16 Burst results for "university of Sydney"

"university sydney" Discussed on Think: Business Futures

Think: Business Futures

07:54 min | Last month

"university sydney" Discussed on Think: Business Futures

"Daubney is the head of school for the school. Philosophical and historical inquiry at the University of Sydney, the government have made it very clear that they new policy ultimately boils down to how job relevant a degree. Degree has been deemed now for the odds, humanities that one hundred thirteen percent increase in phase under that rationale is a pretty damning indictment on employability, but also utility for covid recovery for agricultural studies and maths degrees. It's a sixty two percent decrease teaching us in clinical psychology English language degrees. It's down forty six percent so just to start off. We witnessing shift at the moment in how we understand higher learning away from that classical understanding, going back to as far as Plato's Academy says a very distinct. Of providing a qualification for a job, yes, say the thing that stopped me was Cardinal Newman's idea. The university and and sort of unit idea around gene vessel education that move towards that has been happening for many decades now to move occasional education less emphasis on declining education in itself, but I think that's problematic for reasons been excluded verse responses. To issues I it is if it is found a certification imperative if you lie, and if it is about that, have they got that? Right? Because I've been looking at change increase in A. Remake CINCY groove vacation. Perspective of somebody that sound that is interesting in evidence dates when I become and the people who are making these decisions are also interested in this that. The day. It just doesn't stack up the humanities and. Social Sciences degrees on onset. We're not providing employability in providing more employability. people with those kinds of degrees by government wouldn't exist wouldn't operate without people with humanities degrees, the lots of evidence that the people with those kinds of backgrounds and degrees have a better employability. High salaries, so this doesn't make sense in terms of employability you know, but I don't think a university should be about that and I think that's compensation needs to have a much higher level because. What. Is University Education for in the end? I, completely, because it's, it's about humanity and walk drives us. What what the essence of humanity as? Of Humanity is not. Decision making in a way, and in any way everything's moving towards multi disciplinary understanding of Knowledge Anyway suicide did silence privileged ever? Completely misses. The point of where knowledge is is going Albany. What's the response been by? The research is in academics within your department. They concerns about job cuts, or even the value to the institution that they work for would have caused some in the covid. Nineteen crisis is put a huge strain on higher educational, just in university Sydney, just not just in Australia across the planet. So there's been this model said needs to be relooked at in terms of the government, simple government funding international fees as the things which ed nuts and bolts, but then on a higher level as what are we actually gonNA deliver for for the next generation and the generations that are getting degrees dark, actually put on on a platform that actually makes them employable makes them. Citizens of the world and can take up new opportunities. Obviously, we need an infrastructure, an education system that delivers that and education. As a as a business and a a deliver of of real economic impact in Sydney for example is huge so. Not just about the job cuts the issues impacting the institutions. It's what that then looks like means full the student body, and the the people that rely on the income that those students the the accommodation food that the social events. There's this desert entire industry. Degrees? That's always been historical breeding ground for young activism. Do you think that in many ways that understanding of a university as somewhere where you can taste politically and find your ideological nation is going to potentially disappear if as we say, degrees become more vocationally targeted, and there's less of an emphasis on exploring yourself now this whole manipulation of of Education and value the value system, the politicians of trying to put on different types of education, different types of degrees, different types of learning. Is Crazy essentially because they're all valuable, but they're also all adding to sightsee at all will end up. With is a bunch of of graduates who are not exploring the world, not understanding. The complexities a well known amy those conversations that they need to have with their peers with their huges. Fellow students a not you know. Does this whole idea that we need to get students job ready, but we need to get life ready as well. There will be a huge gap in those things if we're just focusing on. Science Engineering Economics the awesome. They humanities aware. The complexities of life are really explored dealt with on the rule set no on their own account of scientific debate, as well a load of interdisciplinary space load of subjects that you would think would never have relevance to Modern Day society have real relevance, but. Maybe, it's maybe it's time that we actually made that a bit moral facing and made that more clear to. To politicians because value university education known about what you learn it by Finding out who you are an onsite funny I had. A think can be critical. Those are skills that. Be matched in a in a in a workplace in you. Great Members Society Professor Badly Behavioral Economics ultimately the Science of decision making in the government's new plan is all about decision making it's trying to convince young Australians to make Joe Brady choices on a very sort of primitive level, a human beings likely to actually take the lead of the government, or do you think? Passion will still prevail over price well that that's a very interesting question. The rationale of this policies of course incentive sustained standard that whether they really thought that through very carefully. I don't know, but that's what they're trying to do. Vice. Young PEOP-, Ted Substance particular directions and I guess it misses the point. Village, CHEERING BEHAVIORAL ECONOMICS ABOUT Intrinsic. Versus extrinsic engine so. The idea that the people do things just the money. Just the they'll get paid is a very limited understanding of what might face today things. So, many people will want to head foot. Jobs that I've had passion and got sort of intrinsic motivation of funding passion prime job done while priding. Ship older suspicious go be on the puny monitored trade citizen. It's very much focused on the monetary incentives and Milton abroad. The drivers behind people's decisions behaviors I guess it's not necessarily paternalistic in a traditional sense, saying the process Japan. And, respond to the price is an that. It's your choice any netscape back to. Standard. Fremont K. style rhetoric. Be Feisty from coalition government. So yeah I, think companies another thing that's happening internationally with governments is a focus on the limits of.

University of Sydney University Education Cardinal Newman university Sydney Daubney Plato's Academy Sydney Albany Science Engineering Economics Young PEOP Modern Day society Australia Joe Brady Milton Fremont Japan Professor
"university sydney" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:33 min | 2 months ago

"university sydney" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Down now bully in northern Ghana yeah about teh T. mod houses here roofed with touch and it was home to over forty alleged witches most of them elderly women there are still many of such comes across this part of the country where alleged witches are held for years in isolation without trial this place used to be a no go area for residents of this village now things have improved on some villagers are starting to build new homes here for the past five years the non governmental organization actually eat in collaboration with Ghana's commission of human rights and administrative justice and I had a part in this have been waiting to close all the camps in northern Ghana but so far they have only managed to close down a tad over them hi Liam when he is the project coordinator for action eight there was strong resistance from the communities and so that's causing a lot of time and resources that they need them to us that the women back to there was a lot of risk to giving them fifty off some of us who engaged in this the coffee pull out with so much pain and full day scheme you ask protecting the rights of some but the deepest Seve to have calls them so much he could also what results in they should have been some of the hit tricks the hot for that base and also would you and so it has security risk how long will it take for for these comes to be closed down it will be very difficult for me to predict because it has to do with commitment form even the state's commitment from civil society organizations change in the mindset that the perceptions about the poor guidance in general because we send these people to come and for a lot of weight it was no do you without reports on how they plan to close down the counts that alleged witches are being put in in Ghana this is news to it from the BBC world service sporting husky racing on the way as well as also a little glimpse of from a fascinating story basically out of the plague times of the Middle Ages and how this to a charity that was set up to deal with the plagues in the twelfth century which is trying to deal with our current plague as well which can be talking about now in terms of Australia and the economic impact of corona virus and what we've seen with the viruses how of course it's revealed quite starkly how economies and societies are organized in this an interesting contrast in Australia prime minister Scott Morrison has pledged hundreds of millions of years of US dollars to kick start the construction industry get the boys back working basically but the free child care that was put in place during the crisis is going to be cut from July and that's going to have an impact on other industries particularly retail and service industries which traditionally a more dominated by female workers but even in balance going on let's talk about this with ray Cooper who is a professor in gender working employment relations at university Sydney so exactly the person to talk to about this a radio on the face of it like kiss it does seem a little bit of sort of money for a masculine industry and less money for a feminine industry is that a fair way of looking at it you think I think Stockley sorry yes and it's especially stock given what we know about the the really important roles that highly feminized jobs have played in their response to carve it I mean I've been watching the coverage in the U. K. for example about the clapping for the NHS yeah there's a similar kind of a meeting a stranger recognizing the important role of women's jobs have tied in the front line but on the other hand women have actually been the most profoundly affected in terms of those who've been made unemployed through the climate crisis and yet this is not being reflected in what the standings on stimulus and response to two because it knows what we want this one right sorry so sorry right what what what this makes me think is you know people have been talking about you know we learn things from the good the the the behavior of governments and so on and responses it has to be said the government I didn't know this but it it offered really quite a big bonus in terms of free childcare so we did something really very progressive but unfortunately it's not pulling that back do you think that there is an argument there's going to be an argument for keeping some of those child care support and social support that the government brought in as an emergency measure there's a very strong argument for supporting women's jobs and supporting families getting back to work to be supporting childcare and you're right there was a really great mates by government to support that child care and actually to provide free childcare to families for about two and a half months and the commitment was to make that commitment last until September but unfortunately it has just been announced at the same time as the spend on mild overnighted jobs in building and construction it's just been announced that that free child care is going to be pulled back in July somewhat earlier than we had expected so some some good work and then having been pulled back out pretty early is really disappointing for those women who work in the sector of the families who rely on the support of childcare I mean that is interesting is that this idea of trying to build back better learn lessons it would seem that you know the lessons aren't may be being that that account lessons actually be afforded because of course this was an emergency model the government will say we it was a very important patch during a big emergency and now we're going back to how the economy works better can Australia actually afford to have that kind of you know it was called the Nordic model but a more well fairy support based economy because that's not how it's set up well I think it's actually the the economic pie off that we actually get for supporting things such as childcare education and health and Human Services he's actually really quite significant beyond suggesting climate that's created this particular sectors I don't think there is anything problematic about governments in these current fairly difficult economic times in spending in trying to stimulate the economy where I have the issue is not so much on the stimulus about the balanced why that that stimulus to replied right okay that's a really interesting point many thanks ray Cooper professor of gender work and employment relations at the university of Sydney you say BBC world service Lawrence and.

Ghana
"university sydney" Discussed on GSMC Weird News Podcast

GSMC Weird News Podcast

08:21 min | 6 months ago

"university sydney" Discussed on GSMC Weird News Podcast

"Talking about some ridiculously over-priced springs and now by watching videos of each other eating blue tits. Don't don't laugh. This is the name of comfort and great tits can learn to avoid foods the taste disgusting in our potentially toxic. A new study has found. I wonder whose money went into this. Research study birth watching TV seeing the disgust response and others helps them helps them recognize distasteful. Pray by their conspicuous markings without having to taste them and can potentially increase both the birds and their praise. Survival Rate Study published in the Journal of Animal. Ecology showed that blue tits learned best by watching their own species whereas great tits. Learn just as well from great tits and blue tits. In addition to learning directly from trial and error birds can also decrease the likelihood of bad experiences and potential poisoning by watching others such social transmission of information about novel prey could have significant effects on prey evolution. And help explain why different needs bird species flocks together blue tits in great tits forge together and have similar diets but they may differ in their hesitation to try novel food. I watching others. They can learn quickly and safely which prey our best to eat. This can reduce the time and energy. They invest into trying different. Pray and help them. Avoid the ill effects of toxic pray says Lisa Hamlin D. student at the University of Cambridge. The Department of Zoology now Corey University Sydney. I'd first author of the report. This is the first study to show that blue tits are just as good as great tits it learning by observing and probably better than most humans previously scientists thought that great tits were better but now it looks. It looks like they're just as good. This new work shows that using social information to avoid bad outcomes especially important in nature many insect species lady birds. Ladybugs sorry firebugs in tiger. Moths have developed conspicuous. Markings bitter tasting chemical defenses to deter predators but before birds learn to associate the markings with disgusting taste. He species are at high risk of being eaten because they can't stand up. Conspicuous warning colors are an effective anti Predator defense for insects but only after predators have learned to associate the warning signal with the disgusting taste before that these insects are an easy target for naive uneducated predators loons ingredients together in the wild so they have many opportunities to learn from each other. If prey avoidance behaviors spreads quickly through the Predator populations could benefit ongoing survival of the prey species significantly and help drive. It's the research showed that each bird. Researchers showed each bird of video of another birth response as eight and disgusting prey item in the TV birds discussed and response to unpalatable food including vigorous beak wiping and head shaking provided the information for the watching bird. The use of video allowed complete control of the information. Each bird saw the prey shonen. Tv consisted of small pieces of almond flakes Glued inside white paper packets and some of the packets the almond flakes have been soaked and bitter tasting solution to block symbols printed on the outside of the packages indicated palatability tasty prey to cross the symbol the blended into the background disguise And disgusting pray. That had a conspicuous square symbol now the TV watching birds were then presented with the different novel. Pray that was either tasty or disgusting to see if they had learned from the birds on TV both blitz and grades eight fewer of the disgusting pray packets after watching a bird on TV showing disgust in response to those packets sort of like subliminal messaging. You know we watch people drink. You know if it's like a slam campaign or something for a coke and Pepsi Right. Say there was a campaign from Pepsi. Slamming Coke right where they said that it tasted disgusting. It was like a part of us to be like. Oh Okay Yeah Okay. I screws right and then we just stopped drinking it just because we saw it on TV. Don't believe when you see on. Tv remember when they tricked us in the nineties with the house? Hippo thing he can't believe everything you see on TV. I really thought that was real. I was so disappointed at the end of the Commercial House Hippo. They're so cute. They're so little tiny little house. Hippo birds and all other predators have to still work out which potential food is worth eating in terms of benefits such as a nutritional content and Costs such as the level of toxic Defense Chemicals. So they're working on Nutritious school degrees amongst their communities now but watching others can actually influence their food preferences and and help to avoid unpalatable foods and our previous using the great tits as a model Predator. We found that if one sees another being repulsed by type prey then both birds learned to avoid in the future by extending the research. We now see the different bird. Species can learn from each other to since Dr Rose Farragut at the University of Cambridge's Department of Energy Who is now? At the University of Helsinki Highlife Institute of life in science in Finland. Who led this? This research says this increases. The potential audience can learn by watching others in helps to drive the evolution of the prey species in other words. Watch more TV right. That's what I got from this. That's definitely what they meant right. Monkey see monkey do Birdie.

University of Cambridge Pepsi Commercial House Hippo Journal of Animal Corey University Sydney Lisa Hamlin Department of Zoology Coke University of Helsinki Highlif Finland Dr Rose Farragut Department of Energy
"university sydney" Discussed on By His Grace

By His Grace

16:21 min | 10 months ago

"university sydney" Discussed on By His Grace

"Life. This is your first time listening. Thank you so much for joining us. This podcast is now being and listen to all across the world and I just WanNa take a moment before we get into today's episode to thank you so much for listening that it really means the world to me and I would appreciate you taking time to subscribe and leave a rating and review on Itunes to help other people find the podcast. Thank you so much watch. Welcome to another episode of by His grace. Today I am with my friend. Shelly Sang Shelly. Welcome to the PODCAST. Cast thank you here. Thank you so shelly till my guess a little bit about yourself. Sure sure Well My name is shelly seeing I grew up in Canada and I was raised in the Sikh religion. It is an north Indian religion. It's about five hundred years old and it combines elements An influences assist from Hinduism and this Sufi branch of its farm However if you speak to a Sikh in general they will always tell you how a unique we are and how distinct the religion and culture is like most other eastern religions? It's a culture where the culture and religion really closely intertwined and so the concept of of identity is really formed in the collectivist type of culture. And so I'm just someone who happened to collide with the greatest of Jesus and my life is transformed. Absolutely you know once we come come in contact with Jesus we are radically transformed. But you mentioned something a collective culture. What does that mean is? I'm not familiar with that term short. You're still in North America. Our culture and our values are very individualistic. And so we're very independent. We are driven people people on but we love our personal space In collectivist cultures The the concept is based on community. And so I generally is based on community and therefore shame and honor play a huge role. Yeah and that's we're going to talk about. Today is finding grace in the shame on our culture. So what would you tell me about your journey. Money there. Sure so in my case The first person that came to faith in my family was my mother and so being a female from ashamed honor culture that where as a big step of faith for her she had someone witnessed to her in Canada and she instantly and she began witnessing to me and my siblings. It wasn't a very clear cut process for me. I had a people in university. Start giving me books about Jesus and so I read a book about Jesus that triggered my first dream and so it was a confirmation of what she was trying to communicate to me was in fact true am and so I was a very liberal person. I I believed in all religions and the end so the concept of God just being one and being one way was was very surprising and and very challenging for me and But I was willing to go to church and tried to understand and More about Jesus. If so what happened with me was I didn't really Have a an interest going to disciple and because of that I didn't have a good foundation of the Gospel. I understood that God was real. NFL challenged by it. But it did not know how to apply any aspect of Christianity to practical life and therefore I made a lot of mistakes on the way. And that's kind of why I WANNA talk to people about this. Non recalled culture just want to encourage people to know that the Gospel that they carry carries power in having a Ho spirit in the having. The word of God is enough to reach out to people who look different. -Ly who may be a CO worker a neighbor abor or Someone they just meet along their journey on people are empty and they are hungry for the truth and and so a lot of people in the shame honor cultures. They really look like they're doing well but in my story I up with that that facade Assad a of a perfect life on the outside but I was struggling with depression anxiety suicidal tendencies and university Sydney and so all of that was tearing me apart on the inside because they didn't have a foundation of identity. So tell me about your the dream that you had sure it. So I had a series of dreams and to the first one was I had Catholic Catholic friend and he gave me a book about a Muslim woman who came to Jesus in the testimony of her story and so it it talked opt about how she was wealthy and she had chosen Jesus and it was based in the country focused on on and so it was easy for me to relate to this woman because when she was a woman and she was going against this culture is religion to to follow a totally different path. And so I read the book and ahead the I dream and all I remember was this That walked away knowing what was real was in the book but it was also what my mother was trying to convey to me was real. Oh in so I had no doubt after that but I still was stop Kerr couple of years in a mode of. I don't know what to do with this truth. Gasso trying to process that and figure out what following Jesus looks like so for those who are listening. Who'd dude don't understand the shame on our culture? Can you explain that a little bit more. You sure so because in our family values matter so much in the shame and honor culture if you make one mistake it brings shame to the entire family really In so for example if a child doesn't achieve a certain level of education that brings shame came If they marry the wrong person that can bring shame in so people tend to blame the parents in so even even parents feel shame. And so there's a high level of perfectionism An it's unhealthy striving driving To achieve goals that are usually unrealistic. So once you make Jesus and you learn that Jesus is is the only perfect person that that probably rocks your world because you've grown up in a culture of You know you have to you know and I think that's probably why we have some some of my boys. Best friends are in the end and you know they are very aware that with then their culture. There's a lot of people who commit suicide because they can't live up to that standard of perfection. But once you know that Jesus is the only perfect one well. What does that do to you? Well that took me a long time to really get to that revelation a maybe it was almost maybe twelve years. It took a really long to understand his character so I only understood that he was the truth and the beginning and those still living a very secular university type of lifestyle And I didn't have Christian friends. I didn't have Christian influences. I didn't even know where to look it. It was just very overwhelming in the beginning because I grew up in a very conservative. SEE COMB which. I didn't even cut my hair. Telo is eighteen. You know I wasn't allowed to date which I did but nobody knew about it. Ettelaat at things that were so new to me An moved to the US in two thousand four for graduate school. And I didn't even we know where to go to church and so I looked for familiar Churches and and people that spoke the language that I knew and so I didn't know how to navigate denominations at this point so it was so interesting that at ahead you know being someone with going into a graduate degree and living in North America the majority of my life I'd have to say that. Don't assume education means revelation more evens good And so one one mistake I made was married and unbeliever In two thousand eight and I had received a couple of warnings not to go ahead with this marriage and it broke down in a couple of months and that brought more shame To me and that was probably the first time that I brought Qalat ashamed. My parents I grew up being one of the the children. That really Aimed please my parents and so that was a big turning point for me because in my faith I did not know how to resolve Culture and Orm Christianity and godly values yet. And I didn't have the mentorship to understand. So what got you there. So what got you through that process. How were you able to understand and then I would ask you like what part does forgiveness plan that? That's an excellent excellent question So what happened was I ended up leaving my marriage And then I went to a process of great intimacy with the Lord and because before that I just knew God was real and didn't know how to process that relation but in that moment and in those years of broken I had to really come face to face. With what were my values and how to you really learnt to communicate with God on on my own level it had to be my own relationship and it had to the derived from my mother's influence and so that was kind of a very unique process where started growing in the word. Crying out in my broken is You know sharing with God about my struggles of my own desires and what my life that look like And coming out of perfectionism learning to surrender to God Dreams and desires in Being shaped into somebody who was able to forgive because there's no concept of forgiveness in in religion yeah and Jesus comes and offers forgiveness and even while we are sending dies for us so oh that must have been a difficult thing for you to understand especially not having someone to disciple you but what you talked about how about getting basically to the end of yourself and having to cry out to God. That's what we all have to do. I teach my children apologetic and but I also teach them. You can't believe like your faith. My faith will not get you to heaven. You know you have to believe you have to have that personal relationship because It's your face that will stand one day you will stand before the Lord because every knee will bow and how. How will you you respond to him so so let me ask you this? How would you disciple someone? WHO's in an eastern religion? And how would you first of all. How would you share the Gospel with them? And then how would you disciple them in the process. I think that's an excellent question and Eh one that I hope everyone wants to ask I would first of all begin at a relationship with them Be Open and honest with with them. They are going to have questions about the smallest things though. Patients is GONNA be a really important uh-huh answer questions in teach them the basics of the gospel before throwing big concepts because they we already have stereotypes about Christianity For example when I would look at the cross as as seek I would look at it and think well Christian. She didn't seem to worship weakness. You know and seeks really value victory and defending people. I'm being strong in valiant and so I didn't understand the redemptive side. I didn't understand the power forgiveness. I didn't understand the power of of grace and how grace transforms our life for the better and how abundant life can really come into play when we allow God ought to heal our identity And so I would say that that big of relationship combined with consistency distance is really important and just and just showing them the grace of Jesus because graces aces what sets Christianity apart. It doesn't exist in any religion. Sikhism mentions the word grace but it actually actually does not have the same connotation at really refers more to a whole lease pity kind of attitude of God just feeling alling story for us in. He'll just kind of you know Sprinkles mercy Occasionally but that distance exists you. There's no real communication or dialogue but now through Jesus we have the Holy Spirit and we have the word of God where we can connect to him through so many avenues and we can receive from him in a creative way every day. Yeah I love that. That's really good I Met a Sikh woman and shared the Gospel with her while she was doing my eyebrows and she did have a lot of questions questions and I just sat there with her for a long time and.

"university sydney" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

05:03 min | 10 months ago

"university sydney" Discussed on The Science Show

"The work that we do is to develop chemical tools that allow us to improve medical imaging techniques the Global News that's right there fluorescent census so that the beautiful it's such a satisfying area chemistry to work in because everything that we do fluorosis beautifully you call that participants biology that's right but we can also apply the tools that we make to environmental studies as well and so it's nice that we can be doing fundamental chemistry that has so many different applications Tsk and were you surprised selected I was very surprised I think there are so many great physical scientists of my generation in Australia and so many of them could easily have won the award Oh don't be modest brilliant come on I have a brilliant team working with me university Sydney that's right well that Department Chemistry Department Jason is led amongst others by Mash Maher who is doing new batteries which you can make into buildings so the building actually becomes itself store of energy and auto recycling plastics is incredible yeah with very fortunate to have him as a colleague we learned so much from him gained so much from the energy neighboring southwestal the energy indeed and is it the kind of thing you I used to their school life and such like the early career you similar nothing but buzz I was very fortunate to be a student at the university as well and so I think for me I've always seen the energy and the enthusiasm that the school of chemistry at the University of Sydney has had and it's really what inspired me to go into a research career of my own how did you get this glowing effect which are so useful we really take small molecules many of which are inspired by nature that naturally many organisms have fluorescent molecules for different purposes and we take those molecules and then Kendrick oh chemistry to modify them so that they can then respond to their environments and do what would we normally use them our earned cell studies so we take hotels use them to understand different diseases and we send them to Olivet collaborators around the world and they can use them for their own studies I've heard a number of lines like this some in fact people using marine organisms which glows somehow and transplant they're kind of proteins and such like on their enzymes are there different ways of making this glow effect which have been exploited as well yeah that's right so the green fluorescent protein has really revolutionized biology that was the subject of the Nobel Prize in two thousand and eight on the work that we do is slightly different it's not a genetic based technique it's actually just a small molecule so we don't need to genetically modify the organism we can just so cow cells in our small chemical molecule and they will take the fluorescent molecule what do you hope to see it doing if all goes well I think what's most exciting for us is that so many researches are excited to use tools to investigate their own questions questions I've never even thought about and we have a researcher in the UK at the moment collaborating with us to study Parkinson's days when she's particularly interested in the role of Copa and oxidative stress in Parkinson's disease and it's exciting that she's able to tools to actually come up with new discoveries thank you thank you Elizabeth new winner of the Physical Sciences Prize on Wednesday and final message from the prime minister I met away you call home where all Sipho where all healthier because of the work of Australian scientists and researchers and that's what we get data together to celebrate in honoring you this evening so alternates nominees congratulations I know that through the sheer exhilaration of the work you do you hundred fifty million dollars for the nation so far and could be worth many billions a treatment for cancer.

Global News hundred fifty million dollars
"university sydney" Discussed on Probably Science

Probably Science

15:02 min | 10 months ago

"university sydney" Discussed on Probably Science

"Places which makes detection more difficult for example the soles of the feet is a common location. Isn't that what happened wasn't that molly didn't he get some retirement already didn't we place and yet but molly against repeat we wasn't it was it was under the nail bed on his under toenail they had a skin cancer as a football injury and it's not that yeah exactly that he got skin cancer under Tony well this is why you know there's another example why say men should wear sandals Komo against it axiom to live by so you know sunburns come from the sun which is a star Oh yeah yeah do you ever do you ever find yourself curious about the life and death of Stars Matt Man I really do if is there some way that we could learn there is a good way very good very free this kind of subsidy subscription there is that would give us access to that and thousands of other lectures by top lecturers and scientists and professor in that field there's a thing called the great courses plus yes and you can go to the great courses plus dot com slash probably right now and have thirty days a free access to their entire catalog of thousands of lectures on everything from dinosaurs space exploration painting playing music this huge library this oh actually kind of coming full circle because this costs the one that you just mentioned the life and death of stars is taught by Professor cave-in GE strengthen who is at Vanderbilt University which you might have heard of recently on account of its saving our good friend Jesse cases from Nashville isn't it it is that's the university teaching hospital that basically a SORTA Jesse out really just to get keep his stage four cancer bay they are a World Class University and a world class professor of physics is teaching this course this is a twenty four lecture series on the life and death the stars that I mean this is a great sort of justification for this as a medium both video audio by the way you can listen to these as just all you want I've been doing this quite a bit I've been jumping between the nice thing about how this was with the APP on the phone and then the desktop version and a diversion through your apple TV or Roku whatever is you can jump between formats I've been listening to as podcast when I mean driving and then got home when continued with the lecture when I've got back to Micronesia but I think this is one that we really does benefit from the visuals lecture the fourth one in stellar nurseries has this really cool virtual fly through of the stellar nursery and the Orion Nebula so it's nice have in addition to great information great visualizations to go along with some of these things so these are just like on line courses level sources and yet they're they've been on new sponsor reasoning we really love them and it's not just science stuff they've got also said like you were just doing the wine tasting one can't taste through the up you know you have to buy some wine to accompany could could make of it for free you could sign up completely free for a free trial for thirty days if you just go to the great courses plus dot com slash probably that's the hookup that they've probably slash probably hasn't probably yeah that's all a little ask coach that's our hookup so they've given us for others learn about writing fiction about stress management translating Hieroglyphs Nemeth thing it's on there yeah they've they could be good they really is I've been I've been watching a few of those kind of things organization wants a negotiator negotiating when I was looking at some cool things like that learn to negotiate man acting on there I wouldn't be surprised because they have a bunch of arts things like they have music and visual arts I bet there's an acting won the clauses plus man I can't wait to do these great courses they sound great there is a there is one rose mustering stage presence as a course well that's an interesting comedian down you've got you've probably got your a something. The Conflict Management I Wanna I wanNA talk some hostages out of Pasta tickers out of taking their hostages Avenue there's a lot there's a lot of that also stuff but yeah the life and death Dawes's the one that we've been different to most recently is pretty cool once again the great cool says plus dot com slash probably for thirty day free trial what do you think is the coolest course oh I don't know I really enjoyed we did there was one that we did a couple of months ago that was a the understanding the misconception disci- yeah yeah that one is very cool because every episode was able to go in like vastly different directions but they're all they're all great and taught by top professors and lecturers and it's a very engaging and you know it's like a cross between it's like eating your vegetables but they're delicious Brussel sprouts came back around suddenly. Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah smoked with garlic salt and yes see this is a hipster Brussels sprouts of online educational services much they're gonNa love this vegetable yeah we got to be a bit in that your mom wanting to eat Brussel sprouts and you're like I hate Brussels sprouts your pain and you just turned out that she couldn't cook it was like a skillet was like all she needed was a smoker and some organic see Saul just dumping it in water the only way you can fuck up sprouts boil it in water until it's boiling was a pretty stead produce has changed or like the farmers market I don't know twenty thirty years ago there was this preponderance of farmers markets and access to fresh from the more recent thing right yeah but I guess like blaming my mom we had canned vegetables. Sometimes I just mean the Bleich Brussel sprouts fancy now you go to a restaurant and it's a fifteen dollar appetizer and get never boiled it's yeah they're not boiled there and they're always ready made with butter and garlic I might actually do this Hungary there's a few cooking courses but one of them is cooking basics what everyone should know that seems that actually might be quite a Handy WanNa do that go there's little cooking Victoria thanksgiving Turkey as an individual election oh I'm gonNA that's that's an impossibility like every year by brothers tried to do some like one year my brother bought a deep fryer and bright we Mike cattle drama or one of those giant things you put in the driveway area to the earth on the hot Colo Colo a half a day one of them and they were just injecting tons of a saltwater into because we always have like a pretty not always but like I think one year we have close to fifty people at this Thanksgiving dinner so it's like a multiple Turkey Thanksgiving so that you can do apples apples Turkey two Turkey comparisons of the different styles of cooking for each of the by the way sorry what were you gonNa say let's say I think this might be my first Thanksgiving in La what are you GonNa do I don't know like I've always gone back to Denver but I have a day job now so like I don't know that that I can they're all their offense Thera few Olefin Thanksgiving's the various comics through wanted Shirley in Conley's house time ended with Holiday Karaoke for some reason right that does figure I thought when you were talking about the life and death stars when I thought I thought you were going to segue into the story that was in the dock that Milky Way Center exploded three point five million years ago a cataclysmic energy flavor rip million not billion that's not very long ago that is not that long ago in in Universe Yeah 'cause most times a cataclysmic energy flair ripped through a galaxy the milky way about three and a half million years ago say a team of astronomers they say the so-called sy- Flyer started near the supermassive black hole in the center of the galaxy the impact was felt two hundred thousand light years away the discovery that the Milky Way Center was more dynamic than previously thought can lead to a complete re tation of his have Aleutian the results dramatically changed your understanding of the Milky Way says co Wotho Maxima Google Liam Oh by the way Komo that's not a real person not Real University of Sydney scientists beg is now Real Woman Makmur oh I've just found it as a female we always yeah that's that is a fantastic scientists magma lovett magma googly Mo from universities Sydney fake if they go back to if we go back to do a live probably science at so in Australia we might need to get Google Home Oh yeah we always ought of galaxy is inactive galaxy would not with a not so bright center she added listen this Galaxy's back injury right now because you have to insult the intelligence of the center is so bright maybe not book bright but his emotional intelligence very nice it's a very nice galaxy very pleasant to be around galaxy sedentary little slow like it's always fun when you read stuff like that 'cause like my I into your like Oh the the center of the Milky Way exploded three point five million years ago I'm like I'm just hearing about does now took them that long by the way I think the BBC has screwed up somewhere hold this article everything else it's not real thick magma is Magda Maga what it could be mcduck cookie it could also be says the neath like magma could be the name of the Science Group whole what what university that she supposedly works Maqta okay they there is a typhoon Danas magnetically still a great night we're still solid name who tweets whose twitter handle is at astro confusion well that's quite an got messed up right the media is a doctor of astrophysics by the looks of things and also an under and over water photographer on an scuba diver in other words photographer photography everything is in the subset of either outside of or inside of water and that does take pictures in both those two states trying to find a link to her photos that yeah there we go but all right Hey Magda I reckon with a number of Australian this is we're probably no more than one or two degree separation have you ever Austrailia we have we did a life a little tour of life probably science shows at the beginning of this year that's so cool I've never been I wanted to go as a kid it was really fun it was as you've heard Australia is for various reasons all largest puck capita listenership really so it's a very podcast friendly nation it's a pulse for any nation and we had a couple of high profile Australians you've really help boost our audience and so we got to yeah we hit we hit was it five different Australian and cities in Brisbane that's so cool Eddie Melbourne and I want to go to Australia so bad that come with us we're hoping to come back out in two thousand twenty where it's a good comedy well they would appreciate you they need they would enjoy what you offer I wanna go so bad somebody bring me Australia. There is a tool by the way the Melbourne Comedy Festival has a couple of showcase shows every year that all American comics doing sort of three to four comics Bill do but that's not you can't into that probably right I think that's more case of get your people to contact the people who book that put the put your name in front of them no car but Sydney was the best or both both I think Bells Beach I wanna see kangaroo so bad that is very easy to do in certain places peck peck wallows in certain places but other places did I like my my high school math teacher was Australian and he's the one that told me that in Austin they actually hate kangaroo like that they're like deer everywhere that's exactly fear is exactly the kind of equipment or Larry or in America like they get onto the roads yeah there's probably like fucking kangaroo wallabies where we just was the craziest thing I've ever seen because would just we we were being driven back by by Mick by I think it was Mick spout who was looking for us and helped us get out there in the first place and he we driving back from the place we were drinking off to the show.

Brussels molly Bleich Brussel Brussel Dawes Saul Mick spout Bill Sydney America Larry Austin five million years thirty days one year two hundred thousand light yea twenty thirty years fifteen dollar million years
"university sydney" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"university sydney" Discussed on 710 WOR

"And house SO daily and has little team there's all of B. vitamins does a lot of things in their direction for the oddballs but if you need a little bit more protection. we have to eyeball formulas. and it's very interesting. there are things that are good for the eyeballs are good for to bring their actual and for each why well the brain and the brain you could actually when the doctor looks inside your eyes with that little sculptor actually looking at the optic nerve which is the outside of the brain it's a piece of the brain protruding and meeting the Irish that's pretty interesting. so it stands to reason that something that's good for the ice is going to be good for bring. so here's a study looking sank and sleeves Hampton slash the risk of going blind from the most common cause an older people there's a kind of disease that makes you go blind over the age of fifty it's called age related macular degeneration about twelve million Americans have it about two million Americans are at risk of going blind from it that's a big number two million. so this is the blue mountains eye study it should university Newcastle University Sydney it's two thousand five hundred participants and then the full moon for five to ten years after to study and. and they found that if they had sufficient lutein and zeaxanthin they had it as a supplement it reduce their risk of going blind by sixty five percent for macular degeneration zinc reduced risk by forty four percent just by having sync. so here is Harvard. it's a jam up the mall G. S. Harvard University and Brown University. I was looking at a hundred and two thousand nurses. medical doctors pharmacist. older people that have high levels of intake of lutein and zeaxanthin reduce their risk of going blind by forty percent. now they didn't just take their word if they took supplements or H. certain foods they actually check their blood they check their blood to see how much looking and.

Newcastle University Sydney G. S. Harvard University Brown University Harvard. forty four percent sixty five percent forty percent ten years
"university sydney" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:20 min | 1 year ago

"university sydney" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Research institutions throughout the world including threat to United States ubiquinol is the active version of coenzyme Q. ten that's important that's an important point when you hit your forties it gets increasingly more difficult every year that passes to convert coke you ten to ubiquinol charm sixty five so my ubiquinol levels have dropped about forty fifty percent that would explain if I had a drop in energy but I have a lot of energy I'm working seven days a week I've got a very full social life I've got a million friends I see my family all the time I exercise will turn I pretty much just like a much younger person and I think a major part of that is the nutrients are take like rest virtual for blood flow to my brain like you pick one offer my muscles in my heart and we're showing it you actual levels from my body I really think it's making a crushingly wonderful difference and my agent in my age I mean I should be different I really should a difference between me and other people my age because I know how to take supplements and that that's a good that's a good point you go to my stores and we have doctor perfect doctors dietitians clinical nutritionist medical doctors nutritionists I'm a pharmacist and Christmas Greg Agarwal he's an optometrist nutritional season kind of people that help you out listen we have to go to a break when we come back in one explain how you pick one occasion anarchy because it's an important point because you can't your muscles get better and she for exercise more power all she took a quick study before we go to break it was university Sydney in Australia they took athletic fifty year old guy and they put on start which I Statens interfere with energy production and ubiquinol function these guys lost power there was strength they lost in Dortch they put him on you pick one wall two weeks later they got back their power dish Greg there in dorms it really makes a difference that is so not only does age interfere with your ubiquinol you have less and less as you grow older but drugs to lower.

Greg Agarwal Sydney Australia Dortch United States ubiquinol Christmas forty fifty percent fifty year seven days two weeks
"university sydney" Discussed on Impact Boom

Impact Boom

08:23 min | 1 year ago

"university sydney" Discussed on Impact Boom

"Go to a next question over can you give us a few examples of companies all social initiatives, that are really successfully using innovation base strategies to maximize. Again. Yeah. There are few social enterprises full, because I think what they do is, is really interesting. And probably a hedge myself again, by saying, you know, these organizations mental everyone's definition of a social enterprise. But nonetheless, the very end of groups so firstly I was lucky enough to be in New York. One of several potties, for the UN's fishy campaign, which is about basically engaging in the campaign gender equality. The person that campaign is taking on the issue of gender. Equality is just amazing. It's Fanta light of both engagement in women's issues, but without making them feel like monsters, having previously been ignorant. And that's the sort of thing that is. Solely missing in, in today's heavily polarized environment. So the what it was is really good. Also, the work of the circular experiment, which I think, is now cold Kara. One of the professors, I studied within the US. Focused on the decoupling overuse, ownership, which is really fanciful way of, of what we now, think of as the circular economy and the sharing economy, which think about it. And just, you know, these organizations that. A working to reevaluate the Wayne, which we as a society think about how I guess, more importantly, what Lincoln Ford to share and the last one, I'll give a shadow to is really cute is cold woods with hot. It's a social enterprise. It sells recycled stationery and gives a proceeds to help fund education for women. When you go to the website, look at the stuff they do. They have very evolved from the standing of design and branding, never be undervalued in something, like a social enterprise. And this is something wonderful about this logical semi. Relationship between stationary education that I find very appealing. So. The fantastic thing so much those examples to finish off. Could you please show three great design social innovation books? They would recommend childlessness three. Oh my God. I can't chew. Sing is how great deal of affective altruism. I'll start by recommending William mccaskill book. He's a social philosopher, sorry, Scottish. It's called doing good better really gets into the sort of nitty gritty details behind the philosophy but it's really pointingly version. And it sort of makes you feel excited about doing better and not so much guilty about not doing enough, which is really good media read it spokes little fifty. That'll that'll do that. The second book on the list up is going to sort of challenge to over designers out there going back to what I was saying about the differences between design thinking and design strategy. And here's six of design thinking uses that designs drenching takes a level Deepa. Just context books books called the body in pain by lane scary. Pretty relatively old book, nineteen ninety five design thinkers, designed, shall we say, we'll be very familiar with the use of the term pain points took every design simple, always to about this customers pain points, and it's normally dislike the fustrations that, like the customer has they'll do sort of the observation of situation with the customer, like all dot was fustrating. That's the pain point will solve that. But that's as deep as thinking in that area goes and this book is arguably with the concept of pain points rich nights from, it's really a philosophical deconstruction the way, which affects the human body, and the lost chapter is particularly important. It's about the way which we as designers make objects that are about the alleviate. Pain, and that we will have an ethical responsibility to be the sort of people who make determinations about. What shouldn't should not be the forms of pain? We in society mean to experience in order to survive that he was full camera took it was. He's actually in is now back here to the university, Sydney. Fantastic. Ship refers to city was towing that now when we think about pain points pain, design mandates, the most common way, think about is like those mugs sometimes and ring at the bottom put an upside down in the dishwasher, and it comes out as little bit of what a sting of tops, when you flip upside down and put it back in the cupboard splash, a little bit of water and a design thing of looking at, like that's a pain point. That's a frustration. I gotta go solve that designers will will solve everything for we'll make ever going to live in castles and clouds in the sky. But as Ed, this is I think that, that differently using some of that reading that book where you've got to treat the designing products customers parent with child. A child will cry all the time, but us it's the parents -bility snatching to be the, you know, to be the wanna be saying, look at this moment, this thing, that's holding you experienced that is it's gonna make you less feeble this week. So, yeah, this is always money to the maid of that in designing every little issue that sane. But desires me, whether that it is much more good that can be done in countries to society by being conscious of those souls of those sorts of ideas. So seeing as how I gave you that book even more challenging book. Hold the society of the spectacle, which is real critical theory written by a situation, est coke guide to board is book was very prominent in the currency. Paris Ryan's nine hundred sixty nine student more of many student revolutions happens in the happening. France, essentially, outlines the way which people have devolved for focus on being experiencing being is experiencing living life into having. It was the second element, which is materialism consumerism and the third one is appearing and given the book was written in nineteen sixty seven it's sort of prescience is copy out stated in the way that outlined, the sort of social media, Instagram photo narcissistic generation that we now living with everything is batch appearing as if I living Banak living. And I think as a design, it could be more important than on this day ways which the work that we do contributes to that phenomenon. We should always be striving to do that makes people aware that they all have in and not just really helps pretend that they. Thank you so much. Thomas. Listening to impacts burn your find links to the initiatives people in raisers as mentioned in the podcast on impact spoon. The rogue please leave comments pelote and remember, we'll be publishing thrashes brations insights, buke create positive impact every week on the website, Facebook, page and Twitter..

Pain UN New York US Facebook Lincoln Ford William mccaskill France Thomas Sydney Ed Paris Ryan
"university sydney" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

09:28 min | 1 year ago

"university sydney" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"People wonder by and you say, hey, hey, why don't you coming my radio program? And let's catch up Catherine grew and Nala is with me and Daniel Vel valley Zely is with me. You guys have been on the show before I didn't know that I bump into you here. And I want to do an update because last time we spoke you talking about going Vietnam at Christmas and all this magnificent stuff, and I'm sure people were wondering whatever happened there. So first of all, Catherine Daniel, welcome back. Good to be here. Tell me tell me what you saw in in Vietnam. I just can't imagine it just when you you were talking about it, you know, months ago. I thought this is so exciting you get to do so talk to us what an incredible privilege. I mean, we had the opportunity as well as doing some charity works, and we took a team of seventy people with us into. Hanoi and we did three big Christmas festivals. And times we saw fifteen hundred fifty new salvations Christ, the twelve months Daniel headway with the to train chech- planners. And so they had this wonderful system to be able to connect with all of those new believers, and then just so God break out in amazing ways with miracles and signs and wonders it was so glorious. I I wish I could have been there because there is nothing more wonderful than senior bills our own faith. And then you see the love of God for these people that maybe never heard his name before. I mean, obviously in a place like Vietnam. There's so many people have they just never heard any of this stuff that we were bored with in America or in the west we've heard a million times week, nor it this is fresh for them. Well, it was fresh for us to in that we were saying their close that we haven't seen before. I so my first. Blind. I I've Syria we actually saw eight or nine completely blind. I I only pray for one as the team with praying for them. We saw an and these people who abilities and painters just in the name of Jesus. And in fact, the prayers. Yeah. The team that came with us, and we saw three people walk out of wheelchairs who had atrophied muscles, actually, growing their muscles. As they got out. We didn't pray for an coding. Miracles. It's funny because you know, you hear the same questions over and over and I'm asking the same one over and over. How is it that we see so little this in the west in America? There's so many sick people so many people with problems what an extraordinary thing to see not just miracles, but really astounding miracle described handing miracles that. I haven't seen before. In fact, the second night, we were we had some people wanting to stop the meeting, and they distracted them with video testimony of the night before of the people getting out of the wheelchair. It was so extraordinarily who why would somebody wanna stop? Meaning what kind of people would want to do that? Well. Yeah. Oh maker. It's so interesting to me that you had this upper tune ity to do that. I wanna make clear case most people listening probably didn't hear the two of you on this program some months ago. So I wanna be clear that the the ministries called world hope dot com. World hope dot com, and you Catherine ruined Nala. It's are you. Oh and A L A, but you've been used by God in miraculous ways for many years. And I know I asked you this last time, but for those who didn't hear us months ago. How did this start for you? You know, I started reading things like Smith Wigglesworth, John g lay Kathryn Kuhlman, and it just got frustrated. I thought God it's not our okay that I'm not seeing what I'm leading about in the book of that. So I began to research and said, look, what is it? I I thought from what I was reading. I thought maybe maybe it's Tisza fire. It seems like all of them had some form of. Amazing baptism just began to seek the look for that. And I tell you it happened. What does that mean a baptism of fire? Didn't really know. And I still don't really have the stand except that it's the power of the Holy Spirit. And he's the one that does the work, and that becomes more and more obvious as we begin to see him breakout count like this as he didn't bit numb that is clearly nothing to do with us. It's all his chlorine his power. I wanna give Daniel a moment to to speak. Any are you the head of world? Hope I can't remember your title. You are and forgive me that we have one microphone the reason we only have one microphone is because we don't normally hang out here in Anaheim. So we're we're ill prepared for every eventuality. But. How long have you been with world? Hope started the organization in two thousand and three. So you've been with it since two thousand and three. World. Hope I almost laughing at is such a fundamental like how did he get that? You are L world hope dot com. What a wonderful simple message world. Hope if I'm a good negotiator number one. About two. Does everything it says we can bring to the world Jesus the hook to the of the world. Yeah. We're bringing Jesus to the world. So we do a lot of charity. Work in homes. Dominica would. Yeah. We've got schools of the world and things like that. Although we do all of those always attach charity work to the gospel to separate the gospel is showing to people, and so we can't separate charity from the gospel no-show be separate at the other way around. So every time we do something we always work at a way to talk about Jesus show the ghost. Well. And of course, it's why you do what you do. So it's only right now, you obviously from Australia, I know from your accent? But you you raised as a Christian or was this something that happened later in life for you was raised as Christian, but my turning point for me was in in university. And that's where the become hungry full the path God because we were where were you universe? The university Sydney, but it's a very international place. Oh, my friends when people from sees. Yeah. And and Christianity just become one philosophy against another philosophy unless it was demonstrated pow God evident in your belief. Let me talk my producer for second. James? This is the this is the eleven so we'll just keep going here. And you cut out a few seconds there. So when and when did you Catherine connect with with Daniel 'cause I know your husband's sitting here, he never does these programs you to sit here and watch the two of you talk. But how did you connect the two of you? Well, Daniel came to be part of chech- about three and a half years ago. And we quickly recognised just the apostolic grace on his life and everything so flex to together. We now co-lead glory city church in friskin glory city church in. So now, if I go to Brisbane, I know where to go to church. Yes, at because honestly, I mean, I went to and a half years ago to Shelia, and I wasn't Brisbane. But I did not you know, that didn't get the state too long. But I'm looking for excuses to travel to wonderful places like that how much fun that would be to have you. But I want to tell you one more thing we we did these three nights of festivals and on the fed not we will walk working with. Nomination that doesn't really embrace miracles. And Daniel had to negotiate with them to let us even pray for the sick that night. Can you believe it was so mazing as Americans began to break out those pastas began to jump into the crowd and begin to price America's to his new standard. They suddenly that the elegy shifted as they were saying the cripples as I was saying the blind eyes open, Beth theology shifted, and they just spent always all on and they just began Frank. They were the ones having to testify about the miracle hearing this helping interpret the testimonies just glorious so I really bought shift in thinking, and they've invited Daniel and myself back to teach on healing in their Oganization, even even the orient. All this stuff is amazing. That's actually in some ways the most miraculous of all because a lot of people are very hidebound theologically. So the fact. That they were open enough to be willing to see what God might do. And then come back into teach on this. I think it's vital to one of the reasons I love having you on. It's so vital that we move as church and signs and wonders that we expect that it's so important. And so just rules me that God is is using you in that way, all of you at world hope and Catherine were in all ministries, because it's it's the way the gospel is spread. There's no question about it. We've just got about a minute or so left. So what else should we touch on Eric's? Not just the physical miracles of hailing the fact that we were able to go into that country and conduct three major festivals of multiple.

Catherine Daniel America Daniel Vel valley Zely Vietnam Hanoi Brisbane Anaheim Smith Wigglesworth Frank Holy Spirit Eric producer Dominica Kathryn Kuhlman Oganization university Sydney friskin Australia
"university sydney" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

07:43 min | 1 year ago

"university sydney" Discussed on Conversations

"Rights to keep the local people say from disease. Yeah. When you say pre-test, we have to be it's not quite a sort of nine to five ole pervasive job. So he preached us in the temple of segment there was kind of on rotation. I guess that you had a private life with chewed of probably being married. You may have had children. And she would have had that private life at home and at the same time at certain periods of the year. She would have had judy's to do in the temple to Nana Revista. Virgin the in in other words, give ni- she would have had a full life like anyone else, but she would have had certain obligations in the temple to have come into the temple of segment perhaps it in times of the year, and some of those as you say, you imagine the incense little stuff. One of the big rights was to to play music to other ply musical to sing. And that's gonna white the goat up to note to the God to do the same thing at private funerals as well as the Representative of segment, so that you you're about to open this coffin as you say. And while you're trying to damp down your expectations, your hopes starting to creep up. What did you what did you see? Once you been that coffin. I will never forget this moment. Till the dia diary, rich. It was just the most George robbing silence filled the room, so wonderful collections management. Same had lifted. The lead off. The coffin lead had actually been cut separately, probably by the tumor. But so it slides in and out of the top of the fate of the coffin like a pencil box. So you have to slide it out of it. And then it has to be lifted up, and then they place the lead on the giant table. And of course, we will peed out hit into say would is a few bits and pieces lifts and what we saw was astonishing. What we saw was full almost to the top of the trough of the coffin in a part of it with this amazing mixture of beads bandages bones lumps of resin. So resin is going to Batumi viscous liquid was poured over the mummies of preserving agent this then Haden's the rob is cracked through this like a shell. And that that lumps of this stuff will come looks like call world scattered there through there as well. Some of the sodas that I think Nicholson had used a package it before we sent it. Back to Sydney was still there. Imagine picking up a coffin full of bits and. Paces shaking above your head like a cocktail shaker, and then putting it down. And that's kind of what we saw you mentioned the resin. And I mentioned this great big lump inside. There have risen what was that? Well, perhaps jumping ahead of it here. But when we we see T scan this coffin we saw this lump in the scan come up a very high density object, which is dense bind. So we didn't know what it was. But eventually when we started to excavate are Egyptologist, Connie doctor, Connie Lord picked it up and she just went oh my God. I know what this is. And it was an Endo cost so resin that sort of viscous mixture of bees wax, and conifer sap and things his preserving kind of liquid like a Honey put IVA embalmers often then pulled resin back through that Nizo passage into the empty skull cavity. Because of course, they've taken the Bryans out. So why do they need to do that? If taken the Brian we think it's as you site. It's kind of just give. A robustness extra security to keep the body in shape. And we know that they do this because in C T scans of complete mommy's think the famous scan of Tutankhamun, for example, you can see where this resin has settled in the back of this person's head. So imagine Tutankhamun is lying back. The resonance poured into his Brian it pulls into the back of his head with flat top over the the sort the even surface. So we know that this has happened. But I've never been in a situation where we've actually had the end icon. And the reason why the end I cost is here. He's because the body had been so badly broken about by robbers that the skull is there, but it's in about seven pieces scattered throughout the coffin said. So this resin is like a it's like a mold of the interior of this woman's Brian case, and you can see the Kapila res veins the impressions on that. The residents self is black, but it's teiken on the whiteness of the bone. So it it looks kind of freaky, and you can see the the molding of the head of the top of the spinal. Let sort of stuff. So now, we have to talk about how this coffin and its interiors stuff, the debris was obtained as you say it comes from the collection of Charles Nicholson, can can you tell me a bit about him place Nicholson is an amazing character who had a really important role to play an early colonial style. And I think the Nicholson museum is kind of a legacy that we've got from him, but he's gonna much bigger legacy. So he was born in old England around whippy turns out from some research on my predecessor that it was an illegitimate birth. Although to fairly wealthy family. He doesn't medical degree in Scotland in uniting thirty three gets on a boat and comes out to the colony of Sydney, I think like anyone without dirty washing to Launda the colonies were good place to do that. So he comes out on on the boat of of an uncle of who's by sincerities was a ship's captain was making a lot of money by shipping out the convicts. So Nicholson turns up educated man, charismatic man, very. Bright, man. He's dies soon after you know, shipping accident Nicholson becomes very wealthy, man. And you put all of that together in this new colony, and it really is a recipe for success Nicholson makes the most of it. So one of the things he does is he gets very active in the political landscape. He becomes the one of the first elected representatives on the New South Wales legislative assembly is big land writing Queensland's weed becomes the same thing for Queensland when queens lines created, and he he's one of the founding forces of the driving forces behind foundation of strategies, I university university of Sydney, which opens its tools and acting fifty. And then he thinks that this new university needs a sense of history. And of course, we would say today. Well, you know, this sixty five thousand years of history right underneath but for for someone of Nicholson zeal, that's costing back to the mid of training in Europe. And so you becomes the first vice provost vice chancellor chancellor, and it's an in that role in the adding fifties at fifty seven hundred fifty eight he goes on a trip back. The UK, but he goes Egypt the Nile valley through the telling peninsula, and he he's be shopping shopping spree. What he's cruising up and down the Nile Z. Absolutely. And he's buying antiquities off the market quite deliberately to donate to the university's Sydney. Only condition. They start a museum. A lot of people are doing this on the grand tour of the diaper Nicholson's doing it for very particular reason, a mess to create collection for education, and what was he doing once? He'd bought these things how did you verify them? He was quite a learned scholarly, man. So he would he had a lot of good contacts in the sort of the intellectual the time. He he could read a bit of ancient Hebrew HARA, cliff Hard Livings himself. I'm so he would do a lot of rotting research off his own bat. One of the first things he did with some of the Japan mommy's was before sending them to Sydney actually, ship them from Alexandria up to London to get one of the curator of the British Museum to have a look at them. So I'll first descriptions of. By this iding, fifty nine curator at the British Museum who I have to say now that we're one hundred fifty is on Feb it wrong. But. And then from there they get shipped out to see the end. And this is before the sewage canals have come by the roaring forties. And I think the coughing was also put on its head because all the stuff inside sleep to end.

Charles Nicholson Sydney Nicholson museum Brian British Museum Nana Revista judy cliff Hard Livings Representative Haden vice provost vice chancellor George Nizo Japan Queensland Connie doctor Europe Kapila res veins Nile valley New South Wales
"university sydney" Discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

Monocle 24: Midori House

04:46 min | 1 year ago

"university sydney" Discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

"And the battle for the soul of the Democratic Party will be between the younger so-called progressives who often I think regressive. But that's another argument, the the younger progressives will come up with all sorts of policies. He is not in that category. He's voted with Trump and Trump policies a couple of times, he he's not Radic what passes for radical left in the United States. Whereas you can make argue for one or two of the other people that standing, and if if they really do go full. For a sharp swing to the left with this whole idea that to take on Trump. You don't you don't was it punch, high punch low to take and therefore you swing across and become as radical as he is. But the mirror image in which case x y l said wins it if it's the traditional wing of the party than it. It's it's someone else. So I'm not force centers. I suspect Sounders will come out as people Elizabeth Warren will probably fall away fairly quickly up comes Sanders. We I mean gains. He's a guess with such a long way out, but Santa's comes in sand is not gonna pick a man for his VP in this day and age for the Democratic Party, pick a woman. You capable to please. Don't get me wrong. But he will pick a woman if he gets it Kathleen how how far were otherwise is better. Rox from from the pulse of the Democratic Party in in twenty twenty d think well, it depends on who you're looking at isn't it? I mean, he is he is he's not a radical. He certainly center lift as Tim pointed out quite rightly he voted several times for Trump when he Trump proposals. He's very media friendly. He's got a good family clever. Man, is is a an ace politician. The problem is at will another thing. If course is is midwest in his area, the point is you they have to get the midwest the mid west is where the Senate comes from since every piddling little state gets two senators. You know, it's it's that's the thing. You can you. You can't a White House and congress the house representatives, you can stop things being done. But without the Senate there things you can't get done. So I trust that Democrats. If if they want to knock out the Republicans and Trump do remember that they need more than their urban vote. They need more than those onto the age of twenty seven and they need those that have staying power. You mentioned media. Both the US Washington-based media and all foreign correspondents that live there tend to concentrate on these glittering new shiny types, like better rock, and maybe kissing Jilib. Oh, see, I'm Barrack Obama. And an experience. But no the media tend to concentrate on these shiny glittery ones. Whereas actually out there in the vastness of the United States of America their name recognition is nowhere near as high. As is amongst foreign correspondence finally tonight and staying in America, the news, the delete university campuses may be disproportionately populated by the over privileged and undetected may seem as revelations go akin to discovering a preponderance of Catholics in the Vatican. Nevertheless, the scandal gathering in the US over the wealthy and well-connected scamming the college admission system is astonishing without being necessarily surprising. Federal prosecutors have said that at least fifty people have conspired to ease their offspring into college cheating on exams. Bribing officials and in a few picturesque cases in mid children using Photoshop another such trickery with athletic abilities. They may not have possessed among the university's embroiled. Georgetown, Yale Stanford. And UCLA, I I will state NY credentials right away. I got into the university of Sydney Android out of the university Sydney off Sydney entirely on my own if it's Kathleen drugs involvement. Now, I filed twice actually. Absolutely. So book counsel table. I was invited to leave school at sixteen. They said we think it would be better for Tim and the school if he didn't come back Yata. Being around this. I probably have a halo Berkeley, Oxford chick. Can you do better than that? Well, you therefore have the experience which nor the T more..

Trump Democratic Party Tim United States Republicans Senate Kathleen midwest Barrack Obama Sounders Sanders White House Elizabeth Warren university of Sydney America Sydney Georgetown UCLA VP NY
"university sydney" Discussed on The AO Show

The AO Show

12:09 min | 1 year ago

"university sydney" Discussed on The AO Show

"So they back had the job. Back across back up. Twenty three minutes wars starting from Novak Djokovic Vicks times over champion it into the final again. Hello and welcome to the I'm James Parkinson dates at these drilling open and the men's final is set. No joke bitch face revenue. Dow on Sunday also Sam stars and jank's wait, the women's doubles final on the show today. We have the new hape Halsey has been implemented importantly, we measure the conditions on courtside, and we had two tenths legend Lockwood when you working with someone do you have to show them up most respect. Plus, we preview Saturday's women's singles final. But I all the erection from face semifinal. Never jock pitch defeating Lucas Kwait six love six two six two. Polling win Novak spoke on court about the quality of his apartment and believing himself to get back to an open. Final is definitely one of the best matches ever had this court. Definitely. Everything worked way I've mentioned before the mansion and even more so. Tough one four Lucas, but he had a had a great tournament. And wish him all the best for he definitely has a quality to be top-ten player. We see the occasion is different. There's more Wade layers more importance of the match, and he he's going to get more more of these kind of matches. I'm sure in light of stages of grand slams. And I definitely wishing that highly unlikely twelve months ago that I would be where I am today year later. I've said it before. And I always have plenty of believe in myself. And I think that the cells believe is something that always prevails, and there's been always there was always part of me. And they're still is part of me that believes that I can play this way. So I think that's that's the key. You know, obviously, always relying on on your qualities and trusting the process will turn out the way you wanted to put back across backup. Twenty three minutes wasn't funding from Novak Djokovic. Six times former champion it into the final again. We have to say that neither semifinal was much of a contest. But that we have to domini plays. Ben's tennis. They're going to be in the final twenty nineteen. I'll and open one a climax. We're going to have to this doing. On AM radio twilight, sir today the team reminisced about the career of Pat Cash will be on it at the legends launch on Saturday. He's Bridget khloe, Richard Evans, and Sam Dunkin Pat Cash, I think it's that he's going to be on it because he's part of a straight fight law. When it comes to this, isn't it will he is. He's the winner of the Noni ninety seven Wimbledon Totta, leave eighty von Lindell in straight sets. I was in eighty seven I was four years of age. But you know, I almost remember growing up. It was a story. My parents would tell me they stayed up light an Ozzy had made their way into the Wimbledon final. Of course, the final probably starts about living PM and goes into the early hours of the morning, and I stayed up to watch. And I didn't expect him to win. And it wasn't right supplies NATO. Yeah. Know, they interviewed Linda, laughter woods and said you look a little bit surprised that you lost office. Apprised is Pat Cash is you know. So this was a great story in a strategy and tennis around the same time he was making finals he too he made the seven and I. Final here at the ustralian. I've been lost both in five sets Edberg. And then in the very first year that the tournament was here at Melvin wit down to Mets will end I think it was six in the fifth. And I think it was important. He made the final in the first year Melvin pack. Everybody was very interested in it. And it goes he was a diverse cout warrior to winning two Davis gaps. I think ID three and ninety six one of them. The first two sets went thirty and eleven thirty and eleven against aid Berg, and he won. And so he's very much appreciated play here. Let's look ahead now to the women's singles final on Saturday Petrovka versus Nemea Sokha and Vivus today back controlling knows and facing off against so soccer. You know, it's against Lami do have nerves there and doesn't matter. What happened? You are just. And stress me out when you're at home, and I don't know breakfasting won't ever. So that's how it is. But I don't think it's anything like special. I being into fun to grand slam. But this is a little bit different not playing on the grass. But I think it's it's just from a little bit more special because it's after everything I've been through. So I think it's. It's just different. But I don't think it's like more nervous definitely into play. My best tennis. What I can say. I think now is in fire. She's in very good form. And she's a kind of aggressive player, which I am as well. So I think it will be about who going to take the first point and push a little bit. It's certainly going to be an exciting chip. And further analysis, he's Tim solely with New York Times. Reporter Karen Krause big phone comes up on Saturday on. So what are you? What are your thoughts? I think it's going to be a beautiful final. You have two players are very aggressive. So I don't think you're going to see a lot of long baseline rallies. But I think you're gonna see a lot of beautiful shot making. I think the fans are in for a real treat. Let's look at the two I starting with pitcher, obviously, it's been documented Norfolk Turk in twenty sixteen. She's also had a lot of. Assess at Wimbledon on the garage, but not so much here. These trying open lost big success here in two thousand twelve in the semifinal. But how do you think she's going to go hit tomorrow not since winning Wimbledon for the second time in two thousand fourteen she had participated in sixteen slams without getting to the final. So she talked today. In fact, about feeling really proud of herself. And this run has shown her that she can do it. So the fact that she said that indicates that there was some doubt. And that doubt was growing with every failure to advance farther than the quarter-finals. It would be like Monica Seles coming back and winning here at the Australian Open after being stabbed by the fan on court petro. None of us can imagine what she's been through coming back from fighting off the intruder and having nerve damage in her left dominant hand with. Tonight. We now she's a huge favorite here in a strike Leah is she going to carry over that foam, and she's seen off some big scalps. Would you say game at the moment she's playing so well and seems completely unfazed by pressure expectations. But the thing I'm impressed about Naomi is seems as if she's maturing in front of our eyes as an example last year when she lost the first set she was to nineteen. So she won only twice after losing the first set this year at this tournament. She lost the first set twice and won both those matches. So that tells me that she's really learning to control her emotions and let badge shots and bad points go and just move onto the next point or game. So I think she's going to be really tough in the. Semis. What was really impressive was her serve. She had fifteen aces, which is really remarkable, including the one on match point. But I think she's going to be a really tough challenge for Petra. But I don't see either player dominating this match. I think it's going to be really close. Just enjoy meals e hate down here tonight. Melvin pot Leuven absolutely live in it. I can't always good luck. Alsi summers. Forty degrees is not only. He's like soul hot now. So hot it doesn't feel much hotter than other years that we've been probably because of the shade and the free. So actually wanna guy on the software. Enjoy the evening evening, son. It's good spring day over there in the UK. UK shutdown kinda day. Just lumping it up. So the whether just turning it on. Yeah. I guess you could say that. Yeah. It's been a couple of days in mobile with the new hey polcy coming into effect. Tim solely spoke to all of giant land more about its implementation this summer at Melbourne Park. Muslims only Jay I'm gonna socio professor at the university, Sydney and helping implement the extreme heat policy for the straight open this year. Obviously, a big change this year the policy can you just briefly talk through the changes. Sure. Yes. So this year we helped develop a stress scale which replaced the old WBZ t- policy. So this is basically enabling us to rate the amount of stress that develops or heat stress develops for for the athletes on a scale of one five and then associated with each of those segments, those there's numbers are sitting recommendations, obviously be if you today of of knows in scampering around because the the I I that you've implemented the hey policy at five closing the roof on on the big chords here talk further Diane and making that big coal and. And what what what fall off to? Well, a big part of what we've been doing this year is measuring the on onsite environmental conditions because we know that's quite a lot of their ability between the outs- outdoor courts and stadium courts. So we have to have five measurement monitor's on these sites and stay on top of that is big task every day. But today that was particularly testing because we wanted to be knew that the weather was coming when we wanted to make sure that the the units remained working optimally. And then as the weather warmed up and the humidity remained the same. We started kind of busting through these new threshold. So the highest we got to before today was three point seven, and we kind of got through four pretty quickly and then hit hit five at around about full for clock today would temperatures that we talking about down on court. Well, I think it's important to to to emphasize that things that matter is not just the ambient air temperature. So we measure air temperature in the shade. Which is what is reported by the bureau meteorology. Importantly, we measure the conditions on courtside and the different relative to the bureau. Mitchell g weather station, which just one measurement unit. So we what a lot of differences. So the highest air temperature in the shade that we found today was running about forty three degrees celsius which is a little higher than was reported by the bureau meteorology, but we also measured black globe temperature which takes into account them radiation. And the peak situation that's about thirteen degrees celsius above temperature. It was somewhat humid. So we had a humidity levels run about twenty five twenty six percent, relative humidity with temperature which is quite difficult, and there's a little bit of wind which helped a little bit. But not enough to help the place them regulate appropriately without the assistance of breaks or indeed closing.

Novak Djokovic tennis Lucas Kwait Tim Sam Dunkin Pat Cash UK James Parkinson Mets Halsey Lockwood Monica Seles Melvin New York Times Leah Lindell Mitchell g weather station
"university sydney" Discussed on Sleep With Me

Sleep With Me

05:58 min | 1 year ago

"university sydney" Discussed on Sleep With Me

"A rather suggest. Yeah, is this is a in the recent article in recent article of journal neuroscience youngsters, employ a model based approach using three different economic gains the dictate. So this could be coming up in the season. Dig Jada game, automate him game in the trust game, and each game is one who is just interesting linked to it. To check out very article beyond me article a little bit beyond me. You know, it's a little bit. He's for me to read Wikipedia in this about the Jacksonville Jaguars American professional football franchise and Jacksonville, Florida as they're in the NFL in the AFC cell's division, and they play their games at TI AA Bank field. They joined with Carolina Panthers in his expansion teams for the nineteen ninety five season. They won division championships in nineteen ninety eight nineteen ninety. Nine members of the now defunct AFC central in his twenty seventeen as members of the AFC south of qualified for playoffs seven times most recently twenty seventeen after ten season drought, if from the reception to twenty seven, their owned by Wayne Weaver. See in one thousand nine hundred ninety. Nine hundred eighty nine. A group of touchdown. Jacksonville was gonna trying to get people to bring this thing. See ninety four had Tom Coughlin is a coach of the Jaguars. Let's get to bro. You know, let's get to this. I think we'll talk about Blake Bortles but this is a lot of history. Well, then ahead Jack del Rio. We'll just talk about this year because that's when the present high point two thousand litter twenty thirteen four and twelve. So that's not good. Let's see. In twenty four teen j. were selected Blake Bortles from university of central Florida in murky Salihi for university of southern California. And so then as c. twenty seventeen with twenty of cap space work with Jacksonville's splurged in free agency. Adding defensive tackle John Jackson from Denver Broncos. Like a lot of new players to have ten talents. They fell in the second on the twenty six lactobacillus a be colts in international game. Eh, but then their coach lost ninety games in a row. And twenty seventeen. They said interim coach, Doug Marrone who coach Syracuse university. I think there's going to be the new head coach. And see, Tom Coughlin was going to be like soon executive the when. We fifteen. It'd be detections clinched. I laughing appearance. The b. two Buffalo Bills in their first playoff win than be the Steelers in Heinz field. And then they lost to the patriots. Yeah. So. See the, they like y, let's see their logo silver helmet te'o, gold and silver with black accents other colours gold leaking leaping Jaguar. One of the. Our main dispatcher says too much that's now our logo that looks like logo when our competitors. And. See they figure that out. So is a little bit about him. Great episode of ninety nine PI about Schwartz uniforms mostly about NBA informed should check that out. What about Saint John's couch? Because they never did look it up. It's a Saint John's couch at the university of Sydney or the college of Saint John's evangelist residential college within the university Sydney establish eighteen fifty seven. It's oldest Roman Catholic and second oldest University College in Australia. It's a co, educational community of two hundred and fifty undergraduate postgraduate students. So people probably know Chidi pretty well there. It's a nice small school. It was established as a Benedictine foundation by archbishop polled, ING who had formerly been in English Benedictine month at downside abbey. End of the Bennett, English Benedict ings were prominent in raising public support for the founding of Saint. John's. Let's see the curve to gossip style relic box in chapel. Okay, that's interesting. This is a little bit about it architecture here. It is. In February eighteen fifty nine William Wilkinson Wardell the architect to Saint Mary's cathedral in Sydney and St. Patrick's cathedral Melbourne was appointed the architecture Saint John's college. Say working from for dessert from his designs for Melbourne, grew up

Saint John Jacksonville Tom Coughlin Blake Bortles Jacksonville Jaguars Steelers AFC Jack del Rio John Jackson university of Sydney patriots Carolina Panthers Doug Marrone William Wilkinson Wardell Syracuse university TI AA Bank Wayne Weaver Melbourne downside abbey NFL
"university sydney" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"university sydney" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"And here's another big of cats this with this was my mind hope leave does years as well that even this was even considered to be a problem an arenas had ownership for those of you who may have thought otherwise does not cause mental illness in young people loved we're not there was a story out in a scientific journal a cy college you journal that said that there was a link between catch ownership in young children and sight coast sees as they entered adolescence and i think that's pretty crazy and they're more recent study kind of disprove goal that but i is that amazing that actually somebody thought that that was going to be real that you have to be careful that owning a hat is going to cause you to become crazy i think all contreras having pets are going to stop you from becoming crazy but anyway fortunately this crazy story was discarded and the more recent is that and this is also there's a said fact misses australia place i've never been a tomahawk a list i i'm destined to go when my kids after did or semester braun in now university sydney and shit the best time ever and i was so jealous it you got to go i've never been but honest goes kuala coast they call that were a lot of obviously qualifiers over a what's his sixteen year period from ninety seven to two thousand thirteen there is wasn't eighty percent decrease in call their population and they attributed this to two things everyone some virus especially club media they figure could be or like fires took about i mean the infection of action of action took about half of them but the other quarter of the other half so half of the half cars he's poor quality here's are being hit by cars so for all of you drivers it australia if you know somebody else try to tell the slow down when a driving through the kuala coast that's really set and is also set a given aaron in carroll ten texas i think it's a northern on northwestern part of texas don't don't call me on that basically had to i treated a form of the lhp up for a hair when overdose and fortunately the puck survived is now it was an adoption agency up for adoption to find a new forever home so fortunately.

contreras sydney aaron carroll texas lhp eighty percent sixteen year
"university sydney" Discussed on The Budget Minded Traveler

The Budget Minded Traveler

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"university sydney" Discussed on The Budget Minded Traveler

"I didn't have the big work in the middle and i figured at dusk time of doing that reading books you know picked up some books by richard branson and even studied some interesting concepts computer programming that i had thought of you know just to see what's out there in terms of other fields are other interests set i might have and so i just started doing that and just to see where the that got me and again i was working near still with rachel am what happened was rachel accedes was so inspired by beating people like myself meeting people that she stay with the arab e she said all i wanted to quit my job and moved to australia nice ahead and keeping it yeah yeah so she said okay warm i can do masters program a niche case issues a teacher and she decided she to ply to university sydney university of melbourne and is she got into university of sydney for a program that would start at the beginning of two thousand sixteen now taking well that's interesting if i want this relationship the last i should stick around sydney and so then i acts then i started the and this is about three months after leaving my job i was like okay will maybe i should look for a job just for the sole purpose of sticking around sydney so i certain just going out and having conversation surpri interviewed ten different companies and i was in dot analytics as i said in that pence has set him by ninety second clip and i really didn't want to get back into it because his way too much computer time of sitting around and i didn't want i wanted to be a meeting people because i really like i said i went from a very like introverted isolated person's abuse craving the need to be wrong people in and i can have more personal relationships so i found this company is company i'm working for now they were just stored up at the time so there about six people the cold daughter republican and they're basically again point now where theme all the details what they do.

richard branson rachel accedes sydney australia university sydney university o university of sydney ninety second three months