamed of becoming a novelist and went on to become the first and so far only woman to win the fields medal the most prestigious prize in the world in Math Vincent Van Gogh had five different careers, each of which he deemed his true calling before flaming out spectacularly, and in his late twenty s picked up a book called the guide to the ABC's of drawing. That worked out. Okay Claude Shannon was an electrical engineer at the University of Michigan who took a philosophy course just to fulfill a requirement and in it, he learned about a near century old system of logic or was true and false statements could be coded as ones and zeroes in solved like math problems. This led to the development of Binary Code, which underlies all of our digital computers today.

Ted Ex Manchester Scotland Elise Hugh Tiger Woods Math Vincent Van Gogh Youtube David Epstein Sports Illustrated Magazine Claude Shannon Duke Ellington Third Instrument Higher Ed Systems Of England Music Academy University Of Michigan ABC Writer Mario Mir Engineer England
"van gogh" Discussed on Giants of History

Giants of History

03:58 min | 10 months ago

"van gogh" Discussed on Giants of History

"To go next store to the hotel to use the public toilets which were set to be squalid and extremely disgusting. So this is not exactly my idea of heaven but to Van Gogh. Ever wanted. Van Gogh. Himself wrote of the place quote in this meaning the House and surroundings I can breathe meditate and paint I feel that I can make something lasting out of it. and quote. nathe and Smith. Add to this when they write quote Vincent Cy. Garden of Eden where the Greenery was lush and the sky overhead always quote intensely blue as van Gogh himself described it. Van Gogh wrote to family members telling them that he had thought the park with the prostitutes in the bushes was delightful and that he enjoyed watching the sunrise through his windows in the morning from what he could also see what he called a pretty public garden. And quoted. Again, this speaks to the way that Van Goghs saw the world he saw beauty in places that others didn't or couldn't. And as soon as Van Gogh sign the lease where rent was a pittance by the way at just fifteen francs a month or about seventy five dollars a month in today's dollars based on the conversions that I saw. As soon, as he signed the lease, he went to work fixing the place up a bit. And the most famous piece of that rehabilitation was the coat of paint that he applied to the exterior and the. Interior walls. Van Go refer to this coat of paint as quote the yellow color of fresh butter. and quote. He then painted the shutters of the House Green to set off a nice contrast. And just as soon as the place was ready, Van Gogh vocalized the next step in his plans for the yellow. House. Stayed in quote. I could quite well share the new studio with someone. Perhaps Gauguin will come south. and quote. Now again here is obviously referring to the now famous French painter Paul Gauguin. Now Gauguin. Took just like van, Gogh would for the most part be unappreciated while he was alive. But his work would eventually become some of the most valuable and sought after pieces in the art world with one of his painting selling for close to three hundred, million dollars in twenty fifteen making it the most expensive painting ever sold for a time. And it should be noted that Gauguin was also a major influence on Pablo Picasso. But returning to our story of Van Gogh and again. Van Gogh and go Gan had met in Paris, a year earlier in eighteen, eighty seven and they had met at an art exhibition that Van Gogh himself had organized. A hundred pieces of Van Gogh's work alongside a few other artists was displayed at this exhibition and Gauguin attended. Gauguin had never seen van Gogh's work before and vice versa. But the two eventually connected after the exhibition and they decided to exchange paintings and potentially work together at some point. And Van Gogh's brother Theo also bought some of Gauguin's pieces further solidifying his connection to Van Gogh, and their future plans. and. So finally following up on their plans to work together in the fall of eighteen, eighty eight. Paul Gauguin moved to Arl and into the Yellow House with Van Gogh. But. UNBEKNOWNST to the two of them. This was a recipe for disaster. And here again is where our story starts to pick up steam. The reasons they're working together was a recipe for disaster are quite simple..

Van Gogh Paul Gauguin Van Goghs Van Yellow House Vincent Cy Arl Smith Pablo Picasso Paris Gan Theo
"van gogh" Discussed on Giants of History

Giants of History

03:37 min | 10 months ago

"van gogh" Discussed on Giants of History

"Why on Earth, did you cut off your ear and give it to a prostitute as a gift? And that thought has bounced around in my head for many years. And it turns out that most of what I thought occurred on that night was not exactly correct. And so finally, I wanted to know the real story behind this famous event. And, that my friends was the genesis of this episode. Most people don't know this. In all honesty, most people don't know when to place the event. They just know that at some point in his life Vincent Van Gogh Cut off part of his ear. Some people think it was as holier. To place it for you though. The event occurred at the very end of his life about eighteen months to be exact before he committed suicide. And his life wasn't a very long life either van Gogh was just thirty seven years old when he walked into that field in France, pulled out the gun and pointed it at his chest. And for the vast majority of that thirty, seven years on Earth Van Gogh epitomized the idea of the tortured artist. In fact, if you simply google the term tortured artist, which we've all heard before van Gogh's picture is the first one that you'll see. And here's something else most people don't know even though Van Goghs life was relatively short his productivity from a painting standpoint was incredible. Put it this way. Van Gogh didn't really start painting with any serious consistency till as late twenties I think it was twenty eight to be precise if my review of his catalog is accurate. Before that he spent time as an art dealer and then a Protestant missionary all the while dabbling with the idea of becoming an artist himself. And then finally at the age of twenty eight, he went for it. So, if van Goghs started painting when he was twenty eight and then died at thirty seven. Let's call US productivity period about a decade long. And it is said again, if my reviews catalog is correct that Van Gogh produced around nine hundred oil paintings during that decade of work not to mention the other thousand plus drawings and such that he also put forward. But focusing on the nine hundred paintings as that's where his major contribution to art was and what he is known for. Of those nine hundred or so paintings a substantial portion of them were completed in the last two to three years of his life with nearly all of his most famous and his most valuable paintings today being produced during that last two to three years of his life and this includes starry night sunflowers cafe terrace at night starry night over the Rhone Bedroom Arl and many of his most famous self portrait S-. And perhaps, there is some connection here and in my opinion for what it's worth their most certainly is that the most explosive period in his life from painting standpoint is also the most chaotic and tumultuous part of his personal life. But the underlying theme of Van Gogh's entire existence was one of mental suffering in some form or another. It is well known that he suffered from depression on and off for most of his life compounding this issue was the fact that van?.

Earth Van Gogh Vincent Van Gogh van Goghs Rhone Bedroom Arl google France
Netflix is Hollywood

Land of the Giants

05:03 min | 10 months ago

Netflix is Hollywood

"Where are we? We are in Los Angeles. We're about to turn onto sunset. Boulevard Hollywood maybe in Hollywood. Okay, so we're. We're approaching. Hollywood hills. Really Tall Palm Trees. So should we explain why we're? We're driving through sunset radio. There's a bunch of billboards here, right? That's what we're. Getting at. Less Ronnie our producers, etc piled, a newborn, took a drive down Hollywood's main drag. It's a traffic jam packed with billboards promoting new TV shows and movies. I've been covering the business of media for a long time, so I served as tour guide for this trip, but Ronnie is a data reporter who mainly writes about tech companies. She doesn't typically pay a lot of attention to what's going on in Hollywood. Here, we have a a the crown net flicks up on the right. Have you watched any of the crown yet? I have not. On the left we have marriage story billboard. This is a Scarlett Johansson. I don't think I want to watch that. You may not be the right person for streaming roddy in a row. We got the Irishman. That's Scorsese's film and then DOLEMITE is my name. Reading that right. Alfie, these are both movies. They're both movies. You can see on Netflix Sega. Any of these this is this is a worthwhile trip for learning. What's on Netflix? You could just actually go to your browser. Are these like already outer. These are like I don't know. Someone like hermetically sealed raising. A drive down, sunset isn't just a chance for Ronnie to see what's coming on. TV, it's a way to watch Hollywood talking to itself, these billboards are messages which are very much directed at Hollywood except now. netflix's doing most of the talking. Stranger things net flix. The politician. Net flicks, one billboard tuna flexible work three Netflix. Netflix well years ago when Netflix was first getting into its own programming. Executive there told me that because they were tech company. They didn't have to do things that traditional media companies do like renting billboards, so it could show big-name talented netflix serious about Hollywood. That guy turns out was wrong. Netflix has decided loves billboards so much that it went out and bought some for itself, and now the company owns many of the signs on the Strip. This, you still look like before streaming. That's one of the main ideas we keep running across as we're working on the series, it's almost impossible to imagine what the world like before Netflix. Even though that time was just a few years ago. If you didn't know any better, you'd think. Netflix's has always been a huge part of Hollywood. Syphilis can be fatal to your baby free. Check that out not flick show. UNCLEAR UNCLEAR? Welcome the land of the giants. The NETFLIX's effect. I'm Peter Coffee. Today. We're talking about how NETFLIX's. Would outsider that no one took seriously took over the town and change the lives of the people in it. Are the CO founder and CEO of Net flicks. I'm going to conduct this interview netflix style. I'M GONNA. Have like five questions you're GonNa love and five thousand. You've never heard. Today. It's given it. NETFLIX's remade. The media. World to companies becomes so omnipresent in our lives that CEO Reed. Hastings even counts as a sort of celebrity. He's a big enough deal for a guest spot Stephen Colbert. You're like one of the big one of those big new media disruptors. Why did the entertainment industry need to be disrupted? Just for the fun of it. On this happened really quickly. We talked to Kim Masters veteran show business journalist at the Hollywood reporter who said that a decade ago Netflix's was an afterthought for big media companies newcomers from Silicon Valley or anywhere else did not strike fear in the hearts of moguls. There's a thing that happens in Hollywood. Which is the outsiders come in, and they think boy. There's a lot of stupid rules in Hollywood and people sure do dumb stuff, but we're going to be much smarter than these idiots, and then they get kilt. It turns out that Netflix was the exception to the rule. It didn't get killed at one. And NETFLIX's did it with Hollywood's help. You can trace all this back to two thousand eight, which is when Netflix's really broken into streaming by getting his hands on a bunch of blockbuster movies for a bargain, Ben, price, it had made a deal with stars premium cable channel. Let netflix's stream always rate movies from Sony and Disney so stars had created the service called Vong which nobody listening to this podcast is GonNa Remember, but there was a service before Netflix's. That was streaming. Streaming movies called. Longo Van Gogh was losing seventy million dollars a year. Rich Greenfield is an analyst with light shed partners. He's been following digital media closely for years, and in walks, Reed Hastings in Ted Sandoz and says hey will take that streaming content. You could sub-licensed to us and we'll pay you. Tens of millions of dollars Netflix's use it as the base to build their streaming service, versus what was historically just a DVD service. And the rest is they say is history.

Netflix Hollywood Ronnie Reed Hastings Los Angeles Scarlett Johansson Reporter CEO Longo Van Gogh Stephen Colbert Peter Coffee Scorsese Roddy Alfie Rich Greenfield
"van gogh" Discussed on Revisionist History

Revisionist History

06:57 min | 11 months ago

"van gogh" Discussed on Revisionist History

"TAXES DOT COM. Experience Amazing. Alexa Steele. So back to Claude. Who has a child fled Europe with his family. About fifteen years ago, Allen started asking the museums holding hedwig art to do a version of what Charles Venable at Indianapolis or what Randy Frost tries to teach hoarders. To break their attachment to a specific object by asking a broader question about its relationship to their own values. In essence, all in told the museums Mike Grandmother and her family sold some of their prized possessions in a moment of desperation and panic. To help finance their escape from certain death. Are you sure you feel right about owning it an object with that kind of history. Allen started with the Gauguin Street into Haiti and the Van Gogh the diggers that were once owned by Hedwig, brother and sister-in-law. All in a group of his relatives approached the Toledo Museum and the Detroit. Institute of art with their requests. The family was forced to give these paintings up under duress in nineteen, thirty eight. Could they get back. And what happened? The two museums. And sued the all it's. That was in order to, and this is one of those wonderful legal euphemisms. Quiet the title to the painting. And when the case went to court the museums, one on the narrow grounds, the statute of limitations had expired. According to the Federal Court, in Detroit, the case would have been valid only if they had filed a claim for the diggers. Three years of when the painting was for sold. It was sold in nineteen thirty eight, so they needed to ask for back by nineteen forty one. When those members of the family who had not managed to flee for their lives were sitting in concentration camps. Allen had asked museums to consider the morality of their attachments. They responded by pointing to the legality of their attachments. They don't WanNa. Make this about values. No hoarder would. Consider the story of another Van Gogh. A spectacular painting called the night cafe. It was once owned by a Russian collector. The Bolsheviks seized it when they took power in one, thousand, nine, hundred nine. It's worth hundreds millions today later it was sold by the Soviets to the air to the singer sewing machine fortune. The Soviets collected a huge profit. The air later willed it to Yale University Art Museum. Then, the original owners descendant came together and said that painting was stolen from my great-grandfather. Did y'all. Give it back of course. They soothe the great grandson and one. There is a Picasso and the. Metropolitan, museum in New York called the actor worth well over one hundred million dollars. It had been owned by Paul and Alice left man, a Jewish couple in Cologne Germany who fled for Italy in nineteen, thirty seven sound familiar. They sold the painting to pay for their escape. Their great granny sued the Mat to get it back saying that it was given up under duress. The court. Ruled in favor of the met. The judge in the case said that the left men's weren't technically duress because duress for the purposes of the law requires quote, fear induced by a specific and concrete threat of harm, purposefully presented by its author to extort the victim's consent. In other words in order for the Left wants to get their Picasso back and official in the Nazi party would have had to come to them. In one, thousand, nine, hundred seven, put a gun directly to their head and say Sell Me Your Picasso. And because the fascist shows to be a touch more subtle in their methods of extortion. That painting still hangs today on the walls of the met. And Vase with carnations. There's a legal loophole in that case as well head gave it to an art dealer in nineteen, thirty eight, but that was to sell on consignment, and the art dealer took it to new. York and didn't get around to selling it until after the war was over. HEDWIG may have given up under duress of the Nazi threat, but it wasn't sold under the duress of the Nazi threat. Claude. Had No legal claim to vase with carnations just. Plain And moral claims matched up against the compulsions of the order. Don't amount to much. You. In the end, it was not a museum that returned any piece of Hedwig original art collection. It was packaged goods company one that sells flour, biscuits and beer. The other group based three hours north of Frankfurt the kraft foods of Germany. The company's former CEO Rudolf. Ker An extensive art collection. The company did a providence check of his paintings, and they discovered that in nineteen, fifty four Rudolph had bought one of the four Hans. Wall paintings that once hung in head weeks living room. A large canvas of children dancing around a blooming tree when they out of the Blue Your father here's. That wanted his beloved grandmothers paintings coming back. Yeah, it's a really hit him to the core. The did not know the whereabouts of the painting. I'm really now from the short statement released by the group after they contacted the Allens. The company advised them that the painting was in its possession, and that it wished to return it to them on moral grounds. The heirs have gratefully accepted. Remember, can you describe what what happened? When he first, I would have cried. Yeah he was quite emotional and he was quite emotional about. This aspect and we had several conversations I read, and and he would cry nearly every single time. Yeah Yeah Yeah is it a beautiful painting? Yes, yeah, it is. It's a beautiful painting, but it also. Starts to complete. The circle within our family. The stories we would tell because. Hedvig had a a room where the they hounds Toma Works. It was a dining room and they were painted around the room and. Hans Homma I think was one of the oddest. She loved the most so to have. A worker turned was was it was like almost a completing of the circle and Yeah, it was. It was deeply meaningful..

Allen Van Gogh Claude Detroit hedwig art Europe Alexa Steele Yale University Art Museum Mike Grandmother Charles Venable Institute of art Toledo Museum Indianapolis Federal Court Hans Homma Randy Frost WanNa New York Haiti
"van gogh" Discussed on Revisionist History

Revisionist History

05:40 min | 11 months ago

"van gogh" Discussed on Revisionist History

"Is Charles Venable Democratizing a great art museum in Indianapolis or destroying it. Are you kind of marine? The Marie Condo? Is Your. Is Your apartment like minimalist? You get rid of old clothes. No longer wear them. Does this carry over to your private life? Why not particularly I mean? My husband is much more than eat. Nick, who would say I'M GONNA? Go through my closet and get rid of all these things whereas I'm saying I. Will I just love that shirt? And it might hanging my closet for you know years years it could be ten years old. She was even worse. But that's not running an art museum. Charles Venable is different, not because he some kind of weird neat nick. He different because he sees the problem, his profession has and he's figured out a way to do something about it. I asked Randy Frost about what it takes to convince a hoarder to thin their collection. He's psychologist. We met in the last episode. Who Studies Hoarding? He told me that with orders. The first step is talking about the object, so you're seeing in this case, the act of forcing someone to. Conceive and verbalize their attached to the object helps them get rid of yes shatters the bond someway or well I think it puts their attachments. into the context of the values of their life, because we focus on values, what is it that you value in your life what you want your life to be like? And once you start talking about this and have these this set of ideas about value and where you WanNa, go and your life together. It changes the the valence of the object. This is what Charles. Venable and his curator's were doing in Indianapolis as they work their way through the collection. Changing the valence of the objects they were asking. What is it that we value as a museum? Is this object consistent with those values? Acquiring art costs money. The is a nonprofit with a mandate to serve the people of Indiana. Venable doesn't see how collecting more and more stuff that the public will never see not to mention spending. Millions of dollars to warehouse at somewhere is consistent without responsibility. You know you need more conservatives. You need more art handlers. You need more registrars. You need bigger computer systems. If you ask. Charles Venable to give up a work of art for some broader larger reason, he could do it. It, because he's developed a system for giving things up, so I asked him theoretically about how he and his curator's is might evaluate vase with carnations if it were in their collection, so there's a lot is famous artist as you could find, but it's very much a minor work of that artist. Is that not? Is that an ao not in a mean, not knowing that particular painting I'm just thinking as a as an abstract question. Same artists minor work. We wouldn't call that a day. We would get. We would give it a little bump, because by then go a very famous artist, but it wouldn't make an aide. Just because it had his name on it, it would. It would be a minor work by that artist, and then the questions we would ask is. Are we doing? A great artist by Van Gogh in many ways change the course of a Western art history. Are we doing his legacy and his work. A good deed by showing A. Pre, minor. Mediocre work. In a great institution. And particularly institution that has much better works by Van, Gogh. You know where you can show an a plus at a place like Detroit. Why? Why would you bother with a minor thing if we were offered a painting like that, we would. If somebody wanted we wouldn't buy it for sure. And if somebody wanted to give it to us, we would say well. This is not something that's right to go on our walls. If you WANNA, give it to us, or are you willing to let a sell it and then bring bring the money back to the collection by something that your name can go. Charles Venable dept a changing the valence of the objects in his possession. He can give things up, but he's the exception to rest of the art. World is still in the grip of their compulsion..

Charles Venable Van Gogh Indianapolis Marie Condo Nick Indiana Randy Frost Detroit
"van gogh" Discussed on Revisionist History

Revisionist History

07:39 min | 11 months ago

"van gogh" Discussed on Revisionist History

"Few. People know the real story of this intense strong men. Now, his tumultuous career is revealed for the first time with. Sunday. With all. If you look at the corner of the movie poster for for life there, it is fozzard carnations. But by then gets sold it. He didn't hang onto his van Gogh the way he did his other treasures. It wasn't for him. The painting pass to the heirs to the K. Mart Fortune Catherine Kreisky. Who Am I? GonNa things was once married to a Swedish baron. She convinced him to leave London and come live with her in her native Detroit. Perhaps unsurprisingly, the Swedish barons order for Miss Kresge did not survive the move to Michigan. When Kresge died in nineteen ninety, she willed vase with carnations to the Detroit Institute of Art. She gave it without restriction. Meaning the dia bone could do what they wanted. Sell it traded didn't have to make it part of their permanent collection. Kresge clue didn't care anymore for the painting and it. And neither did the DIA. They put in a basement for twenty years. Vincent Van Gogh painted many remarkable canvases. This is now one of them. You also painted larger flower still lives in Perez, but this one thus. kind of canvas which I think was not meant for sale, or as a present for acquaintances or girlfriends, or has models, or so it was just for trying out. Things are experts like to damn with faint praise vows with carnations gets a lot of faint praise. It's very nice. It's very profound, but it's not a very well. Spectacular. Composition or color combination. It's just kind of let me try out what happens if I this if I do this and so it's nice, but not really an important work. The current head of the Detroit Institute of art, Salvador's solar. Pons says the problem is advised with carnations. Just doesn't look like a van Gogh when you say it doesn't look like Van Gogh. What me say, look like sunflowers. I mean he's not a typical work. Like. You would like the tough portrait. Or the works that he did when he was in the south of France, the most famous works. that. The? General Public knows Van Gogh. Did then there's the fact that the painting had a stamp on the back a sign that it was painted on a fancy bit of stretch canvas. Then go in his Paris. Here's was broke. What was he doing with a fancy canvas? It took years to resolve that particular discrepancy. And in the meantime, lots of people began to think vase with carnations was a fake later, we discovered that that canvas with. The Stop on the back was not actually part of the work was added later. So you had the original campus then you have. Lining cameras glued to the regional canvas, and then you had these third cameras. We stencil stamp of EVAC. So once we remove that. We understood that was not part of the original work. So here we have then go. The does not look like a van Gogh. That was never intended to be sold or shown or even given away that a German couple bought somewhere around the turn of the century, and then sold that turned up in the home of Hollywood mogul, and served as a prop in a Kirk Douglas. Movie poster then finally landed in Detroit with a K. Mart heiress, who threw it in as an afterthought when she made her bequest to the DIA. Whereupon the painting languished in a cellar for a quarter century. Of a dubious bit of. Glued to the back. What's your personal feeling about this painting? Do you like it. Are you drawn to? I like it because I. Have a personal story connected to it, you know when I came to the museum. The maintain wasn't a storage. As an attributed painting by Van. Gogh with basically no value. I was able to bring an up to the galleries and put it together with other four van Goghs that the has. Awarded I. IT looks like by a Sunday painter. US consider by by forger. Would have no value, no monetary value, but the minute we consider it as by handle. It has a value of several million dollars. However, the has not changed. The painting continues to be what it is. What has change? Is the perception that we have on the painting. And that is a really interesting concept to think about. So, I liked the painting a for that. Yeah, but if someone said to you when you retire, it's director. You can take one of the DA's Van. Goghs with you. Which one would you take, not this? So why should we care about vase with carnations? We shouldn't. It's not the painting that matters. The painting is just a macguffin. CABOT. In case you don't know what I mean by macguffin. Let's consult the Dick Cabinet show nineteen seventy two. Candidates guest is the legendary film director Alfred Hitchcock the great proponent of McGovern's. Explain, what a macguffin I`Ma Goffin. You see in most films about spy. Is the thing that the spies are often? In the days of Roger Kipling. Will be the plans of the Fort on the Khyber Pass. I would be the plans of an airplane engine. And the plans of an atom bomb, and like it's always called the thing that the characters on the screen worry about the audience don't care. The macguffin is used to propel the plot to motivate the characters, but which has no intrinsic value to anyone else. Vase with carnations is a macguffin. It's described in a scene in English train going to scoff. One man says to the other opposite implicit. What's that package about your head? There? Now elements? Oh, that's a macguffin. It's what is a macguffin. Is Operatives for. Trapping lions in the Scottish highlands. Mansi Berar new lands in the Scottish highlands each other. Then that's no macguffin. Thank you for clearing that up. I repeat. It's not the painting that matters. That has always been a mistake. The way people have thought about vase with carnations. No more mcmuffins? After the break. Let's start the story again..

van Gogh Van Detroit Detroit Institute of Art Miss Kresge K. Mart van Goghs director London Catherine Kreisky Michigan Paris Mansi Berar General Public Khyber Pass Perez Pons US Kirk Douglas France
"van gogh" Discussed on Revisionist History

Revisionist History

02:34 min | 11 months ago

"van gogh" Discussed on Revisionist History

"History..

"van gogh" Discussed on Revisionist History

Revisionist History

01:56 min | 11 months ago

"van gogh" Discussed on Revisionist History

"In March of eighteen eighty six vincent then go move from Antwerp to Paris to live with his brother. Theo in mart, you very soon became befriended with some of the other artists living there who would become very famous within the next deacades like for example Paul Senac only to lose low, take immune there now and some others, and he learned a lot from them. Stefan called Half German art expert. And that led to his willingness. To make experiments in becoming an artist when he painted and rather dark brownish grayish. During his time before in the Netherlands, he was willing to try out what to do with color. How to form things with color invent Gogh's effort to master oil painting. He painted still lifes mostly flowers. He couldn't afford models in a space of a few years. He produced dozens and dozens of paintings. The Paris period means that from God just had decided to become an artist. He no longer wanted to try other professions like he did before like being a preacher or teacher or helping people, he now made the decision. I want to be a paint and he knew that Peres is the place to be. My name is Malcolm. Grab well. You're listening to revisionist history. My podcast about things overlooked and misunderstood. This episode is a continuation of investigation into the hoarding habits of Art Museums. It's about one of dozens of still lifes. Van Gogh painted in his Paris period. A small canvas seventeen inches by fourteen inches vase with carnations. That little painting concerns out. Training and troubled.

Van Gogh Paris Paul Senac Theo Antwerp Stefan vincent Peres Netherlands Art Museums Malcolm
"van gogh" Discussed on Revisionist History

Revisionist History

05:22 min | 11 months ago

"van gogh" Discussed on Revisionist History

"That paintings still hangs today on the walls of the met. And Vase with carnations. There's a legal loophole that case as well had we gave it to an art dealer in one, thousand, nine, hundred, thirty eight but that was to sell on consignment and the art dealer took it to New York and didn't get around to sailing it until after the war was over. HEDWIG may have given it up under duress of the Nazi threat, but it was sold under the duress of the Nazi threat. Claude Allen had no legal claim to with carnations just immoral claim. And moral claims matched up against the compulsions of the hoarder don't amount to much. In the end it was not a museum that returned any piece of Hedwig original art collection. It was packaged goods company one that sells flour biscuits and beer. The ACA group based three hours north of Frankfurt the kraft foods of Germany. The company's former CEO Rudolf August Oscar had an extensive art collection. The company did a providence chuck of his paintings. Discovered that in nineteen fifty, four Rudolph had bought one of the four Hans Thoma Wall paintings that once hung in Hedwig. Living, room. A large canvas of children dancing around a blooming tree when they out of the blue, your father here's That wanted his beloved grandmother paintings is coming back. Yeah. Instead really hit him to the core. The airs did not know the whereabouts of the painting. I'm really now from the short statement released by the group after they contacted the Allens. The company advised them that the painting was in its possession and that it wished to return it to them on moral grounds. The heirs have gratefully accepted. Do you remember can you describe what? What happened when he first dead would have cried? Yeah. Yeah. He was quite emotional and he was quite emotional about. This aspect and we had several conversations over and he would cry nearly every single time. Is it a beautiful painting? Yes. Yeah. It is. It's a beautiful painting but it also. Starts to complete. The circle within our family. The stories we would tell because. HEDVIG had a room where they were the they hands Thoma works dining room, and they were painted around the room and. Hans Tomah. I think was one of the artist you love the most. So to have a work returned was. Almost complete of the circle and. Yeah it was. It was deeply meaningful. father. Died shortly after his grandmother's painting was returned. As, for with carnations, it's still in Detroit. The are not pursuing their claims to that painting they know that never win. The painting currently. Is it now on display or is still in storage? Where is it now in the? In a museum, it's on display is being on display and. It was recently. Featuring an exhibition in. The Barberini. Gallery post them next to Berlin. About. Felix. The Detroit Institute of art is in Midtown Detroit across Woodward Avenue from the main branch of the Public Library. A Beautiful Building with an extraordinary collection. If. You get a chance go and see with carnations. and. If you like it stopped by the gift shop and pick up a pair of vase with Canadian socks for Nineteen ninety-five Ninety Five one-size-fits-all and vase with clinicians. Aloe soap for sixteen ninety, five in a little round tin would van goghs carnations on the cover. But don't spend too much time thinking about the painting. The painting is a macguffin. Think about where it came from and what it stands for. And then do me a favor when you leave put a note in the suggestion box. I have seen vase with carnations. It doesn't belong here..

HEDVIG Hedwig Detroit Claude Allen Hans Thoma Wall New York Hans Tomah Detroit Institute of art ACA kraft foods of Germany Rudolf August Oscar CEO Frankfurt Rudolph Thoma Felix Public Library Berlin
"van gogh" Discussed on Revisionist History

Revisionist History

05:12 min | 11 months ago

"van gogh" Discussed on Revisionist History

"Weird neat nick. He different because he sees the problem his profession has and he's figured out a way to do something about it. I asked Randy Frost about what it takes to convince a hoarder to thin their collection. He's psychologist we met in the last episode who studies hoarding. He told me that with orders the first step is talking about the object. So you're seeing in this case, the act of forcing someone to. Conceive and verbalize their talking to the object helps them get rid of yes. Shatters the bond someway or well I, think it puts their attachments. into the context of the values of their life because we focus on values, what is it that you value in your life what you want your life to be like? And once you start talking about this and have these this set of ideas about value and where you WanNa, go and your life together. It changes the the valence of the object. This is what Charles Venable and his curator's were doing in Indianapolis as they work their way through the collection. Changing the valence of the objects they were asking, what is it that we value as a museum? Is this object consistent with those values? Acquiring art costs money. The is a nonprofit with a mandate to serve the people of, Indiana. Venable doesn't see how collecting more and more stuff that the public will never see. To mention spending millions of dollars to warehouse at somewhere is consistent without responsibility. You know you need more conservatives you need more art handlers, you need more registrars, you need bigger computer systems. If you ask Charles Venable to give up a work of art for some broader larger reason, he could do it because he's developed a system for giving things up. So I asked him theoretically. About how he and his curators is might evaluate vase with carnations if it were in their collection. So there's a lot is famous artist as you could find, but it's very much a minor work of that artist is that not is that an ao not in a mean not knowing that particular painting I'm just thinking as a as an abstract question same artists minor work. We wouldn't call that a day. We would get we would give it a little bump because by then go a very famous artist but it wouldn't make an aide just because it had his name on it it would. It would be a minor work by that artist and then the questions we would ask is are we doing? A great artist by Van, Gogh in many ways change the course of a Western art history. Are we doing his legacy and his work. A good deed by showing A. Pretty, minor mediocre work. In a great institution. And particularly institution that has much better works by Van Gogh. You know where you can show an a plus at a place like Detroit why? Why would you bother with a minor thing if we were offered a painting like that we would. If somebody wanted we wouldn't buy it for sure and if somebody wanted to give it to us, we would say, well, this is not something that's right to go on our walls. If you WANNA give it to us or are you willing to let a sell it and then bring bring the money back to the collection by something that your name can go. Charles Venable is adept at changing the valence of the objects in his possession. He can give things up, but he's the exception to rest of the art world is still in the grip of their compulsion..

Charles Venable Van Gogh Randy Frost Indiana Indianapolis Detroit
"van gogh" Discussed on Revisionist History

Revisionist History

02:34 min | 11 months ago

"van gogh" Discussed on Revisionist History

"History?.

"van gogh" Discussed on Revisionist History

Revisionist History

01:56 min | 11 months ago

"van gogh" Discussed on Revisionist History

"In March of eighteen, eighty, six vincent then go move from Antwerp to Paris to live with his brother Theo in mart. You very soon became befriended with some of the other artists living there who would become very famous within the next deacades like, for example, Paul SENAC, only to lose low take immune there now and some others and he learned a lot from them. Stefan. Called Half German art expert. And that led to his willingness. To make experiments in becoming an artist when he painted and rather dark brownish. Grayish. During, his time before in the Netherlands he was willing to try out what to do with color how to form things with color invent Gogh's effort to master oil painting. He painted still lifes mostly flowers he couldn't afford models in a space of a few years he produced dozens and dozens of paintings. The Paris period means that from God had decided to become an artist, he no longer wanted to try other professions like he did before like being a preacher or teacher or helping people he now made the decision. I want to be a paint and he knew that Peres is the place to be. My name is Malcolm. Grab. Well you're listening to revisionist history my podcast about things overlooked and misunderstood. This episode is a continuation of investigation into the hoarding habits of Art Museums. It's about one of dozens of still lifes. Van. Gogh painted in his Paris period. A small canvas seventeen inches by fourteen inches vase with carnations. That little painting, turns out. Has a strange and troubled.

Gogh Paris Paul SENAC Antwerp Peres Theo vincent Art Museums Stefan Malcolm the Netherlands
Trump takes on twitter, social media with executive order

Phil Valentine

10:34 min | 1 year ago

Trump takes on twitter, social media with executive order

"President signed an executive order stripping big tech of its immunity I'm gonna explain this to you as best that I can and I can explain it I just want to do this is to singly as possible basically boils down to this big media companies like Facebook Twitter I would soon you too Google some of these they have immunity from the lawsuit and you say well how can this be an embarrassing we have it is me well the reason is is because they're supposed be acting as a platform but if you act as a publisher like a newspaper or a radio station near talk show or television whatever if you do Vance then you're not immune from lawsuits because what you're doing now is actively participating the content and you're responsible for the content when you do that so if your platform and you say okay we have a platform and anybody can go in post whatever they want to we can't possibly police all of this stuff well that's what Congress said years ago we're going to carve out an exemption for you because you can't possibly police all the stuff we want a free flow of ideas and we're not gonna have a free flow of ideas if a platform turns into a publisher in other words of a platform is an editor of content there we're not gonna have a free flow of ideas so it was initially intended to protect you and have your freedom of speech protected but what it's turned into is been a shield for these big companies like Twitter and Facebook to be able to do exactly what they want supposed to do which is edit your content and get away with it so the president just stripped him of that today and it's sort of complicated because it sort of goes to the FCC but it's got the justice department element in there too and this is about civil lawsuits so let's just say I put up something about Johnny beat today and I say the Johnny B. as a whatever I mean I mean the same thing goes into the van Gogh listed was that you're trying to be was I did that one time a boy just coming in reverberated around of people came back you said so I said I that was used as examples of Joe so I'm I'm whatever I say about Johnny bean ends up not being true now if I put that on Twitter leading sue not only me being sued Twitter for allowing it up there because they have crossed the line from being a platform to being an editor slash publisher that was their own choice to make and what cross the line for trump is when they started doing to him another man during the rest of us were and that's why I said you know this guy gets hacked off now with that being the him we should have done this a long time ago but he's done it and I'm sure it's going to be challenged in the courts but I don't see how Facebook or Twitter or E. or you to renew the I don't I don't see how they win I also believe it goes this record another win on you know they get the ninth circuit court of appeals or some you know some of these folks is that these courts are packed with liberals who knows what they'll get from them but if you if you talk about common sense is pretty straight forward the law says that if your platform that you have immunity from from lawsuits but if you're not a platform if you become a publisher or an editor and I think by anybody's definition when you flag something and say this isn't true as they did with trump on Twitter you're becoming an editor I mean that's the clearest definition of it you're in a court of law and say well what do you think this is and they'll go well I. D. we just it was a flag no it's in you made an edit on this platform when you delete somebody and say you can't you can't tweet that that said that it when you when you go on Facebook and you say and I try to put a move which have not us we posted that the video from epic times about the Wuhan lab you know this is early on in this thing and they said you before you click on the thing this is been proven to be not true of course now it's proven to be true but at the time they were telling us it wasn't true and you sure you want to watch this video is the way it was set up and then you go to click it well that's editing that's editing when they inject themselves into the process if they put themselves in between the poster and the user then they are an editor that's a textbook definition they are becoming an editor and so they go to any court and I even the liberal courts are going to say you of course you're an editor and if you're an editor you no longer immune that's what the statute says that's what the law says if you become an editor or publisher you're not immune from lawsuits so you can be now wide open being sued which is going to happen people have been trying to sue Facebook and Twitter for years over content and they've been protected within no longer protected and it's of their own design and it couldn't happen to a nicer bunch of folks I'm just telling you so what happens from here that I don't know I don't know what what is going to happen from here but it could very well be that Twitter and Facebook shape up and they say okay all right let's say all right if we if we if we don't do this anymore where you give us back our immunity and I'm sure trump will say yes I would that's all he wants is you to stop **** with people stop injecting your political a bias by the way let me play because I play this early but this I mean knowing what you know right knowing what Facebook does knowing that they have I mean they have a long history of doing this this is what Zuckerberg I'm here again just the case of the epoch times video that I put up there and that other people but of the year and then they they graded out and said are you sure you want to watch is because and you need to click here because this is not true of course it ends up not being true but they were telling us it wasn't true that's them editorializing right that being arbiters of truth here's what mark Zuckerberg said on CNBC I don't think that Facebook or or internet platforms in general should be arbiters of truth I think that's a kind of a dangerous line to get down to in terms of deciding what is what what is true and what isn't well you've already done it you are the arbiters of truth just because we don't want to be determining what is true and false it doesn't mean that that politicians or anyone else can just say whatever they want I want to listen to that one again that means listen to what he says just because we don't want to be determining what is true and false it doesn't mean that that politicians or anyone else can just say whatever they want just because we're going to be arbiters of this doesn't mean the politics you can say whatever they want of course they can say whatever they want it's called free speech what are you talking about of course they see they don't the they've got some gray area and the gray area is not on social media the gray area in their head is on constitution what is allowed and what is not they think that they don't understand the freedom of speech so when they say the arbiters of truth it's their truth so they're saying what are the arbiters of truth I mean this is a known true like global warming for one thing of course we got to get rid of these deniers because that's a lie and we can't allow lies on our platform that's where they this this is how they justified in their mind they think okay well we can't we can't allow false information I mean you're not so you're certainly not saying that we can all fall out false information and so we got to get rid of wrinkles while false information to them as anything they disagree with that's what they've got in their heads they don't understand that I have a right to my opinion about global warming and they can say well this is untrue or whatever but I can say it's true all day long we can argue about it but they think that if they think I'm wrong that that I'm wrong and therefore they have a right not to let me be heard they have a fundamental misunderstanding of the first amendment they don't understand what it means at all it doesn't mean that it doesn't mean you get this you get to shout me down or quiet me if what you hear me saying you don't think is true it doesn't matter what you think I have the right to be heard now that's on a platform I have a right to be heard if you have a news thing or you have an editorial policy whatever then you're an editorial of the entity you're no longer platform but if your platform then everybody should be able to voice their own opinion and you should not have anything to say about it all you're doing is allowing them eight platform I mean that's what that means our platform is a place where people can go and voice their opinions and so if your platform use leave all that alone that's what it was intended to be and as we said over the last few years what the social media folks have turned into its arbiters of truth exactly what Zuckerberg said that they want but that's exactly what they are but the truth is in their own hands and so they can see that's the thing and I will tell you this about anything I don't have any problem with somebody going on Twitter in saying the earth is flat I think it's a line and I can probably demonstrated but what's the harm of having somebody go on and say the earth is flat and have people debate them about it well there's no harm whatsoever but you put something up about this plan that make thing out there and say that something quite right in that the the other thing may have come from a lab in Wuhan and blah blah blah and they go out of their way they got to shut it down it makes you wonder what

President Trump Google Publisher Executive Facebook
See great art from app in living room

Talking Tech

04:13 min | 1 year ago

See great art from app in living room

"Museums are closed right now. Due to the Kobe crisis but Brennan Echoes. Got Some ideas on how we can still see some beautiful art through a new a our APP that he's going to tell us all about a company called museum and he's going to tell us about bringing a using a are to bring great art into the home. Hey Brandon eight Jefferson. Thanks so much for having me yeah. You're absolutely right. I mean Kobe. Nineteen has certainly sent shockwaves throughout all of our lives but especially in the world of art and Culture Museums about ninety. Seven percent of the world's museums have been closed and the great treasures and resources that they contain have been inaccessible to the masses and so we as a company that focus on helping the world's museums and cultural institutions connect with audiences all around the globe using the power of of digital using the power of technology. We had been thinking a lot. About what something we could do to bring. These works into the homes of people all around so that they could experience the artwork make it personal and really revel in these masterpieces from the convenience of their own home so we rolled out an augmented reality APP and feature that. Make it possible to bring these paintings into every single room in your home that you can see the works right up close in person so this first of all the name of the APP is the name of the APP is art museum. Ar T. Museum and it's available on Ios Ios and android right now it's available on Ios. But we do have plans to make it available for android devices as well. Okay so now. Let's tell everybody how it works. I'm in my living room. I've got a blank and have your APP in. I look up. Let Mona Lisa. Are you telling me? Yeah so we pick from some of the most famous works. That are available by public domain. So you can pick the Mona Lisa. Their works like the scream by Edward among Thurs works by Van Gogh So a lot of these great masterpieces that are in the collections of the met and the getty and the museums of Paris. We've made available Right in the right in your own home. We do have plans to start creating city specific tours Based on the great museums of New York and Boston Philadelphia L. A. And Go from there so we want to make it as relevant and personal To folks at home. So would you recommend the people go home and make find blanks place on the wall or take down some art to to have this experience. But yeah absolutely. If you're if you're interested in experiencing some of these some of our world's best art in culture that is currently locked behind doors closed due to the pandemic and and so on your download the APP Pick one of your favorite work. See How it looks in your living room or your or your kitchen. And you know overall I mean artfully such an important role in society. It's here in times like this and we encourage people to you know support these organizations take a look at the art and Um and hopefully it gives them a little bit of relaxation and inspiration Is the APP free? Of course we would never charge for something like that. Were very strongly believed that art should be accessible on. There shouldn't be an economic or financial barrier to this and we've also made this component free and available to the museum community so we're been rolling it out and in talks with dozens of organizations around the country around the world about how things like. This can help them play some sort of role in connecting people beyond you know social media beyond a two dimensional image beyond a livestream remind everybody the name of the APP so the name of the APP is art museum. A are as an augmented reality. T. Museum and I'm Brendan from Kuzan

Mona Lisa Art Museum Brennan Echoes Culture Museums Ar T. Museum T. Museum Brandon Getty Paris New York Kuzan Van Gogh Edward Philadelphia L. A. Boston
Van Gogh painting stolen from Dutch museum closed by coronavirus

This Morning with Gordon Deal

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

Van Gogh painting stolen from Dutch museum closed by coronavirus

"A painting by Dutch master Vincent van Gogh was stolen in an overnight smash and grab raid on a museum that was closed to prevent the spread of the corona virus the museum east of Amsterdam said the parsonage garden at noon and then spring eighteen eighty four by the Dutch master was taken in the early hours Monday the value of the work which was on loan was not immediately known van Gogh's paintings when they rarely come up for sale fetch

Vincent Van Gogh Amsterdam
Dutch museum says Vincent van Gogh painting stolen in overnight raid

AP 24 Hour News

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

Dutch museum says Vincent van Gogh painting stolen in overnight raid

"Wire painting by Dutch master Vincent van Gogh is being stolen in an overnight smash and grab raid on a museum that was closed to prevent the spread of the corona virus the sing along museum east of Amsterdam says the Dutch masters the parsonage gardens at noon in spring eighteen eighty four was taken in the early hours of Monday police say the thief or thieves smashed a glass door to get into the museum that set off along but by the time the police got there the painting and with the study will gone the museum general director says of the institution that houses the collection of American couple William and I'm a singer I'm going to shop on site at the fifth of the painting the value of the work which is on loan from the museum in the north of the never linds is not immediately known police are investigating the

Vincent Van Gogh Amsterdam General Director William
Police investigate break-in at Dutch art museum

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 1 year ago

Police investigate break-in at Dutch art museum

"The painting by Dutch master Vincent van Gogh is being stolen in an overnight smash and grab raid on a museum that was closed to prevent the spread of the corona virus the sing along museum east of Amsterdam says the Dutch masters the pasta dish bottom at Newnham in spring eighteen eighty four was taken in the early hours of Monday police say the thief or thieves smashed a glass door to get into the museum that set off the alarm but by the time the police got there the painting and with the study will gone the museum general director says of the institution that houses the collection of American couple William and I'm a singer I'm going to shop on site at the fifth of the painting the value of the work which is on loan from the museum in the north of the Netherlands is not legally none police are investigating the theft on Charles there this month

Vincent Van Gogh Amsterdam General Director William Netherlands Theft Charles
Dutch museum says Vincent van Gogh painting stolen in overnight raid

Bloomberg Surveillance

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

Dutch museum says Vincent van Gogh painting stolen in overnight raid

"The Associated Press is saying once again they're Hispanics are a thief of a painting it is out of the Dutch museum and it is a Vincent van Gogh and that is a huge huge deal it also has to do like ocean's eleven it's yeah but it's like a big deal over there and they have particularly in Amsterdam some exclusive museums obviously centered out here Rembrandt and the other guy for me because he was a sophisticated I am and is popularly bookkeeper here you seriously they've released a terse two sentence announcement of another

The Associated Press Dutch Museum Vincent Van Gogh Amsterdam Rembrandt
"van gogh" Discussed on Personology

Personology

06:05 min | 1 year ago

"van gogh" Discussed on Personology

"Me today Stephen. Ninety working artist lawyer Pulitzer Prize winner and with his partner. Gregory White Smith is the author at the meticulously researched definitive biography. Van Gogh the life and your times bestseller well. After his death. Viewed as a genius Vincent was born March thirtieth eighteen fifty three in groot sundered in the Netherlands. The oldest son of Theodorus a Dutch Protestant minister and Anna. The daughter of a wealthy family. Vincent was the first of five children. He was really not the first pregnancy. There was a first vincent who basically died in childbirth essentially and something that was really devastating for his mother. They had named him. Vincent and so our Vincent essentially comes into the world already inheriting this sense of loss and distress from his mother growth and born a year to the day after the first visit. That first anniversary is very distressing to any mother who has lost a pregnancy literature sort of implies that the damage was to Vincent in imagining that he was the lesser of the two. Vincent's and we wondered if really the the damage was in his mother and his head. It was her constellation of regrets and frustrations and angers that he perceived and suffered from. That's what we call the replacement child and unfortunately it can become a self fulfilling prophecy when a mother imbues her replacement child as being the bad one essentially or not measuring up in some way it can become a self fulfilling prophecy for that child who lives day to day with the expectation and the transference from the parent. That they're not good where they're disappointing or they certainly don't measure up in some way for guy are vincent suffered from Lille so many problems all of layered on top of each other and If he had an assortment of mental afflictions and partly as a result would have disappointed his parents anyway. The fact that there was this previous Vincent and there was this replacement child syndrome would simply have magnified the parents Disappointment and who he was anyway. Many events in self-portrait showed evidence of head shape and facial deformity a topic. He referenced in letters he wrote specifically about the way other people viewed and reacted to him. It's likely that this was the result of a trauma during the process of birth. Which at the time was much more prone to accidental injury for the infant. And or the mother. Some of the psychiatrist. Who have tried to imagine. What the diagnosis should've been have said it was. It could easily have been congenital and one of my questions to you is the shape of his skull genetic or would it have been a trauma at the birth process. Do you think will given certainly had other siblings. Who didn't seem to have this issue going on and given that the shape of the head and not other sort of medical problems that go along with some sort of genetic syndrome. It seems likely that it was something that happened. In the birth canal now does not unusual that frankly ahead gets misshapen. When birth occurs and in normal circumstances it is something that sort of over the following days goes back to essentially normal skull shape. But sometimes if there's been some sort of trauma or child has sat too long in the birth canal something didn't work in terms of taking an out of the birth now there can be essentially what ends up being malformation and that can affect brain tissue. Which could be fine again. The brain is very plastic. It could recover but if there was some sort of damage and there was some sort of scarring scarring in the brain can set up someone for particular kinds of problems and we'll talk later about what those problems may have been for Vincent but it wouldn't be surprising if that was a nitis what we call a night or like an area of the brain where there was some scarring or something not quite right and that would set him up to develop certain symptoms. Later you and Greg documented a lot of information about the kind of kid. He was growing up. They were poor family but they were a very much class family. And until Vincent came along it was not a terribly distinguished family. We're very fortunate that he became quite famous soon after his early death and therefore people began to record his life. They began Historians went out and interviewed people and in fact a interestingly. A photograph of his nanny came to light for the first time in the last couple of lots. These nineteenth century photographs were stilted in not terribly psychologically revealing but she certainly doesn't look like terribly loving aunt chancellor women so. I think that might have added to the difficulties of his childhood. But we do have the Regulations Nally. Herbert of the other people who worked in the Banco household and of course the recollections of his parents in their letters and also as his classmates we know quite a bit about his his child at and how irascible irritable difficult and unhappy. He was a child..

Vincent Pulitzer Prize child syndrome Van Gogh Stephen Gregory White Smith Netherlands partner groot sundered Lille genetic syndrome Anna chancellor Herbert Greg
"van gogh" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"van gogh" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Thousand nine hundred ninety seven when the tate wanted to borrow a pitch from National Gallery it was actually sent by taxi nothing different now <hes> and it was sent in a very high security vehicle. I can assure you and so the sun fast but rose has some very important loans from far afield from Sao Paulo in Brazil <hes>. There's a very important painting of a woman <hes> there's this wonderful painting from Russia of the prisoners at newgate eight which is a lovely <hes> link this to one of my favorites is a privately owned picture of a tree but it's very very striking and <hes> this quite a lot of Japanese influence in that picture and that's one one of the challenges of the exhibition because Vincent takes things like most artists do from different sources so the Pitch Abba Japanese influence an also an English inference at the same time yes there are magnificent pitches and financial dimension of tools the starry night over the Rhone from all say and last but not least the two self portraits and the most magnificent one is from the National Gallery of art in Washington indeed multi. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you living with Vincent. Van Gogh is published by Lion Publishing and he's thirty dollars in the U._S. or twenty two pounds in the U._K.. White Line also published story night van Gogh for the asylum and that is forty dollars or twenty five pounds van Gogh from Britain is at Tate Britain in.

Van Gogh National Gallery Vincent tate Sao Paulo Lion Publishing Brazil Britain rose White Line Russia Washington twenty five pounds twenty two pounds thirty dollars forty dollars
"van gogh" Discussed on Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

11:53 min | 2 years ago

"van gogh" Discussed on Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

"Comes. That was has he spies curator's of Van Gogh? Brit now, Martin faily co curator and author of starry night Van Gogh the asylum announced him about the myth of the. We are standing in front of a pitcher here hate in front of the silent. But I want to get back to the beginning of the show. I talked about Van Gogh in England, which is something that a little people may not know about what was it. I mean, we we start off with kind of the colors and textures that we don't know van for sort of dumb colored landscapes of clouds, lots of things that were not necessarily familiar with me think evanger, he tells a little bit about his time in England than what inspiration. He found here on the slightly different conditions to all in the south of France with which we're familiar, yes. It's two different worlds entirely. I mean, Vincent was twenty when he came to England which is an impressionable age for any of us, and it was a huge city. He explored London. He enjoyed the sights. He nearly went to Madame toussaud's. Although in the end, he decided he was more interested in the museums. But the most important thing about is buried in England was it is working for an aunt. Healer as difficult to mention him, Vincent as an art dealer. And he wasn't very good at it. But it did mean that he discovered art a Nissan enormous amount of reproductions which the gallery sold very good, high quality reproductions and paintings. So I would say that if he had not come to England is an art deal if you hadn't worked as an ideal. He would never become an artist. And then once he was here, he imbibed English British culture in joy reading the trick. He read nearly all of Dicken's he read Shakespeare, which most of us today would find to read let alone to foreign language, and he discovered English art and most importantly, he became interested in the in the English illustrators who worked for magazines by illustrated, London news and the graphic. So was very formative period for him. And one of the things that jumps out is unusual thing again when are so common understanding Van Gogh, which is his love of. And white his kind of jumping headfirst into the monochrome world of these artists that would have worked for the London Evening. The other straighted evening news and things like that where on earth. Did we trace the line from that early black and white monochrome nothing Vandross to the crazy color of related? Well, he was van Gough was self taught. Although he later went to art college for few months it never actually worked. So he was self taught and he did exercises at home and drawing exercises, and he started off doing drawing not colors or paintings. And when he was doing drawing, he was very inspired by the English illustrators who worked for these papers, and it was actually several years after he left in the till in love with them. But he knew their work originally from when he was working in London. So I think that's what made him go back to them and that really provided the inspiration, and it provided some technical guidance as to how one truth things. So that was very influential in the early years. When he was an artist in the early eighteen eighty s when he was working mainly in the Hague. I mean later on it became important, but it was very important that formative state once he decided that he wanted to become an artist and he said he would want to take up his pencil. That's the way he put it when you decide to become an artist and his pencil. He said began to behave itself, which is handy for seeing how these later works turned out as well. One of the things preoccupation of his supposedly in the early days as well when he was in England was kind of obsession with the tinian as well. He was a Dutchman in England. But he was interested in of lonely figures on the road and windswept landscapes. But there was something of maybe we're trying to trace to further idea of the tortured artist in those early years. There seem to be a lot of singular people looking morose in in a windswept landscape where did that come from? If that was the thing with him. Difficult to look transposing meaning upon paintings. I think so yes, he had periods of loneliness. He was as you say he was traveling all the time he worked in different cities. It was quite unusual in those days to travel as much as he did. He ended up living twenty different places he was never anywhere for very long. So he was always a lonely figure an if like -nificant on the road. But I think there's a danger in looking at his art and the story, and then trying to see that too closely mirrored in the pictures, and he put people in the pitches because they give life to a painting if you're doing a landscape landscape drawing, and he was certainly interested in that. Yes. And that's I mean, that's the thing. Some of the descriptions, I suppose they will on the wall Tech's lifted from the nineteen forty eight exhibitions last time he was shown here at Tate was tortured for the some of the brush strokes and things like that. It's an unfashionable way to look at an artist like days. Days. I mean, we all have our own ways of looking at art. I personally don't look at it in terms of torchlit. I try and look at it as art. And I do think it's difficult to interpret why someone is using brushstrokes. I think he was much more interested in the visual effect. And I think that was in his mind, he had a fantastic visual, memory and visual sense. And he was very ambitious, and he wasn't afraid of doing something unusual. So he would use thick impasse to paint which was unusual those time to convey what he wanted to convey. I mean, you're quite right. He was an emotional person. He was probably a difficult person to live with we've been befriends with. He wasn't easy and he had depths and he became obsessed with his art. But if you haven't become obsessed he never would have created the wonderful works at a restraining us down in the basement of the Tate in the galleries here and to take the title of your Martin. Starry night Van Gogh at the asylum with standing in front of one of those pitches that presumably would source material for your Burke, he was quite in for the day thought, quite rare in self diagnosing himself and putting himself into these places. It's I'm not sure he would actually thought he was putting himself into it. I mean, what he's done in this painting, and it's been dragging screaming. It's a marvelous painting. It's actually the garden of these Silom. And it's the one place that he could escape to from the other patients who are actually only eighteen male patients. So there weren't many. But it must be terrible environment. There were many who is cream ING who shouting who are breaking and that sort of thing and the garden offered him a means of escape, and he went out there, and he loved nature, and he was very wary of the changing seasons. So he would paint in the garden, and what's stunning about the painting here of this gun is the way the trees just sort of grow up above the Bill. The building tiny and he's looking up at the sky. I mean, it's almost as if on a summer's day, you I was lying on the ground. Still looking at the clouds, and sort of relaxing and dreamy, and I think it offered Vincent aware of escaping from the dignities of living in an asylum. And again, we go back to some of those of if we against paint version of him over his pitches. It seems to be great lightness and life and the thick pain and vivid colors in a painting. This don't at least suggest kind of the idea of the torch. No, I mean, most of the artwork he did with artwork of sane person. It's often said the brush stroke show that he was tortured or mentally upset that he painted when he was relatively well. And this is a very good example. So vibrant. I mean, what I love about the colors of the sky and the way that they change and the way the trees are almost alive, you could almost feel the trees moving and the oversee observed the trees, he knew what they did he'd spent hours and hours looking at the garden, and you can see the way he really loved and appreciated nature nature was so important to him. And what point generally do we start getting these colors say we come back from? Come out of Anglican England and appreciation for some of that monochrome world industrial world, he goes to all and he sets up a relative's community and things like that. Where does this sudden rash of color and vividness come from basically when he leaves his home country, the Netherlands when he was working in Holland and the Netherlands he used don't colors, which was the colors that we used by most charts at the time. He then went to Antwerp for few months, only, four five months and he began to see other artists using bright colors. Then most importantly, he went to Paris where he discovered the impressionists, and they gave him a confidence to use color, and he did it. Lots of paintings of still lives of flowers. Again, they were sort of exercises for him in the use of color, then he decided to go to prevent and he was so struck by the bright and powerful light in the south of France. And he sort of that inspired him. To us even more dramatic colors, and possibly the most striking colors when he was working for one week at the Mediterranean, and he saw the Mediterranean beach under the powerful southern some say, it was in the south of France, and prevents that he ready discovered color, and in a way that was his great contribution. And just finally we talked about apps being writers and overlaying Asif desire to check devise his work, tortured, and all the rest of it. This that help with understanding Van Gogh sort of hinted, our understanding fan go, do you think I need a way to put him into this tortured must be possibly the most popular artists internationally? I mean possibly along with Picasso, but he must be and I think the reasons to festival is artists inventive and appeals to well over a century later. But we're also interested in his story and the story of his life. And it was an extraordinary story. The number of inside. Evidence and the things that happened to him. And with very fortunate that we have semi the letters that he wrote mostly to his brother. So we actually have the words of how he felt on a particular day. So people are very interested in the biography and thank gives an anti dimension. And in a positive sense. It helps people understand what he's created. As you say, it also encourages myths and the somethings which hinder development, but I think it's very strong factor of why we will be getting an awful lot of people coming to see the takes vision. We we know him. Yes. No. There's always more to discover since the ROY sort of something we missed a Muslim. Thank you very much. Thank you. Okay. And that brings us to the end of our show about the exhibition Van Gogh Britain Tate Britain until the eleventh of August. And it's wonderful to be mentioned. Well, you'll they're gonna see Mike Nelson's the asset strip is up in the divine galleries also mazing strangely moving and that is on until the eleventh Tober, thanks tape Britain. And of course, this programs, wonderful producer, Holly Fischer. We back at the same time. Same place next week of the time being from me, Robert bounds. Thanks for tuning.

Van Gogh England London Vincent France Van Gogh Britain van Madame toussaud Nissan London Evening Tate Antwerp Mediterranean Anglican England Paris producer the Netherlands Robert bounds Mike Nelson Dicken
"van gogh" Discussed on The Brain Candy Podcast

The Brain Candy Podcast

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"van gogh" Discussed on The Brain Candy Podcast

"Yeah is so cool really cool we've got such talented rainy axe whenever i do interviews behind me people always like that wall back there we'll all you guys so they're going to think you for sending stuff van can tell we like getting stuff we hope that is it i think i was just thinking about getting stuff you know what i'll save that for later i read a thing of van gogh oh you in the holy what do you like about him all okay i like there's well i like there was something that i read recently about how okay he was able to see the movement of color in a way that's only been able to register by some sort of electronic machine i can't remember what the details are but when he it's almost like the way that his brain malfunction malfunctioned in a way that was like really an advantage yeah and it also was linked to mental illness are that in so as you slid into mental illness he also slid into the yes and i love anything like that so do you know the details of this about i know that a gal that i follow on twitter decided to go to the places that he had painted and she had taken pictures of those locations and only when she increase the saturation all the way up chills resemble his painting yeah and that demonstrated how he saw the world in a different way.

van gogh twitter