35 Burst results for "ustralia"

Why the worsening pandemic overseas is a risk to Australia

Coronacast

04:00 min | 18 hrs ago

Why the worsening pandemic overseas is a risk to Australia

"Say Norman it's really heartening to see in Ustralia that at local outbreaks are really coming down to really really levels but the case numbers each day are still high and that's partly because of returned travelers. So people who've coming back to Australia from other countries, many of which have caught lodge outbreaks of coronavirus happening there. We know that last time the big outbreak in Victoria happened from an escape from hotel quarantaine and the New South Wales Health Minister. Bread has it has indicated that he's worried about the potential for something like that to happen again what? Is that scenario and Health New South Wales also worried about the resource implications. I mean, we said before that a few weeks ago I got information from the raw prince Alfred that. Nursing shifts a week were be used at that point for Hotel Corentin, and that's before we upped the ante trying to get thirty thousand streams back before Christmas and as you say, coming from high prevalence countries. So the risk has gone up as the second wave in Europe has gone up. So the risk to us of returning Australians has gone up as well in proportion, and so we're going to see more people coming back who are positive and we want expanded facility. So. It's fantastic that we've got this facility, the heartstrings facility in the Northern Territory which apparently can be expanded, but it can take about one thousand people a foreigner right now that's not going to get you there in terms of Christmas, and getting all these people back and it requires medical resources so that people who are arriving back who might be sick, and in fact, there are people arriving back through sickness. One reason why they WANNA come back to get medical care and distributor. And that was the other implication for all prince offered is that some people were coming out of hotel quarantine to come into hospital For Surgery and other things nothing to do with covid nineteen because they were just seek and they needed help and they're entitled to it. So the question is, how do you scale and what do you do in the government? A report has a report on this and you can take a risk approach, which is that you say, well, if you coming back from Britain or Italy or France, then that's high risk and go into high risk facilities, but if you coming from China. Or Singapore assuming you're not in transit in Singapore that you've been in Singapore for a while obviously New Zealand and other countries than we maybe have a light touch you can quarantine at home we can do ankle bracelets you allow the authorities to track go track you on your phone those sorts of things that we can do but they're all got risk attached to them and we just going have to be really careful because we're all rejoicing Victoria opening up and through the Fall of nobody just the pressure of positive cases coming back we could be at significant risk of some cluster outbreaks. So we got the Howard Springs facility in the Northern Territory, which is great and elsewhere in it's mostly been done in hotels which really useful for quarantine but not purpose built for it. Do we need to be thinking more about the along the lines of the quarantine stations that we used to have a century ago? Well, yes, not can't imagine that the. Government's not thinking about that. So we have these quarantine stations the to I know best of the ones one of the Mornington peninsula in Victoria and the one on south, head, New South Wales, and they were designed for exactly this purpose in the nineteenth century and early twentieth century ships coming back from overseas, which might have had smallpox on them or infections that they didn't fully understand people went to the quarantine station and stayed there for a while until it was sorted out. They could be re purposed. They're not very big really in terms of numbers of people that you could take them. There are army camps. There are other things that you could do, but it's where you might be geographically isolated. It's hard for people to get away from them, but you look after humanely in reasonable comfort while you're quarantining in addition to using home corentin when it's much safer to do. So I think that you can look on this as a national project we want Australians to come home and we're gonna find ways of doing it.

Australia Victoria South Wales New South Wales Health Ministe Singapore Norman Hotel Quarantaine Hotel Corentin Europe Ustralia Hospital For Surgery Bread Alfred Smallpox Howard Springs Mornington Peninsula New Zealand Britain
COVID-19 in Victoria, Australia

Coronacast

09:23 min | 6 d ago

COVID-19 in Victoria, Australia

"Gratified Friday that's right. Twenty third of Tober pardon the PUN number really pushing towards the grand finale Victoria in terms of stamping out the lost. Stubborn pots of coronavirus is still spreading down there. Yes, and there's clearly still virus around in the northeast corridor. Expected of totally disappeared from there and the pop up clinic, and that's that's the way it's going to go forward US way it's going New South Wales in Swiss going to go forward in Victoria and it's a good thing that they're onto its and jumping onto things quickly. So what we're looking forward to on Sunday from Andrews hopefully is certainly moving forward the restriction relaxations he talked about November I this weekend, but I suspect you might see but more than that in terms of. Restaurants spars that sort of thing where you just might see a speeding up or much more much better defined pathway to those opening up in the near future because Victoria is in pretty good shape we did he gets day battle outbreak in a housing block area in Melbourne is this just like we don't need a look down to get on top of those riot if the public health machine is working better now than it was before the and also if you've got the community onside and they're willing to cooperate because the realized the implications of very much larger knock time. So it's the fuel for the fires. When people are living in densely populated circumstances so it could spread incredibly quickly. So going to get on top to get on top of it quickly, but the capacity to do so is much better and there's less distraction around in Victoria. There's a lot of distraction around when you those terrible outbreaks in addition to the other outbreaks in abattoirs and elsewhere in Victoria there's. A lot going on towards the last time there outbreaks in those densely populated towerblocks these days the capacity is there to focus more and have fewer distractions around because there's so much less virus circulating the virus is circulating you know where it's come from right and so I sort of moving towards our kind of steady state of figuring out our relationship with this virus here. And hopefully, looking at opening up our internal borders at some stage in the near future. WHAT ABOUT INTERNATIONAL BORDERS? There's still lots of Australians overseas. There's. All. Students. WanNa come here. Tourism operators here are really struggling and I'm sure there's some. Really want to go overseas as well. WH- should've reopening paddle clack for Ustralia more broadly. Well, it's a very complicated landscape. You Go to feel for these thirty odd thousand students who went back many of them are quite unwell. Don't be exposed to covid nineteen in the places where they're at and they desperately want to get home to their families and they feel cut off. The problem is that we tend to have a one-size-fits-all to our overseas entries and it should be possible to open up a more strategic way if the politics would allow it and I'm not blaming the politicians here is a difficult situation and you've got to do something about stranded. Australians. Overseas. But a lot of them are in countries which have a high prevalence of SARS covy to like the UK European, the US and places like that. Tends to be where strain school some of them are in Asia and lower prevalence countries. So when you're sending a Qantas plane over to London to pick up people, you're bringing back in the plane presumably, they could take three or four hundred people bringing back hundred and seventy five because the crews got to be protected and the people on board to be protected bear in mind that all of the tens of thousands of who've already. Return the only been three or four hundred infections in. Australia. Yes. We hear about the movie dates true but it's low numbers trouble with that is as we've seen Victoria, you only need one episode of escape from Whole Hotel, it's not the family escaped by the virus did circumstances and you've got a real problem on your hands. So the risk is high, but the risk is particularly high when you're bringing back people from high prevalence countries. You've got a lot of international students in China. You'd have to exclude those in India because that's a high prevalence country but China is a low prevalence country. The should be a way of bringing back international students quite soon from China with judicious testing intensive testing, maybe limited quarantine with intensive testing, and there are ways of doing that but perhaps turning over halls of residence colleges to their limited quarantine that you might. Introduce Singapore certainly New Zealand. Pacific. Islands that you could open up these places quite quickly, and of course, if a stranger stranded there, those would be your first priority. You could probably stand up on this plane over and fill it up particularly wear masks and bring it back with a far more than one hundred, seventy, five on board, and almost a full complement of passengers. Because the risk is so low, so should be possible to a risk adjusted system where for safe areas, you have one way of managing it and from high-risk is another and this probably no alternative if you're living in the UK or Europe and want to get back to coming back on a on a very low load plane. So this is different to travel bubble. Is that it's a bit more like you still have to quarantine, but it's just not does we don't have to have as high stringency because the risk is lower it needs a lot of thought it's not straightforward and the highest priority has to be stranded strings overseas. It's just intolerable that we don't solve that problem and it's a bipartisan shoes not party political but equally. Doing. This, which minimizes the risk from already low-risk countries. The should be a way to manage risk more carefully an a nuanced way depending on where people are coming from. So it's not an open bubble, but it is a lower intensity of corn team. So let's take some questions from audience and what better way to rip through a few to do him as a quickfire Friday round you ready ready to go now. Jeffries asking you mentioned the other day that masks need to be washed at sixty degrees Celsius to make sure the virus free but domestic hot water services limited to fifty degrees. So I wanted to be hand washing his cloth masks in water hated in the kettle or what I think that random mackel worked find that sixty degrees was what did the work but you'll find that detergent in warm water should do it the same way it's just that extended washing cycle I think. So fifty degrees, sixty degrees who knows whether it makes any difference the. Point that Ryan McIntosh was making here is a quick rinse in the hand basin. There's not enough specimens a farmer and wants to know why if humans contracted card from animals? Why are the mammals supposedly don't get the virus and has anyone bothered to test shaped cattle pigs and so on record low testing of animals corona there's a lot of coronavirus infection in animals. Pigs get a similar co diseased covid nineteen, and in fact, there is a pig vaccine as far as I'm aware to a respiratory syndrome similar to covid nineteen, but it's not SARS coffee to. are lower than will species have been tested and not find to carry this dogs can be infected but don't seem to retain the virus very well whereas cat. stew. Agricultural, animals don't seem to be a big problem to corona virus is prevalent in lots of different species. This person's flying to dial in from CD next week's visit family added about it. What precautions should they take for the flight? Well, I think for any flight my view is that you should wear a mask threat flight and just be careful about hygiene and Qatar saves on Colonel Cast a few days ago when you flush the toilet. Religious so you don't have an erase allies. And I think this question is asking about sewage testing how can test for the virus with all those millions of latest of water and other chemicals and just take a small test tube and still be able to identify the virus Yup it's mind boggling but they're able to genetically to actually look for the fragments of the virus I think that this is done with antibodies that pickup the virus, and then lie top when they've picked up the. Joys a big fan of Corona cast and her son is a paramedic in London and has had a very mild case of covid nineteen. But she's heard recently that everyone who gets five nineteen has long lasting effects in the front of their brain. Is this true please cleared up her because she's worried you can stop worrying Joe it's far from through a percentage of people do get long-term. Effects. And it's really not known yet what the percentage is, but it's not the of people and one more question Norman Magin one infectious person walks into a room with ten others spends a considerable amount of time seven, get the virus and three. Why don't those three becoming victim? Is it because I got better immune systems probably just the play of chance, but it could be that you've got some genetic. To the virus always somebody in society with a new virus, who's got genetic resistance to that virus by the play of chance, these are mysteries to which we don't know could be that they just didn't inhale quite as many viral particles as others who knows it is a difficult question hasn't indeed uses it. Just another one of the many mysteries that still surround covid nineteen

Victoria United States China UK London Covid Tober Andrews WH South Wales Qantas Asia Australia Melbourne Ryan Mcintosh Corona India
What happens if we don't get a vaccine? This is what 'COVID normal' looks like

Coronacast

03:52 min | Last week

What happens if we don't get a vaccine? This is what 'COVID normal' looks like

"Now no minute pretty much every press conference and in lots of news coverage, keep hearing this term covert normal as if as if we all know what that even means, but it's not normal right? It's not abnormal that we used to know how meant to understand what's meant by the term covid normal covered normal at the moment depends on where you live in Australia. So covered normal in Victoria as we speak is really quite a severe lockdown even with restrictions lifted covered normal in New South Wales is You know it's not quite normal life but the you know indoor activities restricted there's no compulsory mask-wearing, but there are outbreaks. State is on a bit of age. Covered normal everywhere else in Australia is getting back to almost normal life which actually puts them at risk of covid nineteen should be. Deposited into their state for some reason. Well, that's not really normal. Though is it because normal life included overseas travel and that's something that seems to be off the table indefinitely and we've had a question for one about audience members about this. What is the endgame? For Ustralia not just the states? What does the next year look like if we don't get vaccine or the vaccine that does come isn't isn't effective enough at first well, in states like new. South. Wales and Victoria covered normal if you like the end game. Assuming that the virus continues to circulate is that we don't circuit quite as much. So it's not locked on. It's just that we don't get into circumstances where a lot of people are mixing indoors, consp-, read the virus. So we're GONNA fewer contacts on a daily basis to reduce the chances of picking up the virus or spreading the virus. Covered normal, but it's not a lockdown. It's just that you to be careful. Now the question you raise a good one, but let's talk about internal borders. So what happens if you lift the border restrictions across? Australia, when the still virus in New South Wales Victoria, well, there's not much virus. So the risk of spread to those states is low but shoot actually it sprayed. Does that mean that automatically West trillions and south Australians queenslanders means etc.. Territories that they have to change their behavior and they've got to restrict how they do things by going indoors and live in a different way. and Professor James McCall, University of Melbourne argues that they don't that in fact, they're covered normal in states with Novartis circulating with Borders Darn is actually the way people are living at the moment, but there's gotta be a heightened alert to the possibility that the virus could come in. So people have got to be aware of symptoms get tested and that the public health systems go onto it in terms of getting on top of testing and contact tracing and that the if you like the protection so that you can reach retain the behavior in those states that you've got at the moment. So news wasn't Toria a degree of social distancing but not. Too drastic but in other states, you can continue the way you're going as long as you're prepared to come forward for testing in large numbers and the systems prepared to pick that up and the an example James quoted was the spread from Melbourne to kill more. So Regional Victoria said, very little corona virus people are getting back to normal much faster. But in fact, the State got on top of the coolmore outbreak and indeed the shepherd and outbreak very very quickly and go to under control without rural and regional victorians having to change their behavior they are covered normal if you like. So this is good news moving forward is that you could. Lower the borders have much freer flow of people and that the compromise for people in the states with Navarro spread at the moment is just ready to come forward for tasting and the systems got ready to respond, which is a small price to pay for tourism and families getting back together again,

Australia Victoria Professor James Mccall New South Wales New South Wales Victoria Regional Victoria Wales Melbourne University Of Melbourne Ustralia Navarro Novartis
Are we just going to have to get used to dealing with outbreaks?

Coronacast

07:25 min | Last week

Are we just going to have to get used to dealing with outbreaks?

"So one of the things that Australia has really relied on throughout the hall coronavirus pandemic sci-fi is lockdown as a way of getting a handle on what's happening and keeping cases to a minimum. We've seen that really happening in Victoria and a few days ago a special envoy from the World Health Organization was talking about how lockdowns shouldn't be the only sort of tool. That countries used to Cape a handle on the coronavirus and I think that some people in Victoria have sort of used those comments from the WHO as a reason to sort of say, we should be lifting Victoria's lockdown now but it's a bit more nuanced than that. Isn't it? This nuanced? We went into lockdown in March largely to stop the growing pandemic but also to allow the infrastructure for contracting testing to get into place, which is what the WHO, who say. There was an outbreak in Victoria now that I break in Victoria would have killed many many more people had they not to lockdown but in part the outbreak was due to a failure in contracting and testing at that time. So in many ways, they fulfilled whol criteria for lockdown, which is time to get your contact tracing and testing into shape, and in fact, through the second wave in. Victoria that's indeed what they've done some situation where Victoria New South. Wales are pretty XY Pixie in terms of unknown cases number of cases a day. Sorry Pixie. What the hell does that mean some kind of Scottish thing I grew up with meeting. You know roughly equal fair fair enough trying to get a new phrase into the Australian dictionary from Scotland. Anyway. Back to the point the point being. That, you said whereas in Victoria roughly equal and the argument is probably quite well made that there's not a lot of reason why you shouldn't have the restrictions roughly the same in both states the problem of Victoria is you don't WanNa let the break off suddenly because people will just start turning up on masters include a beach which means crowding into trams, etc, etc. so you've got up. Do fairly slowly and carefully, but the endpoint quite soon could be a similar situation to New South. Wales. But we've got to get used to and it's not a trivial phrase a new covid normal. We promised a few days ago that we were going to stop comparing new, south Wales and Victoria, but let's just do it one more time new south. Wales does seem to have like you say. Exceed Pixie level of similar levels virus to what we're seeing in Victoria or at least the confirmed cases that are coming through, and they don't have as many restrictions on them, and we do know as well that it's probably at least a year before we're going to have any kind of vaccine available to that sort of like what we're thinking of as being a trigger for going back to what we used to have as a normal life is what's happening in New South. Wales. Perhaps, a model for what Ustralia could look like over the next year. Well, I think West Australians queenslanders south. Australians would bridal a that because they've got almost nothing happening and they're saying, well, why should we have? Wills has belichick focused on new, south Wales and Victoria for the moment. But I think it is something that queenslanders and others need to be cognizant off is this something we should get used to what we're talking about here for people who don't live in New South Wales is an outbreak from GP clinic now, getting used to is different from getting complacent. So yes I think you gotta get used to the fact that there will be small outbreaks but what we should not do tolerate them and so they're. They're not to be tolerated and our behavior needs to change in the short to medium term which is. Continuing careful social distancing. I believe in new. South. Wales. It should be mandatory mask in public transport just as an extra layer of security. You don't seem to be going that way and really getting on top of outbreaks and people being prepared to get tested if symptoms are in areas where there are outbreaks and if we can do that, then we can cope with these outbreaks but we can't just say. Another outbreak. Let's move on. It's another outbreak. Oh, this could be the moment where this could be the hotel quarantine equivalent moment that we hadn't. In Victoria, whereas if we ignore it is going to get out of control. So get used to not really be able to deal with yes. But just quickly on that, we're talking about being able to be responsive to outbreaks but we see in Shepperton in regional Victoria, they had a the little outbreak happening there people have told to go on to get tested they've gone to go and get tested. They've done what's been asked but they haven't been. Able to access testing this huge queues, how are we going to be out of style up to these? Well, that's for health departments to sort out, but they've got to be ready for particularly in rural and regional areas because this is something that you just need one truck driver to have arrived in a place in spread it and we've already seen somebody hiding away in trying to get into Queensland you just need one person and to move into our networks and off. So everywhere it's got to be ready and you to be ready for scale up and a plan for scale up so. Somebody throws a switch and people start with doing and they set up to prop up clinics, and within a few hours you've got it all going and that's what people have got to plan for and the best thing that can happen is you never have to institute your emergency response, but your emergency response has got to be really Schmidt and if he wants to know. More about how we've tooled up for contact tracing, how good it is, they listen to yesterday's Khurana cast with Ryan McIntyre where we covered a lot of these issues and that chat with Rhino was so interesting and there was stuff in there that we couldn't fit into yesterday's show. So we thought we'd bring it back again in prerecorded form to answer a question from Ingrid. Where Ingrid's ask if a person who has the virus uses a toilet does the next person inhale the virus spray in the toilet is flushed with the lead up and is the virus in urine faeces? Yum. This is just the sort of question that croquettes listeners love energy with toilets. Let's have a listen to yesterday's comments by Rhino McIntyre, which weren't in the krona cast. So this is a bonus we're talking about. And toilets on aeroplanes. We do know that there is a risk with closed transport vehicles with its planes buses. There's been a number of outbreaks already described on airplanes on buses and other vehicles including A. A navy ship whether it was a very, very high tech right? the Theodore Roosevelt in the US. The risk isn't just from Aerosol, droplets spread I mean we know that the highest risk isn't people sitting closest to the infected person and that's been born out in previous studies with diseases like to book your license and Maizels. But the toilet is also respected. There was one study where they were known infected people on board everybody was wearing a mosque and one of the people who became infected took the mosque off in the toilet. So we know that flushing the toilet can create aerosolize -ation. Probably. Less. So on an airplane toilet because of the nature of those toilets that don't have water swilling around, but they still would be rissole generation from the flushing action. So, the hall toilet is probably highly contaminated. So even if you wash your hands afterwards, you could breathe in contaminated aerosols than when you come out even just touching the door handle would be a risk. So that's that's probably one of the real hot spots on an airplane. That was Professor Rhino McIntyre who is professor of global biosecurity at Curbing University of New South Wales

Victoria Wales South Wales Victoria New South Professor Rhino Mcintyre New South New South Wales Curbing University Of New Sout World Health Organization Cape A Pixie Australia Ingrid Shepperton Scotland Theodore Roosevelt Ustralia Rhino
Why are humpback whales getting stuck in rivers?

The Naked Scientists

03:50 min | Last month

Why are humpback whales getting stuck in rivers?

"Say the least as it's the first known instance of this happening. The first little these animals up to as much as twenty kilometers up a river up in the northern territory and USTRALIA dissipated pitchy here we're talking murky muddy waters and so when I first saw the picture of Humpback Whale, which is an oceanic spacey's in this murky water, it was something that was a phenomenal thing thought sydney-based marine scientist Vanessa at PIRATA. Now, two of the whales is thought have since swam back out to sea but at least one remains in the river and the worries if stranded in the shallow water, is it going to be able to get out? So the main reason that the probably in there is well, I should point out this has never happened before, but maybe one of the animals took. A wrong turn and ended up in this area thumbed back wiles generally in the Kimberley region, which is northwest of Australia H. and every year to breed and have their babies, and now say time to be hitting Beck South dant Antarctica where they're going to spend the summer fading. Let's hope that this one reminding while has the opportunity to do just that being a. Tidal River is rather different to being in the sea. So how might the whale be doing? Do you sound to to listen and to vocalise to talk about now this whale because in on Acre located may be reliant on visual cues. So simply having a little look around or trying to say where there's a space to soon that's that site side there's a whole. Number of things that would probably be going through this wiles mind and without ends Promo fighting it'll putting a human spin on it on show that this animal might be doing circles or at least on. Friday. There'll be a tame going up just to have another look at it just to say what it's doing and to see if it's made any progression in its movements. strumming is a real risk and up in the Northern Hemisphere Southampton University's Clive. Truman, told me why this is dangerous for a whale watch would want to be supporting with the weight of the organs and the way to the animal. So when it strands that can compress the lungs and undamaged into Logan's same time if a while is stuck and tide is coming in and out almost paradox. Can Drown because it can lift itself off of the the bite can then water can get into the blowhole and drown. So what tools to scientists have available to encourage twelve plus meet away? Oh, to do anything, there's a couple of examples that I could run through one being creating a physical barrier with farts. So the animal was simply move away with type in some cases that hasn't worked in the past where the animal is simply gone onto bites you could use acoustics such as banging on physically banging on vessels, which is really nice for a while some have suggested using kilowatt playback sounds, which is the Predator of the humpback whales but again, a Lotta, these are potentially guttering juice stress our. Expert, team will have to y out what options are potentially going to be put on the table to see if it's worth inducing these kinds of reactions to then have a favorable result, which would be the animal turning directions and heading out to say as the name of the river suggests the whale isn't the only thing in east alligator river. Clive again. It folktales of fantastic animals extremely intimidating, but probably not a risk to sixteen major adult humpback whale unless again the whale is stranded, and if the world is stranded and stuck than, you could imagine the talk dolls could pies an additional risk.

East Alligator River Tidal River Beck South Dant Antarctica Truman Vanessa Scientist Hemisphere Southampton Univers Clive Kimberley Australia Logan
Will Australia have access to a vaccine if/when it is discovered?

Coronacast

05:02 min | 2 months ago

Will Australia have access to a vaccine if/when it is discovered?

"This is corona cost a podcast all about the coronavirus I'm health report a Teigen Taylor on physician and Journalists Alter Norman Swan it's Tuesday the eighteenth of August. So No, we're hearing that the government seen advanced negotiations with a couple of different companies about a vaccine securing a supply of vaccine for. STRATEGIA. Even though don't actually know which accents GonNa work yet what's involved in this process of making sure that we can get it once we know what works well, there are two ways of getting one is to enter into events purchase deal. Which is what America has done with several manufacturers. So for example, with the Oxford Vaccine I think they've pre-booked three hundred million dollars is the European Communities pre-booked four, hundred, million doses. Then there's does is they've got to give to Garvey for low income countries. It doesn't leave much in Britain's got to get. Some doesn't much out of their first billion doses. So you know and that's the front of the queue. There is an Indian manufacturer sending up to manufacture some of these vaccines particularly the Oxford one. Last week on seven thirty, the telling Nolan from the University of Melbourne was saying that he's reasonably optimistic going to be more than one vaccine available in a reasonably short space of time in other words this year sometime towards the end of this year. And therefore, there probably will be plenty of doors to go around. But that doesn't mean to say that we're home and hosed with that. Now, it's believed that the negotiations the government's doing are with the Oxford Group, but we don't have manufacturing capacity for that kind of vaccine in Australia. Sort of vaccines that CSL US but we have got expertise in vaccine production and the easiest way to do this is to license the technology and manufacturing in Australia so that we can guarantee that. So so in other words taking supply away from anywhere else we would be manufacturing the vaccine for our own use. It does mean, of course that if it doesn't work, we've got to find. Vaccine from elsewhere but it's quite likely that what are the vaccines which will be fun to? We'll be the vaccine, but it's not guaranteed right. So like scientists got a lot of different irons in the fire here and some companies have decided to back a particular one and stop making that. So that one that you mentioned the Oxford one has a billion orders already in what if it doesn't work Tip It all down the drain just closed because of the junk heap that's taking. So the so the least risk for Ustralia is to license the technology and pay a license fee vaccine. Without pre purchasing vaccine so that we can produce it if it works. And in the hope that we can tool up pretty quickly. Probably even test that in advance and you might want WanNa, take a risk and produce vaccine. Ahead of time we they're doing in the United Kingdom or the other way that the the government can do to pre purchase vaccines and what Americans do with some scenes saying, well, we will guarantee you x billion dollars ranks one, hundred, million dollars if your vaccine is approved for registration so there's a caveat on it as well, but it does give those companies the ability to borrow money or. Gain grants or other things because they've got guaranteed income should it be successful? Can we take a step for a second and talk about what it actually takes to get a vaccine from the lead benchtop into the little glass vial that you see at the pharmacy, which is what they didn't stick in your arm. The problem is that was the vaccines that are most likely to be successful. Initially, it's novel technology and the novel technology is on both sides of the equation there's this edge of. And there's the actual bit of the virus itself. So with the Oxford vaccine, the event that's going to amplify the immune response is actually an admiral virus from a chimpanzee. The Russian and Chinese vaccines are also adenovirus vaccines. Now, that requires new technology development, develop it safely, and then you go to the technology to produce the the bit of the Corona virus that you're gonNA use to stimulate the specific immune response with the Madeira no one in America, the vaccine, which is a little packet of. Genetic messaging which goes into the cell to produce. A bit of the virus to stimulate the immune response. There's no Ativan. But. That requires special manufacturing technology as well. So Australia acquiring, the latest technology would be acquiring, know how that's going to be very handy for into the future and makes us independent of other supplies overseas Rava van necessarily pre purchasing large numbers of the doses from overseas in the hope that they were going to be approved. Now, America's done a couple of things that they're they've pre purchased unconditionally some vaccine and they've pre purchased some vaccines. On the basis of them having been approved and they're just hedging their bets and Some money might well be wasted in this and some vaccines which are being pre manufactured such as Oxford vaccine may have to be junked if it doesn't work one hopes not.

America Australia Oxford Group Teigen Taylor University Of Melbourne Garvey United States European Communities United Kingdom Ustralia Wanna Britain Nolan
Feel Good Habits With Lily Pebbles

The Emma Guns Show

05:27 min | 2 months ago

Feel Good Habits With Lily Pebbles

"This is a glorious day. Because little pebbles is making a return to the cost to share her feel good habits highly a. So happy to be here said, I. See you. It's been ages. been such a Carolina Dinner. Gosh. Yes. That was like one of the last. Four. Before. Everything. Yeah Time wasn't it? And but you are coming on the focused show feel good habits which. And just to remind listeners overseas that he's been on the show before and she is a fellow protocol stor, remind everybody about your podcast with Anna? Hermit Liliana we run through top five favorite things from the week, and then we discussed like different topics and answer questions from our viewers. We have like a facebook group and it's just really chilled radio relaxed in Refund Jesse. is also one of my favorite content creators because everything you put together with. So considered I, wonder how you have a specimen in the day but. Even even your content I told you this I still you at Caroline's dinner I will even read in their entirety let your recommendations, strollers or pushchairs, oab because it's just so well fit together and I'm no interest in those things I loved the advice curry funny that from the outside you think everything say thoughts during considered. That's how I feel about Anna guys. So like behind the scenes that she like Oh, my God what am I doing, throw it together I panic and then it all comes together like I didn't panic but. Donna I'm definitely. On his unique and I just have to come to terms because there are times when. I could just be like an my life which we could one of a kind and ten years hard to be best friends. Honestly actually imagine that but she's just pure joy in sunshine but he was thinking about this the other day because I was trying to understand my own. Numeracy's an I, need the pressure of sometimes leaving things to the last minute but. I feel like the quality of works I will produce his best or if that is a little pressure on and I've always thought that was because of magazines. Journalism. Book Yeah definitely same with my managers laugh at me because whenever they come to something my first thing is just panic now I can't do it can't do this go wrong wrong wrong and then I do it in a likely that was unreal and I'm like. Germany I just panic and I've so like, no, no no I can't do it, and then I can. Use is a confidence thing of being being scared to do it and the okay. Picture there. For your feel good habits where are we going to stall where ease I said to you I? Feel like I'm going to be at your worst guests because I asked me come on. I was like, Oh, I just I'm so not like a self care person that you have lots of very positive guests who are very like he needs to have time without your phone I. Wish I could be one of those people but I'm I'm just so no. And I definitely panicked in Donna and I was like I don't know I feel good habits are and then she actually. Is Helpful to hear from someone else like what she thinks minority and she really helped me like thinkers and things. So there have been different I think to what you usually have bit good. Because actually I find the self cast base helpful but also sometimes a bit stodgy. Like. These are some feel good habits from. A cynical realist. Excellent. In fact, that's why would have called the franchise been bit snapping. Okay number. One you ready. This seems a little bit of Yes taking photos, organizing photos, printing them, putting them in albums making home videos. I've got shed albums on my iphone and all of that so much feel good for me. I just love it. I get so much joy from it especially since having gray. Okay. So tweeted shed album thing because I have shove I didn't think I intended to have one. Yeah. I didn't either until my friend reef to Ustralia, and you basically start shed album on your iphone and you can add people to it. So it means whenever you add to video it's domestically than on that shared open, they can also check on. FM So it's great for long distance relationships my friend who's in Australia has done and I've got one for gray because riches family will live in Suffolk didn't get to see how elephants everyday outlawed the videos and they can just check in a little light on the phone and they can like comments instagram but and they can show their pride and it's great. Oh that's really really nice. Yeah. So on it's from the other day you were you would. Created like not a scrapbook but something where you actually. Getting physical pictures. Remember that. Making is it was that a scrapbook? It's just a photo album. That's actually one of the few things that I'm still quite organized with I really try like once a month or like. Every two months go through my phone delete anything that's like shouldn't like random searches of duplicates. Favorite like the best photos and then I'll print them. So I used APP who'd free prints in the best quality perfectly fine for like a full by six thirty and yet she get forty five reprints a month. So you just pay for delivery and every as often as I can all do that, and then I'll just put them in like a photo album.

Donna Anna Facebook Carolina Caroline Ustralia Germany Jesse. Australia Suffolk
Ana Forrest & Jose Calarco - Forging Your Own Path

The Flow Artists Podcast

04:53 min | 2 months ago

Ana Forrest & Jose Calarco - Forging Your Own Path

"Hello Joe. It's Jose Calico and Anna Forest Tia on all CA silent USA. And just by what you see what's going on in the mainland in the US I. And we're I a Saif. He only island in a Beautiful Anna's house thirty acres in lush forest with owls and eagles, and deason vouchers. Would really enjoying actually the lockdown. After five or six years of non stop touring thirty five CDs and countries a year. With had the chance to settle down and? We do have still very, very busy with our online channel and running out business each day we do a nice lengthy yoga practice. I'm a vegan chefs are cooking more than ever. Where actually very, very healthy. And so much has changed joke. Since we last spoke the world has gone absolutely crazy. And the US is one of those places where just off the mainland here. And not too far from here there's riots and shooting and racial tensions. All sorts of crazy crazy stuff going on a lot of it is a countdown to the election. Coming up here in the US I. There's a lot of manipulation lots of lies. Very hard to trust many people right now. So. Much. Going on. But We a happy to announce that old during this lockdown. We've had the opportunity to finally record all online yoga music ceremony shamanism philosophy Joe Prayers, go out to Victoria and all Ustralia Week here how harsh the lockdown is over there and I just lucky that we were able to do the lockdown thirty Acre forest. However, we seem to allow best wishes to Victoria and Australia, and we pray that our freedoms come back again. Go, and Jose. Thank you so much for speaking with us today all the way over in New Zealand the beautiful. Put Her. Could. We stop heads of your connections to first nations culture. Would you like to share how you live and work within indigenous communities and Foams what you share today? Absolutely. Well. I have been director all descendants aboriginal and Torres Strait Island Dance Company for twenty. Five years. People can see that descendants dot com you. We've traveled to the four corners of the planet we have done the world's biggest events over forty countries were visited. And this is where I got my background. In, aboriginal culture and my aboriginal Mahba spiritual mother Imelda Willis came from the dingy. Kanju clans Al-Faw North Queensland. She is now deceased. And we still descendants still together. And this just gave us the idea I had already. Doing first nations work in forest job. But I took it a couple of steps further by doing. Exchange all over the world while wearing Australia, we do Australian aboriginal stuff while we're in the US CY cultural exchange with the Americans. All first nations people in Mexico in Canada. Everywhere we go. We liked to do cultural exchange because first nations have spirituality was is beautiful and untouched by white middle class sort of new age is symptoms. So, with the aboriginal culture, it's the world's all this culture. It goes well over fifty thousand years and it was well before yoga and a lot of people site what has first nation. Philosophy principles and culture got to do with Yoga. And it actually has a lot to do with Yoga when we look at Yoga in the broader perspective as a place learning and healing.

United States Jose Calico Imelda Willis Australia Victoria Anna JOE Torres Strait Island Dance Com New Zealand Usa. North Queensland Director Mexico Canada
Changing Planes and Plans with Jen Ruiz

Cafe con Pam Podcast

03:56 min | 3 months ago

Changing Planes and Plans with Jen Ruiz

"Jenin I talk about her life in Puerto Rico growing up in Philadelphia what it was like to go to law school. Then what a became not practicing law as she started solo traveling and we of course talked about what inspired her to travel, which was being thirty and not being married and having children and wanting that resonated with me as when she talked about letting things be when letting things happen and unfold as they are supposed to when you're a planner and I, think this is one of the things when we get into this topic in the interview that is going to resonate with you as we live through pandemic Jen. Also, shares with us about self publishing becoming a travel blogger and I talk about Australia at the trip that I was going to take to Australia that ended up obviously not taking because that was going to happen between March and April and and that was right when all the things went down. So of course, I didn't make to Ustralia but I did make it to speak at that conference. So I can still call myself an international speaker because I got to speak honest age in Australia while I was in San Diego huckle is that but a winner I'll leave that for another story I will let you enjoy conversation with Jen druce. Jan. welcome together on Prem. How are you? I'm good. How are you is So you are currently in Puerto Rico I. Am okay I'm in Sunny San Diego we are I guess coasts. So you're I'm the Atlantic. Ocean Yes but we both are blessed with beautiful weather I know I. Love Puerto Rican put her because one of my favorite places in the world I love Puerto Rico when I went outside Omega I was from the Caribbean in a past life. I felt home. I'm so happy to hear that I'm so happy to hear that I want more people to come and if they have been before to revisit and if they. Haven't come for the first time because Puerto Rico really is an amazing place and gets a little bit of a bad rep with everything that's happened in the last few years but it just is so resilient and it's such a beautiful island with a lot of natural attractions and you know metropolitan bustling area and a lot of history and culture, and it's just amazing. So I'm so happy to hear that you enjoy it as well for sure in the food I like food. I've had to work really hard to not gain weight while I've been here. Yeah. Go every day. You know it's good for the soul but not necessarily for the hearts up out of moderation I. Suggest let's explore your stories to tell us what's your background with your heritage. So I am Puerto Rican, I was born here on the island I moved when I was six, my family was looking for better opportunities like so many others in that generation I think from the island they just now have their children have started returning to the island and it's a nice thing to see because there is still remaining. Anybody. Who left still has a lot of pride and still loves to share and see things from the island and you know just a sensible Rudo really within everybody here, and so I moved when I was six I grew up in Philadelphia and then I ended up going to college in Miami which became like a second home for me I. Really Love South Florida I went to law school in Baltimore and then I was like, what was I thinking I should've just stayed in south Florida. So mmediately to law school at right back and I was living there for many years I guess ten years. Between School and coming back. Loved it was the one place that was very just like you said, just felt very like home like the people there. I could relate to them like they had delicious food that I liked eating every radio station and play to get the on. Just, a really natural fit and loved it and I still do and I still consider south Florida to be a second home but it's also very nice for me to have this opportunity to come back nappy areas Puerto Rico rather than just like from family visits and family trips and things like that. But on my own and really get an appreciation for the island

Puerto Rico Puerto Rican Australia Ustralia Philadelphia South Florida Jenin San Diego Sunny San Diego Jen Druce Caribbean Miami Baltimore
Namaste Trump: US president fills world's largest cricket stadium for political rally

Correspondents Report

06:22 min | 8 months ago

Namaste Trump: US president fills world's largest cricket stadium for political rally

"Almost two weeks ago the US president. Donald Trump was in India for a quick two-day tour. They were no major announcements expected but donald trump was to speak in front of over one hundred thousand people at huge cricket stadium in the city of Ahmedabad it was an event that piqued the interest of South Asia correspondent. James Ocean Bash. It turns out local media when more than a little curious why an Australian journalist had decided to go along to the spectacle on me. That's the sound of more than one hundred thousand people welcoming. Us President Donald Trump at a new cricket stadium in Ahmedabad not just any cricket stadium the largest in the world. According to seating capacity the president is used to speaking at large political rallies but even hey admitted awake lighter went back in the US that this was something special. This was a political party. Indian style music was blasting people were dancing in the stands paper masks and Prime Minister Narendra Modi and president trump will being worn with glee and they were baseball caps with trump's name on them. Lots of baseball caps the back of the stadium. I'm sitting among many local media and a few other foreign journalists just trying to absorb it all and then something unexpected happened. An Indian TV journalists came up to me and asked if she could interview me a mistrial Ian replied assuming that she thought I was an American. It doesn't matter. She showed me turns out. She wanted a foreign perspective about Modi meeting trump. Why was an Australian journalist here? Does this change the way USTRALIA views? India is big news back home those sorts of questions now. India has a lot of rolling news channels more than twenty. I'm told and that means a lot of hours have to be filled with content on. Saint Live crosses done here for less so when I figured why. Not and within a minute of saying yes. We relies when all of this about say the cell but I will give you a sense of that. Maybe guests with me right now. James Lee Denisov Eaton. That's fine birth names off food related daily. Denise these all Geisha going to spawn in with ABC The Australian Broadcasting Corporation. James. I want to ask you. You obviously definitely give me the foreign media perspective. Paul you wheeling this particular democracies these elitist. Then you've seen a lot of billboards around which summit ipod nausea you've got the world's largest democracy welcoming the first democracy in fact the most powerful democracy so I certainly pro-meta Strategy and perspective with a lot of interest in how they get along and how countries get along as well On. Tv The interviewer and occupying about a third of the screen. Another thirties live pictures of the rally and surrounding. Those two boxes are distracting amount of flashing graphics with the American Flag Waving on screen and headlines about mody welcoming trump constantly changing before the viewers is Indian media is certainly more shoddy than back harm and that includes the news animations anyway back to the interview Australia itself. It's always how to focus on China and you can say that starting to shift quite significantly and even the fries. Indo Pacific is one that you hear a lot more nowadays now. That's the point of made a fair bit recently. In fact the last time I was on this program I said I expected to hear more from India incoming years but if that's true change will surely be gradual industrial change. The Way Australia looks at in there. I wouldn't say a particularly changes to why you've seen to be honest. I likely wouldn't have gone to Ahmedabad either. Weren't for this. Visual spectacle with Donald Trump went on to discuss Australia Mont possibly join India Japan and the US in naval exercises this year or next and that was the end of the interview. Only Latin that perhaps the media not belong to either in America. Third-country thought that would be the end of it. I sat back down waiting for the main event to start but then a man with a golden microphone started chatting to me. He was a reporter with another news station India. Today within minutes on back on the air answering the sign. Top of questions. There was also a bit of Banter about how Australia no longer had the largest cricket stadium in fact that was repeated to me several times in the Strip opposite studio me like this random person who answered a question about Donald Trump explaining that the M. C. J. was no longer the world's largest cricket stadium minutes after the interview with India. Today I had another request for a TV interview and then another eventually. I decided because I had my own reporting to concentrate on now as I mentioned before. There's a lot rolling news platforms in India. Sorry grubbing may or any foreign Janai for an interview. Could just be filler. But it did get me thinking about the rise of India. He had the president of the United States showering India. And it's people with price. I got the sense that this was a proud moment for many here. Regardless of their politics it signified a in. The wider world is viewing India having foreign journalists to report on that reinforce this view but regardless of what the future holds for India. It seems one thing. That's not in dispute. They now have the world's largest Cricket Stadium Great Story there with South Asia correspondent James Oaten.

Donald Trump India President Trump United States Ahmedabad Huge Cricket Stadium Largest Cricket Stadium Prime Minister Narendra Modi South Asia James Lee Denisov Eaton Australia India Japan Baseball IAN James Oaten Indo Pacific
Venezuela in crisis

Correspondents Report

04:56 min | 1 year ago

Venezuela in crisis

"Venezuela is a country in freefall as economic mismanagement an international sanctions. Combine to create desperately difficult times for its citizens as global debate centers, on who's to blame successive, socialist governments or countries like the US, who are putting the squeeze on the government of nNcholas Maduro, people are struggling for basics like food and medicine. US correspondent Zoe Daniel has recently returned from Venezuela as gentlest Venezuela is not an easy country to work in media vases, difficult to get and even with them in hand report is closely monitored by the authorities and government backed armed groups called collective owes rooms need to be checked for bugs sensitive interviews must be discussed in hushed tons movements should not be telegraphed and should never happen after dark time spent in each location needs to be limited violent crime is also close to the w-. I in the world and much of the story that needs to be told is in the slums, or barrios, where poverty hunger and disparition exacerbates that risk. There are also the gangs who trade in drugs, and ruled the roost in recent months, escalating political tensions have added the risk of protest rallies, turning violent clashes between opposition activists and government troops and proxies, all of this means that the stories of ordinary Venezuelans are infrequently told but when you give them the chance this sentiments a clear. Something by women and men young and old have to realize the critical situation, the country, is going through these days, hunger, misery, repression and unemployment. We spent a week in the slums of Caracas and surrounds talking to people about life and politics. Well, I. Research says that nine out of ten people in Venezuela, count afford enough food, because of hyperinflation, which is rented the local currency almost valueless government food parcels that handed out monthly a dwindling. Sometimes now, they come only every second or third month, and they're often missing case applies like milk. There's widespread frustration and people are starting to voice it. Even with the risk of recriminations, Ropeway sediment Settimio, nothing seems to improve it all gets worse. So I think they should be change to give the opportunity for someone else to rule the situation has created a window of opportunity for opposition later. One guy who was backed by the US, and ustralia among dozens of other countries when he declared himself president after twenty eighteen elections that are widely condemned as flawed, although you get the sense that it's a case of right place. Right. Time rather than one guy DOE, having specifically captured the public imagination ROY Innis weather. It's not just a problem for Venezuela, what the international community has done so far is very important. The recognition of our constitution and of me as interim president Australia did that to what's important. Now is to keep the pressure up the dictatorship won't voluntarily leave. And fortunately them enduro government wouldn't respond to the concerns raised by those who can't get enough food or medicine at a time when political division globally runs deep Venezuela's, plied attracts, at a response almost all of the Venezuelans that I've encountered blame the economic collapse, on mismanagement by successive governments who've nationalized, assets, subsidized goods and services failed to manage the country's oil revenues and allowed endemic, cronyism and corruption. They don't always mention soc. Realism specifically many still harked back formerly to the days of logistics, under, former president Hugo Chavez. But for many observers Venezuela's become a symbol of the broader failure of the socialist model, that's gained particular traction as lift and right retreat to their corners, the world over. However, defenders of socialism, attack outside nations for interfering in Venezuela, particularly the United States, which is imposed harsh sanctions and an embargo on oil Russia, China and Cuba continue to back the Madero administration. And that's a K driver of US involvement. The big picture issues, but for ordinary Venezuelans who've seen they country go from the richest in Latin America to a basket case they just want something to change, so they can feed their families, but from Caracas that's North American correspondent, Zoe Daniel.

Venezuela United States Caracas Zoe Daniel President Trump Nncholas Maduro Roy Innis Interim President Hugo Chavez Madero Administration Latin America I. Research Australia Cronyism Cuba Russia China Milk
Early humans may have shared Europe with a giant bird

This Week in Science

01:45 min | 1 year ago

Early humans may have shared Europe with a giant bird

"This is a discovery net Crimean cave, which is that little regionally the north of the waxy? This is suggesting that early Europeans lived alongside some of the largest birds ever to exist. This research is published in the journal of vertebrate, paleontology previously thought that such gigantism birds was limited to islands, Madagascar, New Zealand ustralia. We have now have newly discovered specimen in this cave in northern coast of Black Sea. It is a bird is giant as the elephant bird. Ceiling moa and maybe source of meat bones feathers eggs that sort of thing for early humans in the region, quote voice from doctor, Nikitas Lenka, Russian Academy of sciences. When I first felt the weights of the bird, whose thighbone I was holding in my hand. I thought it must be mad Aghassi elephant bird Foucault 'cause no birds of the size of ever been reported from Europe. However, the structure of the bone unexpectedly told a different story. We don't have yet enough data to say, whether it was most closely Raila to ostriches or other birds, but we estimate, it weighed four hundred fifty kilograms, which if you're not familiar with kilograms as a metric for hundred and fifty kilograms is approximately the equivalent of four hundred fifty thousand grams or nine hundred ninety two pounds or that. That's big. That's really big formula.

Nikitas Lenka Gigantism Russian Academy Of Sciences Black Sea Journal Of Vertebrate Madagascar Europe Raila New Zealand Four Hundred Fifty Thousand Gr Nine Hundred Ninety Two Pounds Four Hundred Fifty Kilograms Fifty Kilograms
Why Are Camel Spiders Harmless?

BrainStuff

05:58 min | 1 year ago

Why Are Camel Spiders Harmless?

"Today's episode is brought to you by the Capital, One card with Capital, One saver card. You can earn four percent cashback on dining and entertainment. That means four percent on checking out that new French restaurant and four percent on bowling with your friends. You'll also earn two percent cashback at grocery stores, and one percent on all other purchases. Now, when you go out you cash in Capital, One, what's in your wallet terms apply? Welcome to brain stuff. A production of iheartradio. Hey, brain stuff. Lauren Vogel bomb here. Some animals have a reputation that's hard to shake take a camel spider. Many Americans are familiar with them based on photos that came out of the Iraq war in the early two thousands a giant, desert spider, with a leg span somewhere between the size of a pack of cigarettes and a full grown man's calf though. The latter one turned out to be a trick of forced perspective. There were rulers, they enter the desert screaming and jumping on camels they would hide an ambush in sleeping bags ready to inject you with venom, but US military personnel are not the first to tell stories about the camel spider in South Africa. There's sometimes called beard-trimmers, because some people believe that if you sleep on the ground camel, spiders, will come trim your hair in your sleep and use it to line, their nests in parts of North Africa. And the Middle East legend has it that they choose the bellies of camels until their intestines fallout. So they can eat them or that they can lay their eggs in their stomachs. None of this is true, of course, for starters, camel, spiders, are not spiders at all. All but solid few goods, these arachnids live on every continent, except in article, and ustralia and all one thousand one hundred and fifty species have eight legs and two body sections, like spiders, scorpions ticks, and mites, but they're different enough to belong to their own order. Secondly, they are aggressive, but they're also none venomous, and the large jaws of most species can't even breakthrough human skin much less camels belly the largest camel, spider has a leg span of around six to eight inches. That's fifteen to twenty centimeters, which is bid for a spider, but it's not horror movie territory. And they seem to take little to no observable interest in human hair. We spoke with Christy Rettig, founder of the bug chicks educational company that uses arthropods to teach young people about social issues like prejudice racism, educational, potential and personal development. She said that thing about sell a few goods is you don't really need to make stuff up about them for them to be fascinating. I was in Kenya. When I first saw one and I went to catch it and it ran up the side of the wall. Right up to my I height it. Reared. Back in rubbed its jaws together to strangulate. Some people say they scream, but it's more of a hissing rasping noise, it had such an attitude. I just fell in love. It would seem difficult to fall in love with an Iraq did with these stage presence of a pro wrestler, and the body of an animal who's parts were scavenged from the invertebrate salvage yard but such is the allure of the camel spider Radic said if you do a rapid count of what appears to be legs. They look like they have ten legs. But their first pair actually mouth parts called pep helps I kind of think of them as mouth hands, they helped facilitate bringing prey into their big jaws when they run they use them, kind of, like antenna or long legs in the front. They also have mouth clause called Chelsea's which are used for a dizzying variety of purposes, one of which seems to be transferring packets of sperm, for male to female camel, spiders, most sell a few gets are nocturnal extremely territorial and top predators in arid ecosystems. They eat other predators in the same size range, as them or a bit larger. But even eat each other, they don't have venom. It's unnecessary because their jaws are so powerful. They can manipulate their food through their mouths by sawing their prey back and forth like an old timey cartoon character eating a cob of corn. Solid few goods are also wildly fast able to reach speeds of about ten miles per hour that's sixteen kilometers per hour and seemed to be able to run for as long as you care to chase them. But with that comes metabolism that requires nearly constant fuelling. So they eat a lot, but that doesn't necessarily explain ones. L A few good behavior mass aunt assassinations for some reason, camel, spiders, will sometimes go after an ants, nest just tearing answered half left and right until they're surrounded by an enormous heap of rented, aunt carcasses some scientists think maybe they're killing ants to save them as a stack for later. But read it published a paper in two thousand fourteen about the diet of solid few goods, and she and her co author found that they don't, particularly, like eating ants another explanation for this behavior. Could be that there. Trying to clear out the ant nest in order to find a nice place to escape the desert sun. But it's really a mystery as to why they do this Rettig pointed out that another possibility though. Is that camel spiders attack Aetna's to get the larva and pupa inside? She explained these don't bite and are super soft squishy little protein and fat bombs. But you can add the mass murder of ants to the long list of things. Scientists don't understand about solid fuel goods. But remember, even though they act wild they can't hurt you Radic said just because something is a predator or even defensive or aggressive. It doesn't make it a bad or mean animal cell. A few kids have so much, great attitude, and they're soft and fuzzy when you pet one, it's like, petting a little mouse. A little demon mouse. Today's episode was written by Jesulin shields and produced by Tyler claim brain stuff is a production of iheartradio's, how stuff works for more on this lots of other creepy crawly topics. Visit our home planet has stuff works dot com and for more podcasts from iheartradio. Visit the iheartradio app, apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Today's episode is brought to you by the Capital One saver card earn four percent cashback on dining and entertainment. Two percent at grocery stores and one percent on all other purchases. Now when you go out you cash in what's in your wallet terms apply.

Christy Rettig Iraq Iheartradio Capital One Middle East Lauren Vogel United States Kenya North Africa Radic Strangulate South Africa Apple Founder Chelsea Jesulin Murder Aetna Tyler
Understanding Australian Indigenous Astronomy

Astronomy Cast

08:02 min | 1 year ago

Understanding Australian Indigenous Astronomy

"Right. This week we focus on the ARCO astronomy of another part of the world, this time from the indigenous people of. Another group of people whose lives depended on knowing what was happening in the sky from season to season are Pamela got a big continent. Here of what is the evidence of archaic astronomy from the continent of Australia. Well, what's kind of cool with a stray Elliot's? It's not so much ARCHE of strana me as it's modern anthropology that allows us to look, Pat back on sixty five thousand years of history with, with the aboriginal tribes of gelia were looking at a couple hundred different language groups. We are looking at a continent that has been peopled for sixty five thousand years, that hasn't undergone the same kinds of destruction that civilizations here in north and South America. Underwent? And so as. As we talk with the people who are there today, we can hear into days oral tradition evidence of Frincis, a meteor impact that was thousands of years ago, a supernova that was thousands of years ago, and we still they still pay attention to these stories. This is still part of how they live their lives and why they do and don't go certain places, and it's, it's really amazing culture, and they look at space in such a different way instead of having four seasons. Many of the different nations of Australia, Mark out six different seasons of the year that are marked out with when different of the constellations rise on the horizon, some constellations Mark out, this is when you should go and gather the eggs, this is when. These animals can be expected to be breeding, the dingoes for instance, it's different. And we've both had the opportunity now to be in Australia. I was there almost a year ago, thanks to Dylan O'Donnell and, and his, his got to speak at his conference star stuff. And then we got Carlin, I went on a road trip north from there into the, the jungle part of stralia north of Brisbane, and it was like the skies. There are just there stunning like it's, it's not surprising that anyone who, who lived there. With out light pollution and saw that sky. And it is, it's a Canadian we have dark skies as well here, and I've seen plenty of Milky Way. But the core of the Milky Way is down by the horizon. We see a little bit of it over the summer when the when we get to see Sagittarius and Scorpio and some of those constellations than the rest of the year. It's, it's, it's fine. It's fine. But, but there it is just right. Overhead it blazes, the planets moved through it, right. Overhead. There's like Ayman, if you have seen dark skies, you have not seen Australian dark skies. They are next level. They absolutely have the best view. The people in the southern hemisphere have the best view. Yes. To the core of the Milky Way that we just can't experience from from the north and like the peoples of South, America, and southern Africa. They include in how. How they Mark out the sky's the dark paths through the Milky Way. There is a tradition of seeing an emus spread out across the Milky Way were the coal shack nebula that super dark patch. I saw. Yeah. Societas once pointed out to you see it. And that that's only one of the stories, another one of the stories that are particularly love related to the Milky Way is they see the Milky Way as a dark river, through the sky. And it's the, the souls of men and women who have passed on to the heavens, that have their fires along that, that river and in some of their traditions when they see a shooting star, that is the soul of someone who died far from home returning. The home. It's cool stories. Yeah, I love I love that idea. What was it? There was a animation that came to a couple of years ago, but anyways idea of putting floating lanterns on like on a river and then letting them go and letting them all float downriver. You get this. They do that in, in Japan and China place like that. But it's, it's a very cool effect. So what are now you mentioned a couple of real big hitters. Supernova. Meteorite impact give me some more information. So, so I think the two really awesome things to come out of aboriginal astronomy is how they look at their crater covered lands, and actually maintain a history of. Yeah, these holes of the ground are actually craters, as, as well as their tradition of supernova. So let's start with the craters Australia is, is one of the oldest landmasses it has thirty confirmed craters that are well-structured. You look at them from an airplane, and you're, like, yes, that is a crater and the thing that really gets me is. They knew that these things in the ground were formed from things falling from the sky. In one case, the hen, very crater about four thousand two hundred years ago, a large nickel iron space rock hit central ustralia. And when it came down about one hundred and forty five kilometers south of siding, springs, it carved out a bunch of individual different craters. And when westerners I started visiting that land, and they had an aboriginal guide with them. The guide was like, no, we don't go there. That is the land that was formed when fire fell from the sky and, and right. They have a modern day tradition of fire fell from the sky. And formed this land, and that's oral tradition. That goes back four thousand two hundred years. There are many other craters across a stray Elliot that that they look at. And the various people know this was a crater here. Wolf creek craters is another one of these that is recognizes having fallen in this case when a star fell from the sky. And there are traditions of people going down in Orrell stories and exploring the sink holes and traveling them to through them to water in a great distant area, and it was a Mark of heroism to travel underground under these craters. And so there, there are clearly stories of when people explored and survived. And now people don't do that. Because. Those heroes did stupid things.

Australia Elliot South America Arco Pamela PAT Orrell Dylan O'donnell Wolf Creek Brisbane Ayman Mark Carlin Societas Japan America Africa China
Explainer 166: Was Australias shock election result really that shocking?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

06:13 min | 1 year ago

Explainer 166: Was Australias shock election result really that shocking?

"The results of the federal election held in a stray Lee. This past weekend was one delighted the country's bookmakers except the one betting firm regarded the thing as such a foregone conclusion that they paid out on victory by the opposition labor party before vote was counted. Believed in miracles. And tonight we've been delivered in the what. Not for the first time in recent memory, the electorate of a western democracy declining to do as pundits and posters. Had confidently predicted a stray Lia returned to office, the conservative liberal national party coalition, led by incumbent prime minister Scott Morrison, despite more than three years of polling showing a consistent lead for the labor party led by Bill shorten. I, I. And we'll wanting to hold out of the also, it's obviously not all of them. It is, perhaps, tempting four to cast Morrison's, unlikely victory as yet, another populace tantrum thrown by these spoilt, people of a wealthy and orderly nation comparable with the Brexit vote of two thousand sixteen the election of Donald Trump the same year and the handing the reins of power in several European countries and regions to sorted varieties of cowboy. But this is not that the result of the two thousand nineteen Australian federal election is instead, something of a political paradox, being both surprising and predictable. It is surprising inasmuch as nobody expected it, at least not this time, but predictable in the sense that it is the nineteenth occasions since the end of World War, Two on which ustralia has elected, the liberal party and its conservative coalition partners, far from being another furious, incoherent tipping over of the tables, this may have been a rare vote for steady as she goes business as usual looked at like that. When contemplating the global context, it might even be vaguely reassuring. Which brings us to the question of what kind of prime minister Scott Morrison will be not before Saturday question that many thought even worth asking Morrison became prime minister in a party room coup only last August, and it was widely suspected that he was destined to be remembered if at all, only by these setters of pub, quizzes seeking to start arguments among competing teams over the identity of strenuous, twenty fifth florist serving prime minister. Instead Morrison finds himself with a full three year term ahead of him and every chance of being the first Austrailia and prime minister to complete one for more than a decade. This is not just due to the against the odds victory Morrison one at the weekend. But the manner of it Morrison whose pre politics background walls in marketing substantially sidelined, the rest of his front bench and may Delek Shen all about him hoping that he's slightly labored, persona of an awkward Ernest suburban dad would connect of let a few things about the prime minister of the last couple of days of whipped up on this visit that we've both chosen well, in terms of MRs body Miranda, and gin you, and I, maybe punching a bit above are white, but nevertheless, that the tactic worked is self evident, but Morrison will not necessarily find the going easy from here, though his win on Saturday was remarkable. It was also close and on a few key issues. Morrison is comfortably in minority among his fellow Australians. He is a Pentecostal Christian and instinctive social conservative. Not a common outlook in a largely secular and increasingly small l liberal country and Morrison is if not an outright climate change skeptic, then a climate change equivocated who now finds himself leading a people who consistently list the environment among the most pressing concerns. This seems to have been one of the reasons though the list of possibilities on this front is not short. Why the voters of were ringer, a hitherto, solid liberal seat on the proverbially, prosperous, north shore of Sydney dumped their long-serving MP, and former liberal, prime minister and big weirdo, Tony Abbott. It doesn't hurt to lose, but sided I'd rather be a loser and quit. Perhaps more interesting question than how the liberal party and Scott Morrison won this election is the one asking how the labor party and Bill shorten lost the supposedly on lose -able. They may have been an answer. In the notably bipartisan national mourning prompted by the death a couple of days before polls opened of Bob Hawke, one of shortens predescessors, as leader of the labour party and prime minister of stray Leah from nineteen eighty three to nineteen ninety one this government, Mr Speaker has the resources that talent and the skill maj, this dramatic vices better, and stronger, and even more prepared to put the interest of the ordinary threat in the country. Was by any measure, a substantial prime minister, but he was also a supreme political communicator, who understood the country needs to see something potential leader of what it is, or what it wishes to become in a stray Lia the liberal party traditionally offers the status quo labor. The vision Bill shorten in the estimate of a majority of the stray Leah's voters offered, neither his successor as leader of the labour party has both need and an opportunity to think big. Monocle twenty four. I'm Andrew Miller.

Scott Morrison Prime Minister Liberal Party Labour Party National Party Coalition Bill LEE Leah Donald Trump LIA Austrailia Delek Shen Andrew Miller Bob Hawke Tony Abbott Ustralia Sydney Mrs Body Miranda
Australia's Federal Election May Be a Tight Race

Between The Lines

08:45 min | 1 year ago

Australia's Federal Election May Be a Tight Race

"Ever since Malcolm Turnbull nearly lost the twenty sixteen election, the polls, the pundits and the bidding markets that consistently put lie in a winning position pointing to a landslide this weekend. But such is the magic politics that the federal election could be a lot closer than anyone had the raw to expect a week or whatnot agai, remember during the past half-century close vigil elections favor, the incumbent, you think of Gordon's narrow victory over whitland in sixty nine the so-called don's party or Gillard up against Abbott losing her majority in twenty ten but when oppositions wind power from the government, the victories are usually in fatty, you think of phrases massive landslide against whitland, seventy five or how smashing catering in ninety six but in politics, there are no guarantees, and the smart money is still on a lie. Victory. And according to my guest, that may be a good thing for conservatism and the nation. Australia, where told needs a shortened government to help us break out of Al complacency genital Ricksen is a columnist with the Australian. She's a board member on the institute of public affairs, and a former board member here at the get I Janet, welcome to our Tom, now you're leading conservative commentator. So naturally, many of our listeners here on between the lines. We'll be shocked to hear you say that a and prime ministership could be a good thing house on Tom. I think some of my raiders were shelter and I made that argument few weeks ago, but I think it's we've now come to the position where we need the lived experience of a shorten government to return, the labor party to the wisdom of the hawk aiding agenda. We need a short and government to force a liberal party to get through what I think, is an existential crisis identity crisis to rediscover its roots to rebuild a very confused. Brand. And we, we the voters, we need lived experience of short and government to, to deliver, what I call buyer's remorse to realize that whitland, esque mix of big promises without policies that grow the economy is not just nicotinic disaster. But a social disaster, and I really think you have to go back to the days of the Whitlam era, to, to find the level of complacency that we see today, and my colleague at the astray Lian PO Kelly code. It know that nineteen sixties grand delusion, that continued prosperity was a strategy is destiny. And it's true, we've had almost thirty years of, of economic growth, but that is not a given. So you sign in the shorten economic agenda increases the prospects of a recession, and Farley will be mudbound, reality. I think that's absolutely right. Because Bill Schoten is very honest that he's politics, the politics of redistribution not growing economic pie, and it's it's much easier by the white to redistribute rather grow the economic pie. If you think of the big reform. The hard reforms in a strategy during the eighties nineties, and the early two thousands. They were hard reforms, but they were important reforms. It liberalized the economy. We're not seeing those same kind of policies with the short and government. He's Fago economics is a slogan. It's premised on complacency is premise on emotion. Just listen is shooting in some of the might say that, you know, we're, we're experiencing an ideological seachange in the electric, the oldest twenty percent of the electorate si- fifteen years ago in two thousand and four. When you wrote that conservatism was cool on the John Howard, the oldest twenty percent back. Then they largely voted for the coalition. They've been replaced by the youngest twenty percent of voters who lift, you got social media Twitter trolls, all the ride a poll show that socialism has risen in stature, especially among these millennials. And of course you got tried unions. They luckily to be reim- powered. So have haven't times changed time certainly have changed in the environment's changed. But what? What you're saying is very much. You know, not just the liberal party and existential crisis, but the left side of politics is strong because it's buttressed by so many elements in civil society that you do not see, on the centre-right of politics strata. It's almost as if liberalism depends on the liberal party in a stray area. And if you have a liberal party that stepped away from those basic, liberal values, what's left, so it really is up to other organizations, I think, to build the foundations of liberalism in ustralia to make deeper than the liberal party cannot rest on a conviction later such as John Howard. We haven't had one since two thousand and seven and look, what's happened to liberal values in that time you've had get up. You have the unions, you have the light party and other organizations. It's up to the center right of a Strayer to rebuild to make the case for liberal values. And that's what hasn't happened. You've written the Rausing damp of the wits in the liberal party has lift the joint with dodgy foundations. And just might clear, the conservatives now would rather walk away than stand up and fought. And he also criticized the so-called modern liberals. But at these decisions by the senior liberals to shift towards the so called center at they attempts to adjust to what many political analysts, I is an increasingly more progressive political and cultural landscape. I certainly think that way in politicians nervous about, you know, their prospects that they start to put on new labels. And we're saying range of liberals call themselves modern liberals. Now, I've pressed a few of them as to what the what that means, and it really doesn't mean anything, it's just a bit of branding. I call it branding bunkum. What is the most important to be successful in politics, merger of conviction with good retail political skills? We've seen that before the last ten years, though, we've seen we've seen the party and politicians on the center, right suffer a deficit of both conviction, and, and really good retail politics now recently under Scott Morrison, I think the party has started to reimburse, for example, explain the social good of a strong economy, the virtues of lower taxes, allowing people to have more of their own money to make decisions how they spend their money. But imagine if the liberal party had more core values at the center of it story for the past ten years, it would be in a much stronger position. It's not about rebranding as modern liberal. I mean this, this guy's back today, but Cameron calling himself, a compassionate conservative, or which had Nixon, quote himself, a conservative with a heart. What does it mean if liberal parties, make the moral case for classical liberalism, you want convince voters about the purpose of a liberal governor Cosa, just to clarify, you think it's premature to read the last rods two Austrailia conservatism. Your argument, is that conservatives a losing tonight because they not farting. But Janet, we had on this program last week Tim sue pomace on the former rice discrimination Commissioner, and he I use that a short vitual Mark the end of what's derided as neoliberalism hasn't market capitalism, filed given the widespread economic inequality, wick told by because I think the evidence is just not there for, for widespread economic inequality. It's become a slogan. If you look at their three surveys from the can. Census. And I think there was another one by Hilda. They all showed that inequality has pretty much not changed over three decades of productivity commission. More recently is found that claims to growing income inequality. Not true. The economic growth has lifted standards across all income groups. I mean these are the facts, but the slogan of income inequality is being used to justify dismantling capitalism, in the name of some sort of utopian social democratic project, we've been here before now at this stage Paul's point to alive victory. But Malcolm Turnbull mind tines he would won the election, if it weren't for his wing enemies in the media, and the potty room. Let's hear for major Neal's interview with tumble on the BBC two months ago at the time of the coup in August. We were level pegging on the public Paul's or the opposition and we were four points ahead on the polling in the marginal seats. But basically, you could argue that the concern was not that I would lose the election, but rather that I would win it. You telling me your own party didn't want you to win the next. I'm just saying if you analyze credit. Well, Andrew, you've only got to look at the facts because Malcolm Turnbull on the base on why he would have won the election Janet Albertson. Well, I see we've moved into the comedy section of

Liberal Party Malcolm Turnbull Janet Albertson Australia TOM John Howard Institute Of Public Affairs AL Gordon Paul Bill Schoten Scott Morrison Lian Farley Twitter Gillard BBC Strayer
Explainer 163: What is the One Nation party, and why wont it go away?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

06:49 min | 1 year ago

Explainer 163: What is the One Nation party, and why wont it go away?

"However, far from a stray Lear, you may be and however little attention. You are paying to the federal election campaign through which the country is putting itself it is nicer than that sometime before polls open on me. Eighteenth your consciousness will be clouded by the name of the one nation party. And if I've been invited to I want into my home, then I should have the right to have say in my country. This may indeed already have happened the characteristically ridiculous interview given this week to a stray in television by one nations, founder and leader Senator Pauline Hanson possessed much of the stuff of which global viral sensations are made scandal fast tears, and the always happening spectacle of those who make their living trading in sanctimonious rage getting their own tone in the pillory. Keep going up. No have no. Until two people. Don't. The central issue of this particular brouhaha was the release of footage, which showed a one nation. Senate candidate Steve Dixon patronizing a strip club in Washington DC and while so doing making a variety of misogynist and racist remarks. Mr. Dixon has now resigned an issue. The does not reflect the person I am apology customary on occasions on which a public figure has done or said something reflecting on the person the when I finish work, and I'll help you never drink when you finish work, but we all do. I'm gonna put my hand on my heart. Have run as a young man being to strip clubs. I've done a whole lot of things. Most young men have done in this country. This was very far from the first scandal surrounding personal conduct of someone associated with one nation, and any bookmaker would be delighted to take your bit on it being the lust for as long as the party has existed. One nation has been a powerful magnet for crackpots. Ding, bats and Yahoos. But and he is the important and somewhat terrifying. Part exist run nation still does after more than two decades of contributing nothing to ustralia public discourse. But division paranoia and stupidity. You come to country you live under constitution in the Lauren. If you wanna have four or five. Do you wanna mutilated children? And if you want to treat women with right disrespect, this many countries you can live in. But none of them cold Estrada poll suggests that perhaps five percent Australia plan to vote for one nation, which is about what they got last time out in two thousand sixteen enough for four Senate seats, although in keeping with one nation tradition. This was reduced to their present to by infighting and incompetence gloriously given one nations hostelry to immigration one. Senator Malcolm Roberts had to resign upon discovering that he was a foreign citizen. His replacement Fraser ending who preferred to sit as an independent earned a richly merited measure of global infamy earlier this year by blaming the Christchurch mosque massacre on its victims. This is my land and RBIs going here. I don't know of any other place. As much as now, just because you're an average will is a week excuse. One nation founder emerged onto a straight national political landscape in nineteen ninety six when a stray is liberal party, which is a strenuous conservative party chose her as a candidate for the Queensland seat of Oxley the liberals then un-chinese her when she wrote a letter to a newspaper suggesting legislative efforts to make amends to a stray Leah's indigenous people had gone too far Hansen won the seat anyway as an independent and launched one nation shortly afterwards in her maiden speech to parliament, she reiterated her fact defying proposition that indigenous Australians were getting an easy ride and further fretted at the prospect of a strenuous. Hansen has moved on since then via picturesque political and personal upheavals, including a prison term for a fraud conviction to quashed, plus the inevitable appearances on reality television. And at one point falling out with the party. She'd founded more recently, she has been burgling about a string beans, Muslims and illustrated her terror of this prospect by wearing a burqa into the Senate chamber atypically pure oil stunt for which she was fiercely denounced by stray Leah's, then attorney General George Brandis enter ridicule that community to drive corner to its religious Gavin's is an appalling thing to do. And I would ask you. Looking back own the wretched one nation story tonight. It's possible to see him as pioneers in as much as someone has to have bad ideas. I the populist convulsions which have beset the United States and Europe in this century. Have looked dismally familiar to straightens accustomed to one nation's feral nostalgia at visting xenophobia and in persecution complex, obviously for the two hundred nineteenth time they were on. There is another Moroccan scum makes the streets unsafe. Video can comb what Nina goes control of our borders and put in place a positive immigration policy. I'm by main we won't Australian style point system. It would be wrong to describe one nation as a failure at least on the tones. They have regrettably attracted disproportionate attention from the media too easily seduced by the shabby thrilled with being seen to poke a bear with a stick. And because of this have too often succeeded in dragging mainstream conservatives towards this warm, but one nation remain fundamentally marginal proposition for two reasons which should be absorbed as lessons by other countries. The first is a stray Leah's compulsory vote. A powerful insulation against extremist entry is this second is that institutional and or ideological idiocy has a way of canceling itself out eventually. Twenty four. I'm andrew.

Leah Senate Founder Steve Dixon Hansen Senator Pauline Hanson Senator Malcolm Roberts Washington Ding Senate Chamber Christchurch Mosque Europe Estrada United States George Brandis Fraser Fraud Nina Queensland
Ski Lebanon

Correspondents Report

05:08 min | 1 year ago

Ski Lebanon

"The greatest part about living in Beirut, brick our man in the Middle East. Adam Harvey is the easy access to the mountains that overlook the Lebanese capital when the snow falls beirutis cast aside daycares and head for the hills. Here's a confession. One of the reasons I applied for a job by route was because I knew that in Lebanon, you can ski of love the sports in service thirteen years old. And I strapped on a pair of skis at a tiny slope in the Brindabella's KARN forest seem terrifying, then I see state bumpy chaotic. But it was so addictive that I soon moved to the big time spins halls, but as an adult of lived in places like purse and Dublin and Sydney with a logistics and cost of skiing with prohibitive, my loss. Stop was Indonesia where the temperature didn't drop below twenty eighteen threes, and the closest thing to snow was the ash falling from mount going, and then I moved to Beirut. We can famously ski in the morning and swim in the sea in the afternoon. You couldn't do that. It's Megan's halls. Well, technically, you could but you'd need to finish at noon and dry for two hundred and fifty kilometers lightning speed to throw yourself in the ocean. And you'd being Tara in July the first time, I went up in January. I approached my Lebanese ski trip with the rigid discipline of someone who'd grownups gain on weekends in Austria, we've got to hit the slopes early. If you want to avoid queuing for forty five minutes at H T bar on parishes front valley. So I was out the door at seeks roaring up the mountain road by six thirty and at the resort by seven thirty that sea level to two thousand meters in an hour, including a stop to pick up skis and poles. I couldn't quite believe it neither I think could the cop hot guys at the resort called Mazaar. I was the first person they're opposed any empty bitumen looked up at the mountain with its deep fresh layer of snow and wondered where you're on was in bed at turned out Lignes live their lives at the opposite. End of the day. The cafes are empty at ten AM and packed at ten pm at Missouri. The ticket counter didn't open for another thirty minutes, a cool. My heels with a handful of the other early birds eventually handed over fifty dollars for a lift ticket. Good on the first chill. If to the day might fresh tracks all the way down and got strike back onto another lift, no Q. And this happened all day long. It was a dream the rest of the skiers arrived after ten AM, but the lift queues who really on the few minutes long at most basically had the mountain to myself and what a mountain wide open slopes loads of shoots and Kelly. To get lost in and best of all two huge. Winter storms had just dumped about full maters of fresh snow so much had fallen the snow plows had to dig channels beneath some of the lifts so they could operate Mozelle about the size of thread boat with a few flourishes that you wouldn't see ustralia the food and drink more interesting. I had a mountaintop Espresso with a size flack bread cooked in front of you on a middle dome. With a layer of cheese tire and yogurt spread on top. Just like in any ski resort. The music's terrible. The fashions more interesting was is the first price of seeing anyone skiing for coat the resorts in a Christian area and the locals have made their allegiance cle-, but decorating the hilltops with giant steel crosses from one of the highest chairs you can look across the Bekaa valley to the mountains of Syria as I'm recording some audio to accompany this report I ever hear a pair of skis taking in view. One man who sounds American says. So that's Syria, and that way Israel, his Lebanese companion silent for a moment occupied Palestine, he says. I head back to the cow pock, which is pandemonium the light cameras roll arriving. Now after lunch, I've never seen this an astrologer we might as well give up if you haven't arrived by ten the ski slopes might have been sedate, and peaceful, but the roads leading to them, and now frenzied is a five kilometer tailback as all the light comes sitting stalled traffic police stand on the narrow mountain road, waving arms and shouting as they try and fail to order the traffic, but even with all the cups drivers pull out of their line and roar up the wrong side of the road booking me and the other cars coming in the opposite direction. Everyone comes to a standstill as impatient. Drivers. And try to squeeze back into the other line. Everyone honks that everyone else tap my horn, just to join in the party, but none of these guys can Rick my good mood. I'm in a post mountain high skiing in Lebanon is paradise. You've just got to rise early. As the old correspondence rule has it. Any full can be uncomfortable. Adam havi enjoying himself on Lebanon's ski slopes.

Lebanon Beirut Indonesia Syria Adam Harvey Middle East Megan Rick Mozelle Bekaa Valley Adam Havi Missouri Mazaar Austria Lignes Dublin Kelly Palestine Israel Sydney
"ustralia" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"ustralia" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Because what I do in my where misogyny as I proposed this super general definition of misogyny as kind of the law enforcement branch of patriarchy, and that's image much, as I said a moment ago, the ideas policing and enforcing the social roles that women supposed to serve within patriarchy and that immediately raises the question, so if we wanna make substantive predictions about what misogyny will tend to do and who will tend to target. We have to say what those patriarchal gnomes and expectations are and one thing that I try to do is make a lot of room for that to differ across different times and places. So I think that will have to understand misogyny intersection Lee. So. In the contemporary American context. Understanding how it intersects with white supremacy, homophobia, transphobia classism alum able ISM ageism all those will have to be understood such that the kinds of exact norms and expectations that misogyny is enforcing might look quite different in the here, and now versus other times places cultures etc. And I'm really attend to look predominantly at the US and ustralia because I think of myself kind of as an analyst of culture, and as really benefitting from having the kind of insider's perspective on my home country of ustralia public life, therein and also the US where I've been for now about the teen years, but in terms of the patriarchal roles and expectations that I argue are operated in the US and ustralia. And similar kinds of Milia. I think of it as this uneven economy of giving and taking. She is meant to give feminine coded goods. Like stuck chal social, emotional and reproductive services to designated men, typically dominant men, relative to her social position in ways that also bolster structures like white supremacy. And so on the flip side of that he is allowed to take various masculine coded goods from her. And also there I think tacit gnomes that she's not meant to take away certain masculine coded goods from him. So she's not meant to rob him, all prestige or respect or compete with him for various masculine coded positions of say leadership and authority. And if she does that I think is both what we would predict is a common locus locus for massage, NIST, aggression and. So we see empirically they're quite hefty penalties for women who do compete in in head to head competition with men for say positions like the presidency. So so we're going to let's put a pin in the presidency. I want to come back. Sure, I wanna hold here for a couple of minutes because this is an idea that. Over one of the things I was thinking about reading this is preparing for this interview was that it helped me actually understand a lot of what the women in my life say or a lot of what I read women ride and Twitter or about some of these debates. So the way you just explained that sort of that's the theory level I'd like to bring it down to to the more day to day level. So it under this theory. Let's talk about an interaction. I think is pretty common. A woman is walking down the street. A man yell something that one may or may not read, but is at least being claimed to be a compliment towards her ULA. Gorgeous today, sweetie. The woman keeps walking and then the man says oh come on. You could at least smile back. This as I understand what you're saying. This is a moment where the woman is expected to under you know, the gender roles. We have offer kind of emotional validating care. Right. Like, hey. Yes. Thank you. I appreciate you noticing me. And when that's not done, then all of a sudden, the sort of reaction that smile sweet, oh, she's a bitch like that's misogyny acting as an enforcer of that role is at a reasonable way to understand it. Yeah. I mean, I really like that example, in the way it brings out one aspect of this..

US classism NIST Twitter ustralia analyst
"ustralia" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

05:07 min | 1 year ago

"ustralia" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Christmas album backing ustralia we hot we bay children's hospital foundation there in Brisbane and the campaign was really successful. And we were able to keep back and keep a lot of money to that organization. And we're really proud of that when be released it in America. We basically wanted to do the same thing on a and keep it local find find a an organization within America that would be able to benefit from from. Yeah. Well, and Saint Jude's great charity. Everybody knows what some of the great work. They do. And it says something especially like in Australia, something go out to the hospitals, and kind of kids hospitals been kind of the thing you wanted to it yourself with well when we went to since you tutors Research Hospital, we performed for the for the kids in, and we we were showing around the hospital there, and we just so inspired, by the way, I do and and real passion for their for their mission, which is to kind of KUA childhood diseases. I think you know, we just we just have to go. We have to go with the children's with the children's hospital. It's excellent album got I just got it a few weeks ago. I love it. It's called wish you were here. What an album what a first of all what people need to get a hold of it. It's a fascinating mix of what we've just been talking about. It was that sort of a thing was you were putting it together. You wanna take a wide variety of music and bring it into one album. Yeah. Absolutely. At shows. We we have everything from you know, from pertaining to Queen. And I guess we wanted to try and put that on on our latest album Cherie here we wanted to try and bring out concert experience onto the album. And so that's probably one of the reasons that we we tried to have such a broad range of songs in choices on it. Well, let's talk about some of those choices. I mean, first of all, Freddie, Mercury. You mentioned Queen. We are the champions this kind of a tough one to go because he's probably the one guy. That's good enough singer. He could be one. Freddie. Mercury was so great. Yeah. I think what with Freddie Mercury. And this is kind of one of the things we we love to kind of talk about ten ten is that I think would people think of apprenticeship Puccini and think Pavarotti, but pretty macrey is one of the world's greatest tenants. And he's got nothing to do with. But he's voices Justice. Really? So that's that's kind of why we love we love to seeing Keith music. Yeah. Also you did. Of course, the the great song from Leonard Cohen Hallelujah. Just seems like was written for you guys. Yeah, we have absolutely extraordinarily talented arranger who's been working with the group since we started back in the back in the ninety s and he he really manages to capture the essence of an awesome song. But then translate it perfectly to suit voices that are in the ten tenets. Well, then there's a couple of songs, and this is what I loved about the album where they might not have thought that will be on there. You know, the the people that buy it. And yet, you got a John Lennon's imagine, and that's an interesting song for you guys to take on was that something where you just like the words and thought you could do something with it because it's not obviously the exact same thing that John Lennon's gonna do. Yeah. I think you know, when when you take us all of this kind of every genre. We can't just pretend to emulate it. Exactly. And so we have to do something creative with it. And and hopefully, we've done that successfully on here. And I think imagine what am I right? So the album, so I enjoyed that one. Which one I love my favorite one was Amy wine houses. Valerie, I mean, I love that song. Anyway. And I've heard it down a couple of different ways that I've I've liked all of them. But yours is fantastic. What a kind of a fun song take on. Yeah. I guess I guess we wish you were here. Kind of it sounds like quite a bit up. It's kinda sad concept seeing seeing of people that have died. But I suppose we bought it's it's more a celebration of the music that I create it. And I think Valerie really captures out typically because because it is such a fun song. And and so it it's really about celebrating the music that these incredible audits have left for us. Yeah. And I think you guys really did it because you went all around the John resume. You have Michael Jackson there Whitney Houston. I mean, again, these are all different things. And I guess it speaks not only do your ability to interpret these things. But to really the the quality of the songs and the really kind of legacies. All these people left. Exactly. These artists swift real pioneers, especially when I kind of think of people like David Bowie. And of course, here is is on that album. He was really really unique one of a kind. But again, we really ought to re imagine he saw I make it make it our own which I think that I hope we. More with Mike Edwards, the ten tenors in just a moment time now for a visit with Eddie, oh, the wind guy today, America's first master sommelier looks.

Freddie America Research Hospital John Lennon David Bowie Freddie Mercury Valerie Saint Jude Brisbane Australia Leonard Cohen Mike Edwards Cherie Keith Puccini Michael Jackson Amy Eddie Whitney Houston
"ustralia" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

11:20 min | 2 years ago

"ustralia" Discussed on KGO 810

"By the cutthroats. The terror cutthroats of many decades standing, of course, I'm speaking of the Palestinians, and HAMAs kindred of Cain. We begin however with the Arab League waking up it's the twenty first century. There's money to be made the United States in Israel are good for commerce, and therefore Malcolm Hoenlein, Conference of presidents joins, Malcolm. The Arab League met in Rome. Which is a good atmosphere for happy thoughts and good food. What is their opinion these days of the long troublesome? Sinister palestinians. Well, it's good to be back with you, and you to be back the Mediterranean twenty eighteen conference of the Arab League met in Rome. And this past week, and there were remarkable developments essentially with a foreign leaders saying the leader saying to the Palestinians, you're off the agenda, the Omani Foreign Minister said quite clearly that the Arab world had to come to terms with the reality that Israel is a fact of life in the region, that's quote, and they should have a share rights as well. As obliga- shins has re Safar minister, it'd be Ron. Saw what was going on? And he refrained from even mentioning Israel in his talk. This only a few days after a Honey. At the same time as Ronnie the quote, moderate talked about Israel's a cancerous tumor and had the EU and everybody else down on him saying was on acceptable. And man this while the EU exports went up twenty five percent in the past year its imports down eight percent. Iran would Italy serious. Spain Germany, France, I think in Greece where the top traders. But here at twenty eighteen the Arab countries are saying to them that and and one of the leading Middle East diplomat summed it up. He said, the basic fact is for better or worse. The world isn't bothering Israel anymore about the Palestinian issue. It's a total change in the paradigm. And I think that that is really what what this represents. And we saw it John in in a number of ways we did visitors who came to Israel just over the past few days and somebody changes vis-a-vis Africa. But I thought this was a pretty remarkable statement by the Arab leaders. About the sick and tired of of the Palestinian talk Racine, refusal to negotiate. Speaking of that, you just mentioned Africa, Malcolm has there not been some positive developments with Chad. Yes. And I think it's a very important one because it's a Muslim majority country as you know, and interest, Debbie, the president visited Israel announcing he's going to start diplomatic relationship between the Republic of Chad. And and Israel, and it's only one of a number of countries they're talking now, I think of Sudan Mali Niger as future possibilities for diplomatic relations. And by the way, regard to the other thing, the the Omanis seem to indicate that they would give Israel flyover rights, which are tremendously important for their eastern routes for the El Al to be able to fly over Oman. You know, a lot of talk about trying to get the Saudis to do to to do the to the same. And at the same time to other things that the president of checks Balki of visited and announced tomorrow. In fact, he's going to formally open. The check house intrusive lem, which he called a precursor to an embassy and again showing the broadening interest in relationships at this. Check house will promote cultural and in investment tourism trade etcetera, and then converted into an embassy in this. Despite a lot of pressure from EU countries, many the central European and eastern European countries. Also wanna do it? And I hope that before long. We will see it not to get run over by too much. Good news now come to slow this down back HAMAs. They're terrorizing Gaza. They're looking for what they believe we're spies or Asians of the Israelis there. So being supplied with weapons by whom? So it looks like that. Iranian weapons bound for HAMAs in this world pampered in the Sinai, and this included advanced antitank cornet missiles and GPS guided weapons system, and I it seems that this is one of the trade routes that has been supplying HAMAs when the question, you know, this is how come they keep coming up with these new weapons where they coming from. Well, now, we know whether they originate from the water into Sinai or from Sudan or other places, certainly the government doesn't allow it where and tries to prevent it as well. But HAMAs is becoming more aggressive, and recently, they uncovered. Days a plan for bombings in Israel, but building infrastructure in the West Bank, and very clever trainings, the video, and they used patients that are allowed to go into Israel for life saving treatment at his hospitals coming from Gaza, something again, the world doesn't know uncertainty doesn't credit it's real four. And here's KamAz using them as the vehicles conveyed the information to their terrorist operatives and in the West Bank. And this is I mean, I think just accept further evidence of what is really up against. And what we see also, by the way, John is more infighting that you and I talked about in the past between similar and Canea to the extent that I'm told they don't talk to each other anymore. Thaddeus, Malcolm, you mentioned that they were on a spy haunt. What is that exactly with HAMAs? Looking for spies HAMAs looking for people who are involved in that raid that? Settles the recent around wait Israel sent in a number of operatives to look for some weapons cash, and maybe the ones that we're talking about coming through the Sinai and previously to to Gaza. So they went in in a fairly routine operation, but the very dangerous one where they go into cover dark, and they check out these places and were discovered and it ended up in a firefight. One Israeli officer was killed and several other HAMAs. Several HAMAs leader is operatives were killed. And now, they're saying, well, this was an operation where they had domestic assistance internal assistance near looking for a Dan, I think a white van that they may have been involved with it. So they're they're looking for spies within and you know, that HAMAs often uses these pretext than just to kill people that are there, political enemies. What is new is Ronnie the moderate of the Obama years now using metaphors unacceptable calling Israel a fake regime and decl. Glaring it as a cancerous tumor, which is an extremely unacceptable metaphor. The e you have they responded now because after all Ruhani is their pet. That is true. And they you know, they continue to to work with the Iranians Iranian hackers are now targeting ustralia, we have for another time. But there's so many things going on with the attack shipbuilders. They got sensitive information. They put it on the internet the dark internet and they've been targeting Europe, and we know of various plans for terrorist attacks, you know, in France in in Denmark, and yet at the same time, we see that they continue to tocado in this case, they actually came out and said that it was totally unacceptable. What real Honey said, you know, this is language we've heard from Iranians, but not for more, Honey and. And the the saying that it's not acceptable. And it comes at a time when the US is has raised a new red flag, which I think we're going to hear a lot about in the future that Iran hasn't declared. It's come a lot of its chemical weapons capabilities. The organization for the prohibition of chemical weapons, which they are signatory in that's based in the Hague, and that's my elation of the the international non-proliferation convention and US ambassador. There spoke about it and talked about facility for filling aerial bombs and a program to obtain band toxic munitions, and he said that the that they discovered chemical filled artillery project on else and mortars as well as aerial bombs of Arjun from Iran, which I said was evidence of of of this. And they said that the Iran is also pursuing central nervous system acting chemicals for purposes for those for those who are arguing about the peaceful intentions of of Iran, especially at European friends who who seem to close her eyes to everything until the God forbid will be a terrible disaster. Saturday's Malcolm misses the Iranian. That was supposed to be trusted to deal with nuclear the nuclear deal. That's right. And here we see not only are the documents that were discovered by Israel. And it new details are coming out all the time in Bergman whom we've had on the show John on Thursday nights discusses this in in detail. Any shows how the information age Israel, God shows the equipment to construction of secret plants incites experiments detail presentation of the progress, the goals stage all of which says that this was a mega scam. And that Iran continued as we have often said on this show. It's terrible intentions and activities in the nuclear realm as we saw it in the chemical weapons around Malcolm Airbnb it's controversial, but very successful in the United States. What does it have to do with a book kind of Israel? So this is a really important story. And a lot of people will think it's marginal because it affects very few people in Israel, in fact, but they declared that they will no longer carry listings from the Jewish communities of houses in the Jewish communities of the West Bank and today in Samaria now, no other disputed territory. No other place is being cited only this in this. We believe traces to pressure that say Barakat, the supposed- negotiator with these rallies. Started in January of twenty sixteen letters and threatening Airbnb and making the case to them that they shouldn't be there. And in fact, I think that MBBS. Made a huge mistake. And hopefully, they'll be smart enough to to back down there. Ready face class action lawsuits in Israel for for what they've done. It's a purely discriminatory. Message offensive and outrageous discrimination and real dangerous that it sets a precedent that others will then be pressed to to follow suit in in the same way. And we we believe that many the state laws and executive.

Israel HAMAs Malcolm Hoenlein Iran United States Gaza Arab League John EU president West Bank Sinai Ronnie Omani Foreign Minister Rome Middle East Airbnb Cain
"ustralia" Discussed on PhotoBiz Xposed

PhotoBiz Xposed

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"ustralia" Discussed on PhotoBiz Xposed

"Or if you're printing member, let's have a chat about inside the Memphis Facebook group. Now at a loss. In last week's episode interviewed Alex cons. She is one of the world's best dog photographers, and certainly one of the most successful pet photographers in regards to running a business in ustralia and possibly the world up. She just an absolute powerhouse amazing woman. Fantastic interview. She sheds much good stuff. Mike concern was when I was interviewing Alex was that she is going to be too scary to hear about because she's so successful a cow hacking white possibly measure up to the things that she's doing with the success that she has with all her television appearances appearances on radio, traveling the world photographing thousand domestic pets every single year making amazing money doing what she loved to do it filled his vase interviewing her the bow was going to be set high than it's ever been set. But what gracious amazing talented giving woman she is. And she wasn't that into. View. I mean, she she ended any question. I threw at her. She sheds amazing stuff in regards to marketing advertising, getting yourself out there, branding all the things that we hear about from different guests. She since doing all of them herself in her business, and she's a huge success. Because if you need some inspiration, some motivation to see what can be achieved as a talk, or if you just looking for some ideas on Hagen adventure and business get have listened to that interview. Alex. It does not matter if you are a pit photographer.

Alex Memphis Mike concern ustralia
"ustralia" Discussed on Who Charted

Who Charted

02:39 min | 2 years ago

"ustralia" Discussed on Who Charted

"Talking about how they're ustralia. Do you? Do you take special credit for a stray alien bands? Like is something like what without us being Australia. Is that can you take ownership? I mean, British people have to take ownership for everything an empire. But no, I didn't take the credit. I just enjoy the music. I mean, I love ACDC fat my last touring up shy. I came out to thumb destruct, then went straight into material about my period. That's what I thought was really good about that. Is it kind of like sample the guys in the audience day this done destroyed? Rockets and I came straight in with that. So it kind of sets they will kill because I believe talking about it. It's quite volume. Oh, underscored by that track. So was forty forty frightened you by mentioning walked out of that. Out of here. Do anybody leave knife? No, I think. Yeah. I think you know, like women exist mentioned, right? And if I am if I'm a period during show, I think that's the most welcome thing. I'm actually bleeding on stage. Do you? Can you can? Yeah. Who can match that? Maybe alsi the head of a bat just to see tiff Stevens, and she was bleeding. I heard. I mean, you wouldn't see it. But just is enough fee to no way to not talk about it. Because like if it was happening to guys they wouldn't shut up about it. That'd be guar uses fake blood everywhere. Right. That's right. Yeah. That. Kit. I make my own. I saw a lady ACDC band once. Oh, yeah. I opened for them. Once it was the same, man. I don't know if I remember there was one that was little people and ladies. Oh, really? And then wasn't just little people. And then there's a lady what? Yeah. I don't I don't know. know. Lady ACDC, right? Great. Are there are a lot of cover bands in England. Oh, yeah. I'm sure there's like the. Like a Rolling Stones one. Because. Rolling breaks or something. Rolling Rhone stolen pan in the titles on all the Beatles. Spout with like to ease to. There. Rolling back the word play. Yeah. Yes. Yes. They're all this. I think this quite a circuit. That's quite market in it. And sometimes we have these holiday, entertainment parks. Hi..

Rockets tiff Stevens Australia Rhone England
"ustralia" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:00 min | 2 years ago

"ustralia" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Australia after footage of thousands of sheep dying in hot cramped conditions caused outcry as sydney correspondent how griffith reports watching on what am ustralia allen piggott works with terry is enthusiastic always abi direct sheepdog work right allen is the third generation of his family to farm here but he's worried that the sheep farming industry is under threat series thought being given to a ban on the live animal exports from stralia to the middle east nationally it would be terrible for australia and said also be ruled devastation for the people in the middle east as well so we need to consider that as well but the economics certainly would indicate a process will drop quad dramatically in western australia which is a bad outcome for the sheep producers in wissmann well but also has a bad outcome for sheep generalists on board the awasa express it's standing room only three weeks from fremantle to the middle east animal welfare has become headline news here since footage was broadcast on the streets channel nine showing a packed expert chip carrying dirty and distressed cheap more than two thousand died on the journey i've driven a couple of hours from the farm down to the city of adelaide and the docklands no this port is one of only to australia where live animal exports happen behind these locked gates whenever there is a ship in port this is where people come to protest the australian rspca is a longstanding opponent of the live export trade it's animal welfare advocate in adelaide is rebecca as the death rate is high the rate of suffering of animals is high those animals are expected to experience hake stress in fact very recently the australian veterinary association the peak veterinary board of australia actually advised the federal government that we should not be sending ships into the middle east between october because the risk of heat stress is expected it cannot be controlled the animals will suffer and many of them will die and our federal government has simply ignored that advice the australian government wants tougher regulation of the live export industry but it recently had to pull its bill from parliament members threatened to support a ban instead according to professor rachel knief university of adelaide it represents a gradual shift away from the additional support for farmers there's been a sort of trust that depends on lack of transparency that sounds counterintuitive but people trust the farmers are doing the right thing it's not very visible with live export particularly in certain kinds of towns they're seeing the trucks there seeing animals on the trucks and so that visibility is lead to more tension particularly the live export people want to trust farmers and others involved in the value chain but they're increasingly distrustful because they're seeing these abuses as as revealed particularly by the activists stuff footage she here been separated back on the thumb allen piggott says he's is consensus anyone about animal welfare wombs australian farmers and those opposing bam on live exports from the need to make sure they voices heard in the debate look at is a conundrum that agriculture is facing world the sheep industry and obviously we're reliving more and more into a disconnect between a city cousins and what's actually happening on the farm it doesn't eight party but we also need to consider the welfare of the people who rely on the try let's try bicyclists end australian sheep farmer allen piggott ending that report by how griffith.

Australia sydney three weeks
"ustralia" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"ustralia" Discussed on Science for the People

"America ustralia as well as western europe but what we commonly see across all of the studies in this is being this listening voting concentrated body image research going on since the eighties and what we typically see is that the goals and women up to eighty percent of women and girls experienced body image concerns and for boys and men is typically between somewhere between steady and seventy percent depending on the age group sorry to your point back in the eighties actually researches coins enormity discontent for women where it's now considered more normative normal whole women and goes to be unhappy with the way that they look as opposed to having positive body image so certainly this high prevalence of body image concerns and interestingly often people think about voting image they always saying all will it's an issue that affects children and young people but what we say from the research is that we don't graduate from body image concerns those concerns throughout the lifespan although the nature of the influences those concerns might vary depending on what life stage whereas i'm curious how much body image research is done globally in particular outside of what we would consider sort of the western world obviously great britain australia new zealand canada the us yet when creasing leasing pockets of research come out of asia as well as some out of the middle east is well the concentration of race such is much smaller but we're starting to say that unsettling my team with starting to do research sean looking at muddy image in india with some collaborators there and our research santana i'm also recently had a european network for the possible years that was funded by the eu funding framework for research and we had over thirty six countries involved in that network of people doing research in this area the certainly it is growing what's the skill from i'm thinking of body image and being dissatisfied with the way our body looks or the way.

europe britain us asia middle east india santana America eu seventy percent eighty percent
"ustralia" Discussed on Chat With Traders

Chat With Traders

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"ustralia" Discussed on Chat With Traders

"Is considered somewhat of a legendary try to hair and ustralia more details about the same i k plays welcome my buddy mike agni yes so that's that's about it man you know just trying to keep that all straight and trying to not let it affect too much of your thinking and you know that's about it cocoa will i'm glad to be chatting with you again i may know if they managed to catch up with you in general so i guess you know we can we can kill two birds with one stone while i'm doing another podcast yeah awesome let's let's just sort of hit the record button and get going we'll probably guy for about fifty minutes so sorry okay and then i've actually got to hit off to work which feels kinda strange to say oh yes so you're doing the you're trading and doing this as well right you're still doing their your risk manager somewhere right yeah so actual tato is try to manage so yet that involves risk and a whole bunch of other things but yeah essentially as a title sounds managing a group of trade is a at a firm and sydney hair so now living in sydney yeah oh nice how's your weather hundred weather down there right now it's raw it's wrought a main with stu i think was sort of on the way out of summa but you know it's nice went to the beach on the weekend we live really close to the beach now and you know it was sunny spoilt for choice with betas all up the coast from where i am in sydney yet knots it's good.

risk manager sydney fifty minutes one stone
"ustralia" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"ustralia" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Ustralia has warned vanuatu against following a greater chinese military presence in the region follows reports that beijing wants to establish a chinese military base in the pacific country bravo punchy is the director of national security studies the royal united services institute here in london and he knows much on this topic robert thank you for joining us what's going on here because we have the report in fairfax media saying there is an attempt to build a chinese military base and the government of vanuatu saying backoff there's there's not not even been a discussion about this well i mean the question around whether this report is accurate or not as it goes a very difficult to pass because a lot of the information is to becoming non masih to western media outlet whereas the countries involved clearly denying any going on and you know countries will often do this we've seen this in other tech's as well whether there's been some disputes with china for example in particular about the military support that they providing afghanistan in the north of the country with the chinese think notes i've seen the case whereas evidence from the ground seized appear to show that it really is happening so i think this degree of what's actually happening is very unclear from that side of the story i think what's interesting is the sort of big dynamic that this this point to which is an increasing sort of chinese outward push and increasing attempts by china to establish you know a growing footprint internationally while a lot of this print is really the moment of driven by commercial imperatives about building up ports and building up roads and infrastructure ultimately helped trade there is another side to that's in the side to that is about how much you know chinese security interests rules against advanced onto these sorts of bigger role species and this is really a huge question that is the troubling lot of western capitals at the moment now starting to traditional.

Ustralia vanuatu beijing director london fairfax media china royal united services institut afghanistan
"ustralia" Discussed on #WeThePeople LIVE

#WeThePeople LIVE

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"ustralia" Discussed on #WeThePeople LIVE

"So we want to be a candidate didn't a new zealand didn't so it's not like this was an adventure that other countries also went into and then iraq and so ustralia certainly believes that the it has a special pride of place in the american military pantheon are we to buzz potentially look i mean it's necessary but at the same time well i think the issue is that you want us to be a friend that can say things in have genuine on conversation your asked us actually look bigger yes that kind of stuff but i mr president abdic origin in those gulf parents i think that classic politicians fake which you had for malcolm temple there which is how can i feel two and a half minutes saying something without actually saying anything we have the ball good lord look at it you know it doesn't actually say anything to a politician who yes is in a different circumstance to us and there's no way that the gun laws or the situation that's happened with us in israel could happen in america because the desire to oregon's is so grinding the cultural fabric over there it's like the stink that gets into a polyester shirt can get it at no matter scrubbing just getting get guns out of america so it's very difficult to turn around and say well you should just do what i would do because it's almost impossible but i think he can if you are good friends and we've gone into war seventy times of those guys than you can have a genuine honest conversation rather than just going you guys who you there are a few spoil listeners that you could go i thought that to journalists credit who is the problem we conservative prime it was to to reform destroyed his gun laws beckoned noted ninety six after the mess shooting utilize mushroom hiv to his credit he wrote in the new york times after a couple of years ago after there was a shooting say.

malcolm temple israel america oregon new york times iraq ustralia president
"ustralia" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

VIBES-LIVE

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"ustralia" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

"First is the dig will report on this you can see the world population figures forecast by these evil people for twenty twenty five and see just how much each country is forecast to drop this is confirmed by the georgia god's joins which state that humanity is to be maintained under the 500 million in perpetual balance with nature and these figures showed what they plan to achieve toward the goal by the he'd 20 25 this is typical how they put things in plain sought for us to say for example in ustralia in 2016 a population was 23 million the forecast for twenty twenty five is down to fourteen million that's from three inhabitants per square kilometer down to two inhabitants per square kilometer that's a whopping decrease of almost forty percent of the population a laborlinked seek can have a look at the plans feron country and also see the australian months they for yourself you can also have looked at the military budgets and some other figures there as well he is the current will population as i take the screen shot we that interferences what is being eight point one billion by 20 25 obviously these evil people are not happy about that and it's been telling the population and will continue to do so i'll leave links to articles about this and what we see happening right now in america is the plan being executed with these manmade disasters forcing people to evacuate their himes scheme to fame a concentration camps never to be seen or heard from again just now that there is an agenda behind all of it this will become commonplace all around the world we've already seen governments staging false flag of events and filling them ss to giving up the freedoms and guns exit trump when nations continued to reject got any slow was they connex expect to be blessed and protected part of the problem is that we've not understood that the only reason we have been blessed and protected is because of glitz grants but just as the bubble prophesied that time has now drawn to completion and god's hand it blessing in protection has been removed and we will be able to see the enemy who has been behind the scenes in this dark world and people will realize which go up i have been serving god's mercy is available to all who.

georgia god ustralia america forty percent
"ustralia" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"ustralia" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Broader astra basis a few months before de xtra which was what what was the footsie's now each he dj which was we started off with drift brought e for hedging and what's interesting is we then made the seconds of reina e for for listeners who are eva is your is your core international index the people follow its all the toward 21 develop markets of the exu s without the emerging markets europe australasia asia so hong kong australia eight candidates europe ustralia the far east zaire centrally the floor yes and so now how do you do consi hedge on a broad region that has a dozen different currencies it through the same ways the exchages with multiple currencies as you have the underlying stock exposures and then you add a currency forward on top that designed to neutralize and get you back to just the underlying stock exposure so you're rolling these currency forward on a monthly basis on which pretty plain vanilla simple move she's the ironic thing if people think of hedging as the more exotic play and i say it actually more playing bennell so answers the lauda devout aren't sees it's complicated make the counterargument so it's really not expensive so it's expensive in brazil brazil causi ten percent a year in epa you're being paid to hedge is actually better than free proposition grill if in better than free probably for last 30 years so the idea that it's expensive is one the smith said i keep trying to come back on and i actually feel like we have this branding problem and hedging which is you can't go back and change history but if i if you call your international stock fund your international double decker fund which is your international stock plus currency fund right who by that i don't know they wouldn't they would say i just want to stocks i don't wanna double decker fund and the problem is people think of the hedge is a double that renault the hejaz plain vanilla stock exposure not stock was so lemme pushed back a little bit on the european hedge fund you have a euro edged the etf but not every country in europe is on the euro so you're x switzerland your exxon a lot of the nordic countries your ones ones how european is is the.

brazil epa smith exxon emerging markets europe austra hong kong australia lauda european hedge europe switzerland ten percent 30 years
"ustralia" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"ustralia" Discussed on The Science Show

"They travelled around each other so quickly that when we sort of lost sight of them they were completing a poll orbit in just two and a half million seconds and these a staggering numbers they tori each other apart there was a boost of gamma rays one point seven seconds after the coalescence and that prove that the speed of light and the speed of gravity were the same to just four parts in ten thousand trillion that's one of the most precise measurements in science and it's incredible that that we can do then is amazing his going back to the center you didn't elaborate on western australia where of course there is the square kilometer array all those different dishes looking up we'll the s k help in their observation they must is carry will hope into major ways and we've already seen radio waves frong the to neutrons stars that tori each other apart some of our colleagues up in the university of sydney use the ustralia telescope compact array to detect a very faint after glow of radio waves as the objective from the coalescence expanded into space the askari will be fantastic for detecting emission like that and not even detect from things that while having no seeing gravitational waves if you observe these wacky stars called milli second pulses there are sort of naturally occurring clock that sits out in space and if gravitational waves from supermassive black holes permeates space time we expect to see correlated behavior between when the pulses from these pulsars hit the is k each also emotional is it not use had swollen liz amazing things you've seen when the evidence came through i can't help reflecting that while we have aspects of politics in this country and elsewhere in frankly a dreadful miss heave god scientists working together across the world in the most efficient and productive way and hey you are in australia sitting up.

black holes australia university of sydney liz million seconds seven seconds
"ustralia" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"ustralia" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"That we are going to say any major reforms and if we do what sort of impact is that have city at asiapac rage particularly perhaps ustralia if we did have some kind of a policy china it would be significant i thought we cut the mood but i think i'll completely right now in what you find that we might take some actual a papal trying to make change but we went to the might poetry policy shift i think it can join in could actually have any significant oecd because they growing at a right which is phenomenal any ended up around the seven mock and that's what they wanna maintain for that i really want to write about even so i mean he over the weekend in washington memory had pboc governor joe xiaochuan talking about the fact that he's concerned about high levels of corporate debt that may be one reason that we saw a spike in longterm interest rates in china overnight and at the same time fed chair yellen was saying hey we're going to see regil grady increases their their justified despite what we regard as being soft inflation data we had the 10year here in the state's at two point three zero in late new york trading that helped the dollar quite a bit i mean do we really have to begin to welcome or at least discounts a little bit more aggressively the fact that interest rates are going higher by quite a large degree oh i think pay cuts coming up a the back of it starkly lower rights and over the last several years and bring it they at the level of okay got they yeah significant issue of the balance trade on wine which i think you could be a bit of a great i'm not one but flag very well that they're going to do it on a very moderate hi but it can't sarrazin that did we will take the rights go up in the us that inflation e v i they do that they're not saying that at the mina and whether or not that transitory is kind of yellen suggesting now that remains to be thing but i think that the market sean tell them that they are at the temperate the.

china joe xiaochuan interest rates yellen us asiapac washington pboc regil grady new york 10year
"ustralia" Discussed on WHYR 96.9 FM

WHYR 96.9 FM

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"ustralia" Discussed on WHYR 96.9 FM

"Mean when the planetary site is based in pasadena california when people from the us thinking of space exploration we generally think of nasa national marshall space administration but when you go to the astronautical congress you meet people from the european space agency broom judge japanese aerospace exe mauritian it agency and a and rosskopf's most the russian space agency and the head of the mexicans face asian it was cool is much more international dan i think us listeners are used to and you realize how much money is spent in space wage all the money that stand in space israeli stern on earth cool there was a really good to be there for us and we got everybody of many people excited again about the remarkable idea of sewer sailing your thoughts about ustralia announcing the formation of its own national space agency oh straight show during the open ceremony of the astronomical karma she's on a monday as quite a moving ceremony the aboriginal people waiting a fire on stage that a fabulous dance this wonderful outer space style graphics and then minister of science and indeed industry comes out in announcers that australia has a its own space agency new many people thought australia already had a staged agency because of the important contribution of canberra donors really a moving zinc was fantastic and as i said all the time nasa is the best brand the united states has and i won't be surprised if our the australian space agency becomes the best brand australia it was a great congress shall talk you've had a wonderful stay and i know you're headed home tomorrow have a great trip linda will shia back here in the northern hemisphere thank you mac carryon bill nye is the ceo of the planetary society wrapping up at trip to australia and a keno presentation at the international ask true nautical congress if you missed it listen to the show from last week with bread benhington last week sixtieth anniversary of the space age nearly coincided with the tenth anniversary of a mission that has gone where none has gone before twice i've invited one of our favorite guess.

california space exploration australia nasa united states bill nye ceo pasadena
"ustralia" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"ustralia" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To cover the whole electromagnetic spectrum accessible to us problems while the grow the regular spectrum is redrawn spiritual sensual rather low frequencies radio words will separately to slow down to rochon wait less abroad about the millions and originally there were several shots that group potentially viral one was china argentina chile those ustralia and others africa symbols on sauberford menace shortlist of just australia or south africa store and both countries book four so you're tire toaster initially and in the end the committee made a decision to split sought and australia has now the low frequency project and south africa africa but and i feel office what is the ultimate goal of this vast array to map the universe and gravitational waves and gravitational waves are incredibly exciting showing us the universe in a new way in the same way that radio telescopes themselves revolutionized the understanding of physical processes in the universe gravitational waves have the potential to do the same again an escape is working at the s k organisational headquarters located at the judge ruled bank observatory in britain it's one of the world's oldest radio observatories and the globe opel hub for radioastronomy the.

electromagnetic spectrum australia bank observatory china argentina south africa britain opel
"ustralia" Discussed on Future Tense

Future Tense

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"ustralia" Discussed on Future Tense

"Thinking of america the uk of the anglosphere if you like the the ustralia and then an upper house which would be chosen by lot now if you choose a body by selecting people at random from the population if that body splits fifty one percent forty nine percent vein that's fine as far as governing its own affairs is concerned but i i might say for instance give it a delaying power a bit like the house of lords i don't think it should probably be able to delight things by move say three months but if there is a supermajority say sixty percent sixty six percent of these deliberative chamber of people who had time to think about things and it disagrees with the lower house vein i think we need to start thinking seriously because what we've turned up is a big difference between the decision that the our representatives want to make our elected representatives want to make and the considered opinion of the people and in that situation i want the checks and balances to be quite strongly operating and i have of the first thing i would do is i would allow in that situation and upper house with a supermajority disagreeing with the lower house to impose a secret ballots on the lower house because around the world we are finding more and more in the united states with donald trump in in the uk with brexit in australia with carbon pricing we are finding governments and parliaments legislatures enacting law which a huge majority of the members of the parliament the members of that body actually think is against the public interest and we really have to focus on that because that's never been the case before that a complete watershed in our form of governance in our civilization we have to get serious about that.

uk the house united states donald trump australia forty nine percent fifty one percent sixty six percent sixty percent three months