28 Burst results for "union army"

How Have Hispanic Americans Helped Shape the U.S.?

BrainStuff

04:57 min | Last month

How Have Hispanic Americans Helped Shape the U.S.?

"Brain Steph Lauryn Boban here. Here in the United States, it's Hispanic heritage month, which officially began as Hispanic Heritage Week in nineteen, sixty eight. Unlike many other campaigns that observe and honor the contributions of a particular group of Americans Hispanic heritage bump run throughout. September. But rather starts on September fifteenth and continues through mid. October. So, why does it start in the middle of the month? Well, a Costa Rica El Salvador Guatemala Honduras. Nicaragua. All celebrate their Independence Day on September fifteenth. Mexico's is on September Sixteenth Chili's is September eighteenth and believes independence. Day Is September twenty first. By, stretching into October, the holiday also includes de la Raza on October twelve, which is a kind of rejection of Columbus Day because of Christopher, Columbus's many crimes against humanity and see our episode on Columbus Day for more about that. De la Rosa instead celebrates the melding of Hispanic races or Raza, and cultures. In honor of Hispanic Heritage Month, let's talk about three times at Hispanic Americans have changed the course of history. Some three hundred years after Spanish, conquerors became the first non native Americans to view the Mississippi River and later the Grand Canyon one host. Jeff Marianne Hernandez helps smooth transfer of the territory of Florida into US rule Florida was still part of Spain when Hernandez was born in Saint Augustine in seventeen eighty four. But that changed when he was selected to serve in the House of Representatives and was sworn into duty in eighteen, twenty three as the first Hispanic person to serve in. Congress. In historical context Hernandez being a slave owner is a controversial figure. Still. He remains the first one, hundred twenty eight Hispanic people to serve in the. US Congress. Maybe of more relevance today is the first Hispanic senator elected to a full term in Congress. New Mexico's Dennis Shabas in nineteen thirty five. We spoke with Paul Orbits Historian at the University of Florida. He said in addition to being the first American born Hispanic senator. He's critical for the time we live in because he fought on behalf of all working class. Equally, he fought for higher wages legislation he fought for people to have the right to organize a union he fought for more progress and you as foreign policy for Latin America he organized N. Double ACP leaders against Jim Crow Segregation. Then, a Chevette as one of those people we can use Hispanic heritage month to talk about our connection other people's democratic struggles. Today's Congress. The one hundred sixteenth has forty seven members of Hispanic heritage. Hispanic Americans also helped turn the tide of the civil war. Some twenty thousand were involved in the conflict. While some in the southeast sided with the confederacy especially those who came from wealthy families with plantations or other businesses in Louisiana Alabama more supported the union. or it said a lot of Mexican American soldiers fought on the side of the Union army in the southwest and actually helped defeat the confederacy in the southwest. Hispanic people in the West back the Mexican government to and celebrated the country's defeat of the French at the battle of Puebla on May fifth of sixty two single Demayo in a victory that may have helped prevent the French from siding with the confederacy and thus ultimately helping the Union win. A bit more modern only about eight years before the US Supreme Court ruled in Brown versus the Board of Education, that segregation in public schools is unconstitutional as Spanish schoolgirl showed the way. Sylvia Mendez a Puerto Rican and Mexican heritage was just eight years old when she and her brothers were denied enrollment into the white only Westminster School district in Orange County in nineteen, forty three. At the time about eighty percent of California, school districts were segregated. Her Parents Gonzalo. Felicitas Mendez enlisted other parents to fight the decision and they took the school board to court. After appeals that were abandoned short of the US Supreme Court Mendez Versus Westminster became the first successful federal school desegregation case in the nation that was in nineteen, forty seven. The case was important arguing that segregation itself even if schools were separate but equal was harmful unconstitutional under the fourteenth amendment specifically, the clause, the calls for protection of the laws for all citizens. In appeals Sylvia's case was argued by Thurgood Marshall who went on to argue for the

Hispanic Heritage Month Jeff Marianne Hernandez Congress Senator Us Supreme Court Mendez Us Supreme Court Felicitas Mendez United States Steph Lauryn Boban Costa Rica El Salvador Guatema Nicaragua Mexico Columbus Raza De La Rosa Dennis Shabas Union Florida
It's the Little Things

Your Brain on Facts

06:39 min | Last month

It's the Little Things

"For want of a nail, the shoe was lost for want of a shoe. The horse was lost for want of a horse. The rider was lost for want of a writer the message was lost for want of the message the battle was lost for want of a battle, the kingdom was lost. Small things can have reverberating effects on history both good and bad. In fourteen fifty three, the great walled city of Constantinople fell it had withstood sieges for eleven hundred years. It had held off fire from the then state of the art cannons for weeks. The Byzantine said even Ford soldiers trying to tunnel under the wall autumn Turks were finally able to overrun the great city because someone left the door open. One of the many gates in the fourteen miles of wall had been left open during the night and the Ottomans flooded in. Killing Constantine the eleventh in the battle and bringing an end to the eastern Roman Empire. My Name's Moxy and this is your brain on facts. It was a freezing Christmas night in Trenton. New Jersey during the revolutionary war. The English Colonel Johann Gottlieb Rall. Commander. Of a mercenary infantry regiment of fourteen hundred has seen soldiers from Germany sat down to a good supper and an evening of entertainment. He and his men were celebrating their recent victories over George Washington's volunteer army, and of course, the Christmas holiday. Safe from the bitter cold and the pelting sleet inside a wealthy merchants home that they had commandeered. They relaxed safe in the assumption that no one in their right mind would possibly try to cross the Delaware River at night in a blinding winter storm. Someone challenged role to a game of chess, and before long he was deep in tactics and strategy. There was a knock at the door. And exhausted young. Messenger boy came in bearing a note from loyalist farmer. It's important to remember that about a third of colonists still consider themselves to be British and didn't want the revolution. Raw paid the boy little notice took the note and put it in his coat pocket without opening it. That pocketed piece of paper would cost him and the war effort nearly. Two hours earlier and ten miles away. Washington's men had begun being ferried across the icy Delaware. River. It took over ten hours to get all twenty four hundred men over to the New Jersey side. The conditions were so adverse five men froze to death. Then began the arduous march to Trenton in the dark. The plan had been to attack the town from all sides before dawn, but the troops didn't arrive until eight am. During the attack which lasted only an hour forty of the German. Henson's were killed and the remaining thousand surrendered. Colonel was mortally wounded. When his body was found the unopened note warning of Washington's crossing was still in his pocket. If role had read it, he would surely have had his gross of professional soldiers prepared. He allowed his pride and the weather to lull him into thinking his enemy was not a threat. Had he won the battle he may well have killed George Washington James Madison James Monroe John Marshall Aaron Burr and Andrew. Hamilton The. Second, most common premise in alternate history circles behind what if Germany won World War Two is what if the south one the American civil war? Two pieces of paper dropped in a farmer's field almost brought that about. Confederate General Robert E. Lee. Whose statue in the middle of my hometown of Richmond, Virginia has recently been given the historical context. It's so sorely needed. In the form of tons of. Graffiti. Issued Special Order one ninety one during the Maryland campaign before the Battle of Antietam. In the order lead divided his army, delineating the routes and roads to be taken and the timing for the units to reconvene. Adjutant Robert H Chilton penned copies of the letter endorsed them in Lee's name. Staff. Officers distributed the copies to various confederate generals. General Thomas Stonewall Jackson in turn copied the document for one of his subordinates, major general, D H Hill who was to exercise independent command as the rearguard. A Union soldier Corporal Barton W Mitchell of the twenty seven. Th Indiana volunteers found two pieces of paper bundled with three cigars as he marched across a farm in Maryland an area recently vacated by Hill and his men after they had camped there. The order provided the Union army with valuable information, concerning the army of Northern Virginia's movements and campaign plans. Upon receiving lease lost order. Major General George McClellan leading the Union army of the Potomac proclaimed. Here is a piece of paper with which if I cannot whip Bob Ely, I will be willing to go home. He immediately moved his army in hopes of foiling lease battle plans. When Lee heard a copy of special order one, ninety, one was missing he. He knew his scattered army was vulnerable and rushed to reunite his units Antietam Creek near Sharp's Berg. Lee's troops arrived tired hungry and many were sick. The Battle of Antietam, would go down as the bloodiest battle of the American civil war with casualties recorded as twenty, three, thousand dead wounded, which was usually as good as dead or unaccounted for over the course of the half day battle. That's nearly two thousand soldiers in our one every two seconds. When night fell both sides ceased fire together, their dead and wounded. The next day Lee began the painstaking job of moving his ravage troops back Virginia. Here, some scholars argue another solitary decision had far reaching consequences. Despite having the advantage. McClellan. Allowed Lee to retreat without resistance. From his point of view, he'd accomplished his mission by forcing Lee's troops from Maryland and preventing confederate win on union soil. President, Lincoln however thought McClellan missed a great opportunity to potentially end the war three years earlier than it ultimately would.

Robert E. Lee Army Major General George Mcclellan Maryland Union Army New Jersey Trenton Virginia Antietam Constantinople Colonel Johann Gottlieb Rall George Washington Ford Delaware River Writer Antietam Creek General Thomas Stonewall Jacks Washington
"union army" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:23 min | 2 months ago

"union army" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Processing facility. I worked here for 32 years. I was a male handler. So yeah, This place is near and dear to my heart. Simmons retired three years ago before he turned 60. He says a career with the Postal Service helped his family have a good life. I was able to raise them. I'll pay for my son's college education. Provide a good middle class lifestyle for us and to know that I would have my retirement taking care of the Postal Service has long given African American workers a place to avoid some of the discrimination that exists in the broader employment world. History Professor Phil Rubio says that started just after the civil war. When Congress passed a law that ended the whites only hiring practice for postal jobs and African Americans, starting with Union, Army veterans, abolitionists and others began finding their way into this government job. Rubio says the pay wasn't always good. But the job came with some prestige, and it offered security benefits and civil service protections that improved over the decades. Today. African Americans are 27% of the Postal Service about twice their share of the overall workforce. Among those who say they benefited from postal careers is actor Danny Glover, My mom and dad worked for the Postal Service, but most of their working lives in this 2015 video. Glover says. His sister and brother also worked for the agency. And he worked there as a teenager during Christmas brakes working for the Postal Service, and they did with my parents to buy their first home. This video was part of a campaign to protect the Postal Service from privatization. Among the advocates for that is Chris Edwards, an economist with the libertarian Cato Institute. The postal industry is no longer any kind of natural monopoly, and when you don't have natural monopoly I think we oughta let entrepreneurs come into this industry and show with how they can improve it. But private sector jobs don't pay as much total compensation for the median Postal service employee last year was just over $96,000. FedEx is about half that, and ups is in the middle of the two Privatization likely would bring downward pressure on postal service wages and benefits, which would hurt African Americans disproportionately. But Edward says there's another issue of fairness here. People paying for postal services are paying all the benefits, though it seems to me that the government should be reflected somewhat of the private sector. Postal worker unions have been among the loudest opposition voices to privatization. The Postal Service is not a business if a fun It's a service to the American people. Judy Beard is legislative and political director of the American Postal Workers Union. She started at the Postal Service more than 50 years ago to pay her way through college. She says. These jobs benefit more than black postal workers and their families but shopping in the community by chaos in the community. Toward the church in the community. The Children are going to school in the community, so all of that just raises the whole community. Meantime, postmaster General de Joy has suspended budget cutting measures put in place this summer until after November's election. But says the steps are.

Postal Service American Postal Workers Union Professor Phil Rubio Danny Glover Simmons Judy Beard FedEx Congress Cato Institute General de Joy Chris Edwards Edward Army political director
Mass Hauntings in Gettysburg

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

03:12 min | 3 months ago

Mass Hauntings in Gettysburg

"Mass haunting 's in Gettysburg for over one Hundred Years Gettysburg Pennsylvania's been flooded by reports of paranormal activity from Phantom cries, wounded soldiers, lifelike apparitions, many visitors to Gettysburg of untouched by haunting. Past Gettysburg was a site where confederate and union armies clashed on July. First, eighteen, sixty, three, the battle. Was Day bloodbath that will change American history forever when cannon smoke clear the union soldiers had one but nearly five thousand horses and fifty thousand men lay dead or dying ninety. The confederate soldiers never received a proper burial now, more than fourteen decades. Later, these unsubtle spirits may still linger and Gettysburg. This historic town is home to a surprising number of Phantom. Forms captured in photography including the ghost of what appears to be General Robert e Lee the Daniel Lady Farm was used a confederate army field hospital soldiers. He suffered from artillery wounds usually lot of chest wombs lost limbs were brought to the farm to recover suffer through the final moments of their lives. The farmhouse and barns saw their share of ghastly horror. The ghosts of general. Isaac you'll and his ten thousand men still reportedly off the farm cash town and just eight miles west of the tiny town cash town was the site where the first soldier was killed during the Gettysburg campaign of the civil war. The current owners believe they have proof of their ghastly and ghostly visitors chat Palomino in his wife had. Pictures from nineteen, Eighty, seven through two, thousand, seven, a strange orbs and skeleton showing up in photos according to Mr Palladino he and his guests have heard their share of thumping doors. They've also witnessed lights turning on and off on their own doors lock IAN unlocking themselves. The history of Gettysburg hotel is filled with tales very haunting 's a ghost of A. Woman. Who has been seen dancing in the hotel's ballroom paranormal investigators believe the spirit of Union soldier James Colbert on of company K Pennsylvania reserves still roams around the hotel or the Bala dairy in offer spectacular views of the countryside. It's sometimes gives visitors a terrifying glimpse of life after death located on hospital road in served as a union field hospital during. Day Two of the battling Gettysburg Suzanne Lawn key. The owner has collected dozens of stories of photos of her guests ghostly encounters according to a psychic. The in appears to be haunted by confederate soldiers buried underneath a nearby tennis court. The ghost train tourists could take a ninety minute ride on the ghost train the only ghost tour. Gettysburg that takes visitors across. The actual battlefield. One of the tour storyteller says he and the passengers of smelt cigar smoke and see the souls of soldiers roaming on the train or near the tracks won't traveling across historic battle mass

Gettysburg Gettysburg Hotel Gettysburg Pennsylvania Daniel Lady Farm General Robert E Lee Mr Palladino Isaac Tennis James Colbert IAN Bala Dairy A. Woman K Pennsylvania
Understanding the border dispute between India and China

Between The Lines

05:48 min | 4 months ago

Understanding the border dispute between India and China

"Together China in India account for more than one third of the entire population of the world, and if you believe the predictions of Keisha Mahbubani, remember him. He's been a skit on this program. He's the distinguished Singaporean intellectual. He says the future is Asian, and it's China's and India's to shame. But as my next guest points out. There, a deep historical tensions between these two budding global superpowers, which might make that impossible. China and India share land border in the Himalayas which has been in dispute since nineteen, sixty two, and it's been a pretty quiet style for decades, however, since May tensions have been rising nuclear powers facing off in a remote corner of the Himalayas, the disputed Kashmir region. This is the first the classroom this border in forty five years Indian government confirmed twenty of its soldiers were killed in the clash. China seems to now be making new claims to territory now. Will this be the event that pushes India away from Chana. Chana for good, and what does it mean for the rest of the World Tom V. Madan is a senior fellow in the foreign policy program at the Brookings Institution. In Washington. She's the author of a new book called Fateful Triangle. How China shut US India relations during the cold. War She's got an article in this month's foreign. Affairs magazine on how China is losing India Tovey. Welcome to between the lines. Thank you for having me Tom now. The border dispute between China and India has probably been the most tasteful. Conflict in the world. No one died and forty five years. What sit this conflict of? It was set off because of some early moves in early May that. had. Brought forward troops and equipped military equipment at different points on the China. India boundary the line of actual control. In the western sector particularly of their border, which is eastern Hlavac and at multiple points, what we saw was attempts to change the status quo whether it was to establish a permanent presence in built in areas, but both sides claim. Or attempts to stop a Indian patrols from moving in those areas which they have traditionally done. That's set the context. It's been going on since at least early May. What we actually saw what was happening to June, sixth meeting between senior military commanders was that they had agreed to a process of de-escalation and disengagement but something went very wrong in the course of this de-escalation. And this is where the incident took place. Now this particular incident has just been a larger in scale and an this whole stat of larger scale, but also regrets aggressiveness and the ones we've seen before, and there are reports that both countries are deploying some serious weapons to the bases close to the border. Is this just posturing, or is there a serious risk of Esscalation I? Think these kind of situation. There's always a risk of escalation. We've seen at least three. faceoffs three major face before this one between the Chinese and Indian military's in two, thousand, thirteen, two, thousand, fourteen in two thousand seventeen This one is could have larger in scale. We've seen as we did. On June fifteenth that even though they have traditionally had a whole series of agreements, standard operating procedures protocols in place between the two countries to avoid the kind of Esscalation we saw injured fifteenth. They clearly are not sufficient anymore, so let's put this in a broader historical context. China and India and went to war in nineteen, sixty two over the border. Now this of course was at the heart of the Cold War. Taibbi take us back to the geopolitical context of the time what was going on? By the time, the nineteen sixty sixty-two war broke out between China and India. You've seen a few years from about nineteen fifty seven about five years already of rising China Idiot tensions you've seen. The Indians relies that The Chinese did not consider. The boundary settled that they were building. A roads through territory India sought was India's. You saw scuffles skirmishes at between. The. Two sides patrols at various points on the boundary. You also saw the escape of the Lama. At a number of Tibetan. Refugees remain to stay in India in one, thousand, nine, hundred, nine, which the Chinese soil with deep suspicion and suspected that the US and you had worked together to engineer about escape. And, so you seem kind of rising tensions between China and India and at the same time you see you saw. The US India actually because in a national park because of their shared concerns about China actually starting to move closer towards each other for the for the the US This saw a in democratic India as both Jew potential, a political counterbalance, but also democratic contrast to soviet-backed Communist China accident, very interested in supporting it. N India welcomed that support, and so that was the. what was? Preceded that sixty to war, but which occurred when the Chinese decided. To move what they call the self defense a counterattack. And in nineteen, sixty two. Move across across the boundary took and defeated India quite badly, which laughed a number of different. It's a it's left a lot of historical baggage. The only major war the Union army has lost

India China N India United States Himalayas Tom V. Madan Esscalation Chana Indian Government Keisha Mahbubani Union Army Brookings Institution Tovey Washington Hlavac Senior Fellow Taibbi
Juneteenth: People are hungry for change

Squawk Pod

03:00 min | 4 months ago

Juneteenth: People are hungry for change

"We observe June team alongside millions of other Americans. It's a one hundred fifty five year old holiday commemorating the day enslaved African Americans learned of their freedom on this day June nineteenth in eighteen sixty five major. General Gordon Granger of the Union army arrived in Galveston Texas and informed the enslaved black population that the civil war had ended, and slavery had been abolished eighteen, sixty five. That's over two years after president. Lincoln's emancipation proclamation took effect. Texas on the other confederate states ignored the proclamation, and in doing so submitted enslaved African Americans to thirty extra months of uncompensated labor and inhumane treatment this. This day the day honoring the reinstatement of freedom that should have never been taken away the day that freedom was lawful, and yet still withheld represents many Americans, the difference between the ideals of the American dream and the reality for black people in this country, the June team holiday has largely been observed by the US black population wall, and efforts to make June Tiv a national holiday have fallen short in Congress as twenty twenty, though forty seven states and the District of Columbia have all passed legislation recognizing June Tepe as either a state holiday or a day of observance this year. Corporate America is also making president. Several large companies are honoring the day as a paid holiday for employees, Google. Uber General Motors Ford J. P. Morgan Nike and others are observing team today CNBC reporter Gene Wells reported today from once center of Commerce. That's also marking this special day. All the dockworkers at all twenty nine West Coast ports, including here at the largest largest port complex in the country are taking an eight hour work stoppage today for June teeth and up at the port of Oakland, where the local is seventy five percent black. They are going to have a a march and a caravan as local President Trent. Willis says there is systemic racism at times still even within the Union we've had incidents of hanging nooses. That we sense addressed. And just just here and there we've had some some evidence of systemic racism. Showing its ugly head. Here, where we work every day, Corporate America is all in on this saying that June teeth will be paid permanent holiday including target, which will pay working employees, today, time and a half. Other companies are still open, but canceling meetings like Amazon, which will offer workers, a variety of opportunities online to reflect on the day and GM where in many plants the work will continue, they will stop for eight minutes and forty six seconds in recognition of the death of George. Floyd one note about the ports guys in this union dockworkers are allowed one work stoppage a month. They are all happening to take it together today

President Trump United States Galveston Texas Corporate America Union Army Gordon Granger Uber General Motors Google Amazon Lincoln Floyd District Of Columbia Oakland Congress J. P. Morgan Nike Willis Cnbc
Companies and state governments celebrate Juneteenth, giving workers the day off

Randy Baumann and the DVE Morning Show

01:08 min | 4 months ago

Companies and state governments celebrate Juneteenth, giving workers the day off

"Today is June eighteenth a June. Nineteenth commemorates the ending of slavery. In the US the origin of the holiday comes from June nineteen, eighteen, sixty, five, when General Gordon Granger of the Union army, arrived with soldiers in Galveston Texas and told enslaved African Americans their the civil war had ended, and they were free more than two years after President Lincoln had signed the emancipation proclamation. June teeth is now celebrated in black communities across the US, and some have called for it to become a national holiday. Nearly all states recognize June teeth with some limited special status in this year. The NFL Nike and twitter have all recognized. June eighteenth as a company holiday. Governor Tom Wolfe is marking June. Teeth is a special holiday closure for employees under his during. For the first time is office as the more than seventy three thousand workers will get either the day off or a compensatory day to use it another time. If they are often, office remains open. The Governor says today is a moment to honor African, American history, and to reflect on how everyone can promote equality, liberty and justice for all people.

Governor Tom Wolfe United States General Gordon Granger President Lincoln Twitter Union Army NFL Texas
Sojourner Truth

Encyclopedia Womannica

03:40 min | 5 months ago

Sojourner Truth

"Today's warrior was an evangelist to became an outspoken advocate for abolition temperance and women's rights. Let's Talk About Journal Truth. Sojourner truth's name at birth was Isabela. Balm free. She was born into slavery in Ulster. County New York in seventeen ninety seven. In eighteen o six at the age of nine years old, so joyner sold at an auction along with a flock of sheep for a hundred dollars. Join our later described. The slave owner is cruel. She endured repeated beatings at his hands, so joyner was sold once again. This time to a man named John Dumont. Interestingly, because to journal grew up in New York, state originally settled by the Dutch she actually only spoke Dutch were living with Dumont. She learned to speak English At that time support for emancipation in new. York was growing. Dumont promise that he'd set so join our free before it became the law to do so. But eventually, so joyner came to realize that he had no intention of freeing. Sojourner fled with her infant daughter in eighteen, twenty six one year before the abolition of slavery in new. York, She was forced to leave her other three children behind. When she later reflected on the escape, sojourner said I did not run off for I thought that wicked, but I walked off believing that to be alright. During her journey to freedom. Journal! into the home of a quaker couple Isaac and Maria van wagon. After learning about her predicament, they took so Jordan around her baby. In until the states Samantha patient of slaves took effect. The van wagons treated with kindness and compassion, so join our leader said that their benevolence inspired her to become a preacher. During her stay with the couple, she became a devout Christian. Around that time, sojourner officially changed her name from Isabella. Balm free to join her truth. because. She felt it represented her mission of fighting for justice. joiners famous words, truth is powerful, and it prevails. Echo that sentiment. After, moving to New, York City, joyner worked as a domestic servant. She became active in the Methodist Church joining the African Methodist Episcopal denomination. So are also used her experience to help others volunteering as a social worker for former slaves. Despite being illiterate, so joyner became a popular speaker and the abolitionist movement, she spoke in front of hundreds promoting religious tolerance, civil and women's rights. In eighteen fifty four at the Ohio. Women's rights convention in Akron. Joyner gave her most famous speech called Ain't dia woman. She spoke about racial and gender equality and refuted aecom an argument that women should have equal rights. Because Jesus was a man. In her speech, she asked. Did Joe cry, come from. He came from God and a woman manding have nothing to do with it. When the civil war broke out, so joyner helped recruit black troops for the Union army. For her efforts in the war and the abolitionist movement sojourner was invited to meet President Lincoln in eighteen, sixty four. She continued to teach and lecture about social justice until her death in eighteen, eighty, three at

Joyner New York Sojourner John Dumont Isabela Joe Cry Ulster Aecom York City President Lincoln African Methodist Episcopal De Isaac Union Army Samantha Methodist Church Ohio Jordan Akron
"union army" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

01:59 min | 8 months ago

"union army" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"As a Union Army private with the Wayne guards a company of the theory regiment by eighteen sixty two the twenty five year old Vincent rose to the rank of colonel in the eighty third Pennsylvania infantry and led his men through one of the fiercest battles of the civil war at Fredericksburg seven months later Vincent found himself in command of a brigade of three regiments at the battle of Gettysburg on the second day of fighting Lucent intercepted career with the message from general Kay Warren urgently requesting troops to occupy a little round top a strategically important hill anchoring the union army's left flank the incident did not wait for orders but immediately double clicked his thirteen hundred men to the unprotected hill arriving only minutes before the enemy he placed colonel Josh what chamberlain's twentieth main infantry on the extreme left of his line which had become the left flank of the entire union army as Confederate units from Alabama and Texas attacked things look desperate for Vincent's troops in an effort to encourage is meant to keep fighting as ammunition ran low fence and jumped on a rock and shouted don't give an inch boys don't give an inch exposed above the hand to hand fighting Vincent was struck by a Confederate musket balls and died of his wounds five days later but thanks to strong Vincent's quick thinking and heroism the Union Army successfully defended little round top and earned the victory at the battle of Gettysburg considered by many the turning point of the civil war and the may sixth president and CEO of the Heinz history center does a great job of those stories you get sucked in and go if you haven't been to the Heinz history center in the strip district its first after it was cloned nearly two decades ago the world's first cloned cast has died she was the world's first cloned.

Union Army Vincent Pennsylvania infantry Kay Warren chamberlain Alabama president and CEO Heinz history center colonel Josh Texas
Sojourner Truth: The life and legacy of pioneering anti-slavery and women's rights activist

Encyclopedia Womannica

03:40 min | 8 months ago

Sojourner Truth: The life and legacy of pioneering anti-slavery and women's rights activist

"Today's warrior was an evangelist. Who became an outspoken advocate for abolition temperance and women's rights? Let's talk about joyner truth. Sojourner truth's name at birth was Isabel Balm free she was born into slavery and Ulster County New York in Seventeen Ninety seven in eighteen o. Six at the age of nine years old sojourner was sold at an auction along with a flock of sheep for a hundred dollars so join our later described. The slave owner is cruel. She endured repeated beatings at his hands. Sojourner was sold once again this time to a man named John Dumont interestingly because Turner grew up in New York state originally settled by the Dutch. She actually only spoke Dutch while living with Dumont she finally learned to speak English at that time. Support for emancipation in New York was growing. Dumont promised that he set so joyner free before it became the law to do. So but eventually sojourner came to realize that he had no intention of freeing sojourner fled with her infant daughter in eighteen twenty six one year before the abolition of slavery in New York. She was forced to leave her other three children behind when she later reflected on the escape sojourner said I did not run off for. I thought that wicked but I walked off believing that to be all right. During her journey to freedom sojourner made her way into the home of a quaker couple Isaac and Maria van wagon after learning about her predicament. They took so joyner and her baby. In until the states emancipation of slaves took effect the van wagon and treated joyner kindness and compassion sojourner later said that their benevolence inspired her to become a preacher during her. Stay with the couple. She became a devout Christian around that time so joyner officially changed her name from Isabella. Balm free to join her truth because she felt to represented her mission of fighting for Justice. So joiners famous words. Truth is powerful and it prevails echo that sentiment. After moving to New York City sojourner worked as a domestic servant. She became active in the Methodist Church. Joining the African Methodist Episcopal Denomination sojourner also used her experience to help others volunteering as a social worker for former slaves. Despite being literate so joyner became a popular speaker and the abolitionist movement. She spoke in front of hundreds promoting religious tolerance civil and women's rights in eighteen fifty four at the Ohio. Women's rights convention in Akron Sojourner gave her most famous speech in called anti a woman. She spoke about racial and gender equality and refuted a common argument. That women shouldn't have equal rights because Jesus was a man in her speech she asked. Where did Joe Cry? Come from he came from God and a woman mandate have nothing to do with it when the civil war broke out Joyner helped recruit black troops for the Union army for her efforts in the war. And the abolitionist movement sojourner was invited to meet. President Lincoln in eighteen sixty four. She continued to teach and lecture about social justice until her death in eighteen. Eighty three at the age of eighty six.

Sojourner Joyner Akron Sojourner African Methodist Episcopal De John Dumont Ulster County New York Isabel Balm New York City New York President Lincoln Joe Cry Union Army Ohio Isaac Methodist Church Isabella Maria Van Turner
The Haunting of Gettysburg

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

03:04 min | 11 months ago

The Haunting of Gettysburg

"Paranormal activity from Phantom cries. Wounded soldiers to lifelike apparitions. Many visitors visitors to Gettysburg have been touched by his haunting past. Gettysburg was assigned were confederate. Union armies clashed on July first eighteen. Sixty three the battle was a three day bloodbath. That would change American history forever. When the cannons smoke cleared the Union soldiers had one but nearly five thousand thousand horses and fifty thousand men. Lay Dead or dying. Many of the confederate soldiers never received a proper burial now more than fourteen in decades later these unsettled spirits may still linger in Gettysburg. This historic town is home to a surprising number of Phantom forms captured in photography including the ghost of what appears to be confederate General Robert e Lee that Daniel Lady farm was used as the confederate army field hospital. Soldiers who suffered from artillery wounds lot of chest wounds lost limbs were brought to the farm to recover or to suffer for through the final moments of their lives. The Farmhouse Barn saw their share of ghastly horror the ghosts of General Isaac. You'll in his core of ten. Ten thousand still reportedly hot the farm cash town in just eight miles west of the tiny town. Cash town in was the site where the I soldier was killed during the Gettysburg campaign to the civil war. The current owners believe they have proof of their ghostly. Visitors Jack Palladino and his wife have pictures from eight nineteen eighty seven through two thousand seven of strange orbs and skeleton showing up in their photos. According to Mr Palladino he and his guests have heard their share of thumping doors. They've also witnessed lights. Turn on and off on their own doors locking and unlocking locking themselves. How about the Gettysburg Hotel. The history of the Gettysburg hotel is filled with tales of eerie haunting. 'S A ghost of a woman has been seen Dancing Hansen. The hotel's ballroom. Paranormal investigators believe the spirit of union soldier. James Culbertson of company K Pennsylvania Reserve still roams around the hotel. How about blood dairy in while Bala dairy in offers spectacular views of the countryside. It sometimes gives visitors terrifying glimpse of life after death located on the hospital. Road end served as a union field hospital during day. Two of the battle of Gettysburg. Susan lockney owner has collected dozens of stories photos of our guests. ghostly encounters according to a psychic the in appears to be haunted by confederate soldiers buried underneath a nearby tennis court. Gettysburg Ghost train could also take a ninety. The minute ride that only the ghost tour. Gettysburg takes visitors

Gettysburg Hotel Gettysburg Jack Palladino Daniel Lady Farm Army Field Hospital Bala Dairy Susan Lockney Robert E Lee Farmhouse Barn James Culbertson Tennis Dancing Hansen General Isaac K Pennsylvania Reserve
Ambassador Susan Rice: If you're not able to make the people who you're leading feel valued and feel like their input matters then you're going to lose them.

Skimm'd from The Couch

11:46 min | 1 year ago

Ambassador Susan Rice: If you're not able to make the people who you're leading feel valued and feel like their input matters then you're going to lose them.

"You really have to recognize that the people around you have value to add and that you may be the person in charge you have the vision. You have the responsibility woody. But if you're not able to make the people who you're leading feel valued and feel like their input matters then you're gonNA lose them awesome. I'm Carly's Aken. I'm Danielle Weisberg. Welcome to skin from the couch. This podcast is where we go deep on career advice from women who have lifted from the good good stuff like hiring and growing a team to the rough stuff like negotiating your salary and giving or getting hard feedback. We started the skin from a couch. So what better at our place to talk it all out than where it began on a couch today. Hey we welcome ambassador. Susan Rice to skimmed from the couch ambassador. Rice was national security advisor to President Barack Obama before serving as national security the advisor. She was the United States Ambassador to the United Nations as well as a member of the cabinet. Prior to the Obama Administration at Basseterre Rice was a fellow fellow at the Brookings Institute and began her career in foreign policy under president. Bill Clinton so many questions also ambassador rice as has just published her book tough love the title references. Her parents approach to raising her which prepared her for career in world politics. And I'm guessing a lot more. The memoir has been called both highly personal and unflinchingly honest. It's landed her a spot on the New York Times Bestseller. Lists congratulations. We we are thrilled to get the opportunity to speak with her about her historic career ambassador rice. Welcome to the couch. Thanks so much. It's really great to be with you. Both very excited right okay. So let's jump into it first question we ask everybody. Skim your resume for us. Okay scholar written and published academic work on national security and foreign policy when I was at the Brookings Institution as a foreign policy scholar I've also been a management consultant diplomat. negotiator national security expert. That's the first time we've had those bullets on this show. What is not on your your wikipedia or login? Daniel dropped. Her microphone in a very important question was the literal mic. Drop in writing. Not On your official biography or Kapadia that we should know about you. Well I mean there's a lot but one of the most important things if not the most important things is that I'm a mom. I have two kids one in high school now in one in college and I'm a wife and I'm a proud daughter daughter of two parents who had phenomenal impact on me So family to me is hugely important. What is a typical day? Look like for you now now. It's well now when I'm not on book tour normally. Okay it's so much better comparatively like I can get up at seven you know as opposed to five thirty or six. I can work out and take my time doing it. Not being rushed I can put on my yoga pants I and my fleece and very leisurely eat my breakfast. which is usually like fruit and yogurt or something like that with a lot of coffee and then it depends on what my days as about? When I was writing the book? Sit Down and focus on that. I spend time at the School of International Service at American University. where I meant to our students I do some speaking. I do some travel. I'm on the board of Netflix. And I do some other private sector so depends on what the the the deal of the day is but for the most part the great thing is I'm in charge of my own schedule and I'll have to get dressed up except when I'm on book tour you said You can travel. I'm sure you have traveled so much watch but a lot of it has been in your professional life. Where's the last place? You traveled here for fun abroad or anywhere anywhere. The last foreign trip we took took was to Peru with the family in August which was really fun. 'cause it's been a while given that the kids have jobs in camp in whatever that we've actually been able to do to a cool foreign trip together. Is there a place you haven't gone. That's been on your bucket list. Oh Gosh lots. Let me do a short summer. Yeah I would think you've been everywhere. I've been a lot of places Che's but not everywhere and there's a lot of places I still WANNA go Thailand Morocco Sosa Czech Republic. Ah Norway I've been Ireland into the big places have been you know. China had been Russia into Japan. Indonesia I've been to many parts arts of Africa most of western Europe a good bit of South America but I still want to go to Chile. I WANNA go back to Argentina. Yeah I WANNA go back to Brazil. We should do do a little girls chalet you should. It's amazing you talk about family being really important to you. And that's obviously a huge inspiration from the book. The the title of the book is a nod to your parents parenting style. Tell us about your parents. Well I had to really wonderful parents both past unfortunately but my dad. I was born in segregated South Carolina around nineteen twenty. His grandfather. My grandfather had been a slave. He fought in the Union army in South Carolina during the civil war and then after the civil war my great grandfather rather miraculously got a primary education occasion became a teacher and then got his divinity degree Went to college and after college he An after his early professional career. He established a school in New Jersey. called the board in town school and from the late eighteen eighty s until nineteen fifty-five that school educated generations of African Americans both in vocational and technical skills and in college preparatory skills and Albert Einstein and Stein and Mary McLeod but Thune. Eleanor Roosevelt. All came to the school which was really quite extraordinary in that. Legacy of service of education was what my father was raised with but born in this oppression of segregation and Jim Crow. He really was struggling to figure out how he could fulfil his potential during World War. Two he served with the Tuskegee airman and in the segregated Army Air Force and he had the horrible experience of not being able elite in restaurants off of base but seeing German. POW is being served and so he knew that he wanted to become somebody. He was brilliant and after after college he decided in after the war lead the south. Go out to California. He got his PhD in economics at the University of California Berkeley and then he spent his professional fashion career. Working his way up he worked in the Treasury Department. He worked at the World Bank in a senior position. Ultimately he was a governor of the Federal Reserve. And I'll come back to him but I learned from my father just extraordinary perseverance and basically believing in yourself even when society and everybody around around you is telling you that you're not worthy or you can't. My mom came from a totally different background. She was the daughter of immigrants from Jamaica. That came came to Portland Maine of all places in nineteen twelve and my grandparents on her side. Had No education was agenda when was a maid and yet like so many immigrants immigrants. They came with the American dream in saved and worked very hard and sent all five of their kids to college. Two of my uncles became doctors. One a university president won an optometrist optometrist and then along came my mother the baby and she was Valedictorian of her high school class. She was debate champion. She she went on to Radcliffe College now. Part of Harvard and was president of the entire student body graduated magna cum laude and because she almost didn't get go to college because she was denied a scholarship because she was black but eventually because her principal enter debate coach went to bat on her behalf. She azazel receive another source of money. She made the fight to enable college to be affordable to low income Americans. Her life's passion and she. He was known as the mother of the Pell Grant Program because she was instrumental in establishing and sustaining this extraordinary program. That's allowed eighty million Americans to go to college. My mom was it was a bad ass in nineteen fifty when she graduated from high school as an African American woman. In a very white state of Maine She he went on through her career to be a pioneer. And so these two parents who were wonderful but had a horrible marriage which can come back to really taught me to fight and to be strong and to not be dismissed her diminished or discounted by others how his career talked about in your household growing up. I mean I. I had a working mom and a professional mother from the earliest days of my life and so on the one hand. It was an example in an expectation that you can work and have family at the same time. It was rare. Frankly at that time this has been the late sixties early seventies for the mothers of my classmates for for example to be working outside of the home in a professional capacity. So I had her example and I had my father's example of rising up in government and in private it's sector we were expected to excel. We were expected to work hard and do our best. We are also taught that you know we could be whatever we wanted to be. They weren't saying you gotta be this or you got to be that but the fundamental message was whatever you choose to be do your best at it and make it something. That's about somebody other than just yourself when I hear you talk about your parents and them as role models to you and your family I think about it two ways on one hand. I'm like that is incredible. crediple an amazing and they obviously created such a strong legacy in you. Second thing I think of is that's got to be a lot of pressure at times. Did you feel that growing up. Who is funny not really not in the sense of? I was scared that I wasn't going to meet their expectations and they were going to get mad at me. They had a really important saying that. Did they sort of banged into me. And my brother which was do your best and your best will be good enough and what they meant by that was you know. Don't be a slacker. Don't be fast but if you do your best and it's not you do badly that's okay. You are allowed to fail. You just not allowed not to try your best. And so they gave us a sort of confidence in safety net. They'll be behind us. We can take risks. We can do something thing that we may not be good at but just do your best. The message was you know. Don't be lame and that was kind of their version tough love. It doesn't mean that they expected us to always get as observe. Be The best person on the basketball team or whatever the the thing was but were they gave us a hard time was when we sort of cut corners fit in the Rom- of your imagination that you would have the jobs that you ended up having served in the way that you ended up serving the particular job that I had were not in the realm of imagination. Because I didn't know yeah. When I was young I was going to be interested in foreign policy and national security? I didn't know the field well enough to say. This is what I want to but I knew that I was likely to to do something and do it to the best of my abilities and that it would be an ambitious objective.

Susan Rice President Trump Brookings Institution Maine President Barack Obama United States Ambassador Advisor South Carolina Danielle Weisberg United Nations Carly Bill Clinton Radcliffe College Basseterre Rice Obama Administration New York Times Bestseller Netflix Basketball School Of International Servic
How Bad Science Killed A President

Science Vs

03:17 min | 1 year ago

How Bad Science Killed A President

"Come to you with a story who attell a tale of science madness and murder. Let's get to it. Okay. So I'm going to take you back to eighteen eighty one the civil war still fresh, the telephone has recently been invented, and this guy James gov, ILD has just been elected president. This is how I want to introduce it. That's my watch. Wendy's famous enough trumpet. Do we like this Garfield villa? What do you of we do like him actually gobbled was a general in the union army is very anti slavery, and it was a thoughtful guy. He liked to read and fund fact you're gonna love this. He is the only president to have ever proved a math theorem. Well, right. Gothard seemed destined for greatness, but he didn't get a chance to be great because he was assassinated. So to get into the story I've gonna take you somewhere. I'm going to take you to the national museum of American history in Washington. DC. Oh, you have your own realm is. Oh, you didn't need the mouth Trump. But I understand this is like an strain, getting to be easy him before the pit go. We're going to get the side and help us tell the story is Sarah Murphy. I am a collections manager in the division of political and military history. And I go token to Sarah about the guy who shot president Garfield and the assassin's name was Charles guitar. He was a little mentally unbalanced. He had delusions of grandeur so guitar trust to get a job with the government. They reject him for that job. And that, that tips him over the edge, and soon he thinks that God is talking to him. And telling him that he's got to do something. And then he just got in his head that he was being told by God that he needed to remove Garfield. So guitar buys a gun and he stopped following Goth field. And in eighteen ninety one the president doesn't have a security detail. Gothi LD is a sitting duck Hughes, basically stalking the president and watching where he was going had. Not how long full a couple of weeks. He's taking nights on every way he's going and basically figuring out when he's going to try and shoot him and the president. Of course, has no idea. He's in danger and on the morning of July. Second eighteen eighty one God's going out of town, the president's going on some vacation because the middle of summer holidays, and he heads to the train station to start his whole day like they got out of the carriages and walked in, and they would just gotten inside like they weren't because guitar was waiting for them. He knew that they were going to the train station that day, so he was essentially laying in wait, he had just this look on his face of, like calm and collected and raised his gun and. Fire the first shot that grazed Garfield arm. And that's when Garfield was like, oh my God. What is this guitar shoots again? These one nails president Garfield in the back the president falls to the ground and all hell breaks

President Trump President Garfield Charles Guitar Garfield Villa Garfield Arm Sarah Murphy Hughes National Museum Of American Union Army James Gov Murder Gothard Wendy Collections Manager Washington DC Stalking One Nails
"union army" Discussed on Hound Tall with Moshe Kasher

Hound Tall with Moshe Kasher

04:09 min | 1 year ago

"union army" Discussed on Hound Tall with Moshe Kasher

"How long would it take for SUNY? She is encouraged to kind of bury the hatchet get along with one another starting right now or similarly Israel Palestine, the stuff is not going to get worked out of the system quickly it will. But what I what I would say is that there is an aggressor in the situation. And that if the slaves were freed and the clan didn't fuck with them. They probably would have just been farmers. I don't appellate yet. I haven't found her point. No. We should applaud because if you know. Look Israel would go. Okay. You know, the Palestine's. There are people in pal the pals who keep attacking, right? But I don't think we have the same situation with slavery. The slaves were like if they would have been freed and be left a farm. They would've not one hundred percent. And that's actually I obviously true. And not really because it's even true that once slavery was ended. Correct me if I'm wrong slaves weren't even asking for retribution or Justice to be an active. They were just asking to be like let let go let le- let alone. So there wasn't even like a call to bringing a hammer of Justice down upon their totally true. I'm more actually asking about the white southerners in the south when they were conquered by the union army did things just what happened did things kind of in. I'm talking during the war. Did they just go like, okay? Well, we're union now or were they still just fighting teeth a nail fighting all the way up to the nineteen sixties. And right. I guess there's that too. Yeah. Okay. Okay. So, but that's what the that's what the ku-klux-klan is is basically, the real Kia a terrorist organization to intimidate blacks. And the there is the confederate army continuing its the guerrilla army was the confederate army a total in the streets in a freak and the sheet. Yes. So in the movie Django unchained, they have like is this supposed to be in slavery times? And they're all wearing hoods over their faces. You know, historically, inaccurate whatever I'm not going to get upset about that. But the claim. That's all the way your turn. Fine with everything I've mentioned so far morally I'm on board with. Tarintino not historically accurate. That's my problem with that guy. So what were you I've started? But what we're going to say the clans not formed until after the civil war. And that's right porn store. He's actually a pretty chill, dude. If you're good friends with them like me. Pretty good friends. He shot with a machine gun twice. But he got the shot. He was looking. I got the shop. It's not in the movie, but he got shot. So tecumseh Sherman. Is one end and on the other end is you listened to grant? And they're closing in on Robert E Lee is that correct in the west Robert de lis not in the west. And I they take Vicksburg and the Mississippi River, and that's an important thing. And then you listen to us grant goes to the east to try to take on Robert E Lee because everybody else's losing against him. And he ultimately wins. But it's really long drawn out then William to Sherman slices through Georgia. So it takes a peek. Yes, exactly. Thank you. So it takes it takes a while Atlanta. It takes them all to get to Atlanta. But then once it gets to Atlanta, then he does his March to the sea to serve how. Yeah. On Peachtree street or no. The March to the sea. It's where the union army just basically just steamrolled all the way through. So there's not an army to even try to stop them. They're burning shit along the way, actually and. Oh, right. Is that the scene that you see in gone with the wind where they're like? Like in the middle where they're trying to get their shit together. Whatever. Yeah. Yeah. No Atlanta's burning and they as he's puts it he wants to make Georgia howl. And so it's a okay, look, we we're winning. We can do basically whatever we want. We can March an army straight through your country, destroying everything in our path. Your morale should be destroyed as well. As your interesting a little bit shortsighted..

Atlanta union army Robert E Lee confederate army Israel Palestine tecumseh Sherman Georgia SUNY William Israel Vicksburg Mississippi River le one hundred percent
"union army" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

12:54 min | 2 years ago

"union army" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Twain his desk at the White House, the emancipation proclamation each shared it with just a few of his closest advisors emancipation proclamation the same way, we're there to be a union victory. And that would make it possible. Set the stage for. Masturbation proclamation certainly couldn't issued after a union loss, desperate. But whether it'd be a union victory, a patient proclamation promise to serve as a beacon telling slaves, and they had the states are free doors. Many of those slaves. Supporting the confederate army. So they so they were they were growing food the army eight about making the weapons ammunition. Stormy used if they fled it would hobble and Hersi confederate war effort. So Lincoln also had an associate time the emancipation proclamation were kind of breathe new life of passions as union troops. So to either side at one it was going to have drastic consequences and what preceded happen starting at five forty three in the morning in this valley in western Maryland with a single state American history and part of what made it such an intense battle was the stakes. Who was little MAC? And where does he fit in his story? Little MAC was lease rival we've got leased commander of the army of Virginia. They army eastern theater the union army in the eastern theater was commanded by little MAC. George McClellan, and George McLellan was a a West Point graduate graduate second class same as Robert E Lee about the same year. There's twenty years difference in their age Lee was twenty years older than however, the two men knew each other daughter. Well, certainly knew of each other very well. In fact, during the Mexican war back in eighteen forty back in the mid eighteen forties Lee had been a captain and McClellan had worked under Louis. Admit his been his Lieutenant and had leeann instructing place howitzers in order to fire on Mexican Mexican fortifications. And in their time together Lee kinda got a read on the Clelland. I gotta read on become what has become sort of the crisis in Oklahoma with which is because a very hokey slow to move hesitant general Lee knew that full well from personal experience and also from wherever what happened that morning. What went on? What happened that morning was the battles at twelve hour battle really went from sunup to sunset and a mush of the fighting really the most intense fighting was in the morning, and what happened then was was there a couple of areas on the battlefield, and and the battle kind of unfolded battle-plan plan, you might think of it as three punches punched a one. I punched the confederate right? I punch Cassandra. Lest I punch to the confederate avenue the confederate army and the nose. So those punches took place in secrets and so during the morning, it was action in a forty acre cornfield that was unharvested and the confederates in union push back and forth, by some accounts that changed hands twelve different times over the course of a couple of hours just ferocious fighting. There was also a kind of a accidental ambush in an area. Called the Westwood's people often called the Westwood massacre. When door confederates gathered in Westwood's and the union of wondered right past Westwood's gave the confederacy opportunity to come out of the Westwood just massacre. The the union army of the the union soldiers in that facility. And then there was something many people tortoise bloody lane which will say sunken road that the confederates can hunker down in just wave after wave of union soldiers tried to dislodge from the sunken road to their these consecutive pieces of battle action throughout the morning. They were incredibly ferocious and also oddly inconsequential, neither side was able to really press its advantage. Who was Ambrose Burnside? And where does he fit in this story? Good question because that takes us right into when there's finally a kind of significant union breakthrough Ambrose Burnside was at the very southern part of the field. And he was chores is getting twelve thousand five hundred union soldiers across a bridge was called the robot bridge, although any visitor Antietam, right? Is it housi-? Burnside who who asks for many, many hours Kevin credible about four hundred and fifty stalwart Georgian soldiers who really well dug in on the west side of the Antietam creek. We're able to hold off Burnside his twelve thousand five hundred federals for three hours during the morning action. But finally around noontime. Burns. I was finally able to have these these four hundred and fifty Georgian soldiers they were running low on ammo might finally and finally they were able to overwhelm them with this far superior force the union soldiers, then crossed the Burnside bridge. What will come to be known as the Burnside bridge. And also folded and team creek at that point twelve thousand five hundred soldiers a lot of soldiers. I so once they were across the creek, even though this has been kind of piecemeal battle and nothing really worked out his plan throughout the morning. You get twelve thousand five hundred soldiers across Antietam creek. There was still the possibility at midday that had the union had things broken right for the union. They could've ended the confederacy by dinnertime. And what happened was the union? Army had to climb hillside. I'm after crossing in Tim creek to a plateau on which the town of sharks for and if they could get there, they couldn't cut off the rebel armies route across the Potomac out of Maryland into the safe. Fifty of confederate Virginia. But as they were climbing that hillside all of a sudden, I'm Elise trusted deputy AP hill showed up on the scene. He'd marched seventeen miles from harpers ferry that that morning he had two thousand five hundred fresh troops fresh from the standpoint that they had fired a shot, although they had March seventeen miles. So this is the union army got the outskirts of sharks and had this offering to cut off the rebel army. Coauthor their means of exiting back into safety of of Virginia. Eighty hill showed up poor down the hillside drove the union back down the hillside right to the Bank of Antietam creek. And at that point, the sunset and the battle advantium ended. And ended as a technical draw. I guess is how people describe it. Although it would be a union victory from the standpoint of that Lee the next night. What would lead his army across the Potomac back in Virginia. Invasion with the over. What was ABRAHAM LINCOLN during doing during that day? One of one of my favorite things. I learned in my research with that ABRAHAM LINCOLN was fifty five miles away in Washington DC, but this was a pre CNN era. And so he really had no idea exactly what was going on. Now, he knew from telegraphs McClellan accidental that sent him the big battle was shaping up in western Maryland. So when he woke up on September seventeenth eighteen sixty two weeks early riser apply several accounts, I came across he tended to rise at daybreak if he rose at all he was an insomniacs might have just been up all night. But there's a pretty good chance that he was awake. At the exact moment that the fighting broke out and yet most of the day. He would have no idea. He was think maybe it happened. And he actually sent he sent a number of telegrams. The people like governor of Pennsylvania just trying to see if anybody had any scuttle. What was happening? They certainly tried to get touched from the cloud. His general mclovin was. Otherwise engaged and didn't get back to them in a timely manner. So liyan. As I said, it was fascinating me. He spent the day of the battle of antiga, you know, thinking baby a big battle happened in Maryland yesterday. And I haven't got news yet. Maybe it's happening right now. Maybe it'll happen tomorrow. Maybe it won't happen at all. So so at all that time he was what today would be an hour's drive away. What? Mcclellan from continuing the battle the next day. What prevented McClellan is was one of the things that help most interesting in my research was just getting a sense of how. What a manpower exercise, a civil war battle was in modern warfare people watch missiles, and he's thrown strikes. They fly airplanes, a civil war battle was just lines of man. And in a weird way. It was just brute manpower your line over well or flank another line, you could beat them. It was physically exhausting even the act of firing a rifle fire forty shots today. You, you know, you a musket rather union would kick your your shoulder be kicked black and blue. You're carrying heavy weaponry a lot of people had poor shoes. A lot of the men were malnourished. All of them were deal that was kind of a long way to way of saying people kind of is this kind of twenty twenty hindsight where people wonder McClellan, it's certainly you sort of had that had a slight advantage. You might call it at the end of the day of the September seventh. Why didn't you resume the next day? Well, he got it took the measure of his army and the toll it cost just fighting those those man who weren't injured or dead were either just exhausted hungry and some of them were just kind of panicked. They they'd seen such horrid today before they even have fan fought, they weren't exactly feeling at ease. So it was really it was a matter of attrition that prevented him from pursuing the battle the following day. What kind of a dated stonewall Jackson have on September seventeenth eighteenth, sixty two. He added j I think I think most historians agree that he didn't figure large team. I mean, he's such a a hallowed of confederate general. He's known so much for his boldness innovation, and he really just maybe close of style of the battle was fought very tight confines the tight confines of a valley. And he just didn't. I mean, certainly didn't comport himself in a way that was in any way, embarrassing or anything. But it wasn't a moment. Install OBE Jackson's biography. Your antetok doesn't stand out with something like say, the valley campaign is one of the great, you know. Access of innovation and hand boldness on on his part. Justin Martin is the author of this wonderful new book, a fierce glory and Tito, the desperate battle that save Lincoln and doom slavery who was a union general who had a really good day on September. Seventeenth, justin. That is a good question. Let me think about who who might be a person to two point to. I guess I might point to Hooker from the stamp said that although he was wet from the field injured, but he certainly showed bold leadership in in the in the cornfield action it opened the day. But that's a good question. Because I gotta say the union generals just in general. Did not have their finest day. The of course, the Burnside bridge is named after Ambrose Burnside. And he did awesome. The way he he also had an okay day. He he did get across that bridge. But you also have to discredit him for you know, for spending three hours having twelve thousand federal soldiers held off by four hundred and fifty well dug in Georgia. And so was it even though the union at a you might call it a strategic victory. It was it wasn't a showcase for union generalship. Justin, Martin author of a fierce glory is our guest from New York. And we've got another segment with Justin. We'll dig a little bit deeper into this whole story of the battle of antique them. This is the Pat Williams weekend. Our we gather like this every weekend. Always enjoy it. Hope you do. You're listening to news ninety six five in Orlando. More.

union army George McClellan Ambrose Burnside Army confederate army Maryland Burnside bridge Robert E Lee ABRAHAM LINCOLN Westwood Justin Martin union Virginia Antietam creek confederate Virginia Bank of Antietam creek rebel army commander Twain
"union army" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

05:43 min | 2 years ago

"union army" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"Ten twenty four central time. CCOO our phone number six five one nine eight nine nine two to six and toll free eight six six nine eight nine nine two to six. So here's a story. I Muhammad Ali. Back in sixty four when cashes clay joined the nation of Islam and changes named Mohammed Ali he had a straightforward explanation. When he was asked about that. He he answered the question with a question. Why should I keep my white slave masters name visible? Am I black ancestors invisible on knowing honored then it was more of an abstract abstract concept a statement against white oppression? Ali did not know much. If anything about his ancestors zone family tree decades later, though. Ali's family has made a discovery that appears to shed new light on the boxers lineage where he came from an also was place in American history. Ali according to his family's research. Ready for this is the great great great grandson of Archer, Alexander a slave who here roic fought for both his own freedom and against slavery. Alexander escape from bondage. And fed information to the union army during the civil war. He was later the model for the sleeve depicted in the emancipation proclamation memorial emancipation memorial, a statue in Lincoln park about a mile east of the US capital. Jonathan figure Jonathan is the author of Ali your life. So the beautiful thing about Ali is that he acted all along as if you were royalty that he had a claim to greatness. I said all he spent much of his life, attacking racist ideas. If he had known that has great great great. Grandfather was such a brave and intelligent, man. It surely would have strengthened his argument after being alerted to the families discovery in recent weeks, I investigated the claim and then included it in the paperwork addition of the biography, which comes out this week. He said to the best of my ability to confirm this it checks out. Ali's daughter Mariam. So that her fodder would have been proud to call Alexander family. He would love knowing. He was connected to someone like that. He was a head of people and understanding that there was a connection that went back through slavery to the kings and queens in Africa. The discovery was made by ALI'S third. Cousin Keith Winstead who has retired from a career in computer manufacturing? And is something of an amateur genealogist. Winstead discovered the connection between Ali and Alexander while conducting research on the website Twenty-three in me. The finding is supported by DNA evidence. Which according to Mary, Molly. Was collected. When Ali and his wife Lani participated in a study with twenty three and me to raise awareness for Parkinson's disease which Ali suffered. Another gas that we should get on hammer. This is this is absolutely fabulous. We can learn more. We'll get Mr. wagon. Alexander was born into slavery in Virginia and eighteen thirteen before he was sold and taken the Missouri. The Missouri remained neutral during the civil war. Alexander was owned by a confederate sympathizer. There are a lot of those Missouri. And in eighteen sixty three he learned that confederate troops had saved. Her head sought a train bridge that union soldiers were planning to cross. He walked five miles to war in the union army, potentially saving hundreds of lives. They also passed along information about hidden arms. Accused of feeding information to the enemy in with his safety. Endanger Alexander ran away, the beating slave catchers by climbing out of a tavern window before he reached Saint Louis. He later arranged for the escape of his wife and children. Alexander said, go for your freedom f you dies for it. You found work in Saint Louis was a gardener for William greenleaf Eliot Washington University's co founder and the grandfather of the poet TSA Elliott. Elliot obtained an order of protection for his employees, though, slave catchers came for Alexander again beating catching him before Elliott produced a protective order to secure his release. We'll try and get Mr Guy. Yeah. We can go into more detail on this because this is really really fascinating. I always I always liked Mohammed Ali. And what he did that people just aren't aware of the money that he that he donated to various charitable organizations that he never said a word and wanted to be kept confidential. He was a good, man. One of the greatest athletes of all time. We'll continue taking your calls are phone number six five one nine eight nine nine two to six an toll free eight six six nine eight nine nine two two six ten thirty on C O. Or Android smartphone?.

Muhammad Ali Alexander Mohammed Ali Alexander family union army Missouri Keith Winstead clay Africa TSA Elliott Mr Guy US Lincoln park Saint Louis Mr. wagon Archer roic Jonathan
"union army" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

05:13 min | 2 years ago

"union army" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Credited with supplying important information to stonewall Jackson during the war. Abbott says Boyd was bolder than most southern belles at the time and wasn't afraid to shoot. First and ask questions later bell. Was so interesting to me first of all she was only seventeen years old when the war broke out. She's all ID, you know, she had no filter, and she was really incredibly overt with both her opinions and her sexuality for the time period. And for only being seventeen years old. I like to say if you know, Sarah Palin and Miley Cyrus had a nineteenth century, baby. It would have been bellboy. Do you know, she just was really out there on all fronts, and he kicks things off in and July eighteen sixty one she's living in Shenandoah valley Virginia and union forces are marching down, and they're planning to have a big fourth of July parade in her hometown. And a balance waiting for them. And she's waiting for them with a pistol by her side. And so when one of these union soldiers threatens to raise a flag over her home federal flag. She objects to this and decides to shoot this fellow dead, and she gets away with it and goes on to become a career in spy for the confederate army and has quite a few adventures in the war, finally Abbott profiles, a real female soldier Emma Edmonds, she joined the union army after escaping from an oppressive life in Canada. She had grown up in Canada with an abusive father, and he threatened to he was going to arrange a marriage for her with an elderly neighbor, and he has seen with this sort of arranged marriage had done to her sister's sort of stopping all their spirit, and she wanted something different for herself. She wanted a life of adventure. And so she cuts her hair and binds her breasts trade her dress for a man's suit calling herself Frank Thompson and living man as he migrates to the United States right before the war started hearing about the abolitionist John Brown and all the events leading up to the war and decides she wants a piece of this. She wants to listen to the union army. And it's quite surprising. How all of these women are about four hundred. We're able to disguise themselves as mad at enlist and the armies both north and south. And and of course, he goes on to have quite a few harrowing adventure during the war. But how could a woman pass herself off a man when living in close quarters with soldiers and enduring the required medical exams, they just sort of happy's cursory physical exam. They only cared if you had finger support trigger if you had enough teeth to rip off powder cartridges. But if you had feet the March that was pretty much it. So the doctor merely shook Emma Edmund hand and said, you're okay, you're acceptable. And she was in private Frank Thompson. And then of course, you know, how did she pass them on her comrades here? She's sleeping next to them. And in close quarters with them all day long and marching beside them. And I came to the conclusion that it would mostly because people had no idea what women would look like wearing pants. She says that there were plenty of Mata Haris in the ranks as well. Women who used their wiles to price-sensitive information from the other side bellboy. Was a notorious seductress her main power more was a union general by the name of James shields. And it was reported that she was quote closeted for four hours with him during one rendezvous, and then she subsequently wrap the rebel flag around his head and celebration and Ruth greenhouse was maple equally talented seductress, I guess I should say and would sort of consort with both northern and southern generals, but really focused on high ranking northern politicians because of course, they were the ones who are going to provide valuable information that she could pass along to the confederate army and her main reported are more in source was a man by the name of Senator Henry Wilson of Massachusetts. Was not only at Appalachian Republican. But also, the chairman of Lincoln's committee on military affairs. So you can imagine that they had some rather interesting pillow talk. How good were these women at going undercover to help their causes? So good that one famous security expert of the time sang their praises, Allan Pinkerton. Who is the union detective was hired to do secret service work for the union and actually one of his first mission was to conduct a stakeout of rose Greenhow the confederates by of he often said that women made better spies than men they knew what to say in certain situations and knew what not to say certain situations. And I think we're more genuinely intuitive as he said as some of his best spies were actually women. And it was also interesting that Pinkerton and the other northern officials and eventually the southern officials when they got wind of Elizabeth what she was doing in Richmond. They just did not know how to deal with them. So even if they suspected these women they didn't quite know how to handle them. You know, women were always the victims of war, not as perpetrators. And it was sort of unthinkable that women would be capable of this story about Titi. You know, not only are they capable of treasonous activity, but he publ of executing. It more definitely than men habits says that not only did women spies and soldiers help in the war effort on both sides. They also helped change the way women were perceived after the war with so many war widows and few single men to marry the ladies of the mid eighteen hundreds had to learn to support themselves in farming business and entrepreneurial endeavors, you can find out about the adventures of four of these brave women who changed the face of the civil war in Karen Abbott's book liar. Temptress.

Karen Abbott union army confederate army Frank Thompson Allan Pinkerton Canada stonewall Jackson Sarah Palin Mata Haris Emma Edmund Shenandoah valley Virginia Miley Cyrus Emma Edmonds Boyd Lincoln Senator Henry Wilson United States chairman James shields
"union army" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"union army" Discussed on KGO 810

"The union army's being resupplied with new a new core arriving as well and there's a dramatic moment it would make a wonderful play at meets headquarters that night council of war john gibbons of the attends david birney newton hancock howard sedgwick slocum all representing the cores available in this fishhook status what does meat ask them professor what does mead want to do the question he puts them as shall we stay here and fight or shall we fall back from this position to a position more defensible to the rear of course what he is thinking of is the position that he had always wanted to use as a defensive position and that was paid creek about twenty five miles to the southeast in maryland and most of the corps commanders who are coming to this meeting are expecting that that's what need wants to do they're concerned that he really does want to order a retreat but when they come together and he pulls them the corps commanders are overwhelmingly opposed to retreat at handcock again winfield scott hancock puts his foot down and says this army has done enough retreating let this be our last retreat they vote from shoulders and says all right gentlemen if this is what you want then we will fight here they vote from the junior to the senior that's the voting for mead and mead protocol invent eventually persuaded by them john gibbons my note says that he wants to correct the position david birney says we stay newton i don't i i wanna concentrate on newton newton says what about if they try to cut our line did consider that john newton was really functioning as george meade's mouthpiece he had been appointed hastily to command the evening before command the i corps and everyone understood the john newton was speaking for me and newton rather timidly puts forward the idea well perhaps we should consider retreating well when all the other corps commanders compiling in on the opposite side of that proposition even newton decides that it's probably a good idea to go along with everyone else but newton is newton is very much out of his class along with all this others there are about fifty eight thousand men they figure that they have laughed and they know lease coming again in the morning and as the caps of quiet down for the night professor paints the scene which is horrible of the ambulance core of what he describes as snakes of light men holding lanterns weaving through the wounded who are still on the battlefield to remove what they can and get them to the high hospitals the amputations are going on piles of legs and arms all night they have no good for a first aid and a men who are got shot are just left to die there's nothing they can do for them they give them opium in the morning lease up any goes to gettysburg college which at that time is unknown as pennsylvania college he climbs the couple and what does he see professor he sees the army of the potomac on the ropes now the seven infantry corps of the army of the potomac well most of them are a wreck the first cores iraq the eleventh a ereck third cores ereck fifth a wreck six core meet needs that as reserve twelfth corps meet needs that to hold cult sale that leaves only the second corps and the second court self has been rather badly handled an entire division is gone and of the two remaining divisions there's really only two brigades each that are ready for combat lease deduction from these observations is let's weighed in with one last blow and that will stretch the army.

union army
"union army" Discussed on X96

X96

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"union army" Discussed on X96

"Union army surgeons on a civil war battlefield and buried their we've heard these stories but this is these archaeological proof of what what these surgeons were forced to do the remains discovering twenty fourteen excavated in two thousand fifteen from virginia's manassas national battlefield park marked the first ever discovery of an intact surgeons lamma pit there had been you know a written accounts of it but they found it in if you from you've ever seen gone with the wind i think it's when the after the intermission the movie opens with the scene i haven't seen him for years but it opens and it just left it i you know i don't know matter of fact i don't think i've seen gone with the wind since i was a kid i i've never i've never seen it you've never seen gone with it was nothing i was ever interested in it's it's really it's most of it is really quite good but the scene when opens right out of the disturbing and it's the it's an art it's a surgical field surgeons tents dozens of tents and there they're sawn off people's arms and legs and they're out of ether yan they're putting her out we gotta just put them in piles there's a lot of that i mean there's some of the movie that's over the top as i recall and but there's some of it that's just incredible and it's beautifully filmed.

virginia Union army
"union army" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"union army" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"I told you that i had a few experiences one was on a battlefield and i wish i could rent what's that bridge uh you know they're e n gettysburg area there's at oh yeah you're talking about and i get invested while i we did visit we can investigate because it was midnight and free shipping and full of people that you're talking about facts covered bridge correct yes that's it and though he had gone out there we had gone out there one of the nights with a very small grouping of people and a sensitive and we were just out there just kind of enjoying it it was nice it wasn't too cold it was just about right we're just standing on the bridge kind of chatting and dumb the sensitive we're with said there's something approaching i can send something and you know i'm still skeptical of a lot of people to claim that they can send something energetically approaching and we turned toward the battlefield area and began seeing what looked like flash cubes going off on at first i thought are those you know i grew up in illinois we had lightning bugs right um and i'm like that is not a lightning bug those are literally like pops of light i'm watching and we stood there astounded i in you're not supposed to be out in that area i approached the battlefield in the dark at night anyway i wanted to go see what we were seeing there and with somebody playing a joke on us it wasn't something being projected it was is they were popping in mid air and we weren't hearing a thing and we recorded all of us whipped out our phones inserted recording immediately so we weren't getting any gun fodder at all but man the visual was crazy richard you can literally c would appear to be flashes from gun points up incredible and the fame bridge i'm thinking of it it fact covered ripped right dave with big their way through every right exactly so that would you five both army during the campaign um it would you by the union army i believe the fifth cool as they pushed into gettysburg and it was used by the confederates afterwards during the retreat and they would.

richard dave union army illinois
"union army" Discussed on KELO

KELO

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"union army" Discussed on KELO

"The was a horse have you heard anything worked there that would be a great story go ahead rich uh i'm familiar with that marker i i it may be the only person that i've heard actually story of encountering the spirit of course um the ghost of animal for actually more common than we would believes um they sure hail of yeah go of ghost dog cat and going home and even uh there's there's a hotel and energy their claim for the ghosts of course um call the walk more cook hill and yeah go west route out of gettysburg actually a big logistics route uh running between uh the union army and gettysburg in fact i believe cash town were there a lot of a general ap air was stationed troops where from gettysburg on i thirty i think it is um so yeah i mean i had not heard of anyone running into the ghosts of the horse but yeah getting it to the spirit of animal go happened more than you would think and that's quite an interesting experience a lot of people who have a loved cat or dog dennis passed on we'll see pawprints or something like that on their bed you know it and you could see the invitations as if the animal still there absolutely and sometimes even kill them like a warm spotlight and we're sitting there joe in the bronx welcome to the show joseph go hey judge hey why good joey good yeah i want up this rich now after gettysburg what is the next smiles on the battlefield over civil war and is it shilo i would say would be their shilo or spots of ya um shilo has a lot of you know areas of as i mentioned earlier such as bloody on um there's also an orchard feel that's very well know they they call it the hornet's nest um were there just they said so many bullets were flying through the air that they found the like hornets funding uh and of course there's the story the drama buoyed pop lavinia is also wellknown for about five or six different.

dennis joe joseph civil war hornets union army joey
"union army" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"union army" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"Dot edu and sign up for their free and terrific online courses this next american stories about the youngest civil war general in the union army and incredibly fearless man who scented his air with cinnamon oil a man who saroeun been reenacted time after time for the big and large stage and screen in fact president ronald reagan played him in the nineteen forty western santa fe trail a box office success that reagan starred opposite errol flynn a year later flynn also start is this man in the bio pic they died are boots on on this day in eighteen seventy seven the us army held a west point funeral with full military honors for lieutenant colonel george armstrong custer this is his story plummet desolate hillside emits the rolling prairie of montana george armstrong koster made his laststand although one of the most successful military leaders in united states history it was custer's defeat that made him a legend and gave you the american west it's first true hero no historians now cast the less glorious picture of george custer who is more likely referred to as a villain been as an american martyr but one point is clear george custer was an exceptionally grave an effective combat leader doering america's bloody civil war the 23yearold custer became the youngest than most admired general in the union army with her rolex that helped him win the most decisive battle at gettysburg custer in a battle uh was was.

union army president errol flynn colonel george armstrong custe george armstrong koster united states america civil war ronald reagan montana
"union army" Discussed on Shutdown Fullcast

Shutdown Fullcast

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"union army" Discussed on Shutdown Fullcast

"A union gunboat came into tampa bay and then launched a boat with twenty men flying a flag of truce a team of about eighteen confederate soldiers met them in the bay and basically said nope we're not going to let you land uh the confederates were given a message that the union army uh the union a navy rather at wanted tampa to sinn surrender unconditionally to union control the confederates refused and so the union said that they would start shelling the town at six o'clock they gave them a time the they put it on their global calendar um in response to this the confederate a delegation gave three hearty cheers but that's at six o'clock the union of vessel the sagnimore opened fire with heavy shell the confederate army returned fire both parties then kept up a regular fire until seven p m at that point the sagnimore withdrew the next day they came back beyond the range of the confederate cannon started firing again after a twohour break for lunch the u s s sagnimore fired two wore rounds wait anchor and sailed away there were no casualties on either side the bow of tampa was a bunch of armed men shooting at each other and hitting nothing and only stopping for lunch rent test occurs was 38 guys all total yeah what is the smallest number of people you can have still call it a battle i mean feels it feels like we're approaching that number here we can't this this is more like a fight in the school lunch this is this is a musical is what this is this is jacks for sharks will forms a dual what seconds bright so i'm just gonna let it and allows us for the tac came title belt.

tampa bay union army tampa confederate army sinn twohour
"union army" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"union army" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"Hundreds of black union army soldiers a founder the kkk why don't people just do the obvious thing get rid of the statues you would think there would be imminent under global there would be a bipartisan contempt the most competitive that they represent local center a symbol ago he'll be removed in in in libya debated visit memory going through a democratic profit i you know i think when you look at com it is an administration general either sort of a coalition of against everything alah or thing i think that's what you're seeing in the confederate that she debate that's just a guanajuato urban calling her reexamination of confederate era memorial and statues the after vehicles i don't believe in making the easy ones hardened the hard ones easy this is an easy one take the statues down and move on now the good news is the president met with his war cabinet they had a very comprehensive conversation it's gone on for six months he's reached decision and we don't know what it is the good news is nobody leaked yeah nobody league though you i i would imagine guilty from reporting grabbed day ordering the weekly standard it is reporting that foul play the president's going to call her a small increase in the number of crew in afghanistan crept up several thousand and it looks like the the mcmaster kelley mattis wing of the administration as as one out again but what was one of the of wing of this administration so uh the hawks are really offended uh go airplane policy more generally but in afghanistan donald trump was very critical o o of mcmaster would want wanted a way out in afghanistan in the looks like you you're going to recommit troops to.

libya guanajuato president hawks donald trump mcmaster black union army founder confederate era afghanistan mcmaster kelley mattis wing six months
"union army" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

03:05 min | 3 years ago

"union army" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"A simple solution to all of this so let's take the statue of robert easily that right now is in the united states capital and let's move it to arlington arlington was his home it was confiscated by the union army a few months into the war they lost the lease lost everything put it in arlington in the house and put an explanation they're a short biography then take the statue which is now at the university of virginia and take it to pietersburg the last great battle though tragic tragic last battle of the civil war and put that statue of lee at petersberg along with an explanation of his attempts to surrender that army before the crater in march of 1865 and that's enough of um i i bet enough of a history lesson i five all put you all to sleep so i'm joyce courtie in you're listening to the reimagined america radio hour and let's talk about a twentyfirst century subject poured general john kelly if only been two weeks can he believe can his wife believe when he comes home at night that it's only been two weeks since he took on the job of chief of staff of the trump white house the question we asked two weeks ago was could this decent good extraordinarily capable man succeed in bringing order out of chaos in the white house he did put some basic discipline end of the staff things like when you come to work and you know that you keep the door of the president's office close of the people know does drop in um he removed or facilitated the removal of some of the most obvious problems in the white house likes caramel chee or the two extremist all right holdovers of general flynn's um in a national security council um me he has he thought he had isolated steve bannon and rendered him impotent uh we found out this week that wasn't true um and we found out not just through the president unfortunate comments um inexplicable comments hall it will leave it at inexplicable we don't want to be disrespectful but we also heard mr bannon in mr bannon's own words um in the new york times and a couple of other interviews that he gave this week in which he countered uh policy and went on to say all the more that.

robert union army arlington the house civil war joyce courtie john kelly president flynn steve bannon new york times united states arlington arlington university of virginia america chief of staff two weeks
"union army" Discussed on Super Station 101

Super Station 101

02:59 min | 3 years ago

"union army" Discussed on Super Station 101

"To report them and hopefully at some point in time summer this i someone may very well stick i have my doubts but hopefully at some point in time there will be a cadre if you will or a section a crosssection a percentage of the democratic population dow will come to the understanding that you are being lied to i hate it and one of the reasons that i am so adamant about this is because in doing the research for the book i discovered one falsehood after the other after the other after the other that has been perpetrated only american public and reported in taught time and time and time again and repeated so often then eventually apparently some folks would hope that up with stick such as you know betsy rawls sowing the first fly together never happen she was a seamstress but it never happened years in the movie uh saving private ryan yes okay you know the opening seena private ryan where the general his play by um has now reads a ladder from a woman by the name of lydia a bixby mckay and the fact that abraham lincoln writes a ladder to lydia bixby because five of her son serbian emin union army have been killed in battle and he uses that ladder as justification to extract paul ryan despite the fact that many americans again it's a it's a fictitious movie but the water was real oh and this is something else recovering the book by in the movie were saving private ryan using the justification of the lincoln letter which was in fact true to this woman lydia bixby who lost five sons during the civil war problem is to if not three of those signs are known to have survived the war one of them is known to have deserted the union army another one is known to have defected to the confederacy the third it was reported was seen as late as eighteen 71 two of the son's didn't fact die in battle but when lydia bixby received a letter from abraham lincoln she tore it to shreds because she was a confederate sympathizer who hated lincoln's guts she was also a malcontent and was accused of several different misdemeanor crimes during her lifetime but the thing gets reported over and over and over again as this charming little letter from abraham lincoln in support.

betsy rawls bixby mckay abraham lincoln serbian emin union army paul ryan lydia bixby civil war
"union army" Discussed on KOIL

KOIL

02:37 min | 3 years ago

"union army" Discussed on KOIL

"Thirteen thcentury has made its leaders princes ever since so this would make emmanuel mark on burma krone the prince emanuel his name is prints emmanuel and because of his party sweep of legislative elections some articles in france are even calling him a monarch who can rule by decree he becomes prince emmanuel of andorra matt krone has positioned himself as well the french nationalist and a european federalist at a time of great political polarity in france now he rides the fence and perhaps this is what is propelled him to such great power so quickly but but make no mistake mccrone clearly wants to revive the faltering european union and has voiced support for a federal europe and creating in a european army so the eu can claim back those things it loses as its faltering so he wants to fortify the european union's army and france itself has the first or second most powerful military in the european union given that of it along with the united kingdom are the only two countries in the eu that possess nuclear arsenals now we know that england is breaking away with brexit so they'll be they'll be their own group again but wouldn't it be odd if a french cesar but mccrone besides that he wants to fortify the army of the european union the first president united states excellent in the united states it was the the first president of the united nations general assembly was named paul henri spock he was also a prime minister of belgium n one of the early planners of the european union is also secretarygeneral of nato and he said this he said we do not want another committee we have too many already what we want is a man of sufficient stature to hold the allegiance of all the people of the world and to lift us up out of economic morass in which we we are sinking send us such a man and whether he be god or the.

burma france prince emmanuel matt krone mccrone european union europe united kingdom nuclear arsenals england president united states united nations paul henri spock prime minister belgium
"union army" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"union army" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Union army at that time and who was a a person who harboured strong jealousy for roberty leave fraternity against the union joining the confederacy uh recommended to president lincoln that they're they establish cemetery on the grounds principally to to uh provide additional burials face secondarily to prevent generally or his family from river living in the state again and the actually before the cemetery was actually established in june eighteen sixty four on may thirteen eight sixty four the first burial place was a private william crispin from pennsylvania infantry regiment who had died in a in a washington hospital that's amazing to me that that you would know that history would know the very first person to be buried in arlington i've never guess we we would know that that was where the unions soldiers buried close to the mansion did i understand yes they were they were buried in what what was of mrs lease rose garki a lake near the mansion in meetings a federal meags we mentioned before actually personally supervised because he wanted them buried so close to the mansion that it would never become a private home again to tell us the connection the or the history of the mrs lee well mrs lee actually owned property wasn't actually general lease property uh her father george washington park kosh this was the adopted son of george washington which many people don't know when he died other property with mrs lee and she in and raised her family there for many many years while her husband was in the united states army serving out west uh he came back to the property at some point in time after george washington park kosh died and he's actually buried with his wife on the property so they were actually.

Union army lincoln william crispin pennsylvania infantry regiment washington hospital arlington united states army president mrs lee george washington park george washington