36 Burst results for "two decades"

Fresh update on "two decades" discussed on WBBM Afternoon News Update

WBBM Afternoon News Update

00:50 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "two decades" discussed on WBBM Afternoon News Update

"The basis within which they're going to challenge or attempt to challenge the extradition. We're ready to proceed. Today. A judge gave their defense two weeks to review and file papers ahead of it. October 9th hearing protests continue in Louisville across the country as well after charges were not filed against police officers involved in the shooting death of Rianna Taylor today. Taylor's family called Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron but not filing charges. Costing his tailors on camera alone didn't kill her. But it ended with the lack of investigation failed her. The officer who told a lie to obtain the search went filled. Her judge who signed the search warrant failed her. The terrorist who broke down her door failed her system as a whole. Has filled her. Taylor was shot by police in March during a search warrant that involved her then boyfriend. The Major League Baseball season wraps up this weekend with the cub's heading to the South side to play the White Sox and the bars and restaurants around Wrigley Field. It marks the end of a lackluster so this was not the summer anyone had counted on. Certainly not the owners and employees of bars and Wrigleyville. Shawn Berry has worked in Wrigleyville establishments for the better part of two decades. Now he's general manager of Output Lounge on Clark Street is disappointed for me.

Rianna Taylor General Manager Wrigley Field Wrigleyville Daniel Cameron Louisville White Sox Kentucky Major League Officer Attorney
Boston's WPI math professor verifies centuries-old conjecture about formation of the solar system

WBZ Midday News

01:07 min | 2 d ago

Boston's WPI math professor verifies centuries-old conjecture about formation of the solar system

"Years years later, later, and scientists are still searching and wondering. About the truth. They're looking for answers and double BBC's Chris Fama tells us about a breakthrough by a local mathematician, shedding new light into the Milky Way itself to the scientific community. The future is rather bleak, something they're going to come closer and closer to the sun. Of course, that means disaster for humanity. Another believe we are going to be running away from the sun, and you know they were going to be a called neither scenario appeals. Toe. Wister Poly Tech professor Meyer, who me who has dedicated the last two decades to verify the formation of our solar system began with gas rings formed around a proto star because it could help scientists figure out what comes next. On Planet Earth. I was somehow able to needle any such discovery lead to understanding off all kinds of processes like climate predictions. Biological processes to face issues. Chris Palmer W B. Z Boston's NewsRadio fascinating stuff. All right, coming up. It's

Chris Fama Chris Palmer W Professor Meyer BBC Boston
Does Growing Almonds Really Waste Too Much Water?

The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

02:58 min | 3 d ago

Does Growing Almonds Really Waste Too Much Water?

"Friend recently related to me a conversation that she'd had with her Barista, a well-known coffee chain. The BARISTA's convicted that she always bristles when her customers order almond milk for their la tastes because she said growing almonds waste so much water. You may have heard similar things about almonds and their negative impact on the environment. For example, maybe you've heard that it takes a gallon of water to produce a single almond and perhaps like my friends Brisa. You've even been avoiding almonds or almond milk out of concern about their water usage but as is so often the case there's a little more to this story. It's true that almonds are a very water intensive crop but not really more. So then most nuts if we were all to switch to pistachio milk or walnut milk and prompting farmers to start growing more of those nuts instead of growing so many almonds, we'd still be using about the same amount of water. According to data published in the June twenty eighteen issue of the journal Science, the Non Dairy alternatives that have the lowest water footprint are soy and oat milk but not milk's still use significantly less water to produce then cow's milk and in terms of greenhouse gas emissions, almond milk may actually be one of the better choices because these trap so much co two in their leaves more so than other crops but getting back to water issues, the reasons that almond uses such a large share of California's water supply is that they make up such a large share of. His cultural economy. The growing conditions in California are perfect for almonds plus almonds are really high value. Crop farmers earn far more per acre growing almonds than they can growing other crops and demand for almonds has also skyrocketed in the last two decades in part due to a sustained campaign by industry groups to promote the health benefits of almonds. Commodity Groups that support almond growers have spent millions of dollars funding research into almonds, effects on cholesterol, appetite, blood, sugar, body weight, and so forth all in an effort to convince consumers that almonds are super healthy food and it worked although our consumption of other nuts estate relatively steady our intake of alms has. Over the last half century in addition to eating more almonds were also buying more almond butter, topping our salads with almonds baking with almond flour, and ironically even though almond milk doesn't really contain the same benefits as all men's it is also perceived as being very healthy and for consumers who want to avoid both dairy, and so the almond milk has long been the go-to

California
How Beauty Insider Tina Hedges Created LOLI, an Environmentally Sound Brand

Latina to Latina

06:11 min | 4 d ago

How Beauty Insider Tina Hedges Created LOLI, an Environmentally Sound Brand

"Career has taken her. From the perfume counter at macy's inside a conic brands like Christian Dior Estee Lauder Al. but after almost two decades beauty shetty personal crisis that inspired her to start lally beauty the I zero waste organic food grade approach beauty we talk about her a Pitney the one thing she asks every investor she meets with and why she is so committed to getting this, right. Teen almost two decades in the beauty industry and then you had both a health scare and day crisis of conscience. What happened I had spent about almost about to get decades or so traveling the world in pretty high powered marketing roles and innovation roles for big companies in the industry pretty much helping, decide and create all the products in women's beauty cabinets and. started. Simultaneously, I had this weird across section of I started having all these other immune issues and systemic allergies. A No physician could sort of pinpoint what was really triggering it as well as went through early menopause. And I was in my mid thirties and no underlying health conditions for that and I started to think about. All of the products have been applying to my body from head to toe for almost two decades and I started thinking about all those buildup of toxins and chemicals, and I realized that I had been polluting my own body and simultaneously. I had this consciousness of wow. Not only have I been pushing into the world products filled with all these chemicals and nasty since and and carcinogens endocrine disrupters all of this you know really scary stuff but on top of that were blending all of that in eighty to ninety five percent water because most of your skin hair and body products are literally water you're paying for water. And then wrapping all that in single use plastic and when the world is running out of water, it's one of our most precious resources when the boy to be more plastic in the ocean than fish by twenty, twenty five. None of this makes any sense to me or None of that made any sense to me a when I had this convergence of the crisis of health and crisis consciousness. Once you had that a home moment what was the first thing you did to sort of take that idea and start? Making it an actual reality. So I had already left the corporate world and I had gone into the start world. I launched a very successful. vegan sulfate free hair brand. Actually I was the first to use reality TV show on Bravo a show called blow out about a hairstylist in La and his hair salon. But because of us sort of uniquely understood, it was basically an hour long infomercial. We turned the industry on dime because prior to that I mean it was super early days of reality to be. We're talking like two, thousand, four it was America's biggest loser where for the straight guy blow out and the apprentice those were the reality shows that were on at that time and I realized wait a second. This is a show about a hairstylist. Want we show him developing his own brand? and. Don't have done that. So we were the first do that. And the purpose of going back to that stories I know how difficult it is. To start a business especially as a minority Hispanic female founder over the age of thirty. So I was really scared to start this and I. Just. Kept finding excuses left a brighter I'm going to consult or help this person with their brand, and it finally got the place at I was just sitting there and I realized. What do I have to lose? What's the worst thing that could happen? So I- self-financed and out of my upper side small studio apartment I launched a test of Lawley and so that was the beginning. Lawley is the world's first zero waste organic food grade approach to beauty. I want break each part of that down what does it mean to be Zero Waste We go to farms and fairtrade cops around the world, and we find parts of organic food that are being wasted or being thrown away in the process. So for example, our Plum Elixir, we work with a organic farm four generation owned in France that grows a very rare plummets called the end tape them and sa- tiniest considered like the fog or caviar of plums it's it's quite unique. It's extremely potent in antioxidants and vitamins and minerals, and when they make prune juice or pitted prunes, they were throwing away the colonel. And the Patriarch the father of this owner of the farm. About ten years ago said wait. We, press avocado oil from the pit of an avocado. We press all sorts of oils from pits Robin Doyle, why can't we press an oil and organic food grade oil from the pit of the plum? And he literally invented it like they're no one had ever had plum oil, and then he worked with the French bent to get it organic certified and recognized as a food ingredient, and then we started working with them and realized how powerful it was for skin hair

Lawley Christian Dior Estee Lauder Al Robin Doyle Macy Menopause Lally Systemic Allergies I Bravo LA France America Founder
Amal Clooney quits UK role over 'lamentable' Brexit plan

KYW 24 Hour News

00:25 sec | 6 d ago

Amal Clooney quits UK role over 'lamentable' Brexit plan

"Rights lawyer Amal Clooney has quit her role is the U. K's envoy on press freedoms. She says she cannot represent a country that has openly said it will break international law in order to gain a trade advantage after Brexit the British government says it is ready to roll back parts of the hard won protocol on Northern Ireland. Designed to uphold a peace agreement that has held for two decades. Elaine Cobb, CBS News

Amal Clooney Elaine Cobb British Government Northern Ireland Cbs News U. K
Amal Clooney quits UK role over 'lamentable' Brexit plan

Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

00:33 sec | Last week

Amal Clooney quits UK role over 'lamentable' Brexit plan

"In protest over the U. K's threat to violate an international treaty. The United Kingdom's special envoy, a media freedom Amal Clooney quits Human rights lawyer Amal Clooney has quit her role is the U. K's envoy on press freedoms. She says she cannot represent a country that has openly said it will break international law in order to gain a trade advantage after Brexit the British government says it is ready to roll back parts of the hard won protocol on Northern Ireland. Designed to uphold a peace agreement that has held for two decades.

Amal Clooney U. K United Kingdom Northern Ireland British Government
PG&E Mistake May Have Exacerbated Rolling Blackouts

Forum

01:00 min | Last week

PG&E Mistake May Have Exacerbated Rolling Blackouts

"Morning. An error by PG and E last month may have contributed to one of California's first rolling blackouts in two decades. Lily Jamali has more on August 15th when hundreds of thousands of Californians lost power for a second straight day. A power plant in the Central Valley unexpectedly ramped down production. That's according to a report out Friday from the California Independent System Operator. Not stated was the PGA. Any personnel made the mistake, which came just his energy demand was peaking during an intense heat wave. P Jeannie says it doesn't know if the mishap directly led to the blackouts. But energy expert Steve Weisman says any loss of power on the grid would have played a role in some of the black out. Some of the customers who were turned off could have been spared in that situation. The error pulled power off the grid for about half an hour. You, Jeannie said. It took immediate steps to correct it and has been

P Jeannie California Independent System Lily Jamali California Steve Weisman Central Valley
Survey: US's international reputation takes a virus hit

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | Last week

Survey: US's international reputation takes a virus hit

"The international reputation of the U. S. has declined further in the wake of its handling of the corona virus pandemic finds the pew research center in some of the thirteen countries surveyed favorable views of the US who hold on to record lows he started posting on the topic nearly two decades ago although the international image of the U. S. has been in decline since president Donald Trump took office in twenty seventeen if you found this mean dented further by what is perceived to be a badly handled response to the pandemic the researchers found that the median of just fifteen percent of respondents say the US has done a good job during the crisis in contrast to perceptions around the World Health Organization all the European Union which enjoyed majority approval Charles the last month London

United States Donald Trump World Health Organization Charles London President Trump European Union
Understanding Early Muslim History and Sectarianism, with Dr. Ali Ataie

Diffused Congruence: The American Muslim Experience

06:00 min | Last week

Understanding Early Muslim History and Sectarianism, with Dr. Ali Ataie

"Elliott I. It is a rental student in researcher WHO's been involved in interfaith activities for over two decades. He holds a Master's in Biblical studies with a focus on. New. Testament and Biblical languages. He also holds a PhD in cultural historical studies in religion from the graduate. Theological. Union his doctoral work focused on Muslim Herman UNIX of Biblical texts especially, the Gospel of John. And he lives, in Santa, cinnabon California with his wife Royer and three daughters. So welcome to the show Dr Ali tight. Thank you because local good to be back for a third time. Yes. We're always excited and I know in the past we've had you You know on the show to Kinda talk. About Christianity. Were of sort of interfaith conversations in the audience as well as US. We benefited him immensely from those on. So I thought this would be a little bit different. I know something that you would probably consider a little bit outside of your wheelhouse or area of expertise perhaps but I would contend that you know i. if you are perfectly suited in a sense that not only given your background that you touched upon on the first episode but to really kind of have a conversation a, that is related to an intra faith. Issue of between kind of the she and the Sunni tradition and I say that. Because Dr your background actually your family background has something you had mentioned the first time we had this conversation you come from a she background your family is or remain or is still short she yes might my parents or practicing Shiites to use the Latin sort of suffix please them or she I guess we can say. So Yeah mink growing up. We were like I don't typical sort of Iranian so. No religion really anywhere and freedom to do whatever we wanted. Think. However, we wanted but as my parents got older, they rediscovered their. Roots their Shiite woods. So there you know they may have two, thousand, six and they're. Very, devout Shia now. so for me growing up however. I actually, never really considered myself. a Muslim until I got into. College. and. Then the brothers I met initially were so knee and they sort of against to enter the wing and and copy. Islam. In an over the years, of course, with I've had. Great conversations with my parents on on certain things and. What's the significance of this event in history you? How do you interpret this verse? What about this Heidi Eve? Things like that So that's that's where a standard now. Yeah, I mean you off air you made the caveat This isn't sort of an area of study or expertise for you on, but not only just given the family background but I would I mean as someone who is really a deep student of history I think that a I think some of the the touch points that we wanNA focus on in today's conversation on it'd be really nice to hear your thoughts on because essentially couple I wanted to make to clarifying points and then kind of dive right in, and that was related to the last episode of the two parter we did with the amount weenie. Is that for the listener someone some heard my question or my line of questioning as. Kind of questioning Sunni orthodoxy around some of these historical issues and I wanted to clarify that wasn't the case I mean I'm not I wasn't sort of trying to place. Any doubts on the Sunni narrative were the Sunni approach to these the historical events that we touched on but rather it was really as I said at the outset of the conversation with the Amati 'cause Weenie that this was not meant to be a debate. We weren't there to debate a Sunni points at the allergy were a Sunni the Sunni approach to some of the historical of historical events that we talked about. So it was more of being able to be deferential. To our guest and give him the opportunity to really essentially lay down the narrative of early. Muslim. History according to the cheese sources. So I, wanted to clarify that from some of the questions that I asked not for you professor Italian but rather listener Number two with regards to this particular conversation where things more meaningful to you is that the purpose of this show is not to have you on to serve offer the Su Ni reputation, right to the points that were raised in the last episode. This is not a polemic, a polemical conversation. Again, we're not here to sort of do that. That's not the approach that at least i WanNa, take I imagine all three of us don't WanNa take it's more of a deep dive or as deep as we can get given time constraints and so on on into kind of the Sunni perspective on some of the issues, there are some of the events that we focused on last time. Good. Bremer. Great. Great. So I think or if you had any thoughts or any comments you wanted to make otherwise I'd be happy to kind of dive right into it with. A tiny. No I just want to echo that like I decided emptying Irwin Cup of understanding and just trying to understand and learn in that conversation we weren't coming with their own. Ideas to the table. They were not that we were undermining ideas. We just put them to the sites we can learn.

United States Dr Ali Elliott Researcher Irwin Cup Heidi Eve Royer Santa Bremer Professor California
Afghanistan Peace Talks Open in Qatar, Seeking End to Decades of War

WBZ Morning News

00:59 min | Last week

Afghanistan Peace Talks Open in Qatar, Seeking End to Decades of War

"After nearly two decades of conflict, representatives from Afghanistan and the Taliban negotiate peace among the U. S officials on hand for the talks. US special Representatives. L'm a Khalil Asaad. He says the release of prisoners is a complicated matter for the United States. And for some NATO allies. All the prisoners did take a long time. On. We were hoping that it wouldn't I'm not dead. We're not happy about the release of some prisoners. On. We know our great allies. Australia on DH France are not happy about the release of some But we understand that What for? This difficult step. I was in the service of something more important. Which is to get the Afghan war to come to an end. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo also attending those peace

Khalil Asaad United States Mike Pompeo Taliban Dh France Afghanistan Nato Australia U. S
Pompeo meets with Taliban political chief as Afghanistan peace talks begin

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:45 sec | Last week

Pompeo meets with Taliban political chief as Afghanistan peace talks begin

"Two decades of war, the Taliban and the Afghan government are beginning peace talks one day after the United States observed the 19th anniversary of the 9 11 attacks that prompted US military involvement in Afghanistan. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo in Qatar for the ceremonial opening of the negotiations, expressed hope that these talks would yield a democracy that is respectful. Of Afghanistan's rich cultural diversity. Of course, I can only urged these actions you will write the next chapter in Afghan history. I hope this chapter is one of reconciliation progress, not another chronicle of tears. And bloodshed. Issues include a permanent cease fire, the rights of women and minorities and the disarming of tens of thousands of Taliban fighters.

Taliban Afghanistan Mike Pompeo Afghan Government United States Qatar
Afghanistan Peace Talks Open in Qatar, Seeking End to Decades of War

Live from Here With Chris Thile

00:57 sec | Last week

Afghanistan Peace Talks Open in Qatar, Seeking End to Decades of War

"Have officially begun the long and likely arduous process of negotiating a peaceful and prosperous future after nearly two decades of war. NPR's Matthew Schwartz reports the Afghan government and the Taliban met Indo Hock, the capital of Qatar. Today. Several concessions were made to get to these peace talks. The U. S promised a complete withdrawal of its troops by next spring in exchange for a Taliban promise to renounce al Qaida and terrorism. The Afghan government promised to release 5000 Taliban prisoners in exchange for the release of 1000 of its security forces. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo spoke at the opening ceremony. We welcome the Taliban commitment not to host international terrorist groups. Including Al Qaeda. Or to allow them to use Afghan territory to train. Recruit or to fundraise. Other goals for the talks include a permanent cease fire and establishing rights for women and minorities. Matthew Schwartz

Taliban Afghan Government Matthew Schwartz Indo Hock Mike Pompeo Qatar Al Qaida NPR U. S
Afghan Peace Talks Open With Calls for Ceasefire, Women's Rights

WBBM Programming

00:36 sec | Last week

Afghan Peace Talks Open With Calls for Ceasefire, Women's Rights

"Are under way between the Afghan government and the Taliban and Della. The most contentious points in the negotiation include the release of prisoners sharing power between the parties and protecting women and minorities, who have not been allowed to do much of anything now. Work not attend school not run for office under Taliban rule. That CBS News Foreign Affairs analyst Pamela Falk. The goal of the negotiations is to end nearly two decades of conflict that has ravaged the nation and killed tens of thousands of soldiers and civilians. CBS News

Taliban CBS Pamela Falk Afghan Government Analyst
Navy Veteran Who Tested Positive for HIV in 1995 Never Got His Results. Now, With Aids, He's Suing

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

00:38 sec | 2 weeks ago

Navy Veteran Who Tested Positive for HIV in 1995 Never Got His Results. Now, With Aids, He's Suing

"Veteran has taken legal action, claiming the Department of Veterans Affairs never told him he's been HIV positive for 20 years, and unidentified U S Navy veteran has filed a federal lawsuit, saying he had no idea he had the virus that causes AIDS for more than two decades. Because government health care workers never informed him of his positive test result. In the mid 19 nineties. The South Carolina man says he ended up with full blown AIDS because he never received treatment after being kept in the dark, His lawyer says. The treatment he's now getting is effective. Jim Krystle, a CBS News Ah

Aids Jim Krystle Department Of Veterans Affairs HIV U S Navy South Carolina CBS
Elderly ball python lays eggs 'without male help'

WBBM Morning News

00:27 sec | 2 weeks ago

Elderly ball python lays eggs 'without male help'

"Louis Zoo, are reporting that a 62 year old ball python laid seven eggs. Despite not being near a male steak for at least two decades. Herpetology facility says it's unusual, not necessarily rare fur ball pythons to reproduce asexually. The snakes can store sperm for delayed fertilization. The birth is also considered out of the ordinary because ball pythons usually stop laying eggs long before they reach. Their sixties. But happen this time

Louis Zoo
New York City to Hold Two Ceremonies for 9-11 Anniversary

Wayne Cabot and Paul Murnane

00:41 sec | 2 weeks ago

New York City to Hold Two Ceremonies for 9-11 Anniversary

"Nearly two decades since the September 11th attacks and some fear the memory is fading. WCBS is Sean Adams on a date, typically filled with hugs and tears. This year, masks and distance Corona virus has kept retired New York City firefighter Lee Ielpi from coming home to New York to honor and remember his firefighter son, Jonathan Ielpi. 19 years later, Ielpi fears memories are fading. How could you go to a school and students were about 9 11, and the comeback is many times What is Niall? Two ceremonies will be held this morning in the city, one of the 9 11 Memorial Museum and another held by this Stephen Stiller Tunnel to Towers Foundation

New York Sean Adams Lee Ielpi Stephen Stiller Niall Memorial Museum Towers Foundation Jonathan Ielpi.
Why No One Is Entirely A Buy And Hold Investor

Money For the Rest of Us

04:58 min | 2 weeks ago

Why No One Is Entirely A Buy And Hold Investor

"I got an email last week from a member of money for the rest of US plus. He has been listening to my show for over four years and loves it. You continue to like the way you explain financial strategies and how you occasionally cover the more personal aspects of life as well as investing. This gentleman retired three years ago when he turned fifty six, he has four million dollars in investable assets half, which is in cash and bonds. He follows one of the adaptive model portfolios on the website and converted over ten percent of his assets out of stocks in March based on the monthly investment conditions strategy report, we do on money for the rest of. US. Plus. He wrote to be honest decision I now heartily, regret. He could generate I really liked the sound logic. The analysis based approach you promote to help, decide how to dial up or down allocations to different asset classes in acknowledge your modifications have resulted in some investment success that said, I've typically been a classic buy and hold investor writing out the dips but this time in March I followed the logic to reduce the allocation stocks and wait for conditions to improve we all know how that turned down. How did it turn out? We have had the fastest bear market recovery ever in the US and around the world. His concern is that by the time investment conditions deteriorate or improve is already being reflected in market prices. Is there even a reason to make any adjustments to our asset mix? He I also know this was a very unusually fast drop and recovery. But as I plan to stick around as a plus member and take some level of guidance from the investment conditions, it seems like a fair question ask about what level back testing is available to see how this method works as an alternative to my old approach to just buy hold. I also recognize your approach covers asset classes, versus just stocks versus bonds and types of bonds such as real estate looks good or bad high yield looks good or bad etc.. Now, this monthly investment condition and strategy record has commentary and metrics to help individuals stick to the portfolio plan or perhaps to make adjustments as risk changed. Focuses on valuations, economic trends and investors sentiment. It relies on my over two decades of investment experience but also draws on data provided by institutional investment and Economic Research Services that we pay tens of thousand dollars per year to access. Now, I'm not trying to sell you on plus membership in this episode, but to be frank is email kind of bothered me a little bit not that he wrote it I think there's a absolutely fair questions and deserve a fair response. What bothered me was the challenges I've had in trying explain what portfolio management is. This member feels regret for a decision. He made one decision, but portfolio management involves many many decisions. I saw a tweet last week that also kind of bothered me not because there was anything wrong with the tweet, but it raises the question is better to trade buying individual stocks or to use options. Her view was better to use options because they're less expensive. That might be true. Again deciding to buy individual stocks with options that's just one decision. Wealth is not built preserved by buying individual options following the latest hot stock tip. Trading Foreign Exchange or following the guidance of Investment Newsletters that sometimes have doomsday scare tactics. My background is in institutional portfolio management. I worked with major universities like Texas, a, and m university. I was their investment advisor for thirteen years. They have over a billion dollars in assets. I've worked with other universities in private foundation. We often met with investment committees to tackle all the decisions involved a managing a portfolio the same decisions that individuals have to make in fact, individuals have to make even more decisions when it comes to managing an investment portfolio. What I have found is institutional investors and serious individual investors. They follow a disciplined portfolio approach. They focus on global multi asset class portfolios. They rely on reasonable expect to return and risk assumptions to make asset allocation decisions. Their focus is on a Chievo real net of inflation growth.

United States Chievo Foreign Exchange Economic Research Services Frank Advisor Texas M University
Has Globalization Undermined the American Working Class?

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

04:51 min | 3 weeks ago

Has Globalization Undermined the American Working Class?

"America's working class has been cheated is an assertion that has been getting a lot of currency lately are last presidential election went deep on that claim in both parties by the way and the culprit most often blamed for that. It's that monstrous five syllable word globalization, the philosophy and the practice of free trade which has been great for companies and for shareholders but has had a devastating impact. It is argued on the American working woman and. Man Well Economist do agree that in the past four decades the American working class, which we're defining tonight as people who lack a four year college degree. They have seen flat wages and a steady disappearance of good jobs. But is globalization a main reason that that's happening to those workers and for those workers is globalization entirely bad. Well, we think this has the makings of a debate. So let's have it. Yes or no to this statement globalization. has undermined. America's working. Class I'm John Donavan, and I stand between two teams of experts in this topic who argue for and against this resolution globalization has undermined America's working class as always. Our debate will go in three rounds and then our live audience here at the Saint Regis Hotel and Aspen Colorado where we are appearing in partnership with the Aspen Ideas Festival will choose the winner and as always if all goes well civil discourse, we'll. Also win a resolution once again, globalization has undermined America's Working Class Jared Bernstein you have debated with us before. So welcome back you're a senior fellow at the center on Budget and policy priorities. You were Vice President Joe. Biden's chief economist. The last time you debated with US interestingly Jason Furman who is your opponent at the other table tonight was your debate partner as a team you were formidable formidable I, almost want to use the French pronunciation. Formula, so are you planning to use your insiders knowledge of Jason's debate battles against him to very much am the way to do that with Jason is to make a lot of sports analogies because they repealing confusing. All right. Thank you and I see you detail to Aspen. You were a to aspen well I. Think the guy with the tie is the guy you want to listen to, but I'll let you decide. All right. Thanks very much. Jared Bernstein and can tell us who your partner is. This someone I've known for twenty five years she's a dear friend of mine and I consider her my mentor in this topic feely gentlemen feeling. Theo welcome to intelligence squared your president of the Economic Policy Institute. You've spent two decades as an economist for the AFL CIO, which is America's largest federation of unions. It represents some twelve point, five, million working women and men. You've spent twenty five years working on trade policy. So what got you interested in trade? Well, when I came to Washington in the early nineties I got drawn. INTO THE NAFTA debate the North American Free Trade. Agreement. And I realized pretty early on that. This was not some kind of a dry text book discussion about tariffs but it was a transnational battle over democracy good jobs, workers, rights, and regulation. So I was hooked because a lots at stake a lot is at stake. Okay. Thanks very much thelia once again, team arguing for the motion. And motion again, globalization has undermined America's working class. We have to debaters arguing against it, I Jason Firm. Welcome back to intelligence squared Jason you're a professor of the practice of economic policy at the Harvard Kennedy School you're a senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics, you were Chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers under President Obama tonight. As we said, you're going to be debating your former colleague Jared Bernstein on the impact of globalization. So is this the first time you to have debated the globalization issue with each other jared and I agree on I'd say about ninety five percent of economic issues and my goal tonight is to bring to one hundred percent. Thanks very much Jason and can you tell us who your partner is someone I've only known for a few years and every single thing. He's ever told me I have believed James Manica Legitimate James Manyika. Welcome the first time telling squared you're a senior partner at McKinsey, and company you're the chairman of their economics research arm, the McKinsey Global Institute, your first time debating with us. But not your first debate you debated at Oxford I did you studied robotics and computers earlier in your career you were visiting scientist at NASA. So how do you go from very eclectic from robotics and space to thinking about trade policy? In American. Workers I've always been fascinated by the kinds of technologies that drive innovation and growth, but also affects what will people in the real world actually do. So when you put that together with the economy, these issues around trade and workforce become very, very important. Those are the issues that motive a great perspective to bring here and then once again, thank you. Thank you again to the team arguing against them.

America Jared Bernstein Jason Partner Senior Fellow Jason Furman Economic Policy Institute President Trump Chairman Aspen Jason Firm Vice President Saint Regis Hotel Chief Economist Colorado John Donavan Senior Partner
Are Commercial Aircraft Production Plans Still Too High?

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

05:03 min | 3 weeks ago

Are Commercial Aircraft Production Plans Still Too High?

"There's a lot of talk these days about when the commercial aircraft industry will recover from the COVID nineteen crisis and return to normal and normal is almost universally defined as the your twenty nineteen. But, what if Airbus and Boeing were already at peak production and twenty nineteen with little room for growth over the coming decade? Scary. As that thought may be a look at the numbers suggests it's possible and that in turn raises questions about whether the two airframes have reduced production enough to whether the OVID. Nineteen. Storm. Joining me from Frankfurt to make sense of all this is Jens to aviation weeks executive editor for Commercial Aviation and here with me in Washington is Michael. Bruno Aviation Week, senior business editor who closely watching production rates and the aviation supply chain. Jens. Let's start with you. You wrote column in the August thirty first edition of Aviation Week and space technology that I don't think Airbus or Boeing are going to be too happy about would you say? Probably not well, what I did is I looked at a Abbas global market forecast, which is the forecast for the next twenty years, and by the way, the Boeing fingers are pretty similar. So but for practical purposes, let's just stick with the the Abbas version. and. Looked at production racing compared to to figures. So the to the. Market forecast Abbas puts out is for thirty nine, thousand Costa over the next twenty years. Divide that by twenty, you come up with an average annual production. Off Nine, thousand, nine, hundred, and seventeen aircraft to seventy aircraft to be precise. That's across the entire industry. So that's Abbas Boeing all the other manufacturers. Now I compared this with the. Actual production. Rates. For Two thousand, nine, nineteen, and the plans. For a front nineteen on the buying side because remember Max wasn't delivered. So there's a big difference between what they planted what they actually did. So the plans for Amazon Boeing were. Already over eighteen hundred at Croft. For Twenty nineteen so they were very very close to the. Longtime over two decades. Average rate that Abbas claims is the size of the overall mark. In this case, we ignore all the others there's going to be aircraft delivered by Komax, there's going to be. Did it by a C. by Embraer who knows maybe someone someone else will come in that we don't know yet on the electric hybrid hybrid electric front, maybe some some new comer there's also. No more room for for growth by both Abbas and and. If you remember. Absent. TIKOLO was pushing it suppliers very, very hot higher. They were talking about rights beyond seventy not an I wasn't in any twenty thirties seventy aircraft for Mancha I should say and I wasn't an in the twenty thirties that was in the next few years. So my point is. They were already producing too many aircraft before covert. Based on their own assessment of the market. And now with covert, of course, it's a whole different story. and. My conclusion is that. They haven't made deep enough cuts so far and more will follow. You and you're right when we started twenty nineteen everyone was talking about how fast can the supply chain ramp up How quickly can Airbus and Boeing increase production? I? Guess what you're saying is everybody was wrong. Yeah everything the the the industry went too far. In its. Appetite for growth and its vision for you. Look back we were coming out of the industry was coming out of the global financial crisis in eight eight or nine, which was a big crisis at that standards back. Then by the Senate's back then and then we have had this decade of unprecedented growth. We were industry got used to growth rates, well in excess of global GDP, of course, that's used that. Twice of global GDP, I should say. which is typically the level of growth that's aviation has seen over the past decades. Looking back is clear to me that. This could not be sustained for that much longer. Now the crisis we were seeing now is you know probably more dramatic than anyone could have expected but. On the other hand. That's gross could not have continued. At the same pace was clear.

Boeing Abbas Airbus Abbas Boeing Aviation Week Jens Commercial Aviation Komax Embraer Senate Business Editor Frankfurt Executive Editor MAX Tikolo Amazon
"two decades" Discussed on The Security Ledger Podcast

The Security Ledger Podcast

08:16 min | 2 months ago

"two decades" Discussed on The Security Ledger Podcast

"Paul, Roberts Editor in Chief at the Security Ledger in this edition of the podcast in the safety area, the failure up everybody low I. Think about an airplane or car in its breaks. Insecurity, probability and impact is commuted differently, and it's again a different in privacy. So how can you create that coordinated magic? You might not have heard of the trusted computing group, but you have definitely used technology helped, develop and deliver industry consortium pioneered technologies such as the trusted platform modules that are in nearly every computer and personal electron device made today providing a hardware based route of trust that validates the identity and proper functioning of the device. But if you haven't noticed computing environments are becoming more diverse and complex. smartphones cloud based applications, resources, and the Internet of things were already dissolving the network perimeter, and that was before the covid pandemics and millions of workers home to work. What is trustworthiness mean in the era of cloud, computing, smart homes, smart communities and the Internet of things, our notions of security, privacy and trust evolving to find out. We invited clear Vic into the Security Ledger studios talk clear is an Intel fellow and chief technology officer at Intel's governments, markets and trade, group or GMT Clare spent fourteen years as director of trusted technologies at Intel and is a director at. At the trusted computing group in this conversation Claire, and I discussed the fast evolving future of both the trusted computing group, and the notion of trusted computing itself as both innovation and changing technology use patterns create opportunities and risks in areas like cybersecurity and privacy I started our conversation off by asking clear to talk about some of her responsibilities at both Intel and the trusted computing group I am clear. And they work for Intel in Amazon in down. Representative on the board of directors are the trusted. Computing Group. In Cow. I am CTO. Markets, government trade. Division Go in I am the representative on the board of the trusted computing at in also by the officers of degrees, degradation trusted computing. Is Industry Standard Consortium. Standard the trusted computing group, the trusted platform. Whitehill is also an international standard known as. I so I see. Biden Brian Eight, eight nine. In four parts. made finishes trusted could beauty. is well as definitions of trust by far the most horrible. Our implementation of trusted beauty is who presented. How I, the area that is falling the specifications in international standards developed the trusted computing group in. The technical conditions of the desire that the computer will consistently behave as expected ways. In. This will be enforced by computer. Hardware and software in pricing became as achieved by loading. Hardware war in some version software for the unique conviction. He in ask several resulting a roots. Trust Act station for the holes in. On chance that I can find. In DC the trusted computing group's specifications at this specification were originally defined for the client machines, but the computing ecosystem has changed in g moved to embrace would is available in the ecosystem in general for instance, servers networks. Embedded systems, lightweight cisterns more recently or more. Security in the look more. When you roll back the clock and look at the origins of Jesse G, you know around the turn of the Millennium Period. The focus back then was really on securing You know access to enterprise networks scaring laptops, desktops, and servers, and as you said kind of creating a hardware based Rudy Trust for for applications to us, but these days. All that's really changed, hasn't it? Both the profile of the device and the way in which technology is deployed and consumed and used as has really changed. You mentioned. Automobiles is one example, but for Internet of things is is a use case for TCJC. We should start with what you said that the trusted computing group technologies used to secure a laptop servers in networks This is not specifically security technology. This is trust, acknowledge he. Provides for a safer environment rather than forcing specific security functions. What does safer environment? It means that all the unauthorized modifications over key components, clients IOT systems networks, automobiles on will be captured in the will be opportunity to to deal with the issues before any damage from that access data staten, so cast acknowledges are in that sense distinct from security technologies, although they are connected an interesting point and and I think for many people Maybe myself included. You're kind of lump, trusted and security together, but they are actually two distinct areas. Tell us a little bit about this concept of trust and its relationship to cyber security, and and then may be kind of wear sort of think of it as I could ven diagram. were, there's overlap there between trust and Cybersecurity, and you know what areas are are actually separate. This is Hugh into question, but I will try to answer their media definitions of trust. Inevitably just like many definitions of privacy trusted computing for a trusted computing is It is seen by the trusted computing group. Trust is an expectation that assists them product infrastructure process will behave as expected under given circumstances. This expectation base understanding of trust can also obliged to many other aspects of trust to people to situations to organizations. Issued Flex that the trusting by. Has It believe that the trusted party will support it in in computing the facts decisions made I run. Participants those disciplines could be people, or they could be machines what they could be broader policy systems so acne trust is a lion to some extent, this predictability and this is also the case in non-technical Charles. And descending suffered from our bitchy. Trust, a underlying the motion. But it commerce most are the situations. Interestingly, trust is also a very significant under different names in economics for instance. By the noble price winning George A girl states innovation divide fashion that. Risks. By. A new products received this too high. No transactions will.

Intel Rudy Trust Representative Editor in Chief director Industry Standard Consortium chief technology officer Paul Biden Brian Eight Vic CTO Whitehill Claire staten Jesse G TCJC George Amazon Hugh
"two decades" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

POLITICO's Pulse Check

13:41 min | 5 months ago

"two decades" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

"My head so Dan the reason I am asking about. Twenty years ago is that you had this big investigation. Come out this week about how around the same time when you were sitting in your college dorm room playing video games. I was sitting in my basement listening to with my brother. Some officials in the White House were preparing for a serious pandemic. Like we're seeing right now at this exact moment and others in the White House though were ignoring it. I mean I WANNA get into some of this story that you wrote. I. I'm curious. Why did you focus on that chapter of recent history when I mean? There's just so much going on right now. Jeremy I think that a theme of the current reporting is how much of what we are doing to fight this. Pandemic this couvert. Nineteen outbreak has its roots in. What happened twenty years ago? Including all the way back to the Bush administration's efforts to fight bioterror and there are parallels between the country fighting this crisis and the moment in time after the terrorist attacks in two thousand one. We'll take us inside of the Bush. Whitehouse what was going on there at this time. In two thousand one the Bush administration was trying to find its footing. The big issue in the health department across the summer of two thousand. One wasn't pandemics. It was stem cell research. Connie Thompson he was the health secretary at the time. The Alexy's are of two thousand one Tommy Thompson hadn't really done much or had any expertise in emergency preparedness or pandemic flu in fact several former officials and Told me that Secretary Thomson was set to have one of his first pandemic preparedness briefings on the morning of September eleventh. Then everything changed that day. His agenda change the health department's Focus and mission change the country changed almost immediately preparedness bio hazards. Those became top priorities for HHS which recruited new staff like a scientist named D A Henderson. Who had fought smallpox and those fears were worsened days later with the anthrax attacks that were mailed out to news outlets and lawmakers and several people died including a pair of DC postal workers. There were real fears of domestic terrorism. So I mean did these fears lead to any preemptive planning at the time for things beyond bio attacks like for things you know like the pandemic. We're seeing right now so the story gets into this a bit the idea that. Hhs needed a dedicated office to work on emergency preparedness issues and that's where Da Henderson. A bunch of other new hires scientists military experts came into play. They worked on early. Pandemic plans in one. Big Focus across two thousand to two thousand three was the idea of smallpox vaccination this. This was a fear that vice president. Cheney had that there would be an attack using smallpox on America in some way maybe on our soldiers on the frontlines possibly even on the homeland as a follow-up terror attack the administration ramped up a plan to vaccinate some if not all Americans against smallpox and this. This was something that health officials were really worried about. Because if you roll out a massive vaccination campaign you have to be sure that the side effects from those vaccinations aren't GonNa also cause new problems and DA. Henderson was one of the scientists who was really worried that there would be on a massive scale vaccination complications potentially in children so he warned President Bush not to go through with the national plan and it appears president. Bush listened to him and and other scientists and and stood down When with a more limited vaccination plan and then more notably Bush and his team pursued a plan to fight pandemic flu back in two thousand five and officials like Mike. Levitt the health secretary at the time who followed Secretary Thompson and a deputy named Alex as our ended up playing a major role in rolling out. That new plan to fight pandemic influenza. So this is the same Alex as our who's now working for president trump in the Bush administration working on planning for something. That sounds almost exactly like what we're seeing right now. It is one in the same. It is Alex as our who in the Bush administration cut his teeth on these issues before joining department. He was not a healthcare expert but as the top lawyer at the health department for four years and then as the top deputy to the secretary as our took a major role in crafting those plans and learning the lessons of preparedness. One former official told me that he's our had a binder of many tabs. Essentially all the emergency plans. You'd ever need if there was an emergency. This was a guy who really lived the idea of being prepared for whatever was coming around the corner and now that we are in the middle of the pandemic that Asia another's had planned for had warned about those plans in the Bush administration are helping inform but the trump administration is doing today. So I WANNA get more into you know how this leads to what we're seeing right now under the trump administration but I I know you also talked with in the Obama White House who who took over these panic planning efforts after after the Bush administration. What did they do next well? I think it's both what did they do. And what didn't they do? And one thing that the Obama team did right away that might surprise listeners. The Obama team came in and dissolved the White House Office on Healthcare Preparedness and security. This is something that Bush did when his team took over. The White House Clinton had had an office of global security that Bush dissolved. And it's the same decision that trump would get castigated for years later This is a constant theme that a new administration comes in and for whatever reason decides. They know how to do this better. They don't need all the same offices and trappings and staffing that the previous administration did but thinking in. The Obama. White House changed quickly. Because there was a flu there were there was a pandemic the h one n one pandemic flu in two thousand nine into two thousand ten and that taught the Obama team that a preparedness plan wasn't just a necessary feature. It was a needed tactic to fight the pandemic that they were facing each one and one led to a number of investments improvements across the health department some of which came into play later in the Obama administration when the abol outbreak ravaged West Africa in came to the United States the handling of that outbreak. The handling of -able was not seen as perfect even by Obama officials. I talked to a few who admitted. They did not move as quickly as they would have liked to contain that outbreak. Partly because it was unprecedented. Bullet didn't normally move the way that that outbreak did where jumped across country borders normally at burned itself out but the combination of the H. One one fight at the beginning of the administration. The Abol outbreak at the end of the administration led the Obama team to not only have this pandemic preparedness unit inside the White House but they crafted the pandemic playbook which we talked about one hundred previous. Podcast this this step by step guide. That was supposed to help the next president. Whether Trump Hillary Clinton whoever helped the next president avoid all the pitfalls that the Obama administration ran into so then president trump takes office in two thousand seventeen. He's had two presidents before him. Prepare for pandemics. One of them is handing off a playbook of how to deal with pandemics. What happens then? The trump administration has gotten a lot of criticism for getting these handoffs and not doing enough with them. We have some of the big stories here in addition to the pandemic playbook Hall Tuesday Daniel. Lemon I wrote the story. On the trump team getting briefed and a pandemic exercise at the beginning of two thousand Seventeen Moose to those officials ended up leaving the administration and some of the officials. Who Were there like Wilbur? Ross the commerce secretary either were disinterested or some said that Ross fell asleep during that briefing. So it's fair to say that pandemic preparedness was not a top of mind issue for most trump incoming appointees 2017. One official. Who took it very seriously was a guy named Tom Bossert? He was trump's homeland. Security Adviser he had worked on pandemic preparedness during the Bush administration. He'd been a top deputy working on the pandemic flu plan. So bossert was was a big believer that the US had to be prepared for this fight. Unfortunately for Bassir. He was dismissed from the White House. Little over a year later when John Bolton came in as the new national security adviser so by the time of the corona virus outbreak arrived this year some of the officials who are best prepared to fight it had already left and officials like Alex Czar. Who who had taken lessons from his experience in the Bush administration who had warned the president back in January that this was going to be an urgent issue. Alex Azar was also politically weak as listeners of pulse check will know he had fought and lost in battles with the White House. He had fought and been mashed banana. Survival fight with Seema Verma at CMS. So he was not playing The strongest hand when he went to the White House and try to convince trump to take politically risky moves to prepare to fight the corona virus outbreak. But as as things have unfolded the past few months it's pretty clear that as our and his deputies if you're looking at the right side of history for who was trying to warn the president they will be on that side of the ledger. Even though as our in his team also clearly failed on some other things like getting the country ready. It's a complicated story. And and that's why that's why the story from this weekend was fifty seven hundred words long. It's hard to boil down. Who is right who is wrong unpreparedness because doing this kind of work is so fricking hard where you don't know what's coming around the corner and if you warn too loud no one takes you seriously if you don't warn enough then people will die tracing these responses over three administrations over twenty years the past two decades? What do you think we can learn from all of this about the response to the Corona Virus Pandemic? Right now sued. Jeremy I think the shame of it is in the middle of a crisis. There's probably less to learn than either in the build up to a moment like this when officials are sounding alarms or trying to get ready or alternately after when we have a clear picture of what went right what went wrong and how to learn and copy that but it's clear to me after interviewing officials across the past three administrations the value of practice of getting the muscle memory of knowing who to call. What are the decisions we have to make? How many supplies do we have? And who is in charge of ramping that up? Those sorts of things can happen very easily in a down moment and one big frustration that I heard again and again was the United States went through this massive planning exercise two years ago for an emergency. This happens every two years. Fema calls together different government offices. And this isn't just sit in a room and you know pointed a blackboard. And figure out where you'RE GONNA do. Hypothetically this is a role playing scenario where people are scattering around the DC area. They're making calls are kind of acting out what they would need to do what they ended up acting out was a scenario where a hurricane struck. Dc A big hurricane. What would happen? How would you respond to that disaster? The problem was the federal government. Had already done that in real life. It responded to three big hurricanes in two thousand seventeen just a few months beforehand and officials were confused as I think any of us would be. Why are we spending all of our time role playing this hypothetical situation? We have all this real world experience and I talked to officials who said we should have used that time to practice for a possible pandemic. We were overdue and some said. They raised those complaints at the time. The issue being at the bureaucracy had moved so far along on planning this other hypothetical hurricane exercise. But what I have heard again and again is if we have more tabletop exercises just people sitting in a room and deciding. How are we going to allocate ventilators? How are we going to decide when to sound the alarm on pandemics? That would train of those senior leaders to know what to do when the moment arrives..

Trump Hillary Clinton White House Obama President Bush president pandemic influenza United States scientist Obama administration secretary Secretary Thompson Da Henderson HHS smallpox Jeremy Tom Bossert White House Office official
"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

Chat With Traders

01:33 min | 9 months ago

"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

"More about these competitions but just before we do that One of the cool things with the the Tay Interface is that you can trade As you mentioned a little bit earlier directly by clicking on the ladder or the YUP clicking on the price levels think ladder is a is a tatum. That's something you can't do other crypto. Exchanges Right yes. Because you've got you will see some exchanges are coming out. Who are who may have copied not ladder because they know how popular it is and there's one in in in in testing right now but essentially the vast majority almost all don't have ladders and and what's good about ladder is that It's point and click. So you set your default sizes you can see wearing the orderbook. There are gaps so you can place orders or you can directly aggressive. Just take lift offers and you can cancel working orders and move where he orders by. Just dragging your mouse around the order. So you WANNA move it down three ticks you. You don't have to cancel the order like you do on any other exchange and reentry again here you just sort of you click highlights and you just drag it down the ladder itself. So it's very very reforest very easy to use and once you get used to the sort of you know dealing with it What's interesting is a spoke to a couple of our high frequency retail traders recently and they don't even have On their on their gooey anymore. They've just sort of deleted out. All they have is a huge groff fills a massive acid ladder the middle. Yeah I think.

"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

Chat With Traders

01:33 min | 9 months ago

"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

"More about these competitions but just before we do that One of the cool things with the the Tay Interface is that you can trade As you mentioned a little bit earlier directly by clicking on the ladder or the YUP clicking on the price levels think ladder is a is a tatum. That's something you can't do other crypto. Exchanges Right yes. Because you've got you will see some exchanges are coming out. Who are who may have copied not ladder because they know how popular it is and there's one in in in in testing right now but essentially the vast majority almost all don't have ladders and and what's good about ladder is that It's point and click. So you set your default sizes you can see wearing the orderbook. There are gaps so you can place orders or you can directly aggressive. Just take lift offers and you can cancel working orders and move where he orders by. Just dragging your mouse around the order. So you WANNA move it down three ticks you. You don't have to cancel the order like you do on any other exchange and reentry again here you just sort of you click highlights and you just drag it down the ladder itself. So it's very very reforest very easy to use and once you get used to the sort of you know dealing with it What's interesting is a spoke to a couple of our high frequency retail traders recently and they don't even have On their on their gooey anymore. They've just sort of deleted out. All they have is a huge groff fills a massive acid ladder the middle. Yeah I think.

"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

Chat With Traders

01:59 min | 9 months ago

"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

"WHO's an active crypt I try to Consider using the the tape into faces. Spa As opposed to the you know the interface that you see on every other exchange. Yeah No. It's a great question. Continue something around one particular order type that we're sort of doing a lot of fun on in competitions and trading games around and we've called it the bracket competitions and it's It's a TUB and if you're if you're an individual trader right now you would and mental processes. You WanNa buy buy bitcoin here. And then in your mind you would have a take profit level away. said he went doubt. Definitely sell it and you would have stop loss level where it's you know. What if it goes down going to cut this position well? TT bracket orders does both in one go and the beauty about bounties that you have to define the profit and the stop before you enter the order and so what it does is that it teaches you to really really good rhys managed traits. And no one's telling you where to put your stop so take your profits but the point is you have to define it takes motion away from the trade and so we discover T- brackets because we were playing around with ourselves and thought. Oh Wow this is the most disciplined way to trade and so what does is that. We educate crypto traders who trade occasionally or who are a nervous about crypto because of the volatility of it and we take them from that stone to a safe zone where they could actually portrays on and and risk manage it from from a from a loss and profit perspective and these are not brackets. And we've actually started a whole series of competition which star in the next few weeks around breaking competitions partitions and it's basically around our ally and volume and trading brackets and and you know and he said way of basically educating customers onto the platform to say look you. The crypto futures trading are not dangerous as long as you're disciplined and and your you set your your levels up front and I'm curious to know.

rhys
"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

Chat With Traders

02:20 min | 9 months ago

"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

"Based Okay Okay Coke and you touched on Investors just before and that's one of the things I found really it fascinating about coin. Flex is that the high profile investors which he did have on board one of those being Taytay or trading technologies. How did that relationship nations ship come about because it's very interesting? Trading technologies is a software company and the corner pioneers in this space especially in the the the futures and options world. And neither. I've been getting more. And more into Crypto by offering it through the platform etcetera. How come it made sense for them to actually become partner of coin flex? Yeah so for. I think from their perspective they were. They are as you say. The largest fixed income Icefield software vendor in the world. I I read somewhere that a trillion dollars of off a fixed income flow of futures flow goes through that infrastructure on a daily basis and of market leaders. They were looking for a way to sort of differentiate and add to that sort of product offerings and they started investigating crypto will kind of unknown to us at the same time We were looking at launching this exchange. And what we knew we were good at was the matching engine the marketing being the kind of operations the whole exchange running business will What we knew we weren't good front and you know like a lot of crypto after exchanges The front end is his got you log into your system. And he's got a big fat buy and sell button graphing not a lot not a lot else and and so we were looking for a software partner that could fill the fill that space with multiple auditoriums exciting staff and ladders and brackets. Listen all kinds of different ways of managing risk and trading and and We saw having a conversation with t t and soon become became a power in that you. We're going to be great partners because we both take what the other want to do At all wanted to have. And that's how the policy was born. Yeah I think that's really cool that you have linked up with Taytay and you know in my eyes I. It added a lot of credibility to coin flex will win beginning to have those.

partner Taytay Icefield
"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

Chat With Traders

02:20 min | 9 months ago

"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

"Based Okay Okay Coke and you touched on Investors just before and that's one of the things I found really it fascinating about coin. Flex is that the high profile investors which he did have on board one of those being Taytay or trading technologies. How did that relationship nations ship come about because it's very interesting? Trading technologies is a software company and the corner pioneers in this space especially in the the the futures and options world. And neither. I've been getting more. And more into Crypto by offering it through the platform etcetera. How come it made sense for them to actually become partner of coin flex? Yeah so for. I think from their perspective they were. They are as you say. The largest fixed income Icefield software vendor in the world. I I read somewhere that a trillion dollars of off a fixed income flow of futures flow goes through that infrastructure on a daily basis and of market leaders. They were looking for a way to sort of differentiate and add to that sort of product offerings and they started investigating crypto will kind of unknown to us at the same time We were looking at launching this exchange. And what we knew we were good at was the matching engine the marketing being the kind of operations the whole exchange running business will What we knew we weren't good front and you know like a lot of crypto after exchanges The front end is his got you log into your system. And he's got a big fat buy and sell button graphing not a lot not a lot else and and so we were looking for a software partner that could fill the fill that space with multiple auditoriums exciting staff and ladders and brackets. Listen all kinds of different ways of managing risk and trading and and We saw having a conversation with t t and soon become became a power in that you. We're going to be great partners because we both take what the other want to do At all wanted to have. And that's how the policy was born. Yeah I think that's really cool that you have linked up with Taytay and you know in my eyes I. It added a lot of credibility to coin flex will win beginning to have those.

partner Taytay Icefield
"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

Chat With Traders

02:20 min | 9 months ago

"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

"Based Okay Okay Coke and you touched on Investors just before and that's one of the things I found really it fascinating about coin. Flex is that the high profile investors which he did have on board one of those being Taytay or trading technologies. How did that relationship nations ship come about because it's very interesting? Trading technologies is a software company and the corner pioneers in this space especially in the the the futures and options world. And neither. I've been getting more. And more into Crypto by offering it through the platform etcetera. How come it made sense for them to actually become partner of coin flex? Yeah so for. I think from their perspective they were. They are as you say. The largest fixed income Icefield software vendor in the world. I I read somewhere that a trillion dollars of off a fixed income flow of futures flow goes through that infrastructure on a daily basis and of market leaders. They were looking for a way to sort of differentiate and add to that sort of product offerings and they started investigating crypto will kind of unknown to us at the same time We were looking at launching this exchange. And what we knew we were good at was the matching engine the marketing being the kind of operations the whole exchange running business will What we knew we weren't good front and you know like a lot of crypto after exchanges The front end is his got you log into your system. And he's got a big fat buy and sell button graphing not a lot not a lot else and and so we were looking for a software partner that could fill the fill that space with multiple auditoriums exciting staff and ladders and brackets. Listen all kinds of different ways of managing risk and trading and and We saw having a conversation with t t and soon become became a power in that you. We're going to be great partners because we both take what the other want to do At all wanted to have. And that's how the policy was born. Yeah I think that's really cool that you have linked up with Taytay and you know in my eyes I. It added a lot of credibility to coin flex will win beginning to have those.

partner Taytay Icefield
"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

Chat With Traders

01:59 min | 9 months ago

"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

"Or take the business to Asia? Yeah because it's it's It became very clear to us and the vast majority of crypto taking a retail business comes out of Asia. Every day you know PSA cryptovest very interesting market in in terms of makers and take his an alternative with. I use those terms in traditional space but I certainly didn't before did a crypto but makes liquidity providers. We tend to be very sort of western Western type based businesses. And then you've got the retail side of it. Who are the takers aggressive? They are very much Asian retail and and but the vast majority of future teaches drew's business comes out on the taking side comes out of China Korea Japan Vietnam Turkey so by moving out to Asia. emend that we can be close to this customer base that we really didn't know much about because always coming out The traditional space. And so you know that these big thumbs trading western trading trading from Saudi our trade crypto. And you could get relationships with them fairly easily but we will sort of scratching your head singing right. How do I get closer to our retail? Take a base to do that. We spoke to his. You know some of shareholders were were crypto guys based out of Asia and they were like look. You know you have to be here. Because the the customers need to know that you committed to that part of the world and that's how we ended up. Yeah Edgy spend any time in Asia just personally before this before the move I had I had done. I personally love the travelling around. Asia lived in Singapore for a while as well in the past but the majority of my life has been in London. But but but a hide hyped flavors of Asia. So I knew from sort of living perspective would be very very simple but but obviously the whole unknown was the business hide. Yeah Okay and the same goes for Marcus I presume of for mark. Actually the opposite. He had no experience of Asia from a living perspective. He is very much the Californian Boston in London.

Asia China Korea Japan Vietnam London emend Marcus drew Singapore Asia.
"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

Chat With Traders

03:16 min | 9 months ago

"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

"I'm not sure where this fits into the timeline bit. I think somewhere round about here which you became introduced to Don Wilson In some listeners. Donelson is be found a and the man behind. DIRW massive project trading firm out of Chicago and now uh-huh has a global presence with like five hundred. Also people tell us a little bit about how that came about. Yeah so one of the interest- interesting transitions nations As the years went by on the floor was that as the American market sort of became very very type from an arbitrage perspective. Some of the bigger American trade traders from these. US houses started coming to Europe themselves. Because previous to this period they would sort of train their Judaism out and then kind of stay back in Chicago. Algo one fine day. This American Jen turned up in the pit and said don't Wilson of DFW and of course you know fifty guys like like looked at him and then cattle and chatting amongst ourselves. Because we've never heard of women didn't really care quite frankly but it soon became apparent that you know this guy was forced to be reckoned. I'm with and and that was my first introduction. As competitors and then towards the end of the full period came off I went to she to you. Work with dot and we actually became flatmates. He was my boss and he was Growing the DR WS European side of the business which shaw which is still hugely as you said a huge global business now in Singapore London an Chicago. What gave it away that he was a force to be reckoned with the sort of size and certainty that he traded with whereas we were we were taught to sort of keep it? Small go for big edge trades the only and Kinda recycle effectively. It's sort of an F. T. type model but in the you know due to do fifty to one hundred small trades make decent money on every one of them a few losing trades. And then you kind of go home flat and happy whereas whereas dawn was very much of the mode of this thing is miss price and I'm going to sell it and I'm going to buy back till it's family priced whereas the way we were trained as you sell something that you know if you if you thought an option was worth ten you would sell at twelve and if someone off their eleven well you know what you've made a tick take it back whereas Donna's like why would I pay Levin. It's worth ten which was very change of real mindset change so in a in a way you a very much a scalp e type of China. Yes everyone was on the floor because it's the way you kind of trained whereas don was calabro trader by around a massive position. Yeah okay okay. And did that influence your trading stall in any way it did actually because when we moved upstairs and I went to work for dawn I started to realize that we were full. For years. We'd left age. Inverted Commas are on on the Independent. And we we should have done so much better than we did but and so you sort of take skills it away and start start learning about the longer term trading which you know don was and still is I guess a master of obviously looking at where.

Don Wilson Chicago Jen Donelson dawn US Europe DFW Singapore London don China Levin Donna
"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

Chat With Traders

03:16 min | 9 months ago

"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

"I'm not sure where this fits into the timeline bit. I think somewhere round about here which you became introduced to Don Wilson In some listeners. Donelson is be found a and the man behind. DIRW massive project trading firm out of Chicago and now uh-huh has a global presence with like five hundred. Also people tell us a little bit about how that came about. Yeah so one of the interest- interesting transitions nations As the years went by on the floor was that as the American market sort of became very very type from an arbitrage perspective. Some of the bigger American trade traders from these. US houses started coming to Europe themselves. Because previous to this period they would sort of train their Judaism out and then kind of stay back in Chicago. Algo one fine day. This American Jen turned up in the pit and said don't Wilson of DFW and of course you know fifty guys like like looked at him and then cattle and chatting amongst ourselves. Because we've never heard of women didn't really care quite frankly but it soon became apparent that you know this guy was forced to be reckoned. I'm with and and that was my first introduction. As competitors and then towards the end of the full period came off I went to she to you. Work with dot and we actually became flatmates. He was my boss and he was Growing the DR WS European side of the business which shaw which is still hugely as you said a huge global business now in Singapore London an Chicago. What gave it away that he was a force to be reckoned with the sort of size and certainty that he traded with whereas we were we were taught to sort of keep it? Small go for big edge trades the only and Kinda recycle effectively. It's sort of an F. T. type model but in the you know due to do fifty to one hundred small trades make decent money on every one of them a few losing trades. And then you kind of go home flat and happy whereas whereas dawn was very much of the mode of this thing is miss price and I'm going to sell it and I'm going to buy back till it's family priced whereas the way we were trained as you sell something that you know if you if you thought an option was worth ten you would sell at twelve and if someone off their eleven well you know what you've made a tick take it back whereas Donna's like why would I pay Levin. It's worth ten which was very change of real mindset change so in a in a way you a very much a scalp e type of China. Yes everyone was on the floor because it's the way you kind of trained whereas don was calabro trader by around a massive position. Yeah okay okay. And did that influence your trading stall in any way it did actually because when we moved upstairs and I went to work for dawn I started to realize that we were full. For years. We'd left age. Inverted Commas are on on the Independent. And we we should have done so much better than we did but and so you sort of take skills it away and start start learning about the longer term trading which you know don was and still is I guess a master of obviously looking at where.

Don Wilson Chicago Jen Donelson dawn US Europe DFW Singapore London don China Levin Donna
"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

Chat With Traders

03:16 min | 9 months ago

"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

"I'm not sure where this fits into the timeline bit. I think somewhere round about here which you became introduced to Don Wilson In some listeners. Donelson is be found a and the man behind. DIRW massive project trading firm out of Chicago and now uh-huh has a global presence with like five hundred. Also people tell us a little bit about how that came about. Yeah so one of the interest- interesting transitions nations As the years went by on the floor was that as the American market sort of became very very type from an arbitrage perspective. Some of the bigger American trade traders from these. US houses started coming to Europe themselves. Because previous to this period they would sort of train their Judaism out and then kind of stay back in Chicago. Algo one fine day. This American Jen turned up in the pit and said don't Wilson of DFW and of course you know fifty guys like like looked at him and then cattle and chatting amongst ourselves. Because we've never heard of women didn't really care quite frankly but it soon became apparent that you know this guy was forced to be reckoned. I'm with and and that was my first introduction. As competitors and then towards the end of the full period came off I went to she to you. Work with dot and we actually became flatmates. He was my boss and he was Growing the DR WS European side of the business which shaw which is still hugely as you said a huge global business now in Singapore London an Chicago. What gave it away that he was a force to be reckoned with the sort of size and certainty that he traded with whereas we were we were taught to sort of keep it? Small go for big edge trades the only and Kinda recycle effectively. It's sort of an F. T. type model but in the you know due to do fifty to one hundred small trades make decent money on every one of them a few losing trades. And then you kind of go home flat and happy whereas whereas dawn was very much of the mode of this thing is miss price and I'm going to sell it and I'm going to buy back till it's family priced whereas the way we were trained as you sell something that you know if you if you thought an option was worth ten you would sell at twelve and if someone off their eleven well you know what you've made a tick take it back whereas Donna's like why would I pay Levin. It's worth ten which was very change of real mindset change so in a in a way you a very much a scalp e type of China. Yes everyone was on the floor because it's the way you kind of trained whereas don was calabro trader by around a massive position. Yeah okay okay. And did that influence your trading stall in any way it did actually because when we moved upstairs and I went to work for dawn I started to realize that we were full. For years. We'd left age. Inverted Commas are on on the Independent. And we we should have done so much better than we did but and so you sort of take skills it away and start start learning about the longer term trading which you know don was and still is I guess a master of obviously looking at where.

Don Wilson Chicago Jen Donelson dawn US Europe DFW Singapore London don China Levin Donna
"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

Chat With Traders

01:48 min | 9 months ago

"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

"Situations like that. We breached limits There will be took precious. Where the clear changed the margin parameters and then he would say you would have to kind of submit more margin in the morning but but it was minor tweaks around that but put but nothing more nothing too serious no so? How long did this go on for Helen? We you actually trading on the floor. I was trading on the flow offering for about eight years gradually during that period more and more products. We're going to electric trading and the options were very very much lost product Iraq to go to go upstairs because it was all the concerns at the point about how easily you know options with multiple strikes multiple months could get transported two two electric platform. I is that seems like quite a long time to be tried on the floor. Did you enjoy that experience. I absolutely It never even felt like were because you would kind of go there and the buzz of of you know people surrounding you and shouting with you. was incredible and as a trade. It was actually the easiest period to trade because you saw the flow. If you're a trader right now a market maker and electric environment you'll kind of sat in in your little office watching a screen with where there's no real indication of flow Direction size what the focus of working. What are people looking to do? Whereas when you're in the pit everything had to go through that pitzer? If you stood there from morning till noon you would get a really really good feeling for for what the market was doing east to be a profitable Abi to better manage your portfolio because you can sort of how you a lot of looking around there whereas on the electronic well you know you're very very silo D- where you are so in.

pitzer Abi Iraq Helen
"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

Chat With Traders

02:49 min | 9 months ago

"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

"Hundred. It six starting outing out You actually began trading on the floor of the life exchange London. Emma correct. That's correct. Yeah I I studied invested in London and Economics and then one evening I saw an ad for trading derivatives traders and the tea and knowing very little about it I applied right for it and the shift. Matt's questions rapid five or sort of three sets of interviews and next thing I know it was standing in the middle of a lifelong when Sunday morning. So who was that. That which you working for yes so. In the original options trading business was dominated by independent Trading trading businesses and there were three main ones at the time And they were a phone call to O'Connor associates which became Swiss banks. UBS as this derivatives arms there was a phone cold Chicago recession trading which became the derivatives arms of Bank of America and the third one was the firm that I joined Cole Cooper Naff half and associates which became the derives arm of BNP back national. PYRO PA KA and what we trading once he came onto lawf- breath so you start by being a clerk like you do on the called the CME CBOT. And I was a clerk on the gill option guilty. confucious government bond futures pit and then my first trading rose. Junior trader was in the Footsteps Hundred Index options pit. I okay so the index today operating in slightly different ways. I imagine AC- There'd be different nuances between trading bonds and then chiding an equity index wchs. Yeah this is one of the kind of interesting questions and points about options tradings. Actually but I would say about eighty percent of options tradings uniform around around irrespective of the product trait and that's because they're very complex product or trade and handle and manage and so that skill set sits independently handedly off the underlying and I will say the other twenty percent also would be kind of specialised products kill so so if you swapped which affects bombs fixed income equities you. Are you know you are learning about the new on the lying but your fundamental skill set. It's transportable which interestingly Sali's probably the other way around normal futures trading because if you like yourself big equity trader I gave you a a I would say. Hey Ira and he is the you know the list of drop down. Trading connections to fifty largest government bonds are that you'd be like what is this in a way that makes sense to me whereas an option guy can easily pollinate across different asset classes. And what was.

London Ira Matt Emma Junior trader equity trader UBS lawf- breath O'Connor gill Sali Cole Cooper Chicago Bank of America
"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

Chat With Traders

02:49 min | 9 months ago

"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

"Hundred. It six starting outing out You actually began trading on the floor of the life exchange London. Emma correct. That's correct. Yeah I I studied invested in London and Economics and then one evening I saw an ad for trading derivatives traders and the tea and knowing very little about it I applied right for it and the shift. Matt's questions rapid five or sort of three sets of interviews and next thing I know it was standing in the middle of a lifelong when Sunday morning. So who was that. That which you working for yes so. In the original options trading business was dominated by independent Trading trading businesses and there were three main ones at the time And they were a phone call to O'Connor associates which became Swiss banks. UBS as this derivatives arms there was a phone cold Chicago recession trading which became the derivatives arms of Bank of America and the third one was the firm that I joined Cole Cooper Naff half and associates which became the derives arm of BNP back national. PYRO PA KA and what we trading once he came onto lawf- breath so you start by being a clerk like you do on the called the CME CBOT. And I was a clerk on the gill option guilty. confucious government bond futures pit and then my first trading rose. Junior trader was in the Footsteps Hundred Index options pit. I okay so the index today operating in slightly different ways. I imagine AC- There'd be different nuances between trading bonds and then chiding an equity index wchs. Yeah this is one of the kind of interesting questions and points about options tradings. Actually but I would say about eighty percent of options tradings uniform around around irrespective of the product trait and that's because they're very complex product or trade and handle and manage and so that skill set sits independently handedly off the underlying and I will say the other twenty percent also would be kind of specialised products kill so so if you swapped which affects bombs fixed income equities you. Are you know you are learning about the new on the lying but your fundamental skill set. It's transportable which interestingly Sali's probably the other way around normal futures trading because if you like yourself big equity trader I gave you a a I would say. Hey Ira and he is the you know the list of drop down. Trading connections to fifty largest government bonds are that you'd be like what is this in a way that makes sense to me whereas an option guy can easily pollinate across different asset classes. And what was.

London Ira Matt Emma Junior trader equity trader UBS lawf- breath O'Connor gill Sali Cole Cooper Chicago Bank of America
"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

Chat With Traders

02:49 min | 9 months ago

"two decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

"Hundred. It six starting outing out You actually began trading on the floor of the life exchange London. Emma correct. That's correct. Yeah I I studied invested in London and Economics and then one evening I saw an ad for trading derivatives traders and the tea and knowing very little about it I applied right for it and the shift. Matt's questions rapid five or sort of three sets of interviews and next thing I know it was standing in the middle of a lifelong when Sunday morning. So who was that. That which you working for yes so. In the original options trading business was dominated by independent Trading trading businesses and there were three main ones at the time And they were a phone call to O'Connor associates which became Swiss banks. UBS as this derivatives arms there was a phone cold Chicago recession trading which became the derivatives arms of Bank of America and the third one was the firm that I joined Cole Cooper Naff half and associates which became the derives arm of BNP back national. PYRO PA KA and what we trading once he came onto lawf- breath so you start by being a clerk like you do on the called the CME CBOT. And I was a clerk on the gill option guilty. confucious government bond futures pit and then my first trading rose. Junior trader was in the Footsteps Hundred Index options pit. I okay so the index today operating in slightly different ways. I imagine AC- There'd be different nuances between trading bonds and then chiding an equity index wchs. Yeah this is one of the kind of interesting questions and points about options tradings. Actually but I would say about eighty percent of options tradings uniform around around irrespective of the product trait and that's because they're very complex product or trade and handle and manage and so that skill set sits independently handedly off the underlying and I will say the other twenty percent also would be kind of specialised products kill so so if you swapped which affects bombs fixed income equities you. Are you know you are learning about the new on the lying but your fundamental skill set. It's transportable which interestingly Sali's probably the other way around normal futures trading because if you like yourself big equity trader I gave you a a I would say. Hey Ira and he is the you know the list of drop down. Trading connections to fifty largest government bonds are that you'd be like what is this in a way that makes sense to me whereas an option guy can easily pollinate across different asset classes. And what was.

London Ira Matt Emma Junior trader equity trader UBS lawf- breath O'Connor gill Sali Cole Cooper Chicago Bank of America
"two decades" Discussed on Odd Lots

Odd Lots

10:26 min | 10 months ago

"two decades" Discussed on Odd Lots

"He's the director of research at the Jerome Levy Forecasting Center great voice and great insights on markets and economics six. And today. We're going to be talking a little bit about the Fed. Monetary policy bubbles economic volatility. And things like that. There's a lot of There's a lot of belief out there that the Fed contribute to instability bubbles. But a lot of the thinking is kind of muddled Sort of overly simplistic ideas. There's about a low rate just lead to surgeons speculation SRINIVASA has some more insightful complex ideas about the nature of central banking over the last several decades and how it's contributed to less than ideal outcomes in the economy and I was GonNa talk to him now so Sri thank you very much for joining us. Thank thank you thank you John. Good to be back interesting Before we get into you wrote this paper the recently on inflation targeting but before we get into that it's funny I was looking at a chart recently of just inflation. You can measure it. Obviously several different ways. Try things over the last fifteen years as in prior further about oil prices. It's almost impossible to find any meaningful upper down trend at all even the the economic collapse collapse the boom or whatever it's like there's inch it. It kind of just stays the same flat you read like this always strikes me. They get really excited like gone. Three months annualized rate of change in core. CPI excluding healthcare services is that it's fast level in three years and they get really excited but then you zoom zoom out. It's like inflation hasn't changed dynamics in years. Yeah and we've got used to that. You know that that stability I mean that that even a small teacup in the three months. Begets yes I did. You know how much they can be attributed to fed policy in your view. The fact that inflation trends are so stable. I mean what happens when inflation trends are stable. How much would it be attributed to fed? I think certainly fed has contributed to it. And if you look at the Fed policy in the last twenty twenty thirty years What it has done is implicitly? Not trying to I mean a lot of people are a lot of motives to fan. I just wanted to be careful. Not trying to do anything they are within their mandate now it may be the framework is wrong which is what I believe But what they have tried to do. Who is the TC two things very seriously low and stable? The stable part of it is is a lot more problematic than just a low part. In my opinion it's if if you have low with a little bit of volatility around that would be okay probably. Okay maybe you need to cheat it up a little bit but but you keep the stability that you're pointing out is The is is partly the feds doing. So let's start. You wrote this paper and you took aim at a particular particular approach to monetary policy or framework. I guess maybe long recall it called inflation targeting. What is inflation targeting? When did it start? When did the Fed adopt this current framework? In your view defense. I actually officially started inflation targeting. Only in two thousand twelve but implicitly. If you look back they probably have been doing it since the early ninety s or maybe mid ninety s at least have been doing that. And even before that you know if you look at the Seventies when people really got of course upset about inflation so the original Humphry Kazakh actually called for low and stable inflation inflation to be like zero or eventually they said that two zero is not possible to supercenter over a long period of time So it's been dead implicitly. We have been doing inflation targeting in one form or the other pieces the Mid Ninety S. What what what is it? What ah it's just this idea that it's not enough to just have low inflation but that they should really worry about any sort of volatility and that is what is there Eh? What's the main approach to achieving that goal so demean approach to achieving this goal and this is the tricky part because the mechanism is never really clarified? You know the new OSC monitors so when you ask economists they would tell you. It's also expectations but these expectations channels. I mean if you really look at expected inflation expectations. They have really not changed Macho. They don't seem to have any relation to reality sometimes. So you know. I don't know how that expectation channel works except in textbooks but the basic idea between being the expectations channel is through some magic. I know they would never say magic that we all expect inflation to be low and maybe around two percent percent and if everyone sort of accepts that and if we all accept that the Fed will do whatever it takes to keep it there in that has the effective actually keeping at their right and probably the main way sort of mechanically that the Fed keeps it. There is by being very vigilant raising rates at any sort hint that inflation might be picking up to reinforce this notion among consumers among businesses that they will do it it takes that I that is that is that is clear there signaling aspect of it apart from raising rates. All the talk that goes along with it is one aspect of it to be sure you know I mean of course people to some extent you know. There is a set expectation that prices go up by two percents get revenge wage hikes about two percent. People are happy and you know that's what gets set in the pricing thing mechanism. But it doesn't work through expectations way that a lot of people think it works. But that is that's how they sort of explain it or that is in theory now you they say. Inflation targeting officially only has existed since twenty twelve defacto. It's existed since the mid nineties. Okay so then. And what was the pre the earlier approach. How does that substantively differ? From what the Fed did and sixties or the seventies or the sixties decent seventy S. They were not particularly in the seventies was a little bit different but in the fifties and sixties when they would see economy heating up and inflation starting to pick up. They were just slam the brakes but didn't particularly have an ex specific target in mind. We're not trying to target inflation. But it was also much more From the industrial l. site Much more you know like a German type economy. There were large unions and would be large unit eibar gaining so the price mechanism was a little bit different region. You didn't place mechanism. We don't have that kind of thing. So you know I mean prices were not more closely aligned with wages and productivity okay so they they still fought inflation. They still want to low inflation. And then did you say the Humphrey Hawkins mandate required them to have that. But it wasn't like we have this number number two about two percent and we were going to do what it takes. We just don't want inflation to go up and if it looks like it's going up we're starting to go up we're GONNA fight it. That is I think the the difference Prince in in the post nine thousand nine hundred zero is especially post nine thousand nine hundred ninety. Let's say That's put that as a cutoff is the mandate on on stable inflation and what they think contributes to the inflationary pressures see in the past. They used to have some kind of immune. If you try to recast it into immortal and try to F- Back fit the data. They did some terrible rule kind of thing all through up to nine hundred ninety. They have been doing that ever since as well but they also have an extra emphasis on not just the output gap but on how fast. You're eating output gap. I mean so you'd let's say you have a huge Joe put gap. Let's say not yet for simplicity. Sake night who is five. Percent Unemployment is ten percent is huge right and that night. who made self overstate in an unemployment employment? I mean the the natural rate. But that's a huge gap but let's say you're accelerating should the FBI worried. Right should should economies accident and should be worried because the gap so big but they seem to impact work shows that they seem to be really concerned. You're accelerating very fast. Even if the gap is yeah so even if there's it's clear earlier that all right everyone thinks that ten percent is a very long way from full employment like what we saw obviously in the immediate during the crisis there is almost no oh level if if if we got hot growth. It doesn't matter. How big that gap is that makes fed officials nervous at this right and you? Who've you saw that early in the in the expansion right they were not people? Keep seeing now in hindsight all the Fed should have been more accommodative. They should have said this at that. But you'll like foreign two thousand twenty six years ago when they put put anthem thing. I mean you know when things heat up a little bit they react to the heating up and I kind of knew that isn't new so you did not. Let's see that in the sixties and Seventies. It was a big output gap. If it was clear that there was a lot of people who are left to come back in the workforce they would be they would welcome. Yeah fast-growth because that would get to yes absolute so is that Greenspan who sort of beat was the first I mean in a way I mean. Sometimes it's interesting because Greenspan's legacy I think over the years as I think people deteriorated a little bit too. Sometimes I think he made some interesting choices and was certainly certainly seemed to tolerate the boom a little bit in a way that maybe modern central bankers will be more uncomfortable. Yeah the longer you stay the greater that's under your remit get started on Yeah I mean he did in the one thousand nine hundred eighty two to some extent for sure he led the boom boom run. Yeah and and that's right. I mean there are two aspects to letting the boom ron is is is not necessarily bad but the problem with letting the boom run in backdrop of an inflation framework with the Fed says. It's going to keep inflation. Control leads to build up and leverage and the financial exist. That's the issue right and so this gets to you kind of one of your key points but also sort of what seems like the unspoken or increasingly vocalized problem with all of this. which is is that so far? We've just been talking about this sort of Push pull relationship between unemployment and inflation right. But then there's this added dimension of Financial Leverage and speculation I so we had a very good economy throughout much of the ninety s right but when things are good for a long time people.

Fed director of research SRINIVASA Jerome Levy Forecasting Center Greenspan Sri Humphry Kazakh FBI OSC Humphrey Hawkins ron Joe