7 Burst results for "university of Portsmouth"

"university portsmouth" Discussed on I Know Dino: The Big Dinosaur Podcast

I Know Dino: The Big Dinosaur Podcast

01:30 min | 8 months ago

"university portsmouth" Discussed on I Know Dino: The Big Dinosaur Podcast

"The Oh that too and also you haven't seen them in a long time. It's great for Paleo artist. Mark Winstons teaching in New Paleo Art Short Course in March marked for the six called recreating prehistoric animals art and he's teaching in association with the University. Portsmouth there's going to be six lectures a seminar and five practical sessions and the course syllabus is on his site. It says that they're going to be talking about the history of pillow. You are case studies in animal anatomy among many other things. The Courses Gonna work with modern and fossil specimen so for anyone interested. You can book now and and we'll have a link in our show. Notes sounded like an AD. But it wasn't just something that's cool. That's true yeah. Paleo courses are cool and we like mark last the TV show. Dinosaurs is getting funk. Oh pops one for each character in the Sinclair Family Earl Fran Robbie Charlene and the baby. It sounds like there's going to be fun copes of other older. TV shows coming out soon too but this one looks pretty good here. That does sound good. I Really WanNa Baby One god. I haven't even seen it but I know I want you say not the Mama all the time. Yeah but if you can't wait to get those phone go pops and you want some dinosaur merchandise. You can get it from our store. We don't have any figurines but we do have t shirts and lots of clothes as well as like phone cases and notebooks other.

Mark Winstons Earl Fran Robbie Charlene University
"university portsmouth" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

09:54 min | 10 months ago

"university portsmouth" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Microwave. Dinners any good. I don't know I'll forgive me. Kevin and home alone casualty buying groceries. When the scanner in Barcode I arrived on the scene in the mid Seventies? It was pretty futuristic. Laser beam is concealed inside the window. Checkout counter clerk Posey Johnson past the window and the laser is Fox one of those mysterious patches of squiggle engage. It's about the size of the first commercial uses. Were in American supermarkets. And now they're everywhere. That's Deborah Doug Ryan. She's a professor of design history at the University Portsmouth in the UK. The supermarket scanner sped up. checkouts wiped out the need for individual price stickers also befuddled at least one American president and before four long Sug Ryan says the Barcode scanner became part of nearly every commercial interaction. We have tickets when we're pasting postles. It's us so if you go into hospital your bar code. A fixed T.. You said it has this kind of ubiquity which I think is kind of hard to replace. Not It's just hard to replace. Laura's invention completely transformed how businesses operate it really helps the supermarket with the just sticks and supply chain to to make sure that it had the right products at the right time but of course it's also I'm gathering information about us as customers as well so the the stores know what kind of toilet paper we prefer for example. which is the creepy part of Barcodes? And now they are inescapable from the ISB and numbers on books to Qr QR codes. It all goes back to George Laura and his colleagues at IBM in nineteen seventy-three. You may not have heard his name before but his work beeps on. The world's biggest oil producer is going public. The Saudi Arabian Oil Company. Also known as ARAMCO is offering a small percentage of its shares on the market investors vessel can get their hands on the company shares through the Saudi Stock Exchange. Starting tomorrow this will kick off a new era for a company that is state owned and historically very insular. Here's the world's Sharon Jafari. Saudi Aramco is the most profitable company in the world more profitable than Apple Google Walmart and then wall is the author of Saudi Inc.. A book about the History of Aramco and she says it's hard to overstate the company's role. Oh in making Saudi Arabia. What it is today? Aramco is the most important company in Saudi Arabia. In many respects it is the entire reason that Saudi Arabia has become such a wealthy and successful kingdom. ARMCO started out as an American company says well owned by four media Americans America shareholders in nine hundred eighty it was fully sold to the government of Saudi Arabia in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight becoming Saudi Aramco. Which is the company that we know it as today? Today around is worth one point seven trillion dollars that's trillion with a t and he makes most of its money by pumping oil out of the ground and selling it to the rest of us. So why is the crown jewel of Saudi Arabia. Estate owned oil company going public now. Oil production is going to become less and less of an interesting business. Fifth Cornell worked for Amkor from two thousand fourteen to twenty sixteen and is now with the Atlantic Council and the issue for Saudi Arabia. is how quickly can they. Let's say front end their value and tried to leverage their national assets including Saudi Aramco and pump that money into programs that might diversify the Economy Cornell Nelson says realistically global oil consumption is now going to die out completely anytime soon but companies are concerned about long term in prospect of fossil fuels the advancement of things like electric vehicles and other kinds of substitutions for oil mean that demand could start Dr to weaken Even in this decade Crown Prince Mohammad bin. Salman knows this. He has laid out. Plans to reduce the kingdom's reliance on oil real and expand other non oil sectors his pouring money into tourism entertainment and technology. It's not clear exactly where the Saudi Saudi government will invest the money from the Aramco. IPO Says Ellen Wall they do say they want to diversify economy whether or not the sale of shares. There's of Aramco will be able to accomplish. This diversification is a major major question and also a major risk but it's a risk that the Saudis Saudi state is willing to take in. The meantime environmentalists. Are Concerned that money raised in this. IPO will allow the oil giant expand. Dan Patrick mccully is the rainforest action network and Environmental Organization based in San Francisco. He argues are uncle is already already big enough. Ramco is the single largest carbon on the planet study showed that is responsible for emissions of carbon dioxide than anyone else. Last October is study found. That Aramco was responsible for nearly five percent of all global greenhouse gas emissions in the past half century. It produced thirteen million barrels of oil a day in the first half of this year. That's more than four times. What Exxon Mobil produced MacAulay sent a letter to the CEOS of the banks that are involved in Aramco's public offering criticizing their role in the sale? Nine other environmental groups signed it. The banks need to start putting some serious pressure on the fossil fuel industry and that means sandy break clear single by not getting involved if there is a long term in financial future. That's going to be expensive. The planet the banks didn't respond to the letter but McAleese's environmental concerns as well. As Saudi Arabia's human rights records have dampened investors interest in Aramco initially planned to sell three percent of the shares. But now it is. Scaled sailed back to only one and a half percent it also wanted to list its shares on the international stock exchanges looking London or in New York but now the it's only limited to the Saudi Stock Exchange Speaker. Here today. Please join me in welcoming. I mean Nassir. Aramco did not respond to an interview request but at a recent conference in London the company's CEO. I mean Nassir acknowledged concerns about oil oil and climate change without a doubt oil and gas will be here for many decades to come but there can also be no question that climate change is among the most. It's significant challenges facing humanity but Nassar went on to say that governments should come up with a more holistic approach to reducing their carbon footprint. And not just focus on the oil industry. Meanwhile Wall the author of Saudi Inc predicts tomorrow sale will likely push around quote produce more. That's because as a listed company it will want to increase revenue to attract more investors in the future for the world. I'm sharing Jafari if the polls are right. Boris Johnson and his Conservative Party are looking like the clear winners in Thursday's election in the UK the polls as we know can N. B. Wrong so the Tories as Johnson's party members of called have a strategy. They're targeting districts that voted Yes for Brexit and also happened to be traditional strongholds holds for the opposition Labor Party in British political speak. These areas are known as the Labor leave heartlands in recording leak to a news website this morning owning a key Labor Party figure John Ashworth even expressed serious doubts about his own party and its leader. Jeremy Corbyn sort of small town midland off. Aw It's abysmal. Our I mean they don't line Thompson books. They can't stand corporate and Labor's Brexit Brexit Ashworth later dismiss these leaked comments as quote Unquote Banter. But what does it look like. In these small towns. I went to Windy Yorkshire Marco in West Yorkshire to be more specific and a place called Wakefield Rose Oliveira's out in one of these key labour constituencies today. Yorkshire itself is a Rural County the biggest county in England county that has the Yorkshire Moors and people will think of the Bronte sisters and Jane Eyre and all of that and they think of of Yorkshire would also also places like Wakefield real mining towns and mining hubs and in the nineteen eighties when the mines were closed onto the Patrick government. People were very angry and they were Labor supporters up to them but they were very strongly Labor supporters after that because they sold the Conservatives as ruining their local OKLA Konami but today or low. When you got down to the ground there in Yorkshire what was it actually like in terms of the upcoming elections? Well it's interesting. You know we are coming up to. Christmas is terrible time time to be out canvassing. It's also not great weather to be out campaigning. Either again you know the issues. John Ashworth mentioned in the tape there. They it did come up on the doorstep issues of Br exists issues of Jeremy Corbyn dishes of Boris Johnson. But that said I joined the Labor Party on there canvas you give me a little handful of molly fix. Which Labor candidate did you go out with? Mary Craze Labor MP and she's held the seat there for a number of years. So I suspect some of the doors that they were calling to were very specifically labour doors and labor targets and I give you an example. This is one door that we call it on having listened.

Saudi Arabian Oil Company Saudi Arabia Saudi Saudi government Saudi Inc Brexit Brexit Ashworth Saudi Stock Exchange Posey Johnson Labor Party History of Aramco Saudi Arabia. Jeremy Corbyn Saudi Stock Exchange Speaker George Laura Sharon Jafari UK Ellen Wall Cornell Nelson
"university portsmouth" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

In Defense of Plants Podcast

14:53 min | 1 year ago

"university portsmouth" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

"Check out their episode on plant podcasts so I don't WanNa keep you from this. Let's jump right into it without further ado travel back in time with me and Dr Sam heads to discuss amber all right. Dr Actresses Heads Welcome Hello. How are you pretty good. How are you great. Thanks so much for sitting down with me very welcome pleasure so let's start with who you are. Tell us about what you do and no were you. Were you held from. I come from the northeast of England. Originally I the University Portsmouth in southern England in Paleo. I did my undergrad degree in paleobiology and then my PhD Insect Paleontology and I came over here in the to the US in has nine as opposed to here. I've been here since the must've liked They can't do it all yeah. No that's awesome so paleontology. I was a foster kid growing up. It's not too hard to imagine how someone gets into that but what was kind of your journey for so I was really really young when I when I first got into to hustles like five or six I was walking with my dad on the coast in Northumberland and I find a a a rock with a snail shell in it and it was really similar to the snails the you know you would find in the back garden auden down on the beach or whatever but he was totally encased inside a piece off so confused as to why so I asked my dad I said what what's this you know and he said well that's a fossil. Gel Any expanded its the romance of over millions of years ago and and I was so sort of blown away by the as a little kid yeah that I've been hooked ever since and you know my my. My parents were very supportive supportive. They bought me all kinds of books of fossils and dinosaurs and all that kind of stuff old every kate. Isn't it hard so so so yeah. I had the whole dinosaur thing going on but yeah I was. I was just hoped by this idea of ancient life ag might discover things by inch in life and that's always been a passion of mine and so when I when I came up through high school I took as many I knew what I wanted to do. Now I want you wanted to be a paleontologist and so I I took all the necessary classes lots of science lots of math like anything and then I I applied to post put the university posters have one of the only ed undergraduate paleontology no programs and so I was one of the few places where I could actually studying painting sold as an undergraduate. I'm pity intelligence. Come into painful as you from a You know a stretch yielded. You've upgraded or biology background. a lot of people do these kind of double. midget type of degrees weather do jobs you but you know this was an opportunity from this study paleobiology as undergraduate and then it just kind of led led led me into. Grad school here says his later arrested history up It's interesting it's rare. I think to find approach program like that. They can just like jump. Start you right out of the gate and just keep your head in that game and it was a it was a great great program. You know I mean you know it was really correa an in-depth kind of will wind inch failing to and and you know it was a wonderful place to study to posted stand on this on the coast England yes the Iowa that has lots of geology and paleontology there varies area. You know like you could head over to the ISLA white you know for the Dan and going find dinosaur bones Dan on the beach album then you. It's a really good place to study to playground for pilion areas. He's here not far away from Dulcet to lodge sequences address it. Ross Dawson packed full of ammonites and stuff analogies. Gra Gra seems to be a big instagram these Elia Hamre open the when I was a kid when I was a kid I spend a Lotta time on the Yorkshire Coast where they also have a very thick sequence of tross across that kind of thing that that I really got into as house teenager. you know the the such a phenomenal dusty. US team says he useful group of fossils for sure him intensifies take effect in dating rocks kind of like lining up where it occurs when it it's Danica nominees are really good. What we call index fossils they will tell you. What age of rock is now see? If you find sentence be season season in a certain bed of rocks than you know have revealed that unit is so when you try to correlate it sequences of rocks across different different geographic places you might you might have a sequence of Ross and at times on the coast in the North and then twenty thirty miles safe. You have another sequences talks. YOU WANNA try and Carlisle those sequences than you know you can use these index fossils to do and so I was really fascinated by the idea that you could use fossils not just to understand ancient life financial diversity but also to solve geological problems variable which which is Kinda Eddie cool too. I like those sort of connective threads because it does sometimes feel like you kind of get into something and it's just that little field and you stay in that lane and you don't deviate much than appreciating the bigger pictures. How much more can it bring to the table for other aspects of not only this field but broader kind of investigations and college is really interesting. It can be considered a branch of biology because you know you're looking at Muslims but it's also a branch of geology in terms uh-huh of like I mentioned using it to Seoul geological problems Dan and geological questions and so it has this this sort of tandem. If you look at the history of penny has this conversation Avenue Lucien it it it's like a marrying of violence net and that's really cool to yeah and that's I mean in terms of this podcast in terms of people that I wrote the circles. I run and I mean those two fields. They're so intertwined. It's so important and that's that's our origin story right. I'm GonNa his the how we got here. No matter what happens you're taken to that but speaking of avenue avenues I mean we're in your office Ron. I'm looking around. There's a lot of insect pictures and books down snuff. So where did that switch happened to me. What what brought insects into this world of paleontology for you while I was always interested in insects as a kid to and my granddad he's a a really avid fly fisherman and so he used to study insects quite closely sleep because he ties his own flies portrayed fishing is and so he would collect sex to look on them said sort of mimic their that body that will follow not to make a sufficient and so he told me we sufficient all the time and he told me all of the different groups of musty aquatic insects and like we would sit collect how does fly Lavi lava passes Dan in the in the the Ponson and and things like that where we would fish and so I learned a little bit insects and other arthropods have just really interested in author blood since he's now a lot a lot of kids when I have my dinosaur office kids get into paleontology with his they're interested in dinosaurs missile my interest by the time I was in high school was very much focused author pulse. I was modified trial of ice. I've always been interested in in spiders insects nice and so when I got to the University Portsmouth as an Undergrad I was fortunate enough to work with Dave martill Um when he was a prominent paleontologist in the UK and he works on a on a deposit in Brazil cold across omission which is a unique cretaceous take pretentious insectivores his what we call a lavish stop which is a jemison roughly translates into bonanza. which is you know this? Is this idea that this these are exceptional hustle to pass with soft tissue preservation as who is the big thing yeah and these logs stanton. are usually the the the deposits while you find fossil insects. I'm because insects generally pretty soft and indicate very quickly and so you have these exceptional opposes and he had a large collection of fossil insects from the cremation and so I- managed to of Mary my two separate interesting and sexy paleontology by working on on these fossil insects and I was given you know give me the opportunity to work on these vestments and I just as an undergraduate a new species nice some of a blessing from mission that would beautiful color pattern preservation wild wings and so I was really lucky in that I got back. research experience is is to publish a payback and under that's rare which you know was I actually I actually undergraduate of this three times which you know it's just really lit up fire. The you know fossil insects with the way I wanted to to go and then when I did my PhD also impulse with the Dave. I spend a Lotta Time Crato formation specifically on options grasshoppers crickets which are my specialism cool and so you know I it was just regret opportunity for me and it just kind of linked to begin trust in my life excellent. That's a really cool trajectory and it's really heartening for people to hear that you can mary Mary meeham creative with it and you find the right kind of avenue in right so fast forward a few years you're here in Illinois and we were connected because now you're working on amber. Yes I am and that's really exciting because a I grew up loving drastic park ever made famous the world doesn't Traffic Asoka. It shouldn't be listening to the show. They don't just kidding. Please subscribe but you know Amazon credible. Is it a fossil. I mean it's it's obviously old right. I mean let's start at the beginning like what is amber so a lot of people say Abbas fussell sap tree sap. It's not I knew it. It's not sack Zack. It's resin okay so you know plants produce. lots of different plants produce resin and amber is if fossil resin so you know the plants exude resin. Nobody's really show why yet do that but you know there are various ideas that it has protective role you know in sealing woods on trees pine trees. If you walk a pine tree with a machete you will get a lot of resin horrid wound and and so their ideas that it might you know help help with that they're also there's also some evidence that centene types of insects are attracted to resin and so there is this kind of mysterious why why ponts really produce resin of the do and it becomes fossilized so that's kind of interesting because a lot of people recognize that the insects and punch on some things that have preserved in offals but it's it's kind of neat to think of. Albert's self is a foreign material yet so also resum right because I think when people think fossils they want to see that sort of compression or zooms or trace fossils something there but to think of here's a substance. That's often millions of years old. That's has been preserved. I mean is it. It's not a rock right not rock now in how it's still fossilized yes to the extent and you know it's considered in sort of jewelry are- industry is a gem okay but it's not a stone at all. It's a fossil resin and it. It's one of a series of different fossil resins. You know they're awesome. Cool sub the fossil resins which I think is like coble which I'll you know sometimes cold young Abba It's basically not completely cross plumbers tends to be very a young couple of hundred years to acclimatise okay it also has fossil insects and it's like a fist stage and in becoming amber okay but Albert self is is totally cross polarized and it was really interesting as you can tell the difference between Ambrym Copa just by dipping in a finger in little acetone and rubbing it on the surface I'm but does not become tacky but cope will becomes talking so reverts a day off. Some yeah resumes so it's it is crossed baller marriage. It's going through some sort of chemical change. It's preserved at for this amount of time. That's fascinating. So where does one look for amber. I mean is this something then I can go out in Illinois or in California or there is actually from Illinois. I'm from the Pennsylvania from the coal deposits while I I think the specimens come from from the line was done again at from a mind it's very very oldest cabinet frus yeah several hundred million years old but doesn't honey pot holes in it is very tiny little pieces yeah and so but it is one of the oldest Abbas but there are a various deposits that a famous for having amber around the world and various an edgy usually from you know relatively young of attentively knees dangling too early to mid Cretaceous Age Bemis Zomba's very famous lots of the mid Cretaceous one hundred million years old the and it's fascinating through interesting organisms preserved in the posted. I'm working on a on a Pepino describing a new family of both upturn insights sites and then unlike anything you know alive today. Tony Wacky it usually pictures after the alternate yeah thank you but those those interesting because very old young there there is some cretaceous. There's participant from just on under there are some time of from southern England on the white an an you know this bowl Tampa which is super fans here about the viable eligible to Cameroon line and it's often used in making jewelry and it has being from linear the Romans used to Maglis Jewelry Amel in fact Ombu NBA was at at sentence journ history. The Romans considered ammo valuable than Google Dang and so it's it's got a long history you know human but Baltimore's Eocene Isabey forty five to fifty minutes and then of course there are a Dominican Abba which is what we have an awful lot.

England Dan Illinois US Ross Dawson University Portsmouth Abbas fussell Albert Dr Sam Gra Gra Seoul Northumberland Amazon Google correa Tony Wacky Ron Mary Lavi lava Cameroon
"university portsmouth" Discussed on KNSS

KNSS

15:42 min | 1 year ago

"university portsmouth" Discussed on KNSS

"And if you want to send an Email have added the addresses elrushbo at. At dot. US? Okay. From the light-hearted. Well, I say lighthearted, it's not really light hearted. It's not it is. It's it some of it's humorous all of it instructive. Bob McNair, the owner of the Houston Texans passed away on Friday. I believe I only met him one time in the golf course didn't know him at all. He had been battling melanoma. And I think we came here for twenty years and two or three years ago. I thought that he had gone into remission. It was cancer free. But he succumbed to the disease. We was anyone who is genuinely self-made guy. He arrived in Houston. It was born in Tampa arrived in Houston with seven hundred bucks in his his a true story. He got the Houston during a day. They were having a like a celebration of Houston one hundred years ago. He got the Houston, and there were covered wagons and horses in the streets. And he thought my God, he called his wife and son. I don't know if this is the place for us. I don't see any cars here. It literally shown up during a rodeo week. Anyway, he went on to lose a lot of money in the trucking business make a lot of money and other businesses and ironically, his fortune came he he created company called co gen which basically found power plants around the country and combine their output that he controlled and he sold them for a billion and a half dollars to Enron. When Enron still had a billion and a half dollars. And he used seven hundred million of that. To by the Houston Texans. This is after bud Adams had moved the Oilers out of Houston for Tennessee. Because he couldn't get a new stadium built bobbling. There was able to get a stadium built became quite the philanthropist gave away five hundred million dollars various foundations over the course of his life. He and his wife and his family. So when it came time for the obituary. In houston. You know what they did? They ticked off the Republican groups to whom he donated as though donating to Republican made him a devil donating to Republican causes and Republican candidates made Bob McNair. A bad guy. The guy was one of the great philanthropists of the city. He brought the National Football League back to Houston after the Oilers left for Tennessee. He was not a bad guy. He was not a flamboyant. Personality. He he did not make everything about him didn't run around hoping it everything revolved around him. He was just a just a guy that was born to nothing in made his fortune and lost the fortune. He did over and over here. But he's a self made guy and he happened to be a conservative. And so that's what was noted. In local obituaries. In Houston, local CBS affiliate thought, it appropriate to itemize his latest political contributions. While speaking of his death. When big time Democrats Di do you see obituaries of all the left wing causes? They donated to as though there's something suspicious about it. I mean, I'm talking legitimate snark here. Legitimate snark. Simply because he donated to Republican and conservative causes. And that's all they wanted people to know about him. People that didn't know much about Bob McNair. That's all the local Houston media wanted people to know about it. Now, why would that be well when you know who runs the media, and when you know what the objective of the media is the answer kind of explains itself. This is despite the fact african-amer African American mayor of Houston, lionised McNair. Praised him to the hilt. Born in South Carolina, by the way. I just it's just a an indication of of where we are in the partisan divide in this country is such that a great man who did a lot for his sivy. Is demonized at his death simply because he was a friend of George H W Bush donated to Republican causes a big golfer, by the way to. A professor in Ohio. Is so wing over a transgender pronoun flap. This is about a story at shawnee state university in Portsmouth Ohio philosophy. Professor nNcholas Meriwether ran into a problem last year, one of his students, a male who identifies as a female insisted the professor refer to him as ma'am instead of sir. The professor disagreed and offered a compromise. You know, what I'll call you by your name. That didn't go over. Well. The student sued claiming he was being disrespected entreated less than human. What do you think the school did? The school took the student's side. The student was male identified as female wanted to be addressed as ma'am instead of, sir. The professor offered. A compromise suggested calling the student by his name rather than agree to address him by an inaccurate pronoun. You are not. Sir. Now, according to the Kansas City star and a student threatened to have the professor fired. If he refused and went on to alert school officials university officials told the professor he had to use the transgender pronouns and said that he had created a hostile environment for the distressed student. Now, the professor hasn't yet been fired, but he has sued officials from the university now the professors seeking damages claiming his first amendment rights are violated. So the news is that the guy hasn't been fired yet, but he's being pressured by the school in the fall in line with the transgender agenda trans gender agenda, which has led us to a tweet that I shared with you last week eastern Michigan university canceling all performances of the vagina monologues. Or if you miss this one folks Waleed here lis- eastern, Michigan. You'll canceling all performances going forward the vagina monologues because not all women have the genus anymore. And it's insulting to transgender females who don't have vaginas because they haven't had the chopping off me operation. And until that happens that you can't sit there cancelling the production. The feminazi is behind the production or cancelling it. That's the transgender agenda. And there are other. Aspects. What is the percentage of the population? We're talking about here. Like one half of one percent tops. But it has an agenda, and it is being bowed down to by shawnee state university. Portsmouth, ohio. Now, folks, I made mention last week of a story about Mars, and I had a couple of updates to it the story last week on Mars was that a bunch of millennial. Tech bloggers were livid at Bill Nye the science guy, who by the way, they consider to be a God. He's second only to Neil degrasse Tyson. Neil degrasse Tyson is the heir to Carl Sagan and millennial people young millennials who think they too are scientists because they care about climate change and write about technology. They leaguer scientists to them Bill Nye who does not is not a scientist. He's a TV performance wears a white lab coat. He's not a scientist never has been. But he has a TV show called Bill Nye the science guy where he tells it'll five and six year olds why water is wet and why it's hot and why it's cold. And so forth. It's considered great. Great science show. Bill Nye the science guy happened to tell a bunch of people that the idea of colonizing Mars is ridiculous and impossible. Hey, we can ever get there be. We couldn't live if we did get there. Because a there's nothing debris there. There's no food there, and there's no shelter that it's not possible on the other Elon Musk is outselling trips to Mars for two hundred thousand dollars. So these young millennials scientists think the only way they can save themselves as to go to Mars. Because the earth is not going to be around very much longer because of climate change. I'm not making this up the kids really believe this. So when Bill Nye came out and told them that colonizing Mars is impossible. They turned on him with a rage and hatred. Like, you can't believe. Because they believe colonizing Mars or a passing astronaut their asteroid. Maybe the only chance they have to live beyond the age of sixty. It's kind of a shame really when you get down to what I mean. This many young skulls full of mush have really bought this. But it's their problem. It's not ours. Unless they make it hours, which they're trying to do by changing every imaginable American policy, they can while the update on this comes from NASA. It turns out that NASA does not want to believe this. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration, which is the agency that got us to the moon in ten years. You realize we couldn't get to the morning a hundred years if the order were given today. Because of all the Iraqi and all the cancer and all the risks. And all that we want to never the fact that we did this looking back on it is stunning compared to the roadblocks and obstacles in our way today but net, and this is an example. Nasa doesn't want to go to Mars, even if we could. A story from another tech blog found a blogger from undertake one found a story involving a. An official at NASA happens to be the library of congress chairman in Astro biology. Her name is Lucienne Walker wits. And she had a recent panel discussion at the library congress on going to Mars instead NASA doesn't want to go. You know, why? Because it would not be right. It would be colonizing Mars. It will be an extension of American colonialism to go to Mars, and we're not gonna do it America is so impure America has such filth for fingerprints America has been so mean to people around the world what we have colonized along with the Brits that we are not going to go to Mars and do the same thing. She actually said I can't give you an example of what a decolonized Mars looks like, but it starts by having multidisciplinary conversations about the things that happen here on earth. I often give examples of standing rock as an earth based example of interest colliding where you have indigenous people opposing a large scale project that much like space expiration features cooperation between private industry and the government. So she was asked a question. Well, what is d? Colonizing Mars mean to you. The NASA official. I'm trying to think carefully about what our relationship to Mars should be and whether we can avoid reproducing, deeply entrenched, colonial behaviors as we seek to better understand our solar system. This includes thinking about why our language for developing understandings or environments that are new to us tends to be colonial as in colonizing Mars as in exploring Mars as in developing Marzel. Those are three dirty words. We call them is the Merrick. We developed America we explored America. And we ruined it. We took it away from the Indians, we took it away for the native Americans. We destroyed the North American content in these people's minds. And so we can't do the same to Mars. So we're not going. I am not making this up. We can't go to Mars, even if we could because we're such Ryden people that we would colonize the place and take it away from the martians, and we would steal the marshes resources from them and use them ourselves. They don't wanna be left with some casinos now. And then and that would be do you believe this? If these people were in charge of NASA back in the nineteen sixties, we would've never we would the moon would still be on the drawing board. I'll tell you. These people are hilarious, but they corrupt literally everything now Elon Musk one more story has found himself in a new controversy. And this is from by the way, another tech blog. As Mars colonization inches ever closer to becoming a reality. Oh as Mars colonization inches ever closer to becoming a reality. What happened to Bill Nye the science guy gets ever got him? Some people have argued that the ability to afford a ticket to Mars is a luxury afforded only to the wealthiest billionaire. Elon Musk has said that it'll run potential Mars inhabitants, traveling with his company, SpaceX hundreds of thousands of dollars to get there. But in a new interview musk rebuffed the assertion that a one way ticket to Mars is easy ticket out from words..

Mars Houston National Aeronautics and Space Bill Nye Bob McNair Houston Texans professor shawnee state university US Elon Musk cancer official Ohio golf Michigan scientist Tennessee Oilers Neil degrasse Tyson dot
"university portsmouth" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

06:28 min | 2 years ago

"university portsmouth" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"And this episode is brought to you by BYU TV's relative race. Glad to have you along. In fact, coming up at about nine minutes. We're gonna be talking to the host of relative race. Dan, Devon ham because the series starts again season four this weekend on BYU TV. So join us for that. And then a little bit later on in the show. We're going to be talking to DNA specialist. Diane, southern and she's going to talk about ethnicity reports and DNA how much can you rely on them? How much more reliable will they get? There has been some news in the ethnishity department this past week you're going to want to hear about as well right now. Let's head off to Boston and talk to my good friend, the chief genealogist of the New England historic genealogical society and American ancestors dot org. David Allen Lambert. How are you? David. Awesome. I got this incredible Email from a listener named Laura and she's given me permission to share this. And I want to get your take on it. And I'll tell you what I told her about this. She said I have a mess to fix let me start, and you might want to take notes as I share this story. Yup. Get your flow chart. Okay. My mother was raised in a small West Virginia town where most everyone knows everyone. Moms closest brother was John he dated to of moms girlfriends, Lori and Lizzy World War Two came and like, many enlisted Lizzy was his closest girlfriend, but Lori was his buddy when he got home he discovered Lizzy had married. A local boy named will. He also found. Laurie had married and divorced Bob during this time period. Well, John married, Lori and agreed to raise her son. They ended up with three more kids a daughter and two sons Lizzy and will had five kids skip forward to twenty eighteen and DNA a few cousins, and I have DNA test results out on several sites ancestry family, tree DNA twenty three and me and jed match we come up with a new first cousin. It seems that Lizzie and will second son is biologically Lizzy and. John's. Yeah. This new cousin just thinks the test is wrong. I don't have the heart to tell him. I know for a fact that John and Lizzie were deeply in love. So I get the brilliant idea to pay to have my youngest cousin John and Lori son tested thinking that this new cousin will see he has half siblings out there. Well, talk about a shock when the results came in that Lori and John's youngest son was not John son. What do I do? Should I continue to keep my mouth? Shut. Do. I do DNA test on another of Laurean John's kids and John's youngest son that I tested said he has no interest in genealogy to top it off Laurie and John's daughter dated. What is now known by me to be Lizzy John's, son half, sister and half, brother. Any advice would be greatly appreciated? Sounds like genetic counseling. One a one. That is definitely an interesting one. You know, we all have these stories that happened in our family, and as you well know last fall, I got the surprise and delight that I have a half sister. And now, I'm delighted have Donna and my family and her son, Matt, but I also have it in my dad's side, I said to him one time, you know, you don't look a lot like your brother. And he said, well, he's not my brother. I said what? And I found out that my grandmother in fact, had four children with another man after my grandfather was out of the scene. They were never married. However, the DNA has proven it definitely. The on off. But the better part is they have a Mayflower line. Very nice. DNA now is revealing the secrets from even a century or longer ago. And that's the amazing thing. What I told Laura was my feeling was what Socrates is basically taught all the medical world. I do no harm. If the one doesn't want to know and the other doesn't want. I don't know that it's her job necessarily to lead them to water just because it's the truth because having gone through this myself having helped somebody discovered that their father wasn't their father. It's painful, and I'm not going to be really anxious to do that. Again. I think they'll eventually figure it out because more DNA tests will come out that will cause questions to arise and they'll they'll figure it out from there. But wow, what a mess. Yeah. It's pretty amazing. What you can find with DNA the surprises await all of us. All right. Let's let's get onto some family. He's to our news here real quick, David. What do you have? Well, this one is a presidential type of thing. But it has nothing to do with what's going on in the White House. It's what went on in the White House years ago. There were actually a small group of people part of the presidential descendants who had their first ever summit. So from people, including the grandchild of Dwight, D Eisenhower the grandson of Grover Cleveland to great grandson of teddy Roosevelt. But how about the grandson of president John Tyler? Yeah, he has a living grandson, a president was born in the eighteenth century has living grandson, that's all they have shared stories. Some of them have memories of being in the White House has children, and it's a great way of connecting. This small unique group of people my bloggers spotlight this week shines on someone out in the UK. And it's actually not a person, but it is a university. Portsmouth that actually has program where they're researching the railway accidents of Arlanda in the UK. This is a website tippy reached out railway, accidents dot port dot AC dot UK, documenting all the railway accidents in a railway death. So check out that blog across the pond. And then it's fascinating to me because I'm actually the survivor of a fatal train crash back in nineteen Seventy-three. Crazy. I think you need to start an American version everything I don't have time. I don't have time. I just wanted to give a shadow to my good friends family history. Fanatic stubby their guest on September twenty second two thousand eighteen odd. Hubble Jen dot org. I'll be part of the conference with Cami tipplers Parrilli. Melanie, McComb Intesa Kiel where we do back to research. Econ? Delighted to be guests of Devon and Andy again, humble, Jen dot org. It's September twenty second. Well, that's all I have from any h yes this week..

Laurean John Lori Lizzy David Allen Lambert White House John son Laura BYU Laurie John Tyler ethnishity department West Virginia Diane Boston dot UK Econ Cami tipplers Parrilli UK Dan
"university portsmouth" Discussed on The Tom Leykis Show

The Tom Leykis Show

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"university portsmouth" Discussed on The Tom Leykis Show

"A piece about how was small restaurants are not necessarily very happy about valentine's day number one the all the tables are used for couples who can't get a big party in there right right true secondly the cobbles seemed to hang around with way to goddamn long's though turnover right that hurts to let her ntt's end of day sales yeah so in you what they do is they got a the the hire more people to come and help with the big crowd but then you know it's just a bunch of people less they're not talking and it of trying to be romantic and they should doesn't work in you know they do the another little thing near they do that the menu said were the young have different our prices for the are a fix prices i forget the french way of saying for example whatever shore and that hoped that that way uh the the the sawake staff basically can't like up sell you it's even going on higher prices it's like here they are let's roll gulf right and finally here's the study that got me worked up although it wasn't intentional it's a study regarding of people who ride horses as specifically women and what they complain about in a apparently they're not happy with the bras other big titid chicks a very very embarrassed about riding horses because uh tits bouts too much right well i hate the taliban that that in their asses exactly like the hogan this is the point i think more importantly the story a while the study specifically led by university portsmouth thing i which is a good school by a girl named madaka janney i she just wanted a design broz internet sheets looking at all these different things and i i don't know what she came up with an idol i ate the taliban that's exactly the light rain extra roper footage fight the thieves well i'd like to offer my sis the horses of data that who will definitely.

taliban hogan valentine
"university portsmouth" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"university portsmouth" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Will they moved armed guards and then the four policemen or soldiers people are worried that they'll be an escalation but certainly initially if there's a heart border it will not work on the bus was denny's murray speak into monaco's res james and finally on today's broke from fossil sources the oldest known and sisters of humanise of being on earth in the united kingdom let's get the latest on these we've talked to chris smith who is from the naked scientists us team bruce university greece aims to help the public understand the science so greece could you start by explaining bulls exactly has been discovered well this is a discovery from the south coast of england from dostam bay by researchers at the university portsmouth broad smith is one of those researchers and he was doing a thesis where he was looking at some ancient rocks which date from about one hundred and 45 million years ago and wall came out of these rocks were smooth teeth and these teeth did not bear any resemblance to things known to exist imro said this age because we know that these source of teeth come from mammals free ancient and sisters of el type of organism not coldblooded things like dinosaurs so immediately the researchers were interested because they thought we've got these unusual discovery of rocks much older than previously you we had teeth from mammals in and we hadn't samples existing of this little time before so they immediately them began to investigate and they sink well they have here is potentially some of the oldest existence or the oldest evidence of the existence of mammals warmblooded creatures back in history host us all these change our understanding of the human evolution.

denny james greece dostam bay imro murray chris smith 45 million years