11 Burst results for "university of Copenhagen"

"university copenhagen" Discussed on This Week in Science

This Week in Science

02:43 min | 3 months ago

"university copenhagen" Discussed on This Week in Science

"Research. Center where you have to. You have to carry a gun. If you leave the facility at have a rifle I, knew because polar bears are omnipresent. As well as The temperatures in this this sort of Arctic. have been increasing at one point five degrees. Decade. Throughout this same for your period, this is inclusion has published in nature climate change. According to voice of Yen's houseware Curson, our analysis of Arctic Ocean that we have been. Underestimating Rate, of increases in atmosphere nearest you the sea level, which is clearly caused the ice. Sei's disappear faster than we had intimidated. He's a professor, the University Copenhagen. You'll board institute one of the researchers. Study. So. Basically she smoking while you got people if they don't get you the global warming. Yes. Yes. It's over. Over Yeah last week. Was it the Greenland Ice Sheet? There's a report. It's pretty much even if we stopped climate change right now the melting of Greenland's ice sheet is just it's on its way it's it's not it's not accumulating enough snow anymore. So it the amount it loses it's no longer making backup in snow. So everything about this it's it's pretty easy math I'm I'm not the I'm not a mathematician by any stretch of anybody's imagination my thirteen year old daughter is way better matheny. But a one degree. Per Decade versus a one point five degree. day seems like a fifty percent higher number. Which means the estimates that we had that were based on, and these are the PPC old estimate that has been picked apart. This is the highest end of. Warming trends based on carbon is already taking place. Now, not into the future when we were talking about windows, hot work could get to it's already seeing warming. That's associated that because the warming isn't happening. Evenly in it's not happening how we thought it was. Planes why the every every week we could do a story about how isis disappearing faster than predicted.

professor Arctic Ocean Greenland matheny Yen Sei Arctic. University Copenhagen
"university copenhagen" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

08:28 min | 10 months ago

"university copenhagen" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"Anton. That'd take some more of the other stories making news in science this week with the Science report any study is founded association between people consume oriented soy products like Mazo Netto and a low mortality rate. However the findings were reported in the British Medical Journal has shown no such association for non-fermented soy products like Tofu and soy milk the authors warned? That won't win. Nearly Ninety three thousand participants in the study. They findings should still be treated with caution. That's because they couldn't control for factors. Lexus you economic status certain certain diseases and the possibility that the people who committed soy products also eat more fruits and vegetables and you study claims kids. Rice snacks axe found in Australian supermarkets contain ask NIC levels above European safety guidelines side has found that seventy five percent of rice based products tested at concentrations of Agnich that exceeded a you guidelines for safe rice consumption for babies and toddlers. You can read the study in full in the international journal Title Environmental Research and public health well every Australian nose to slip slop slap sunscreens over themselves to protect from dangerous. UV Rays from the sun new study reported in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Wounds that sunscreen chemicals being absorbed through the skin and making their way into the bloodstream. The finding showed that the levels of active ingredients being absorbed exceeds. US Food and Drug Administration thresholds. Scientists tested six six of the main active ingredients. In lotions sprays and comfort of sunscreens finding the quantities of active ingredients discovered in the blood with being the FDA will require additional additional safety studies. Youth say the findings don't mean people should stop using sunscreens but that more research is needed to figure out the significance of these liberals in human blood. These findings follow recent studies. Showing significant levels of micro-plastics microbicides were found in sunscreens as well as cosmetics and toiletries and these micro beads and micro-plastics were ending up polluting the environment oceans. Chinese scientists have designed the coating that could be used on cell offense to help keep them cool on hot days in the same way. People do by sweating L.. Sounds pretty gross. But the phone sweat would be simple water vapor to hopefully be considerably less offensive than human bio a report in the Journal. JEWELL claims the new sweaty system could prevent overheating without the need for bulky and hungry fans and it could replace the inefficient waxes and fatty acids manufacturers currently used to keep devices cool the researchers claim the swift fund will be ten times more efficient and we use metal. Organic frameworks capable of storing large amounts of water making them hastings. Scientists have released the cracking. We'll lease the cracking just genetic code. The giant squid attitudes stocks as being the stuff of legend for centuries the infamous see Munster looking down in the abyss this and then striking suddenly without warning snatching sailors from ships and dragging them down into the deep doc the giant squid usually resides at depths around twelve hundred meters. They really have a cited and have never been caught and kept a lifelong. Want you if you have been caught in fishing nets or washed up on beaches pods a niche links thirteen maters and weights of more than nine hundred kilograms but little else is known about them their biology even even how they reproduce is still largely a mystery. One of the problems has been getting good quality. DNA available samples have originated from decomposing squid with elevated levels levels of ammonia and preserved informal or ethanol and that's Mitt poor genetic DNA sequencing and that's within you samples come in and lies by researchers from the University Copenhagen. They came from freshly frozen tissue collected by fishing vessel near New Zealand by sequencing and noting that you know scientists hub to unlock some of the giant on squid secrets such as its growth rate. It's age and how gets to be scarily. Big scientists have discovered that the giants squids genome has an estimated two point seven billion pairs. That's ninety percent the size of the human genome wall. Syphilis pods have many complex and elaborate features have evolved completely lately independently of vertebrates so by comparing the genomes scientists can explore with us if the pods vertebrates built the same way or differently will she can't budget for family. She's not much good at Fetish shopping herself to blend away those age related crow's-feet channy got into show business thanks as to offend the connections. and Oh yeah. She still shoot a scientific products as alternative health and wellness treatments. I of course referring to sometime actress and fulltime Tom Wu entrepeneurship Gwyneth Paltrow who has a new series on that flicks based around the products and services through good outlets cupid by extension engine. Paltrow have drawn massive criticism over the years but showcase expensive products and promoting medically and scientifically impossible treatments many of which have harmful awful consequences. In fact Paltrow was recently forced to agree to pay one hundred forty five thousand dollars into Consumer Protection Lawsuit Settlement and Refund customers of unproven proven claims about the so called health benefit of inserting egg-shaped stand in the vagina allegedly to cultivate sexual energy clear. Cheap pathways in the body intensify Safai femininity and invigorate lifeforce. Now all that came after the WHO website was slammed by doctors and medical health experts for recommending that women steam gene cleaner. The Jonah's for extra energy to rebalance female hormones and for squeaky clean uterus. Then this paltrow's dangerous coffee enema device and have a Jonah candles. It's all very strange. Tim Mendham from Australian. Skeptic says Lifestyle website is infamous for recommending trade instead instead of letting the bunked and Austrian skeptics concerned. That Netflix is now promoting. It has been to land for number map promoting the group libel and the group shops and on that sort of thing entitled cleansing products giant eggs to be inserted to health Highly dubious highly dangerous all sorts of things all the way to suck Q.. He was in People talking to the data center runs the whole Gamut Miami Alternative Medicine Quack Medicine. Definitely Netflix is putting on a limited series. I think it's been a six hundred hundred series theory school the Group lab with his basically promoting everything that She's been talking back and it's pretty upsetting to say that. Netflix is blindly promoting the nonsense which is dangerous. It's been very popular in the states. What does that say about people when they prepare to buy these products? Even though there's actually no medical evidence that they work okay and effects the evidence is some of them are actually dangerous. Very dangerous I think part of the issue is It's actually Glenis. And the why products represented vary thanks looking packaging very sort of classy looking promotion etcetera Gwyneth theirself. He's an attractive person. It's not like some sadie person selling stuff down road. You know. Indulge e shop. This is highly professional professional promotion. And obviously there's a lot of people who have more money than Samson happy to then pick it up whether it's disposable income they want to spend whether it's a fun thing whether it's a glamorous thing whatever it does say a lot about the people who completely full go any sense of raising on logic and looking at the evidence in favor or something you bet he was good even the name he was sort of designed to be from paltrow believe in the stuff with the money. She has set of times that she doesn't like what these things Ah says she's willing to put a name behind something that she admits she doesn't understand. It wouldn't be the first person to do that really. It's just celebrity commission. Celebrity obviously has has south some sort of authority for what reason it always see them involved in politics all the time these days as well and quite frankly count imagined anyone trust list to understand understand world affairs liberty. I mean what is the criteria used to Support the abuse. They find that even people who are in the in the failed so sort of promising alternative medicine doesn't who was head of the Australian anti vaccination word qualification as she said herself was. She has a Brian. And that was it already and Dan Qualification simply wife very little compared to grandma and blitz. That's Tim.

Gwyneth Paltrow Netflix British Medical Journal Lexus Mazo Netto Wounds Journal of the American Medica FDA Anton. Drug Administration New Zealand Title Environmental Research Dan Qualification Safai Tom Wu Munster JEWELL
"university copenhagen" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

12:46 min | 1 year ago

"university copenhagen" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Behaviors of pet parents with obese pats and they've talked about this idea of over humanizing where work and exercise isn't viewed as important when their pet is looked at as the like them or when it's looked at as as a human where they're getting lots of treats they're not getting enough exercise and finally just recently in the university Copenhagen looked at the body mass index of pet parents who had obese pets and it turned out that they also had a higher body mass index essentially when you put it as as if I could speak plainly what they found is that when it came to dogs were obese they also saw pet parents world peace as well this is Chad Allen Jing because it's something that I think a lot of it needs have encountered have been sensitive to and have read the band particularly sympathetic towards but it's still very challenging conversation and I wanted to ask you how you navigate that scenario if you are you know if your focus your attention is about the health of the Pat your seeing an obese Pat but then also you see the parents and they may not be in the picture of health as well due to obesity or being overweight yeah and and look this is something that we have been very vocal about for a long time and I'm gonna give you my opinion it may not be one that everybody wants to hear but I hear you yeah so this is old old research this goes back to a German study nearly twenty years ago the people with obesity or are they more likely to have a pet with obesity right and of course here's where first of all you have complete bias in your data set because Hey the majority of adults in Europe will I should say all European countries but so let's just let's speak to US and Canada since that's where most of our listeners will be the majority of U. S. adults are overweight or have obesity so right there what does that tell you it doesn't tell you anything if the majority of people have that I mean you can do some clever statistical analysis and he's on certain things but the reality is if most of the people are already in this one cohort Yardi completely biased I don't really see the value there right okay okay all you did was conclude that okay independently we know that there are more are are at least over a little over half of the dogs and cats are overweight or have a Beastie we know of similar types of of data supports human adults and even childhood now so I don't see where that mixes together the other thing I would caution veterinarians is we are not there we are not human physicians we're argument healthcare providers five hundred percent and by definition what you've just described is actually judging a client and we're this is where we get into stigma and bias yes because what we have to do as a veterinarian and I would argue this is what our human colleagues to do as well is we need to focus on the species that we are the expert and okay now I have some cross talk you know between my coaching and and personal training at like you right but I I don't go into the exam room and say well let's talk about your diet Mrs Smith you know I'm right I mean it's inappropriate and it is distracting so I really want us as a veterinary profession to to focus on our patients our responsibility first and foremost this is why we're doing a lot of research right now the association for police to prevention around weight bias and stigma because we think that what you've just described Courtney actually is happening and so these better into going into the room they're seeing a person who's suffering from obesity themselves and then they don't have the conversation for fear of inadvertently you know offending the client I mean I've written about this for almost twenty years and and this is a real this is friction this this tension that's created in every exam that has these factors at play and I think that as a profession we really have got to we have to be able to set aside our judgment of the client we really have to go beyond blaming the client or blaming the Pat for this and say look here's what we've got right I mean like I I it kind of drives me crazy sometimes yeah a person that comes down to human doctor's office and they are diagnosed with prostate cancer typically the physician is going to say well did you eat a lot of process red meat you now well there you go can't do much for you of course we don't say that but yet if you apply that same methodology as a dog or cat comes in it's a hundred fifteen pounds golden retriever and we're looking at the owner who's three hundred fifty pounds that they're suffering from obesity and we just say well you know I'm not gonna be able to help you guys because you obviously can't help yourself again we've got to do better this is a disease state we need better tools we need to better treatment again I just I wanna be careful of judging the pet owner in the situations in focus squarely on the patient that I am Abu did in license to treat which is the daughter the cap or the horse very well said I think if you approach almost every situation and that's what I try to do every every day whether you're talking about that'll be city or any sort of disease state if you place it had first what's the best for the Pat then everything I think falls into line at your conversations with pet parents your treatment goals your decision making your medical strategy if you place it what is best for the pack first I think everything seems to fall in line before we get off tractor okay and we're going to what well yes please only just it just one quick jump for very colleagues here's a bit of advice you should apply to everything in your life and and pet owners who can take this as well that is approach every situation with a success outcome mindset so many that when I spoke on mine so when I look at a pet patient with suffering from horrible obesity I don't say well they're never going to fix this they're never going to be able to overcome this you have to go in with the success outcome you have to say we can do this you know it's a positive mindset and I think that what happens is we go in with the defeatist attitude we've judged and we have stigma and biased towards the pet owner we believe it's a lifestyle only issue and therefore will they haven't done anything to date and they've gotten themselves in this fix we have to now somehow be able to ju jitsu our mindset and say wait how do we flip this around and say of course we're gonna succeed with this cat the most important thing though is that how do you deal with failure because in life with your surgeon with your internal medicine with your general practitioner you know what you don't win every case you don't solve every dilemma and you really have to then develop a coping mechanism that says Hey you know what I'm still really good enough I'm valuable what I'm doing is very important and essential and I understand that I don't win every time and that does not defeat my self esteem and what I'm trying to do my purpose that's wonderful I think that idea we just talked about one health and reference that but I definitely think mental and emotional health particularly in about a profession with that's a completely separate topic but I particularly in the veterinary medical such a so so important and that idea where you start out winning we start out as a success I'll come mindset is key because like you said you're not gonna win and if you're not gonna win every case in veterinary medicine mother nature they will humble you very quickly if you feel like you're going to win every case so thank you for saying that it's really important for veterinarians and everybody's mental health I'm kind of put you a little bit in a corner here because there are some people listening who is saying wait a minute they haven't even talked about how much I should feed my pet right right here he why don't we do this we do some quick hits and again I know this is way more complicated we know that we are staying superficial but I'm gonna ask you some questions and give me if you don't mind just to your hot takes on it number one okay and hit it they have their diet right now a commercial diet they purchased at home in your opinion and there's been some research as far as thermogenesis and things like that how often should you be feeding your pet if you have a pet who's overweight or obese yep I would say as often as you are comfortable meaning that it looked at and I think that you can interpret the data frequent feedings versus your look and one of the approaches I use is in a minute fasting I've been a big fan of that for the past fifteen years and might that patient pets too absolutely and in my own personal life but regardless and there's some good reasons for that but be regardless what you wanted to you is you've got to adapt and somehow interlink with their lifestyle so if the if you are asking a pet owner to feed their dog or cat five or six times a day which could be ideal in certain cases and they work you know two jobs they've got kids with soccer whatever guess what you've already set them up for failure and this will lead to this continuance and failure to comply with your recommendation so I always start with let's talk about your lifestyle what's a day look like in the typical life of Mrs Smith there Mister Jones and let's now work within those parameters that's the first and most important thing when it comes to feeding frequency because Courtney I see so many bad to go well you know I told him to feed five times a day and the wheels came off and everything went south sometimes simple advice like that that they cannot it here too is what D. rails your recommendation so I'm I'm try to make it easy and successful not make sense because that's part of it goes beyond science right so we we know that we're both kind of alluding to the fact that science does to a certain extent point two more frequent smaller feedings inducing I'm at a higher energy output or higher energy expenditure we'll get into more if we can get into more detail but I think what you're bringing into it which I think is genius is because we're talking about the pet health community in the pet help setting it's about forming a partnership with that pet owner informing and understanding that it's not the dog who's feeding himself and so you're creating an environment in which you're not going to win that scenario by making these suggestions that are just not realistic I think that's part of this entire process is a part of fighting the battle is creating a partnership and a working relationship with that entire families so that you have a greater chance for success that's one quick hit how many times a day to feed number two how many treats are allowed now I think you and I have that number that's been reinforced constantly of as far as less than ten percent of their over all diet but I'm very curious what's been your experience a what do you recommend how many treats are allowed throughout the day depends on the treat so if you're using a crunchy help the single source vegetable baby carrots sliced cucumbers the kini so forth you can give that hundred times a day I'm exaggerating of course but you can get that many many times which is why you hear us lean into those treats so often because we know that you know it people often ask men look I've worked on these projects before the automated feeders like look Ernie the solution here simple take the person out of the feeding equation I agree if you could have a robot dispenser dog food and treats throughout the day they would only be fed exactly what they want but that's not why we love dogs and cats part of our expression of love and affection is feeding so if you take that out of the equation Courtney I think you've damaged in devalued the human animal bond call me crazy but what I find is that when we use the automated feeders to do the six times a day dispensing and so forth people are desperate for that interaction and they go around the feeder and give them extra treats so we actually find them to be highly ineffective in many instances because the people can't help themselves they want to then give extra goodies because they feel so bad because they're not beating and you get the picture here I yes so so I I again getting back to this whole how many treat I would say let's talk about what kind of treated as let's get rid of the junk food treats so many of the treats me going back to gosh I think that was in two thousand and now I don't maybe two thousand and four two thousand five I did at night line that used to be A. B. C. news show I talked about and I did an expose on the hidden sugar and treats so you've really got to evaluate the streets and look at what's being added to them in addition all the junk stuff but just the calories right in the sugars there than driving that dopamine response to say well I want more so really be careful the treats I love vegetables for this exact reason single ingredient treats I think are are better in many instances but you know higher protein lower carb certainly loaded no sugar those are kind of simple guidelines but man you can't beat a baby carriage no I hit my dog when I was growing up love raw cauliflower have no idea why I guess I just would throw it in the air and he would test I mean go crazy for which a beautiful because like you said you're single ingredient low calorie treats and now we've hit on it's sort of the the flagship question that everybody's trying to trying to figure out I just spoke with firefighter he said you know my dog was obese him I started looking at his lifestyle and I realized I was giving him you know it's a lab a yellow lab I was only given a couple food today and then I looked at my Cup and.

Chad Allen Jing university Copenhagen
"university copenhagen" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

13:26 min | 1 year ago

"university copenhagen" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"And so as a medical professional we really need to we need better tools and we're working on this and we this is an active area of research and interest for most of of our board members we've been working on lots of technological solutions whether you know these are electro impedance which we worked with you know several groups over the years to try to make that happen we're now using without getting to a lot of details of visual morphological interpretation so basically we could take some type of image and give a specimen of body fat all this is very complicated you know but it's doable for sure but let's get back to this awareness so the first thing every pet owner and every veterinary professionals should do during every exam is a body condition score it's really that simple what I find is during the busy hustle bustle of our daily practice we just don't take the time the thirty seconds quite frankly to do this to write down a number but yet if we would start there what happens when you are forced to think of something then it allows you to then create an action but Courtney if we never think of it if we dismiss it if we ignore it then we never are challenged by action so if you put down a BCS of eight or nine you've now old defined and diagnosed obesity in a dog or cat you are obligated to do something and I think that's really where vets like look I've got to do with the the limping I have time to do with the weight or what I think is most important I think that's a frustrated because all we can say is feed less exercise more and you know what it doesn't work they get tired of selling a dog a bag of therapeutic weight loss diet the dog comes back six months later it's gained weight right I mean so all this restoration just equals two in action and this is why again we go back to why is it so important to clear this the disease because we're trying to raise awareness what what we've seen in human medical in the US you medical bill and in Europe once they declared it the disease doctors took it more seriously and people often so that's because they're worried about liability it really wasn't it was because doctors love to treat disease we are here to help and so suddenly when you put that on the radar you know and what I think will happen in battery medicine quite frankly court is we will the next generation of vats as we move forward towards its formal declaration of obesity as a disease and and companion animals you can have an entire generation of that's that they treated as a disease not old timers like me or you right right right right I mean we're gonna have young veterinary students who are always taught that this is a disease it will change how we do it but more importantly it'll drive industry pharma food to give us better solutions right now I can tell you I go to technology companies and say Hey help me with the diagnosis of this the like hi is you know we were really focused on kidney disease or really on a large dermatitis on corneal disruptions right it's like what you know they like what diseases not you know man this is just people feed their dog too many treats I wish it were that simple so awareness and we've gone on too long but body condition score and if your pet owner listening today in your that does not write down a BCS score on your physical exam report you need to demand it I mean I'm I'm just going to be that blunt no I love it in and that is genius listen and you know you you alluded to it earlier you know as a surgeon that is something that we can get put the blinders on is okay we have a dog who has a decrease quality life because of a lack of mobility up whether it's a there limping because a torn ligament or fracture or osteoarthritis or whatever it is the goal is to regain mobility but I I know that maintain a lean body condition is part of that conversation with mobility and you know when you have that parents you said to me you know you recommended that my dog lose some weight because of obesity are because my dog is overweight my dog lost weight and it's like I've got a brand new dog you know so their lifestyle is just totally different and you're right we did kind of dive into number one a little bit too too much let's see if we can touch base on you mentioned diseases I always think and this could be number two or number three but number two talk to me about how important it is that you look at obesity is a disease but also make sure that we screen for underlying diseases because you could be trying to fight obesity but it's an up hill battle because there's something simmering on underneath the surface that you don't know about yet without a doubt hormonal imbalances are the biggest complicating factor for obesity particularly in dogs and by that I mean by right dysfunction and so hypothyroidism is still largely how misdiagnosed undiagnosed under diagnosed in our canine patience I can't tell you how many second opinion dogs with obesity that I've seen and they really the the only did a total T. four and guys you're not going to diagnose hypothyroidism often enough if you just do a total T. for and so by the time you do a toe you know you do a total thyroid panel when you look at free T. four and T. and I I do T. three as well but regardless you at least need to free T. four by equilibrium dialysis and then suddenly these dogs that this hundred fifteen pound lab to retrieve your like well well there's the problem right I mean if it's a Datsun just go ahead and and make sure I mean they're certainly reach that we need to be testing for without a doubt right now no that's one thing the other thing that I do especially on referral basis is I look at hormones that maybe aren't always tested and so that means cortisol and I like cortisol is sort of a marker for a what's the current status and then it gives me a a temporal benchmark moving forwards because I will see as dogs lose weight this cat lose weight more so dogs but that cortisol level drops which is again indicator that there's less physiological stress and so cortisol of course drive so many of the metabolic pathways to store fat more efficiently actually increases appetite we've got to be super careful around that the other thing that I look at is C. reactive protein I really don't wanna get into the weeds but I do believe that that's that's okay that's where I live I live yeah we service perfect it's a it's a validated by a marker you know certainly I think a lot of that I think I actually the next generation of bats will wake up to see reactive protein we also use it to look at Kern inflammatory status internal beasts dog in particular because I think we have just a little better validation with dogs and cats I also look at all the a means so proposta mean in particular Hey when seas in cats because this can give me early insight into Hey this chronic inflammation going on here that may be leading to you again and I use the term prediabetes people that know me know my fight for defining prediabetes and cats for the past fifteen years we're getting closer every every year but regardless you know these are the types of other biomarkers and one other quick thing to just to note there are a lot of metabolic disruptors that are present in the environment and we talked about environment earlier but BPA this final you know a is one of those things and plastics and this is why you you wanna get BPA free water bottles right all that kind of stuff you're hearing now but there's a lot of cheap plastic water and food bowls for dogs and cats out there that probably contain BPA and BPA evidence linking to beasties very very strong so again I would say let's watch the environment closely for any of those little things that may be causing metabolic hormonal disruption leading to obesity genius that's absolutely genius with there is that bush and when we talk about that the concept of one health grant the one health human dog cat regardless of the species we also talk about how all of us are inextricably linked with its humans Pat and the environment the global health of all of us and I think plastics is a really important part of that discussion well I am in and one could go ahead yeah so back in two thousand and sixteen I think it was the CDC centers for disease control for the US government they convene a special one help obesity summit and when a Georgia where they're located and so a bunch of us were invited down to is a bunch of obesity experts with bunch of human obesity experts to talk about what was it was really funny because I'm used to sitting on one help panels as you are Courtney where we look at companion animals as the Sentinel species right so right you say are it's going to pop up first like flame retardant cancers popped up in cats okay so things that they're putting in furnitures and mobile homes we're seeing this type of thyroid cancer in cats years and years ago it was the Sentinel species for humans okay so getting off track but he was what was I found quite interesting was that they were like Hey wait humans are the Sentinel species for companion animals because they were saying look the lifestyle of the human caretaker is actually leading to are contributing to the pet obesity not the opposite right now of course I quickly spun this talk about things like plastics and and all types of you know diseases that we're we're not really thinking about you know microbiome influences impact we know that when you live with a dog or a cat you're microbiome your got intestinal flora is influenced by that species so there's also some really exciting research that we're doing at currently with that a company called animal by own doctor Holly Gantz out in California where our offices located in Berkeley and just just some fascinating stuff that's going on Sir yeah there's a lot of translational there but the one health aspect is something we really need to embrace more well listen I did want to ask you this but I wasn't sure if we were going to get to it but listen let's dive right into it this is gonna be a pretty hard question but I wanted to get your opinion on it that there's been some discussions in the journal of nutrition and some in psychology journals about the behaviors of pet parents with obese pats and they've talked about this idea of over humanizing where work and exercise isn't viewed as important when their pet is looked at as the like them or when it's looked at as as a human where they're getting lots of treats they're not getting enough exercise and finally just recently in the university Copenhagen looked at the body mass index of pet parents who had obese pets and it turned out that they also had a higher body mass index essentially when you put it as as if I could speak plainly what they found is that when it came to dogs were obese they also saw pet parents world peace as well this is Chad Allen Jing because it's something that I think a lot of it means having countered have been sensitive to and have read the band particularly sympathetic towards but it's still very challenging conversation and I wanted to ask you how you navigate that scenario if you are you know if your focus your attention is about the health of the Pat your seeing an obese Pat but then also you see the parents and they may not be in the picture of health as well due to obesity or being overweight yeah and and look this is something that we have been very vocal about for a long time and I'm gonna give you my opinion and may not be one that everybody wants to hear but I use yeah so this is old old research this goes back to a German study nearly twenty years ago the people with obesity are are they more likely to have a pet with obesity right and of course here's where first of all you have complete bias in your data set because Hey the majority of adults in Europe well I should say all European countries but so let's just let's speak to US and Canada since that's where most of our listeners will be the majority of U. S. adults are overweight or have obesity so right there what does that tell you it doesn't tell you anything if the majority of people have that I mean you can do some clever statistical analysis and he's on certain things but the reality is if most of the people are already in this one cohort Yardi completely biased so I don't really see the value there right okay okay all you did was conclude that okay independently we know that there are more are are at least over a little over half of the dogs and cats are overweight or have a Beastie we know of similar types of of data supports human adults and even childhood now so I don't see where that mixes together the other thing I would caution veterinarians is we are not there we are not human physicians we're argument healthcare providers five hundred percent and by definition what you've just described is actually judging a client and we're this is where we get into stigma and bias because what we have to do as a veterinarian and I would argue this is what our human colleagues to do as well is we need to focus on the species that we are the expert and okay now I have some cross talk you know between my coaching and and personal training at like you right but I I don't go into the exam room and say well let's talk about your diet missus Matthew now right I mean it's inappropriate and it is distracting so I really want us as a veterinary profession to to focus on our patients our responsibility first and foremost this is why we're doing a lot of research right now the association for police to prevention around weight bias and stigma because we think that what you've just described Courtney actually is happening and so these veterinarians going into the room they're seeing a person who's suffering from obesity themselves and then they don't have the conversation for fear of inadvertently you know offending the client I mean I've written about this for almost twenty years and and this is a real this is friction this this tension that's created in every exam that has these factors at play and I think that as a profession we really have got to you we have to be able to set aside our judgment of the client we really have to go beyond blaming the client or blaming the Pat for this and say look here's what we've got right I mean like I I it kind of drives me crazy sometimes you a person that comes down to human doctor's office and they are diagnosed with prostate cancer typically the physician is going to say well did you eat a lot of.

"university copenhagen" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

11:11 min | 1 year ago

"university copenhagen" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"What was it was really funny because I'm used to sitting on one help panels as you are Courtney where we look at companion animals as the Sentinel species right so right you say are it's gonna pop up first like flame retardant cancers popped up in caps okay so things that they're putting in furnitures and mobile homes we're seeing this type of thyroid cancer in cats years and years ago it was the Sentinel species for humans okay so getting off track but he was what was I found quite interesting was that they were like Hey wait humans are the Sentinel species for companion animals because they were saying look the lifestyle of the human caretaker is actually leading to are contributing to the pet obesity not the opposite right now of course I quickly spun this talk about things like plastics and and all types of you know diseases that we're we're not really thinking about you know microbiome influences in fact we know that when you live with a dog or a cat you're microbiome your got intestinal flora is influenced by that species so there's also some really exciting research that we're doing currently with that a company called animal by own doctor Holly Gantz out in California where our offices located in Berkeley and just just some fascinating stuff that's going on Sir yeah there's a lot of translational there but the one health aspect is something we really need to embrace more well listen I did want to ask you this but I wasn't sure if we were going to get to it but listen let's dive right into it this is gonna be a pretty hard question but I wanted to get your opinion on it that there's been some discussions in the journal of nutrition and some in psychology journals about the behaviors of pet parents with obese pats and they've talked about this idea of over humanizing where work and exercise isn't viewed as important when their pet is looked at as the like them or when it's looked at as as a human where they're getting lots of treats they're not getting enough exercise and finally just recently in the university Copenhagen looked at the body mass index of pet parents who had obese pets and it turned out that they also had a higher body mass index essentially when you put it as as if I could speak plainly what they found is that when it came to dogs were obese they also saw pet parents world peace as well this is Chad Allen Jing because it's something that I think a lot of it means having countered have been sensitive to and have read the being particularly sympathetic towards but it's still very challenging conversation and I wanted to ask you how you navigate that scenario if you are you know if your focus your attention is about the health of the Pat your seeing an obese Pat but then also you see the parents and they may not be in the picture of health as well due to obesity or being overweight yeah and and look this is something that we have been very vocal about for a long time and I'm gonna give you my opinion it may not be one that everybody wants to hear but I hear you yeah so this is old old research this goes back to a German study nearly twenty years ago the people with obesity or are they more likely to have a pet with obesity right and of course here's where first of all you have complete bias in your data set because Hey the majority of adults in Europe well I should say all European countries but so let's just let's speak to US and Canada since that's where most of our listeners will be the majority of U. S. adults are overweight or have obesity so right there what does that tell you it doesn't tell you anything if the majority of people have that I mean you can do some clever statistical analysis and he's on certain things but the reality is if most of the people are already in this one cohort Yardi completely biased I don't really see the value there right okay okay all you did was conclude that okay independently we know that there are more are are at least over a little over half of the dogs and cats are overweight or have a Beastie we know of similar types of of data supports human adults and even childhood now so I don't see where that mixes together the other thing I would caution veterinarians is we are not there we are not human physicians we're argument healthcare providers five hundred percent and by definition what you've just described is actually judging a client and we're this is where we get into stigma and bias yes because what we have to do as a veterinarian and I would argue this is what our human colleagues to do as well is we need to focus on the species that we are the expert and okay now I have some cross talk you know between my coaching and and personal training at like you right but I I don't go into the exam room and say well let's talk about your diet Mrs Smith you know I'm right I mean it's inappropriate and it is distracting so I really want us as a veterinary profession to to focus on our patients our responsibility first and foremost this is why we're doing a lot of research right now the association for police to prevention around weight bias and stigma because we think that what you've just described Courtney actually is happening and so these veterinarians going into the room they're seeing a person who's suffering from obesity themselves and then they don't have the conversation for fear of inadvertently you know offending the client I mean I've written about this for almost twenty years and and this is a real this is friction this this tension that's created in every exam that has these factors at play and I think that as a profession we really have got to we have to be able to set aside our judgment of the client we really have to go beyond blaming the client or blaming the Pat for this and say look here's what we've got right I mean like I I it kind of drives me crazy sometimes yeah a person that comes down to human doctor's office and they are diagnosed with prostate cancer typically the physician is going to say well did you eat a lot of process red meat you now well there you go can't do much for you of course we don't say that but yet if you apply that same methodology as a dog or cat comes in it's a hundred fifteen pounds golden retriever and we're looking at the owner who's three hundred fifty pounds of their suffering from obesity and we just say well you know I'm not gonna be able to help you guys because you obviously can't help yourself again we've got to do better this is a disease state we need better tools we need a better treatment again I just I wanna be careful of judging the pet owner in the situations in focus squarely on the patient that I am Abu did a license to treat which is the daughter the cap or the horse very well said I think if you approach almost every situation and that's what I try to do every every day whether you're talking about that'll be city or any sort of disease state if you place it had first what's the best for the Pat then everything I think falls into line at your conversations with that parents are your treatment goals your decision making your medical strategy if you place it what is best for the pack first I think everything seems to fall in line before we get off track though okay and we're going to what well yes please only just just one quick jump for very colleagues here's a bit of advice you should apply to everything in your life and and pet owners you can take this as well that is approach every situation with a success outcome mindset so many that when I spoke on mine so when I look at a pet patient with suffering from horrible obesity I don't say well they're never going to fix this they're never going to be able to overcome this you have to go in with the success outcome yet say we can do this you know it's a positive mindset and I think that what happens is we go in with the defeatist attitude we've judged and we have stigma and biased towards the pet owner we believe it's a lifestyle only issue and therefore will they haven't done anything to date and they've gotten themselves in this fix we have to now somehow be able to jujitsu our mindset and say wait how do we flip this around and say of course we're gonna succeed with this cat the most important thing though is that how do you deal with failure because in life with your surgeon with your internal medicine with your general practitioner you know what you don't win every case you don't solve every dilemma and you really have to then develop a coping mechanism that says Hey you know what I'm still really good enough I'm valuable what I'm doing is very important and essential and I understand that I don't win every time and that does not defeat my self esteem and what I'm trying to do my purpose that's wonderful I think that idea we just talked about one health and reference that but I definitely think mental and emotional health particularly in about a profession with that's a completely separate topic but I particularly in the veterinary medical such a so so important and that idea where you start out winning we start out as a success I'll come mindset is key because like you said you're not gonna win and if you're not gonna win every case in veterinary medicine mother nature they will humble you very quickly if you feel like you're going to win every case so thank you for saying that it's really important for veterinarians and everybody's mental health I'm kind of put you a little bit in a corner here because there are some people listening who is saying wait a minute they haven't even talked about how much I should feed my pet right right here he why don't we do this we do some quick hits and again I know this is way more complicated we know that we are staying superficial but I'm gonna ask you some questions and give me if you don't mind just to your hot takes on it number one okay and hit it they have their diet right now a commercial diet they purchased at home in your opinion and there's been some research as far as thermogenesis and things like that how often should you be feeding your pet if you have a pet who's overweight or obese yep I would say as often as you are comfortable there meaning that it looked at and I think that you can interpret the data frequent feedings verses it look and one of the approaches I use is in a minute fasting I've been a big fan of that for the past fifteen years and my pet patient pets too absolutely and in my own personal life but regardless and there's some good reasons for that but be regardless what you wanted to you is you've got to adapt and somehow interlink with their lifestyle so if the if you are asking a pet owner to feed their dog or cat five or six times a day which could be ideal in certain cases and they work you know two jobs they've got kids with soccer whatever guess what you've already set them up for failure and this will lead to this continuance and failure to comply with your recommendation so I always start with let's talk about your lifestyle what's a day look like in the typical life of Mrs Smith there Mister Jones and let's now work with in those parameters that's the first and most important thing when it comes to feeding frequency because according I see so many bad to go well you know I told him to feed five times a day and the wheels came off and everything went south sometimes simple advice like that that they cannot it here too is what D. rails your recommendation so I'm it and try to make it easy and successful not make sense because that's part of it goes beyond science right so we we know that we're both kind of alluding to the fact that science does to a certain extent point two more frequent smaller feedings inducing I'm at a higher energy output or higher energy expenditure we'll get into more if we can get into more detail but I think what you're bringing into it which I think is genius is because we're talking about the pet health community in the pet help setting it's about forming a partnership with that pet owner informing and understanding that it's not the dogs feeding himself and so you're creating an environment in which you're not going to win that scenario by making these suggestions that are just not.

Courtney thyroid cancer twenty years three hundred fifty pounds hundred fifteen pounds five hundred percent fifteen years
"university copenhagen" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

11:01 min | 1 year ago

"university copenhagen" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Pet parents with obese pats and they've talked about this idea of over humanizing where work and exercise isn't viewed as important when their pet is looked at as the like them or when it's looked at as as a human where they're getting lots of treats they're not getting enough exercise and finally just recently in the university Copenhagen looked at the body mass index of pet parents who had obese pets and it turned out that they also had a higher body mass index essentially when you put it as as if I could speak plainly what they found is that when it came to dogs were obese they also saw pet parents world peace as well this is Chad alleging because it's something that I think a lot of it needs have encountered have been sensitive to and have read the band particularly sympathetic towards but it's still very challenging conversation and I wanted to ask you how you navigate that scenario if you are you know if your focus your attention is about the health of the Pat your seeing an obese Pat but then also you see the parents and they may not be in the picture of health as well due to obesity or being overweight yeah and and look this is something that we have been very vocal about for a long time and I'm gonna give you my opinion it may not be one that everybody wants to hear but I hear you yeah so this is old old research this goes back to a German study nearly twenty years ago the people with obesity or are they more likely to have a pet with obesity right and of course here's where first of all you have complete bias in your data set because Hey the majority of adults in Europe well I should say all European countries but so let's let's speak to US and Canada since that's where most of our listeners will be the majority of U. S. adults are overweight or have obesity so right there what does that tell you it doesn't tell you anything if the majority of people have that I mean you can do some clever statistical analysis and he's on certain things but the reality is if most of the people are already in this one cohort Yardi completely bias I don't really see the value there right okay okay all you did was conclude that okay independently we know that there are more are are at least over a little over half of the dogs and cats are overweight or have a Beastie we know of similar types of of data supports human adults and even childhood now so I don't see where that mixes together the other thing I would caution veterinarians is we are not there we are not human physicians we're argument healthcare providers five hundred percent and by definition what you've just described is actually judging a client and we're this is where we get into stigma and bias because what we have to do as a veterinarian and I would argue this is what our human colleagues to do as well is we need to focus on the species that we are the expert and okay now I have some cross talk you know between my coaching and and personal training a lot like you right but I I don't go into the exam room and say well let's talk about your diet Mrs Matthew now right I mean it's inappropriate and it is distracting so I really want us as a veterinary profession to to focus on our patients our responsibility first and foremost this is why we're doing a lot of research right now the association for police to prevention around weight bias and stigma because we think that what you've just described Courtney actually is happening and so these better into going into the room they're seeing a person who's suffering from obesity themselves and then they don't have the conversation for fear of inadvertently you know offending the client I mean I've written about this for almost twenty years and and this is a real this is friction this this tension that's created in every exam that has these factors at play and I think that as a profession we really have got to we have to be able to set aside our judgment of the client we really have to go beyond blaming the client or blaming the Pat for this and say look here's what we've got right I mean like I I it kind of drives me crazy sometimes yeah a person that comes down to human doctor's office and they are diagnosed with prostate cancer typically the physician is going to say well did you eat a lot of process red meat you now well there you go can't do much for you of course we don't say that but yet if you apply that same methodology as a dog or cat comes in it's a hundred fifteen pounds golden retriever and we're looking at the owner who's three hundred fifty pounds of their suffering from obesity and we just say well you know I'm not gonna be able to help you guys because you obviously can't help yourself again we've got to do better this is a disease state we need better tools we need to better treatment again I just I wanna be careful of judging the pet owner in the situations in focus squarely on the patient that I am Abu it and license the tree which is the daughter the cap or the horse very well said I think if you approach almost every situation and that's what I try to do every every day whether you're talking about that'll be city or any sort of disease state if you place it had first what's the best for the Pat then everything I think falls into line at your conversations with that parents are your treatment goals your decision making your medical strategy if you place it what is best for the pack first I think everything seems to fall in line before we get off track though okay and we're only what we ask please only just just one quick jump for very colleagues here's a bit of advice you should apply to everything in your life and and pet owners you can take this as well that is approach every situation with the success outcome mindset so we knew that when I spoke on mine so when I look at a pet patient with suffering from horrible obesity I don't say well they're never going to fix this they're never going to be able to overcome this you have to go in with the success outcome yet say we can do this you know it's a positive mindset and I think that what happens is we go in with the defeatist attitude we've judged and we have stigma and biased towards the pet owner we believe it's a lifestyle only issue and therefore will they haven't done anything to date and they've gotten themselves in this fix we have to now somehow be able to jujitsu our mindset and say wait how do we flip this around and say of course we're gonna succeed with this cap the most important thing though is that how do you deal with failure because in life with your surgeon with your internal medicine with your general practitioner you know what you don't win every case you don't solve every dilemma and you really have to then develop a coping mechanism that says Hey you know what I'm still really good enough I'm valuable what I'm doing is very important and essential and I understand that I don't win every time and that does not defeat my self esteem and what I'm trying to do my purpose that's wonderful I think that idea we just talked about one health and reference that but I definitely think mental and emotional health particularly in the better a profession with that's a completely separate topic but I particularly in the veterinary medical such a so so important and that idea where you start out winning we start out as a success I'll come mindset is key because like you said you're not gonna win and if you're not gonna win every case in veterinary medicine mother nature they will humble you very quickly if you feel like you're going to win every case so thank you for saying that it's really important for veterinarians and everybody's mental health I'm kind of put you a little bit in a corner here because there are some people listening who is saying wait a minute they haven't even talked about how much I should feed my pet right right here he why don't we do this we do some quick hits and again I know this is way more complicated we know that we are staying superficial but I'm gonna ask you some questions and give me if you don't mind just to your hot takes on it number one okay and hit it they have their diet right now a commercial diet they purchased at home in your opinion and there's been some research as far as thermogenesis and things like that how often should you be feeding your pet if you have a pet who's overweight or obese yep I would say as often as you are comfortable meaning that it looked at and I think that you can interpret the data frequent feedings verses it look and one of the approaches I use is in a minute fasting I've been a big fan of that for the past fifteen years and my pet patient pets too absolutely and in my own personal life but regardless and there's some good reasons for that but be regardless what you wanted to you is you've got to adapt and somehow interlink with their lifestyle so if the if you are asking a pet owner to feed their dog or cat five or six times a day which could be ideal in certain cases and they work you know two jobs they've got kids with soccer whatever guess what you've already set them up for failure and this will lead to this continuance and failure to comply with your recommendation so I always start with let's talk about your lifestyle what did they look like in the typical life of Mrs Smith there Mister Jones and let's now work within those parameters that's the first and most important thing when it comes to feeding frequency because Courtney I see so many bad to go well you know I told him to feed five times a day and the wheels came off and everything went south sometimes simple advice like that that they cannot it here too is what D. rails your recommendation so I'm okay I try to make it easy and successful not make sense because that's part of it goes beyond science right so we we know that we're both kind of alluding to the fact that science does to a certain extent point two more frequent smaller feedings inducing I'm at a higher energy output or higher energy expenditure we'll get into more if we can get into more detail but I think what you're bringing into it which I think is genius is because we're talking about the pet health community in the pet help setting it's about forming a partnership with that pet owner informing and understanding that it's not the dog feeding himself and so you're creating an environment in which you're not going to win that scenario by making these suggestions that are just not realistic I think that's part of this entire process is a part of fighting the battle is creating a partnership and a working relationship with that entire families so that you have a greater chance for success that's one quick hit how many times a day to feed number two how many treats are allowed now I think you and I have that number that's been reinforced constantly of as far as less than ten percent of their over all diet but I'm very curious what's been your experience and what do you recommend how many treats are allowed throughout the day depends on the treat so if you're using a crunchy help the single source vegetable baby carrots sliced cucumbers the kini so forth you can give that hundred times a day I'm exaggerating of course but you can get that many many times which is why you hear us lean into those treats so often because we know that you know it people often ask men look I've worked on these projects before the automated feeders like look Ernie the solution here simple take the person out of the feeding equation I agree if you could have a robot dispenser dog food and treats throughout the day they would only be fed exactly what they want but that's not why we love dogs and cats part of our expression of love and affection is feeding so if you take that out of the equation Courtney I think you've damaged in devalued the human animal bond call me crazy but what I find is that when we use the.

university Copenhagen twenty years three hundred fifty pounds hundred fifteen pounds five hundred percent fifteen years ten percent
"university copenhagen" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

11:53 min | 1 year ago

"university copenhagen" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Pet parents with obese pats and they've talked about this idea of over humanizing where work and exercise isn't viewed as important when their pet is looked at as the like them or when it's looked at as as a human where they're getting lots of treats they're not getting enough exercise and finally just recently in the university Copenhagen looked at the body mass index of pet parents who had obese pets and it turned out that they also had a higher body mass index essentially when you put it as as if I could speak plainly what they found is that when it came to dogs were obese they also saw pet parents world peace as well this is Chad Allen Jing because it's something that I think a lot of it needs have encountered have been sensitive to and have read the band particularly sympathetic towards but it's still very challenging conversation and I wanted to ask you how you navigate that scenario if you are you know if your focus your attention is about the health of the Pat your seeing an obese Pat but then also you see the parents and they may not be in the picture of health as well due to obesity or being overweight yeah and and look this is something that we have been very vocal about for a long time and I'm gonna give you my opinion it may not be one that everybody wants to hear but yeah so this is old old research this goes back to a German study nearly twenty years ago the people with obesity or are they more likely to have a pet with obesity right and of course here's where first of all you have complete bias in your data set because Hey the majority of adults in Europe well I should say all European countries but so let's let's speak to US and Canada since that's where most of our listeners will be the majority of U. S. adults are overweight or have obesity so right there what does that tell you it doesn't tell you anything if the majority of people have that I mean you can do some clever statistical analysis and he's on certain things but the reality is if most of the people are already in this one cohort Yardi completely biased so I don't really see the value there right okay okay all you did was conclude that okay independently we know that there are more are are at least over a little over half of the dogs and cats are overweight or have a Beastie we know of similar types of of data supports human adults and even childhood now so I don't see where that mixes together the other thing I would caution veterinarians is we are not there we are not human physicians we're argument healthcare providers five hundred percent and by definition what you've just described is actually judging a client and we're this is where we get into stigma and bias because what we have to do as a veterinarian and I would argue this is what our human colleagues to do as well is we need to focus on the species that we are the expert and okay now I have some cross talk you know between my coaching and and personal training at like you right but I I don't go into the exam room and say well let's talk about your diet Mrs Smith you know I'm right I mean it's inappropriate and it is distracting so I really want us as a veterinary profession to to focus on our patients our responsibility first and foremost this is why we're doing a lot of research right now the association for police to prevention around weight bias and stigma because we think that what you've just described Courtney actually is happening and so these better into going into the room they're seeing a person who's suffering from obesity themselves and then they don't have the conversation for fear of inadvertently you know offending the client I mean I've written about this for almost twenty years and and this is a real this is friction this this tension that's created in every exam that has these factors at play and I think that as a profession we really have got to you we have to be able to set aside our judgment of the client we really have to go beyond blaming the client or blaming the Pat for this and say look here's what we've got right I mean like I I it kind of drives me crazy sometimes you a person that comes down to human doctor's office and they are diagnosed with prostate cancer typically the physician is going to say well did you eat a lot of process red meat you now well there you go can't do much for you of course we don't say that but yet if you apply that same methodology as a dog or cat comes in it's a hundred fifteen pounds golden retriever and we're looking at the owner who's three hundred fifty pounds of their suffering from obesity and we just say well you know I'm not gonna be able to help you guys because you obviously can't help yourself again we've got to do better this is a disease state we need better tools we need a better treatment again I just I wanna be careful of judging the pet owner in the situations in focus squarely on the patient that I am Abu it and license the tree which is the daughter the cap or the horse very well said I think if you approach almost every situation and that's what I try to do every every day whether you're talking about that'll be city or any sort of disease state if you place it had first what's the best for the Pat then everything I think falls into line at your conversations with that parents are your treatment goals your decision making your medical strategy if you place it what is best for the pack first I think everything seems to fall in line before we get off tractor okay and we're going to what well yes we please only just it just one quick jump for very colleagues here's a bit of advice you should apply to everything in your life and and pet owners you can take this as well that is approach every situation with a success outcome mindset so many that when I spoke on mine so when I look at a pet patient with suffering from horrible obesity I don't say well they're never going to fix this they're never going to be able to overcome this you have to go in with the success outcome yet say we can do this you know it's a positive mindset and I think that what happens is we go in with the defeatist attitude we've judged and we have stigma and biased towards the pet owner we believe it's a lifestyle only issue and therefore will they haven't done anything to date and they've gotten themselves in this fix we have to now somehow be able to jujitsu our mindset and say wait how do we flip this around and say of course we're gonna succeed with this cat the most important thing though is that how do you deal with failure because in life with your surgeon with your internal medicine with your general practitioner you know what you don't win every case you don't solve every dilemma and you really have to then develop a coping mechanism that says Hey you know what I'm still really good enough I'm valuable what I'm doing is very important and essential and I understand that I don't win every time and that does not defeat my self esteem and what I'm trying to do my purpose that's wonderful I think that idea we just talked about one health and reference that but I definitely think mental and emotional health particularly in about a profession with that's a completely separate topic but I particularly in the veterinary medical such a so so important and that idea where you start out winning we start out as a success I'll come mindset is key because like you said you're not gonna win and if you're not gonna win every case in veterinary medicine mother nature they will humble you very quickly if you feel like you're going to win every case so thank you for saying that it's really important for veterinarians and everybody's mental health I'm kind of put you a little bit in a corner here because there are some people listening who is saying wait a minute they haven't even talked about how much I should feed my pet right right here he why don't we do this we do some quick hits and again I know this is way more complicated we know that we are staying superficial but I'm gonna ask you some questions and give me if you don't mind just to your hot takes on it number one okay and hit it they have their diet right now commercial diet they purchased at home in your opinion and there's been some research as far as thermogenesis and things like that how often should you be feeding your pet if you have a pet who's overweight or obese yeah I would say as often as you are comfortable so meaning that it looked at and I think that you can interpret the data frequent feedings versus your look and one of the approaches I use is in a minute fasting I've been a big fan of that for the past fifteen years and might that patient pets too absolutely and in my own personal life but regardless and there's some good reasons for that but be regardless what you wanted to you is you've got to adapt and somehow interlink with their lifestyle so if the if you are asking a pet owner to feed their dog or cat five or six times a day which could be ideal in certain cases and they work you know two jobs they've got kids with soccer whatever guess what you've already set them up for failure and this will lead to this continuance and failure to comply with your recommendation so I always start with let's talk about your lifestyle what's a day look like in the typical life of Mrs Smith there Mister Jones and let's now work with in those parameters that's the first and most important thing when it comes to feeding frequency because Courtney I see so many bad to go well you know I told him to feed five times a day and the wheels came off and everything went south sometimes simple advice like that that they cannot it here too is what D. rails your recommendation so I'm it and try to make it easy and successful not make sense because that's part of it goes beyond science right so we we know that we're both kind of alluding to the fact that science does to a certain extent point two more frequent smaller feedings inducing I'm at a higher energy output or higher energy expenditure we'll get into more if we can get into more detail but I think what you're bringing into it which I think is genius is because we're talking about the pet health community in the pet help setting it's about forming a partnership with that pet owner informing and understanding that it's not the dogs feeding himself and so you're creating an environment in which you're not going to win that scenario by making these suggestions that are just not realistic I think that's part of this entire process is a part of fighting the battle is creating a partnership and a working relationship with that entire family so that you have a greater chance for success that's one quick hit how many times a day to feed number two how many treats are allowed now I think you and I have that number that's been reinforced constantly at as far as less than ten percent of their over all diet but I'm very curious what's been your experience a what do you recommend how many treats are allowed throughout the day depends on the treat so if you're using a crunchy help the single source vegetable baby carrots sliced cucumbers the kini so forth you can give that a hundred times a day I'm exaggerating of course but you can get that many many times which is why you hear us lean into those treats so often because we know that you know it people often ask men look I've worked on these projects before the automated feeders like look Ernie the solution here simple take the person added the feeding equation I agree if you could have a robot dispenser dog food and treats throughout the day they would only be fed exactly what they want but that's not why we love dogs and cats part of our expression of love and affection is feeding so if you take that out of the equation Courtney I think you've damaged in devalued the human animal bond call me crazy but what I find is that when we use the automated feeders to do the six times a day dispensing and so forth people are desperate for that interaction and they go around the feeder and give them extra treats so we actually find them to be highly ineffective in many instances because the people can't help themselves they want to then give extra goodies because they feel so bad because they're not beating and you get the picture here I yes so so I I again getting back to this whole how many treat I would say let's talk about what kind of treated as let's get rid of the junk food treats so many of the treats me going back to gosh I think that was in two thousand and now I don't maybe two thousand and four two thousand five I did at night line that used to be A. B. C. news show I talked about and I did an expose on the hidden sugar and treats so you really got to evaluate the streets and look at what's being added to them in addition all the junk stuff but just the calories right in the.

university Copenhagen twenty years three hundred fifty pounds hundred fifteen pounds five hundred percent fifteen years ten percent
Fat people are more than TWICE as likely to have overweight dogs because they feed their pet pooches fattening treats, study finds

Let's Talk Pets

04:50 min | 1 year ago

Fat people are more than TWICE as likely to have overweight dogs because they feed their pet pooches fattening treats, study finds

"Just recently in the university Copenhagen looked at the body mass index of pet parents who had obese pets and it turned out that they also had a higher body mass index essentially when you put it as as if I could speak plainly what they found is that when it came to dogs were obese they also saw pet parents world peace as well this is Chad Allen Jing because it's something that I think a lot of it needs have encountered have been sensitive to and have read the band particularly sympathetic towards but it's still very challenging conversation and I wanted to ask you how you navigate that scenario if you are you know if your focus your attention is about the health of the Pat your seeing an obese Pat but then also you see the parents and they may not be in the picture of health as well due to obesity or being overweight yeah and and look this is something that we have been very vocal about for a long time and I'm gonna give you my opinion it may not be one that everybody wants to hear but yeah so this is old old research this goes back to a German study nearly twenty years ago the people with obesity or are they more likely to have a pet with obesity right and of course here's where first of all you have complete bias in your data set because Hey the majority of adults in Europe well I should say all European countries but so let's let's speak to US and Canada since that's where most of our listeners will be the majority of U. S. adults are overweight or have obesity so right there what does that tell you it doesn't tell you anything if the majority of people have that I mean you can do some clever statistical analysis and he's on certain things but the reality is if most of the people are already in this one cohort Yardi completely biased so I don't really see the value there right okay okay all you did was conclude that okay independently we know that there are more are are at least over a little over half of the dogs and cats are overweight or have a Beastie we know of similar types of of data supports human adults and even childhood now so I don't see where that mixes together the other thing I would caution veterinarians is we are not there we are not human physicians we're argument healthcare providers five hundred percent and by definition what you've just described is actually judging a client and we're this is where we get into stigma and bias because what we have to do as a veterinarian and I would argue this is what our human colleagues to do as well is we need to focus on the species that we are the expert and okay now I have some cross talk you know between my coaching and and personal training at like you right but I I don't go into the exam room and say well let's talk about your diet Mrs Smith you know I'm right I mean it's inappropriate and it is distracting so I really want us as a veterinary profession to to focus on our patients our responsibility first and foremost this is why we're doing a lot of research right now the association for police to prevention around weight bias and stigma because we think that what you've just described Courtney actually is happening and so these better into going into the room they're seeing a person who's suffering from obesity themselves and then they don't have the conversation for fear of inadvertently you know offending the client I mean I've written about this for almost twenty years and and this is a real this is friction this this tension that's created in every exam that has these factors at play and I think that as a profession we really have got to you we have to be able to set aside our judgment of the client we really have to go beyond blaming the client or blaming the Pat for this and say look here's what we've got right I mean like I I it kind of drives me crazy sometimes you a person that comes down to human doctor's office and they are diagnosed with prostate cancer typically the physician is going to say well did you eat a lot of process red meat you now well there you go can't do much for you of course we don't say that but yet if you apply that same methodology as a dog or cat comes in it's a hundred fifteen pounds golden retriever and we're looking at the owner who's three hundred fifty pounds of their suffering from obesity and we just say well you know I'm not gonna be able to help you guys because you obviously can't help yourself again we've got to do better this is a disease state we need better tools we need a better treatment again I just I wanna be careful of judging the pet owner in the situations in focus squarely on the patient that I am Abu it and license the tree which is the daughter the cap or the horse very well said I think if you approach almost every situation and that's what I try to do every every day whether you're talking about that'll be city or any sort of disease state if you place it had first what's the best for the Pat then everything I think falls into line at your conversations with that parents are your treatment goals your decision making your medical strategy if you place it what is best for the pack first I think everything seems to

University Copenhagen Twenty Years Three Hundred Fifty Pounds Hundred Fifteen Pounds Five Hundred Percent
"university copenhagen" Discussed on Bellwether Hub Podcast

Bellwether Hub Podcast

08:35 min | 1 year ago

"university copenhagen" Discussed on Bellwether Hub Podcast

"I'm Jim Frawley. And this is bellwether. Hello, everybody. And welcome to this episode of bellwether hub. I am very excited about this particular issue. It is one that a lot of people like to talk about a lot of people like to have opinions on. And I feel like a lot of comes from a place of misinformation. And that's why I'm thrilled to have our guest, and the the topic is technology and how to detangle yourself from technology. We we always talk about how the impact of of social media. The impact of sitting in front of your phones all the time and sitting in front of your computers all the time. And what effect that has on us as a society as an individual. What what it does to our psychology? I feel like technology is a lot like money time. Most people don't know how to properly use it. And that's why we have peaked on lap on Pete is he's made it his life's work to hit the pause button. And really question. What's the appropriate? Use of technology. How to actually make it work for you? And how do you implement technology into your life and not make your life adjust to the technology around us in and technology changing? Extremely quickly society is changing. Quickly. Sometimes it's difficult to keep up. So being able to separate yourself from technology. I feel is is an extremely important skill set to have especially as the economy changes in and things can be difficult to adapt to he wrote his book called digital detangle a guide to mindful technology, use I read it a loved it. I found very helpful very interesting. What I love most about it is that it's extremely practical. And if I go just talking to them before we started recording. I like practical things I I don't like to just necessarily talk a theory. I like people to actually learn something from an us information or have an exercise that they can implement into their particular life. So that's that's why I'm so happy to have him on here because he is chock full of practical advice on how to detangle yourself technology, and how to use a properly so with that being said, I would like to introduce peed on latte, author of digital detangle. Pete. Welcome to the Jim. Thank you so much for having me. So tell me a little bit about you. You tell me about digital detangle. Tell me about your whole entire story before we got really into the details. Yeah. Yes. So I'll just start by saying digitally Tyler works with leading organizations to cut wasted time particularly corporations, this is a big issue, and we also lower employee stress levels through workshops and speaking engagements. So that's that's digital detangling nutshell. My path to detangle her is I guess goes goes way back which is when I was a teacher. And so I spent several years traveling the world as an international teacher and throughout those years. I was kind of getting close to wanting to do some build some software. And then when I moved to Nashville had the opportunity to do that. And I spent then about the next four years building software, and that transition was brutal. You now between going from such a structured environment. As teacher. I mean, every doubt down to like you can use the toilet in this five minute period. And so when I transitioned to being offered developer. I I mean, I hardly even had meetings. It was just kind of you've got this internet connection. You've got a great laptop and you're supposed to get work done. And I was very difficult at first, but I learned about a lot of kind of practical things to kind of rebuild your digital environment to stay more focused, and so after several years of doing that I kind of built up these tools to to be affective and a lot of my friends who were suffer developers. I didn't know about a lot of this stuff. And most of it is super practical super easy easy. Install kind of things. And I was like software developers. Don't know about this. Definitely no one else does about this. And there are a lot of people out there, you know, helping helping aging parents that kind of thing will learn to use technology in. So I I'm really not trying to do that. I'm really trying to help people who use technology day in day out. How can you kind of make peace with with the way use technology? How can you not feel as overwhelmed, but still be affective? And one of the also add is that I'm not huge on like this whole digital detox con. Concept. I'm more about like how you get through your days without feeling super stressed which was going to be. So that's going to be one of that was going to be one of my questions. You've got your people who just say, you know, let's go back to the stone age live was much better. When I just, you know, read the New York Times in the hard paper, I go to the library to get my buck leave my technology alone. Don't touch a phone don't look at it. After eight o'clock, your not necessarily that hard core, you'd think that it's appropriate. Obviously, we're going to be using technology. I feel like it's more a more realistic view of how to respond, right? Yeah. I mean, I think there's there's certainly evidence that the technology is adding stress to our lives, and you know, I mean, it's it's just a matter of the vast majority of people are not about to kind of move to a cabin. And there are massive benefits to a lot of technology is and this is this is one one distinction. I think is very important is the distinction between sort of manip-. Violative user interfaces so something like Snapchat has streak feature right which encourages people to log in every single day and particularly for young people. That's a very big of motivator go in everyday to keep their streets with their good friends alive. And so that's manipulative in the sense that that Snapchat wants to report to their investors. A high percentage of their users are daily active users, and I would separate that from technology which allows us to do things that we can do before. So if you think about Email versus pre Email when you had a male everything you use a career a message to someone it obviously has benefits. And so for me, it's really about where are the benefits? And what does this technology ad, then what does it change because it emails another great example of it? Also adds a bunch of junk that that once you lower the barrier to communication you. Get more flowing. Through not just the things that would have been great prior to existing. So it changes the way that we experience our technology our environment. Now, a new think about technology, then which is interesting because you've got things like Snapchat Facebook. You know, the social media bucket is designed to be manipulative is designed to get you to scroll is designed to spend as much time on there as possible. So that they could sell ads and the information's already come out that they are designing it this way to tap into your brain. So that it's almost addictive if not really addictive, how do you separate that from your do you have buckets of appropriate technology. Inappropriate technology. Is it a, you know, is there a fine, you know, sick of a highway lane and the right hand lane is functional Email that you could separate into usable non usable. And then on the far left is social media. Don't go in the left hand lane. Do you buckle things that way? Or are you more of you could have a little bit of? Anything in some kind of moderation. Yeah. I mean, I think there are things that are clearly problematic. So for example, there are a lot of studies. Now, the causal studies showing social media makes you less satisfied with your life that makes you less happy. So these are studies where they take half of the people, and they actually force them to use less social media, and they end up happier. So that's one study from university Copenhagen, and then Stanford in university of Pennsylvania replicated studies. So I think it's pretty clear that that minimizing how

Jim Frawley Pete developer New York Times Nashville Tyler Snapchat university of Pennsylvania university Copenhagen Stanford five minute four years
"university copenhagen" Discussed on This Week in Science

This Week in Science

05:09 min | 2 years ago

"university copenhagen" Discussed on This Week in Science

"Food remains from a fourteen thousand four hundred year old knack to fee in hunter gatherer site, which is puts it about four thousand years before the Donovan agriculture a site known as show Bica one locating the black desert north eastern Jordan results are published in the journal proceedings of National Academy of sciences, provides the earliest empirical evidence of bread production. And what sort of asinine about this bread production is that it is for thousand years before it'd be dawn of agriculture so it it's a pretty good sign that agriculture may have spread out of a necessity to utilize resources. We were already using. Utilizing for many thousands years to sort of get better drought. So this is quoting voice from university Copenhagen archea missed a mea Iran's of Tegi who was also I offer the study, the presence of hundreds of charred food remains and fireplaces from shebek. One is an exceptional find has given us the chance to characterize fourteen thousand year old food practices. The twenty four remains analyzed in this study show that wild ancestors of domesticated cereals, such as barley note had been ground seemed needed. Prior to cooking remains are very similar to unleavened flat rides identified at several Mula thick and Roman sites in Europe and Turkey. So we now know that bread like products were produced long before the development farming. The next step is to evaluate if the production consumption of bread influence the emerging. Of plant, cultivation and domestication at all, though. She's she's still leaving that open, although it becomes a pretty clear a pretty clear Pat from relying on this resource for thousands of years. And then as people move, they wanted to take that that bread vixen with them. Yeah, I think it's I, I mean, I I was giggling to myself for a moment with a vision of the wild ancestors of the domesticated bar lease roaming the plains in wild herds, herds of Bartoli's running away from the the hunters that were chasing them. The gatherers that were gathering them. But really, I mean, it is I, I think it's fabulous to have this historical aspect of the history of one of the main food sources for around the world and to know that there were these fires and that you know, we've got these charred remains these things that once were. Once this once was bred, we've been making bread for a long time. People figured out how to put things together and make them into more complex mixtures to make them more easily edible to make them last longer when they were traveling a across the plains. And it's often. So this a university of Copenhagen. Also, archaeologist, Tobias Richter. He goes on at the two hundred gathers particular interest to them because they lived through a transitional period where people became more sedentary and their diets began to change. Interesting. Yeah, you would think, Brad, it'd be a good packing for the long haul, but I guess you know, you're still one hundred gather still do plenty of trekking right? They've had found the past Flint, sickle blades as well as ground stone tools at the site, which is we're a long time made them believe. That they were going to find something to do with plant expectation. But flat, Brad certainly fits the Bill, and it shows also that baking was invented before we had plant cultivation that's also added to this to this. To this list of things we've been doing for really long time. So when people are trying to Vilnai's bread and say that it's very modern and that usually eating nothing but cultivated crops that are more natural turns out bread is actually older. Fred has been a very healthy, dense source of caloric nutrients for a very long time. And this is just further evidence of it. Yes. And the idea that are are paleo ancestors weren't eating grains. That's just that's just hogwash. Yes, elite your Brennan. I'm gonna go eat mine. I love my bread. This this story makes me very happy. Yeah. You must stop, but I know gimme my gimme my carbs gimme migraines. Sweet carbs. Sweet. That's right people in those days also ran an average of twenty miles a day..

Brennan Brad National Academy of sciences Pat university Copenhagen university of Copenhagen Tobias Richter Iran Tegi Mula thick Europe Turkey Fred Bartoli Vilnai fourteen thousand four hundred fourteen thousand year four thousand years thousand years
"university copenhagen" Discussed on The World Transformed

The World Transformed

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"university copenhagen" Discussed on The World Transformed

"Right aim straight thing change things about yourself as an adult once you're up and running at turin what's your yeah what's your him up and running i i don't think you're necessarily uh in in a world like that destined to always be in in an underclass you can uh you know you got a bunch of super smart geniuses wandering around one of the things that they would work all of us well how do we all people that don't you know the that want to upgrade themselves once they're in a doll uh and i think those problems get solved too so and your absolute info marietta they did they they did have space travel and got can they did have people colonizing other points they had a couple of liquor electric vehicles they're very futuristic i believe their lapels were really wider narrow or something too so he could really tell it was the future anyway we we move on uh next story artificial intelligence can stop premature aging i loved the headline because as headline so often do it somewhat overstates the case but you know what not too much it doesn't overstate the case too much and i think this is a this is a really big story could we've talked about the potential for this kind of thing and it's great to see research going on here this is at the university copenhagen and they're talking about using deep learning to check for um but the correct gene expression to test for the potency of drugs specifically around premature aging they're really looking for things around alzheimer's parkinson's cardiovascular disease but everything related to aging is is in there and of course the.

turin artificial intelligence university copenhagen premature aging alzheimer