20 Episode results for "twenty twenty Rover"

Name the Rover

Innovation Now

01:29 min | 1 year ago

Name the Rover

"Red Rover Red Rover. Send a name for Mars Twenty twenty right over this is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future. The Mars Twenty Twenty Rover is a twenty three hundred pound robotic scientists that will search for signs of the past microbial life characterized the planet's climate and geology and collect samples for future returned to Earth Mars twenty twenty will pave the way for human exploration of the Red Planet and NASA is inviting K twelve students nationwide to give the rover a name before four November. I interested students should submit a short essay explaining why their proposed name should be chosen in January. The public will have an opportunity unity to vote online for one of nine selected finalists NASA plans to announce the winning name on February eighteenth twenty twenty exactly exactly one year before the rover will land on the surface of Mars. The student who submits the winning name will be invited to see the spacecraft launch in July from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida for details about the contest visit the NASA Dot Gov Mars website for or innovation now. I'm Jennifer pulley. Innovation now is produced by the National Institute of Aerospace through ration- with NASA.

Mars Twenty Twenty Rover Mars Twenty twenty NASA Cape Canaveral Air Force Stati Jennifer pulley National Institute of Aerospac Florida twenty three hundred pound one year
Boarding Pass for Mars

Innovation Now

01:29 min | 2 years ago

Boarding Pass for Mars

"Nasa is giving the public a chance to send their names. Stenciled on a chip to the red planet. This is innovation now bringing you stories of revolutionary ideas emerging technologies in the people behind the concepts that shape, the future from narrow until September thirtieth, you can submit your name to fly aboard the next Mars Rover members of the public who send their names. We'll get a souvenir boarding pass and earn about three hundred million NASA frequent flyer points. The Micro Devices laboratory at Nasr's Jet Propulsion Laboratory will use an electron beam to stencil the names onto a silicon chip about the size of a dime, with lines of text smaller than one thousandth, the width of a human hair. More than a million names can be written on a single chip. The chips will ride on the Mars twenty twenty Rover under a glass cover the Rover. A robotic scientists weighing. More Than Tun will search for signs of past microbe. You'll life collect samples for future return to earth, and pave the way for human exploration. And now you or at least your name can go along for the ride for innovation now. I'm Jennifer pulley innovation now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with NASA and is distributed by w. HR V.

Nasa Mars twenty twenty Rover Jet Propulsion Laboratory Jennifer pulley Micro Devices National Institute of aerospac Tun Nasr
This Week @NASA, February 15, 2019

NASACast Audio

00:00 sec | 2 years ago

This Week @NASA, February 15, 2019

"Working with industry to develop new lunar Landers testing resumes with our space launch system rocket engine and after a job well done the end of the line for one of our Mars Rovers a few of the stories to tell you about this week at massive. We hosted an industry forum at our headquarters in Washington to talk to American companies about developing reusable, lunar Landers and supporting systems for future human missions to the moon. And this is all part of the president's space policy directive one that we here at NASA are charged with moving out on space policy directive one calls for an asset to work with industry to study and refine the agency's approach to landing on the moon. A key aspect of this proposed approach is the use of our gateway and outpost in lunar orbit to support journeys to and from the lunar surface. This is really sustainable. You're going to need the best and brightest from you in industry. We're gonna need the best and brightest from international partner community to Paul this off. Our Stennis space center in Mississippi conduct that this year's first hot fire test of an RS twenty five engine controller for use on a future. Flight of our new space launch system rocket or S L S the S L S we use four of the engines to launch astronauts aboard are Orion spacecraft on missions to the moon. Our Mars exploration Rover opportunities mission is complete opportunity last communicated with earth on June tenth twenty eighteen during a global dust storm on Mars that blanket at the solar power Rovers location opportunity which landed on Mars in January two thousand four was supposed to operate for only ninety Martian days and travel just eleven hundred yards. But it far surpassed those marks traveling over twenty eight miles in it's almost fifteen years exploring the red planet. Everything we do and think about in our binary neighborhood with Mars and elsewhere relate stood a research that came from that. We announced the selection of a new mission that will help astronomers understand both how our universe all. And how common are the ingredients for live in our galaxies. Planetary systems the spectrophotometer for the history of the universe. Epoch of reorientation an ISIS explorer mission or sphere x is a two year mission targeted to launch in twenty twenty three that will survey the sky in optical as wellness near infrared light to gather data on more than three hundred million galaxies as well as more than one hundred million stars in our own Milky Way. Our atmosphere. Sniffing maven spacecraft is lowering its orbit around Mars a move that will enable it to act as a data relay satellite for our Mars twenty twenty Rover which launches next year. The change in orbit will bring the spacecraft about a thousand miles closer to the surface of the planet. This will slightly increase the number of daily orbits, which will allow maven to communicate more often with Rovers on the Martian surface. When not conducting relay communications maven, we'll continue to study the structure and composition of the upper atmosphere of Mars. Our van Allen probes mission is in its final. Phase. After one of the twin probes began a series of maneuvers to bring its lowest point of orbit closer to earth over the past six and a half years, the Pearl ABS have confirmed scientific theories and revealed a new structures and processes at work in the harsh region of space known as the van Allen, radiation belts. That's what's up this week at NASA for more on these and other stories follow us on the web and NASA dot gov slash taunt.

Landers Mars Rovers NASA Mars twenty twenty Rover van Allen solar power Rovers Rovers Mississippi Washington president Orion partner Paul eleven hundred yards fifteen years two year
European rover has better chance of discovering life than NASAs Mars 2020

SPACE NEWS POD

10:07 min | 2 years ago

European rover has better chance of discovering life than NASAs Mars 2020

"Hey, space news pod listeners if you wanna show your opinions give feedback or tell me what you're thinking said me, a voice message voice messages, earn easy way for you to send me audio the might end up in a future episode of the space news, pod voice messages are the latest feature from anchor the platform, I used to make this podcast if you have an idea for an episode if you want me to cover something, you can send me a voice message right now from wherever you're listening, just tap. The Lincoln my show notes. And I can't wait to hear from you to or listening to the space news pod. So that means you like podcasts and you probably like music too. So on Spotify, you can listen to all of those things, all your podcasts, and all of your music in one place, and you don't need a premium account. They have a huge catalog of podcasts on every topic including space news pod. You can follow your favorite podcast. He never miss episodes, download episodes into offline and easily share what you're listening to with your friends with Spotify integrations with. Social media platforms like Instagram. So just searched for space news pod on the Spotify. Browse podcasts in the your library tab and follow me. So you never miss an episode of space news pot. Spotify is the world's leading music streaming service. In now it can be your go-to for podcast, too. Hello. And welcome back to the space news pod. A daily podcast about space science and tech, I'm your host will Walden and in twenty twenty three Rovers one from the US want from Europe and one from China will leave earth and depart for the red planet of Mars to look for past in present life. And these Rovers are just going to go to Mars. They have in their mission directorate to bring back samples from the red planet to earth, which is going to be one of the most influential. Botches in landings in science experiments of human history. Parts of Mars directly from the regular of Mars will be returned to the planet earth. So scientists on earth with really sophisticated instruments can study, what's in the ground on Mars. So the Rovers will be sent up in twenty twenty in the land, though do science, and the cash, the, the samples for a return mission for Mars and are from Mars and the return to earth in twenty twenty eight if America in Europe come together and make the mission as success, but a project scientists on the east Rover Exo Mars that will land in twenty twenty one along with the American Chinese Rovers might be worth reconsidering, which samples would actually be the. The best valuable to send back to the scientists waiting on earth. And the scientists said Mars twenty twenty will acquire samples from the surface, where I n ising radiation is likely to have damaged any organic molecules, it is. Excellent Mars with its two meter depth drill in advance organics detection, instrumentation MoMA that has the best chance to make an import discovery regarding the possibility. The Mars may have harbored life in its distant past, if this proves to be the case, perhaps, we may need to rethink where they, we should not think of bringing back. Well selected subsurface samples rather than those collected by Mars twenty twenty in the bars twenty twenty Rover which is a NASA Rover. It has the ability to cash the samples that against, but Exo Mars does not have that capability for a return mission leader on and he goes on to say that requires a complicated. Yup. That weighs allot it would have been impossible to combine our present very capable payload with a sample caching system on the same Rover. In fact, Nasr's twenty twenty Rover his Pete a dear price to include the caching system, and that's compared to curiosities analytical firepower. So what they gave up an analytics and studying the actual surface of the planet Mars. They gained a caching system. So instead of doing the science on Mars itself, what they're doing is putting it away for a little while and they're using that space to harbor though samples, then they're going to return them to earth on the March twenty twenty Rover. And then George Vago goes on to say the point I am trying to make is that bringing back the right samples will make all the difference in this regard, Exo Mars will be super important are the samples collected at depth more interesting and better preserved. We think probably yes, in once we will have investigated this, perhaps it will be time to rethink what samples to bring back to earth. Or I'm gonna take a quick break. A little pause for the cause stick with me because I have more about exa Mars in March twenty twenty right after this. Hi everyone. I wanna let you know, about inker doubt FM as we're I host my podcast in, I find that it's the easiest place to do that. In a gives you everything you need in one place for free, which you can start. Podcasting from your phone, or from your computer. You don't need special crazy equipment to start doing it. You can talk into your phone, you'll need editing equipment that costs thousands of dollars to start a podcast, you can do it from anywhere in when you're done, recording your episode anchored at FM will distribute it. So it can be hard everywhere on Spotify. Apple podcast Google podcasts. Stitcher, every place. Podcasts can be heard, and you can make money with your podcast. It's pretty simple. There's no minimum listenership to start making money with anchor. So if you wanna make a little bit of money while having a cool podcast, while download the crap or go to anchor dot FM to get started so Nasr's curiosity. Rover is traveling around Mars right now. It's getting data. It's doing sampling in, it's doing all of this, in gale crater that Exo Mars. We'll be landing in axiom. Plenum in the Klay deposits are dated at four point one billion years old and curiosity is in the crater where it's only three point six billion years old. So excellent Mars is going to be in a place. It's much older than our curiosity is right now. So therefore it can search for life from past marks from a long time ago. You know. Another almost another billion years older than what curiosity is check in every now and that's the epoch from when Mars is surface was plentiful with liquid water systems. Exit Mars missions will be capable of securing many firsts the oldest site investigated on Mars, the first exploration of the Martian subsurface, the most accurate, geological inorganic composition determination, so far, and the best chance, yet to make bio signature detections on another planet, and the other thing than ex Amar's has going for it is that it has the longer drill. Then March twenty twenty Rover so it can dig down deeper and also get more samples from a longer period of time on the surface of Mars. So March twenty twenty is going to be a very important Rover. Exo Mars is also going to be a very impor-. Portent rover. We're not gonna have a battle about, which one is going to be more important because they're posted both important in their own specific ways. X Omar's, they want to bring stuff back to earth. So scientists on our planet here can actually do science with very, very complicated and technical specifications, on bars. You only have a certain amount of room to have scientific instrumentation and once it's there, that's all you have. And it could not, you know, it might not be the most up to date science stuff, because they build these things years in years in years before the launch, and this technology might be a little bit outdated. By the time the Mars Rover gets the cash of samples back to earth. So it's gonna come back and twenty twenty eight and by twenty twenty eight maybe technology will catch up. Maybe technology will move forward so much that the samples that we. Back, we may be able to find things that we weren't able to find when XL Mars is doing it science up there. So that being said, I'm excited about all these Landers and Rovers on Mars in the coming years. It's twenty twenty know we're launching that thing in twenty twenty so next year it has gone up. So if you like this kind of content mix sure to subscribe to this channel because I do this every single day and I want to say thank you for everybody who has subscribed at thank you to everybody, who's on our patriotic patriot dot com slash space. News podcast, it make this happen. So thank you so much. I appreciate it. Also. Thank you for taking the time out of your day. The spend a here with me on the space news pod on name is will Walden, and I will see you sued.

Spotify Rovers Mars twenty twenty XL Mars Nasr twenty twenty Rover Walden Europe gale crater twenty twenty American Chinese Rovers MoMA George Vago NASA US Landers Apple Amar
Trump Says Moon is part of Mars and A MARS HELICOPTER

SPACE NEWS POD

08:22 min | 2 years ago

Trump Says Moon is part of Mars and A MARS HELICOPTER

"Hey, space news pod listeners if you wanna show your opinions give feedback or tell me what you're thinking said me, a voice message voice messages, earn easy way for you to send me audio the might end up in a future episode of the space news, pod voice messages are the latest feature from anchor the platform, I used to make this podcast if you have an idea for an episode if you want me to cover something, you can send me a voice message right now from wherever you're listening, just tap. The Lincoln my show notes. And I can't wait to hear from you to or listening to the space news pod. So that means you like podcasts and you probably like music too. So on Spotify, you can listen to all of those things, all your podcasts, and all of your music in one place, and you don't need a premium account. They have a huge catalog of podcasts on every topic including space news pod. You can follow your favorite podcast. He never miss episodes, download episodes into offline and easily share what you're listening to with your friends with Spotify integrations with. Social media platforms like Instagram. So just searched for space news pod on the Spotify. Browse podcasts in the your library tab and follow me. So you never miss an episode of space news pot. Spotify is the world's leading music streaming service. In now it can be your go-to for podcast, too. Hello. And welcome back to the space news. Pot daily podcast about space science and tech. I'm your host will Walden. And in this episode, I'm gonna talk very briefly about President Donald Trump. He posted a tweet that said for all of the money, we are spending, NASA should nap be talking about going to the moon. We did that fifty years ago, they should be focused on the much bigger things we are doing, including Mars of which the moon is a part, defense and science, and I want to break this down for you. I don't like to do political things, so I'm not gonna make this into a political issue. This is just one of those things that our President Donald Trump he tweets in. It's not very coherent. The thought isn't very coherent because his Twitter, you know, like you have X amount of characters that you can type basically what he was saying is. Okay, we've been to we've been to the moon. We should be talking about Mars moving forward with Mars. But keep the moon in the picture. So the moon is a part of us going to Mars. That's it. That's all the tweet means doesn't mean anything more than that I'm actually Jim Breitenstein the, the administrator of NASA said, as police said, NASA is using the moon to send humans to Mars right now Mars. Curiosity Mars insight are on Mars and will soon be joined by the Mars twenty twenty Rover and the Mars helicopter. So Jim Beck set up basically said, okay, we're on Mars. We're doing mar stuff we have to go to the moon in order to get to Mars. This is baby steps. The moon is baby steps to get to Mars. Now, let's talk about something really cool. The Mars helicopter Amar. Okay. So a helicopter on Mars. This is the sounds like science fiction, that sounds like something from like a nineteen fifties scifi movie where like martians land on the earth. In they take over, but the us helicopter. So, you know, something crazy, like a Mars helicopter. Okay. So let's talk about that for a second. So on the Mars twenty twenty mission, there's a helicopter right, there will be launching a helicopter to Mars during the March twenty twenty mission and the aim of this helicopter is a test the feasability of flying heavier than air vehicles through the atmosphere on the red planet. It just passed some really important tests. It is now moving into the final stages of preparation ahead of the July. Twenty twenty Mars launch, and this isn't a big helicopter. It's four pounds so easily lift it up in your hands, but it's going to be flying to Mars in the twenty twenty mission in, it'll be deployed once the Rover sets down in Mars Jazirah crater. And that's supposed to happen on February. Eighteenth of? Twenty twenty one and it's going to take, you know, numerous months to get to Mars from earth in the helicopter will also have a camera on board in. Also used solar power to get the job done. So this camera that doesn't have any sensors or anything. I mean the the helicopter has empty censor is ready thing like that. It's just to do the flight test. That's it, it's only there to see if it's possible to fly a helicopter on Mars. That's all it's gonna do. It'll have cameras. It's thomas. I'll talk a little bit more about this Mars helicopter right after this. Hi everyone. I wanna let you know, about inker dot FM as we're I host my podcast in, I find that it's the easiest place to do that. And it gives you everything that you need in one place, for free, which you can start. Podcasting from your phone, or from your computer. You don't need special crazy equipment to start doing it. You can talk into your phone, you'll need editing equipment that costs thousands of dollars to start a podcast, you can do it from anywhere in when you're done, recording your episode anchored at FM will distribute it. So it can be hard everywhere on Spotify. Apple podcast Google podcasts. Stitcher, every place that podcasts can be heard in. You can make money with your podcast. It's pretty simple. There is no minimum listenership to start making money with anchor. So if you wanna make a little bit of money while having a cool podcast, while download the ANC rep or go to anchor up FM to get started. Okay. Let me see this one more time. There's a Mars helicopter Mars, helicopter four pounds. It doesn't have any fancy schmancy sensors on it. Nothing to do any real science when it gets up to the surface of Mars. The only reason it's there is to see if a helicopter can fly on Mars. It has been tested in high vibration, environments that simulate launch and landing condition so far, it's been tested in extreme temperatures. Like those found on the surface of Mars. And it has been tested for, you know, to see if the Electric's in the mechanical systems are working properly. The solar panels already installed and the rotors on this thing have been spun down here on earth. So their stress test happening as we speak in this thing is supposed to have, you know, a about years lifespan on Mars. The Mars twenty twenty mission we'll have a one year lifespan, I should say, and that's with the Rover included this new Rovers. It's really cool. And I'm going to have more Rover news the March twenty twenty Rover I'm going to do that in tomorrow's episode. So stay tuned for that. So that's it for now for this for this episode. We have, by the way, the, the helicopter the Mars helicopter its autonomy. I think I said that before. So what's it gets up there? It can fly itself, and in, it'll take pictures and let you know, it'll skin kind of the environment and take pictures and send them back to earth. So we can. Figure out if this thing's actually working or not. So how cool is that? But anyway, that's it for this episode of the space news pod. I want to say thank you for taking the time out of your day to spend it here with me, and my name is will Walden. I'll see you soon.

Mars twenty twenty Rover Mars Jazirah crater Spotify President Donald Trump NASA Walden Twenty twenty us Twitter Jim Beck President dot FM Jim Breitenstein Rovers Apple ANC
Gravity Assist: Life on the Rocks, with Heather Graham

NASACast Audio

20:48 min | 1 year ago

Gravity Assist: Life on the Rocks, with Heather Graham

"Starts with chemicals. The chemistry of life is so important to understand. So how do we know? It's life if it's life like we don't know it. There's a lot of ways that life could be different but not related to life on earth. Hi I'm Jim. Breen chief. Scientists and NASA gravity assist on this season of gravity assist. We're looking for life beyond earth. I'm here with Dr Heather Graham. She is an organic geochemists NASA Goddard Spaceflight Center. Heather has a profound curiosity about the natural world. The history of life a vast connections between biotic enabled attic systems in one evolution can tell us about our future. Welcome to gravity assist Heather. Thank you so much Jim. Well first off what? The heck is a bio signature so via signature is just a physical indication of past or present life. That can be something as simple. As a bone that appealing colleges might find footprint an imprint on the environment or a chemical compound that's highly specialized for life. So how do we know if a bio signature actually came from life? Can WE BE FOOLED? Oh yeah that's Probably the most important part of bio signature. Science is making sure that you are looking at something that came from life and not being fooled by something can be made by physics by nature by geology by biotic chemistry. There are a lot of things that we associate with life. That are actually very common Being made out in stars a lot of the chemicals that we associate with life are really an inheritance from the universe. We also have to be very careful to keep our work clean so that we're not contaminating it with contemporary life. When we're trying to understand past life we know a bio signatures require certain chemicals. Is there some underlying composition that you look for in a bio signature? Yeah so it really kind of depends on where you're looking and what you're looking for For example a really common by ensure that we hear about a lot is DNA on that something. That's universal every organism. Has it so it's easy to say? Oh yes this is definitely from life. This is a molecule. That's too hard to make without biology being involved but DNA is ephemeral. It goes away quickly in nature. It's broken down by other organisms and reused very quickly but there are other chemical compounds that lasts for a really long time especially in the geologic record in the rock record and those are the kinds of things that we can look at as being a more robust signal of life on long timescales so getting down to the basics you know the the really important chemicals at carbon seems to be one if we if we look at what we have inside us. It's carbon hydrogen oxygen nitrogen phosphorus and sulfur. Sore those the fundamental compounds. We ought to be looking for so those are the fundamental compounds that we associate with life on earth life as we know in life as we know at correct them the kind of work that we're doing here at Goddard and the research group that I'm involved in doesn't always presupposes that though we're interested in bio signatures that might not just be about those particular elements or more importantly other elements that might be bio signatures as well. How do we figure that out? How do we figure out? What are the more important moment in? That's really from just observing nature in its in its completeness in its totality not just by looking at life but by looking at nature in context of its environment to understand what it's taking from a chemical system to build itself what it's eating what it's requiring Breathing out what the byproducts of its metabolism are and. Then you can track down. What are the important things that are are moving through? A system and that movement is the the central signature of biology. If something static it's unlikely to be involved so the concept of you are what you eat is true absolutely so we we actually pull things out of what we eat in in plug them in or body yet so we we take carbon from all these other sources and interestingly though you know carbon dioxide is our major byproduct we all breathe it out but there are lots of organisms that don't do that with carbon. They use metals and other strange things. And we find all these metals certain places in the geologic record and even though we don't see that organism. We know that this is something it left behind. So where do we find bio signatures usually when we're thinking about bio signatures? We think about the rock record. We think about geology. And really. That's just because that's a really stable repository to find a bio signature. You have to find a place. Where a molecule or. A part of an organism is protected from degradation. So we think of places where there's not a lot of oxygen since most other critters that would want to eat that organism are going to be using oxygen we look for for rock areas of sediments that have been protected from oxygen in the atmosphere and the rock records interesting. Not just for people who are interested in land but A lot of the rocks are actually old ocean. It's all the ocean sediments so we can peer into past ancient oceans despite going to certain rocks on earth. Will you brought a really nice friend with you? It's a fossil. What is that so this is a really special fossil this is from the Ad Akron period? That's about six hundred million years ago and this was a time in Earth's history when biology got really experimental and during this time period we find all sorts of crazy organisms that only exist during that time period biology was trying to all sorts of body plans and ways of living on the surface or just below the surface and really neat ways and these kind of fossils are only found in a couple of really special places on earth on Nevada. Namibia so this fossil as you can see there's these Long sort of tubes and there's ridges along them and they criss cross and what's sad is. Is this piece that I brought to you. Only about the size of my palm. And what you'll see is there's all these tubes weaving back and forth over each other but not in a random way in a very special pattern and that's part of what makes us realize this is biology and not just rocks happened to fall in a really interesting pattern. This is this has intentionally in. There was energy. Put into a system to leave this texture. This strange structure. There's a couple of different ways you might be able to try and explain it. Maybe it's texture on Iraq from a BIOFILM. Maybe it was a tube worm that was living below the surface. But what's really important about? This is we. Don't have any physical way without biology of making a pattern like this and that's what makes it a bio signature. You can do all sorts of experiments with different sizes of rocks and different chemistries of solutions of water. But you'll never make something that looks like this. Yeah it looks creepy. So I heard you know. There's like four thousand seven hundred minerals on earth in about three hundred of them could only be made by life. Yes absolutely so I know I am a chemist so I'm biased towards organic chemistry and I'm giving a lot of examples of organic chemistry that are by signatures but really there are lots of minerals that are bio signatures as well. There's a lot of great work that's been done to show what minerals you absolutely need for. Example oxygenic life the kind of life that made oxygen all the algae and the ocean that made oxygen there minerals that would only be associated with those really high levels of oxygen that those organisms created so if those organisms never developed on another planet we would be unlikely to see many of those minerals on those planets. How long do these bio signatures last once? They're in the rock is at it No actually one of the real arts of bio signature. Science is knowing what things look like when they break apart unfortunately a lot of the chemical compounds that we use his bio signatures. Don't last in that state that your body or another organism's body made them. They break down in very particular patterns and so we find those degradation products in the Rock Record. So once life is created in a decomposes a end up with the parts and so figuring out you have all the right parts are or even some of those parts may or may not be preserved over time. Yeah that ends up being a real problem. So what kind of tools do you use to really identify these parts and pieces and bio signatures? Yeah this is a real puzzle. So this is the kind of area would really Think of his interdisciplinary science. I'm looking at a particular sediment for example looking for particular compounds. I'm taking a lot of information that I've learned from other geologists that have described that rock so I will know something about like. Was this rock. Once a lake was at the ocean was it Buried in heated. So I'll have a lot of information from geology to help me direct those tests. About what sort of molecules? I'm likely to find and the other important thing about these molecules that we think of as a signatures that are being preserved in the rock record. Is there an example of a community? They're usually not just one particular organism. You're looking at a habitat. You're looking at a whole bunch of different metabolism's so you're really. Not just saying was their life. Was there not life? But you're getting a sense of what the ecosystem was you know another thought? I had relative to Bio signatures in rocks is is a structure in our structure. That how how geologically could that have possibly have happened in a like straddle light So you know when we studied by signatures. How does that help us? Think about the origin of life. Here on Earth Yeah. That's really interesting so a lot of these chemical compounds that we're thinking of don't really last on really really long timescales when we're thinking about something like the origin of life a lot of what we're looking at is physical Structures in the rock a really old evidence of cells really old evidence of biofilms which are just Big Accumulations of microbiology together So we're looking for those kind of physical things in the oldest rocks and that's where textures in rocks become really important and also something that you want to be able to make sure that those textures aren't something that nature makes all by itself without biology being involved so the key to find him life way in the past is to start looking at the old rocks wall. How old are the rocks here on earth? So that's kind of a bummer. About Earth is that most of our rocks have been recycled. Oh no and heated and cooked and moved and washed lots and lots of water. So it's really hard. Actually we think of of earth is being this you know life saturated planet and so it must be so easy to find life but when we look in the deep past. It's actually hard because much of that. Evidence of life has been destroyed by tectonics by the planet moving around were very dynamic planet. So we have to look for what we call. Quiescent parts of the planet These are like old croutons the really the oldest rocks on earth that are up in Canada and Greenland and places like that we find really interesting textures in the and we'd like to think that those are probably the earliest forms of life and then that gives us a sense of. What was the chemistry in that early ocean? What was the planet like? And that gives us a sense of the kind of chemistry. That was possible so just recently. A team from the Mars Twenty Twenty Rover Group. This is the group that is going to be looking at the rock record from Mars Tracked out into Australia. An owner was running. Why are they going to Australia for a meeting? While they're out in the middle of nowhere in Western Australia and they went to the Australian shirt cruel. Yeah so this attract. That's old rock. Yeah Yeah So. What do we know about that? Australian shirt yeah so those are some of the really old rocks where we find the oldest evidence of life. What's really special about some of those rocks in Australia? Is you can find really old evidence of microbial biofilms these mats microbes that that form these layers and they grow up up up upon each other in these layers. And that's a strata light like you mentioned and what's really interesting as you can see living examples of those right off the coast and Australia. So it's such a special place feel that window into the deep past and then see something that's contemporary. That's stars the same lifestyle and conducting its biology and pretty much the same way for billions of years. It's a really special place. In fact when they measure the date these rocks they find. They're like three point six or three point eight billion years old yet. We know the earth is four point six billion years old. So there's you know nearly a billion years record that we've lost yeah and The really sad thing is because that's our earliest evidence. We know that somewhere in that time period between formation and that three point eight ish number that you give. That's that's the exciting part. That's when life evolved and we don't have really anything to go on there and that's where Experiments in the laboratory can become really illustrative for giving us a window and giving us something to imagine for that passed. This is were Mars comes in and a really neat way because It doesn't appear to have had some plate tectonics but not like earth and it appears to have been a blue planet like Earth early on but then went very arid and so maybe the record of life starting perhaps On Mars before three point. Eight billion years is attainable. Knock record there that we can bring back yet. That's what's really exciting is is. It hasn't had that you know. Heating and Cooling and moving and crushing. The Earth has and that really can tell us a little bit about why we choose to go the places. We go on Mars right that we're looking in these sediments that we know were buried once upon a time and If there is something organic there were looking in the best places to find something that wasn't exposed to the surface where it could be altered. So what's an agnostic? Signature of life. Yes that is A bio signature. Where we're not presupposing. A connection to earth biology a carbon based life like we know it that could be one or it could be carbon based life that has different informational polymers besides DNA. Something like that. There's a lot of ways that life could be different but not related to life on earth and these kind of studies get really interesting as we're starting to move farther and farther out into the solar system where there's less and less likelihood that were related to creatures out there if they exist so do you think we're alone in the galaxy. Do you think life is confined to just earth? I tend to think not and I basil out of that. On probability this is another area of expertise that there's lots of people working in by signatures and that's kind of people who think about statistics likelihood and probability and it's rare. You see something as a one off in nature. If something works it usually happens again and again and so. I just can't imagine that we're the only Instance of that kind of unique chemistry happening. Okay so if you think we can find life beyond Earth where do you think will find it? Where Oh that's interesting. What they're finding I in the solar system or will we find it in EXO planets. I you know planets around other stars. I would tend to say that. We're probably going to find something unambiguous in the solar system. I and I would say that's really just because for this kind of evidence. You really do need a bunch of different ways of viewing the problem to be convincing. We can't just find one molecule and say. Oh look that's life because you need to be able to see it in context so I notice you have some really unique tattoos use long streaks that are emanating from particular point. What are they is our high speed photographs taken from inside a bubble chamber where they were crashing particles until children a very particular way to see what kind of other particles are made and this is imitating processes that happened in certain kinds of stars that make light that has mass. So light from our stars massless. But that's not always true and I got these tattoos because light was something that was a big part of my phd work. I actually looked at bio signatures to tell us about light harvesting molecules in photosynthetic organisms while heather. You know I always ask my guest to tell me what was the event or person place or thing that got them so excited about being the scientists they are today. I call that a gravity. Assist so heather. What was your gravity assist? Oh I think if I think of any person place or thing that the place that immediately pops to mind is the community college that I went to Santa Monica College in La. It's a it's a really great place and I think what made it so great as I got to take so many different classes. There's all these different people who work on bio signatures and you need to have a a really firm grasp of physics and geology and chemistry and math. And that's something I was able to do at this community college because I had the grace to just explore every topic I wanted to. I took every every science class. They had took field. Ornithology and I had a wonderful organic chemistry professor. There Jamie Anderson who just pushed me into every research opportunity he could find and I think if I had been given that allowance to have all that curiosity I wouldn't have the background. I really a benefit from in by signature science. You had mentioned to me earlier that you were the first one in your family to go to college. How hard was that? Yeah I am the first person and I think it's it's hard because I i. I don't think it was something I ever expected I would do. I didn't actually go to college until I was an adult and I'm not saying that that are eighteen. Coming out of high school aren't adults. But I was a real at all. I was thirty when I went to college. And I think it really changes the intention And how you approach your studies I wasn't doing it because my mom and dad told me to. I was doing it really because these were things I wanted to know. This was interests that I had and I took it really seriously because I didn't have any examples in my family of how to do this and I was really helped by a lot of wonderful professors and when I think about the way I approached it in that curiosity. The only bought two studies. There's a saying by an old author Charles Baudelaire that I sought the Y. Of It and turned pleasure into knowledge. Well thank so very much. This has just been a delight. And you're a wonderful bio signature. Thank you will join me next time as we continue our journey to look for life beyond. Earth. I'm Jim Green and this is your gravity assist.

Earth Jim Green Dr Heather Graham NASA Australia Goddard Spaceflight Center Breen Mars Twenty Twenty Rover Group Namibia Charles Baudelaire Goddard professor Western Australia Iraq Jamie Anderson La
NASA Mars Mission Updates

SPACE NEWS POD

10:33 min | 2 years ago

NASA Mars Mission Updates

"Hey, space news pod listeners if you wanna show your opinions give feedback or tell me what you're thinking said me, a voice message voice messages, earn easy way for you to send me audio the might end up in a future episode of the space news, pod voice messages are the latest feature from anchor the platform, I used to make this podcast if you have an idea for an episode if you want me to cover something, you can send me a voice message right now from wherever you're listening, just tap. The Lincoln my show notes. And I can't wait to hear from you to order listening to the space news pod. So that means you like podcasts and you probably like music too. So on Spotify, you can listen to all of those things, all your podcasts, and all of your music in one place in, you don't need a premium account. They have a huge catalog of podcasts on every topic including space news pod. You can follow your favorite podcast. He never miss episodes. Download episodes. Listen to off line and easily share what you're listening to with your friends with Spotify integrations with. Social media platforms like Instagram. So just searched for space news pod on the Spotify app. Browse podcasts in the your library tab and follow me. So you never miss an episode of space news. Pot Spotify, the world's leading music, streaming service in now it can be your go-to for podcasts too. Hello. And welcome back to the space news pod. A daily podcast for space science in tech. My name is will Walden and today on this episode, I'm going to be talking about Nasr's future Mars missions, and current Mars missions like the Mars reconnaissance orbiter. But I, I wanna tell you about what's going to be happening on Monday. I did my first interview with somebody in that somebody is Dr David warm flash on Twitter. You can check him out at cosmic evolution. He's a he's a writer. He's an author. He's a doctor and we talk about his new book. It's called moon an illustrated history from ancient myths to the colonies of tomorrow. But we don't just talk about the moon. We talk about upcoming Mars missions, a little bit of space, politics, and some other stuff in there, too. But there's a lot of. About the moon. So if you're interested in that mixture to listen on Monday to the episode with Dr David warm flesh, and I'll be posting the full video interview on our YouTube channel YouTube dot com slash space news pod. So I got a news alert from NASA at JPL the Jet Propulsion Laboratory about their new Mars twenty twenty Rover updates in the a picture of the ship of the craft is going to be taking the Rover to Mars the ship. It's about the size of let's just say, like a I don't know, seven to eight person hot tub. If that makes sense where you're not cramped, like you have a lot of room, it's like a like a like a larger hot tub. It suspended by cables, there's a cruise stage which will power guide, the March twenty twenty spacecraft during its seventh month seven month trip to Mars. And below that there's an arrow shell which will protect the vehicle during cruise as well as during the crazy fire descent into the Martian atmosphere. In. You might remember something like the descent from curiosity, which was this like a seven minute, descent, where it's fiery, it's really really hot in it. Looks like the craft is gonna burn up in the atmosphere, but survives in, then we have great science going on Mars. But inside of that shell. There is a rocket powered descent stage and it has a Rover in there, too. But right now it's just a, a standing Rover for the time being until they actually lost the mission because they don't want to put the actual Rover in there did want a cocoon it up right now. They want to wait until the actual mission. They'll put it in and then the flight up to Mars in the actual Rover that's got to be going to Mars is getting its final assembly and GPL's high bay one cleanroom right now. So it's not complete. That's what Stanton is there just to make sure everything fits for when the actual Rover is done goes in the show, they send it off. And it says here that the Mars twenty twenty spacecraft was tested in the twenty five foot wide eighty foot tall, which is eight meter by twenty six meter chamber in the same configuration, it will begin while flying through interplanetary space, the twenty twenty Rover carries an entirely new suite of instruments, including a sample caching system. The. Will collect samples of Mars for return to earth on subsequent missions, this mission will launch from Cape Canaveral air force station in Florida in July of twenty twenty in landed Jezero creator on February. Eighteenth of twenty twenty one. So if all goes, well will probably start getting some science from this thing in March of twenty twenty one and want to get back from this break. I'm gonna talk about Marzieh's m aro, which is the Mars reconnaissance orbiter and held many trips. It made around the red planet. It's a crazy number. So get ready. Hi everyone. I would've let you know about inker dot FM. It's where I host by podcast in, I find that it's the easiest place to do that. And it gives you everything that you need in one place, for free, which you can start. Podcasting from your phone, or from your computer. You don't need special crazy equipment to start doing it. You can talk into your phone video, editing equipment that costs thousands of dollars to start a podcast, you can do it from anywhere in when you're done, recording your episode anchored at FM will distribute it. So it can be hard everywhere on Spotify. Apple podcast Google podcasts. Stitcher, every place that podcasts can be heard, and you can make money with your podcast. It's pretty simple. There's no minimum listenership to start making money with anchor. So if you wanna make a little bit of money while having a cool podcast, while download the ANC rep or go to anchor up FM to get started. So Mars recounts, orbiter collects daily science about the planet surface at atmosphere, including detailed views with its high resolution image science experiment. Camber the high rise and it's powerful enough to see surface features the size of a dinner room table from one hundred eighty six miles above the surface in just a -ccomplish a really crazy milestone, it has done sixty thousand loops around Mars and on average, the M R O takes a hundred and twelve minutes to circle Mars in goes about two miles per second. That's three point four kilometers per second. It goes really, really fast. And it's not just a hot rod. It doesn't just go fast around Mars. It collects daily weather data it probes the subsurface for ice and the. This data that they get from this reconnaissance orbiter. Well, they can use that data for designing future missions that will take humans to the surface of the red planet in the future, and it doesn't just do its own science. It works as a relay. So it's a network of relays the being data back to earth from Nastase Mars. Rovers Landers, and later this month, the MRI will hit another milestone, it will have relayed one tear bit of data mainly. From Mars is curiosity Rover. So if you've ever seen, you know, sell fees from curiosity, or, you know, the surface of Mars, they have really great photos, Anastas website in on the social media channels, while the empire, oh, probably helped with that helped relay those images back to earth. Dan, Johnston in Nasr's JPL in Pasadena, California. He's the project manager over there. He said, MRI has given scientists in the. Public new perspective of Mars. We've also supported Nastase fleet of Mars surface missions. A loving them to send their images and discoveries back to scientists on earth. And also during landings of crafts on Mars, while the MRI takes pictures. It'll take pictures of these landings. It'll take pictures of the lending sites before they actually get there to make sure that nothing has changed, and make sure that everything is okay. And you know, and then they make decisions based on the photos from R O, and other orbiters. And also, not just before the landing though, make sure that the Lander got their properly in the make sure they'll take photos of the, of the Landers, and make sure that, you know, they didn't collide with the surface because instruments on the lenders could be wrong. You know, there could be some, some damage to some of the instruments. It does happen. And those instruments could be wrecked on their way, you know when they hit the surface. So am I rose there to take photos of Landers? Make sure they got there in one piece. Make sure that everything's good. Make sure that the parachute didn't deploy over the actual Lander in ruin all of the science. So I'm arose there for numerous reasons and they just got sixty thousand laps around Mars. So I wanna say thank you to everyone who subscribe to this podcast if you haven't subscribed yet. Police hit the subscribe button, if you'd like space science in tech, because it happens every single day on the space news pod. Also, thank you to patriot patrons patriot dot com slash space news podcast. And also, thank you for taking the time out of your day to spend it here with me on the space news pod. I'm your host will Walden and I will see you soon.

Mars Spotify Nastase Mars Rovers Landers Walden Dr David Nasr twenty twenty Rover YouTube Jet Propulsion Laboratory Twitter Cape Canaveral writer NASA Stanton Marzieh Apple Florida
Mars 2020 Rover Assembled and Tested for Launch Next Year

SPACE NEWS POD

08:53 min | 2 years ago

Mars 2020 Rover Assembled and Tested for Launch Next Year

"The moral Bill. Hello and welcome back to the space. News pod. Daily source for space. Science Intech news ear host will. And today's episode. We will be talking about the Mars twenty twenty Rover where it's at in its assembly, and what it's going to be doing when it actually gets to the surface of Mars. But before I get into that. I want to say thank you to every buddy who's been supporting this podcast, especially our patriot patrons patriot dot com slash space news podcast, if you wanna sign up, you're helping tremendously I can buy more cool stuff for the studio. That's going to help make the podcast even better in because of your help. I've been able to sound proof the studio area little bit more. So I mean, I can tell the difference a lot from before I sound proved that's probably like ten fifteen episodes ago to today, which today is well, it's a lot better. It doesn't have that. Like Reverberi weird sound. So thank you so much for all that help the Mars twenty twenty Rover is based on the mar science laboratories. Curiosity Rover configuration. It's about the size of a car about ten feet long nine feet wide and seven feet tall. And it's two thousand three hundred and fourteen pounds and it weighs less than a compact car. So this thing is pretty big. I mean, if you think about a compact car for a second you could fit a family of four in the compact car, and this Mars Rover will be up on the red planet by itself doing science, and this thing has a body. It's the Rover's body, and it's called the warm electric box. The w e b for short, and it's like a car body strong and protects the Rovers computers in electron IX, which are the brains of the operation during the whole time that it's on its way to Mars and also when it lands in it starts doing science things in just recently at JPL Nasr's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California. Technicians have assembled the capsule that will keep the March twenty twenty Rover secure for its ride. So everything that's around the Rover not the Rover body itself. But the capsule around it, they have completed it and this camps along with the Rover will launch to Mars in twenty twenty in it'll spend about seven months getting there in when it gets there. Do you remember the famous seven minutes of terrorist Quance from the curiosity Rover little while back in twenty twelve well, it's gonna go through similar things. It's going to have the seven minutes of terror of its own and all the parts need to be secured in the capsule in this process is called stacking and GPO member said that stacking is an important milestone in mission development because as good as our computer models. Are we still need to put it together to show that the bolt holes lineup and everything fits together? So without the structure, the the Rover would make it. So the nuts and bolts of the opera. Have to work. It's not as detailed as the computer set up, but still has to work and they're working hard on it. And they go on to say it is a great feeling for the entire project when we see the stack sitting there waiting to go for the next part of the journey which will eventually to a launch pad at Cape Canaveral in July of next year. So right now when doing the stack they have a test Rover is a surrogate Rover, so they have to make sure that everything fits properly before they put the actual Rover in the stack. So the surrogate Rover as test Rover and the working on that right now and making sure that everything is good to go. And in these recent checks technicians place, the rocket powered descent stage on top of the surrogate Rober and confirming that the holes in the stage surrogate lined up, they performed a careful check before lowering the back shell which is the part that protects the Rover as enters the Martian atmosphere, and they of mind it properly, and then the team will go on to. The fit of parachute nosecone next. And that's the important piece that will protect the parachute. As the Mars twenty twenty shell slammed into the atmosphere in once it's entries done. The March twenty twenty can safely deploy the parachute in slowly drift down to the surface of Mars. This is all during the seven minutes of hell that I was talking about earlier or I'm going to take a really quick break. A little pause for the cost to pay some bills in when it come back. I'm gonna tell you more about what makes the Mars twenty twenty Rover. So freaking awesome. Hi, everyone. I would let you know about inker dot FM as we're I host podcast in. I find that. It's the easiest place to do that. And it gives you everything that you need in one place for free, which you can start podcasting from your phone or from your computer. You don't need special crazy equipment to start doing it. You can talk. Doc into your phone need editing equipment that costs thousands of dollars to start a podcast. You can do it from anywhere in when you're done. Recording your episode anchored at FM will distribute it so it can be hard everywhere on Spotify, apple podcast, Google podcasts, Stitcher, every place podcast can be heard and you can make money with your podcast. It's pretty simple. There's no minimum listenership to start making money with anchor. So if you wanna make a little bit of money while having a cool podcast while download the crap or go to anchored up f m to get started. So the Mars twenty twenty Rover is still there's more things that's gonna go on with this stack. They have to stack it up. They have to put the things in order in order to make sure that everything fits properly, and then they have to unstuck it. So the Rovers in their while va dummy Rovers in there, and they have to take it out. They have to unassembled everything. And then they have to put the regular Rover back in there. The real Rover back in there to make sure that everything works with the real Rover as well. They'll do some testing. And then and only then once it pass those tests it'll be ready to launch to Mars in twenty twenty. A NASA spokesperson said until the hold down bolts on the atlas rocket blow in a Rover is headed to Mars in July of twenty twenty. There is almost always something being assembled tested or modified. Now, let's get into the brains of the operation the brings of the Rover the Rover compute element the RC. E? There's two of these things on the Rover. Now, that's for redundancy of one bringing goes down somehow doesn't work. There's always going to be a spare brain in the remote compute element interfaces with engineering functions of the Rover over two networks which follow an aerospace industry standard designed especially for the high reliability requirements of airplanes and space crafts and this thing will directly interface with Rover instruments for exchange of commands and science data. So without these two brains. None of the science would be happening in this Rover assembly for the March twenty twenty mission while they have cameras that are going to film, everything the entry descent in lane. Ding cameras will capture better than ever recordings of the events that deliver the Rover to the surface of Mars. They have up look camera to record. The parachute. They have a descent stage, which looks down that will view the Rover from above. It has an uplift camera another one that see the descent stage in operation as lowers the Rover from the crazy sky crane, and they also have down look camera that will be viewing the ground underneath everything. These cameras will be recording. What happens when the Rover actually lands how much sand and rock is blown into the atmosphere by the retro rockets. How does the landing system move is the Rover nears the surface, and how do the wheels and legs respond when the Rover finally puts all its weight down on the surface of the red planet and as time goes on. And as more of this mission is uncovered I'm gonna give you as much information as I get and I want to say, thank you, everyone who supported this podcast. Do appreciate it. And thank you for taking the time out of your day to spend it here with me on the space news pod. I'm your host will. And I. We'll see you soon.

Mars twenty twenty Rover Rovers twenty Rover Mars twenty twenty Science Intech Jet Propulsion Laboratory California Rober GPO Cape Canaveral dot FM NASA twenty twenty Spotify JPL Nasr Google apple seven minutes fourteen pounds
This Week @NASA, June 14, 2019

NASACast Audio

00:00 sec | 2 years ago

This Week @NASA, June 14, 2019

"The latest about our Artemis program and astronaut shares her story with students and another record breaking maneuver by one of our spacecraft. A few of the stories to tell you about this week at NASA. Administrator Brian Stein, spoke about our Artemis program during a June tenth townhall at our Glenn research center in Cleveland Ohio, artists missions will land the first American woman, and the next American man on the moon by twenty twenty four by using innovative new technologies and systems some of which are being developed at Glen. Glenn is going to be very instrumental and helping us achieve these goals for a sustainable lunar return, and an eventual mission to Mars our Serena on chancellor, stopped by excel academy, public, charter school on June tenth as part of her post flight, visit to the Washington DC area on chancellor, spent one hundred ninety seven days in space, as a member of the international space station's expedition, fifty-six Fifty-seven crew contributing to hundreds of experiments in biology, biotechnology physical science and earth science, she returned to earth in this Semper twenty eighteen. Science continues to flow from Arcus Seaney mission to Saturn, which wrapped up in 2017, a new paper published June thirteenth in science describes findings from the spacecraft's closest ever operations of the planet's main rings, the findings include fine. Details of features textures and patterns sculpted by tiny moons, or masses, embedded within the rings that interact with the particles around them this raises questions about the interactions that shaped the planet's rings. On June twelve hour Cyrus Rex spacecraft performed another significant navigation maneuver. Breaking its own world record for a spacecraft making the closest orbit of a planetary body. The maneuver began the missions new phase known as orbital be and placed the spacecraft six hundred eighty meters less than half a mile above the surface of. Asteroid banou. A newly installed webcam affectionately called seeing twenty twenty offers the public alive, bird's eye view of construction and testing of our Mars twenty twenty Rover at our jet. Propulsion laboratory in Pasadena, California checkout, go dot NASA dot gov slash seeing twenty twenty four. Continuous live video of the Rover taking shape before it launches next year on one of the most technologically challenging interplanetary missions ever designed. On June twelfth administrative Breitenstein Stein was joined by US Senator, Ted Cruz DC council chairman, Phil Mendelson and author Margo Lee shedder Lee at a ceremony to rename the street in front of our headquarters in Washington e-street, southwest, to Hidden Figures. The event honored Katherine Johnson Dorothy pon and Mary Jackson, who were featured shedder, Leigh's book, and subsequent movie, Hidden Figures, as well as other women who have dedicated their lives to honorably serving our country advancing equality, and contributing to the United States space program. That's what's up this week at NASA for more on these and other stories, follow us on the web at NASA dot gov slash Thuan.

NASA Mars twenty twenty Rover chancellor Brian Stein Arcus Seaney US Margo Lee shedder Lee Breitenstein Stein Katherine Johnson Dorothy pon Glenn research center Glenn Ted Cruz Phil Mendelson Cleveland Administrator Ohio Washington e-street Senator chairman
Mars 2020 Rover Gets a Super Instrument

SPACE NEWS POD

06:39 min | 2 years ago

Mars 2020 Rover Gets a Super Instrument

"If you're listening to this you obviously like podcast and you probably like music to on spotify. You can listen to all of that and what place for free you don't need a premium account. spotify has a huge catalog podcasts on every topic including the one. You're listening to right now. Uh spotify spotify you can follow your favorite podcast. You never miss an episode download episodes to listen to offline wherever you are easily share what you're listening to with your friends. Via spotify integrations was social media platforms like instagram so just search for space news pot on the spotify APP or Browse podcasts in Your Library Tab and follow me so you never miss an episode of the Space News Pod spotify is the world's leading music streaming service and now it can be your Go-to for podcasts too hello and welcome back to the space pod daily podcast about space science and tech. I'm your host will wall in this episode. We're going to be talking about the Mars. Mars Two Thousand Twenty Rover has numerous instruments on it that will be detecting numerous things but just recently engineers at NASA J._p._l.. In Pasadena California have installed a Super Cam masked unit in it onto the Mars twenty twenty over this camera laser and spectrometer can identify the chemical and mineral makeup of targets as small as a pencil point from a distance of more than twenty feet away and Super Cam is a next generation version of the Kem Kem which is on the Nasr's curiosity Mars rover right now in its been deployed <hes> in developed jointly in the U._S.. France and Spain wants France delivered the last piece of flight hardware. The instrument was fully integrated on the Mars Twenty Twenty Rover on June Twenty Fifth Twenty nineteen. Eighteen and in the spacecraft Assembly Facility High Bay One cleanroom at Nasr's J._p._l.. Massa said Super Cam has come a long way from being a bold and ambitious idea to an actual instrument Super Cam deputy principal investigator said that France and he's also said while it still has a long way to go all the way to Mars this is a great day for not only Super Cam but the amazing consortium that put it together and Mars Twenty twenty scientists we use super camp to examine <hes> Martian rocks and soil seeking organic compounds that could be related to past life on on Mars so this camera we'll be able to detect possible past life ancient life possibly on Mars from twenty feet away. Super Kim's rocks <unk> Zapping laser allow scientists to analyze the chemical composition of its targets it lets the Mars Twenty Twenty rover can done. It's cutting edge science from a distance. That's what the a payload developer manager G._P._l.. Said and it's also to be installed on the new weeks. In the next few weeks. I should say is Mars Twenty twenty sample caching system which includes seventeen separate motors and will collect samples of Martian rock and soil that will be left on the surface of Mars four return to Earth by a future mission so this is what's going to happen with Mars twenty twenty. They're going to get the rover up. They'RE GONNA fly up there from the LACI from here from Cape Canaveral in July of Twenty twenty and in a will land in the two zero crater on February eighteenth of twenty twenty one. Now when it does it's going to take samples is going to leave those samples on Mars for a future human rated mission on the <hes> Red Planet now another thing that's possible is that if humans don't go to Mars to get this stuff. They don't go there to get these samples. They could possibly send another robot. They'll be up there. They'll be ready to come back but there's no way for Mars Twenty Twenty rover to bring these samples back to Earth is it an oversight vow is more like a foresight because if they were to put this land around Mars and get a sample bring it back to Earth. That's only good for a few things but if they leave the rover up there for a sustained. Sustained amount of time so it can do a lot of science. It's possible that it could find ancient life pest life on the Martian surface which is more important than getting. These samples apple's back as fast as possible. I host my podcast on Anchor F._M.. Anchors the easiest way to make a podcast an anchor gives you all the tools that you need in one place for free which you can use from your phone or from your computer now these creation tools allow you to record edit your podcast so it sounds amazing in they'll distribute the podcast for you so it can be heard anywhere. spotify apple podcasts Google podcasts in many more in you can easily early. Make money from your podcast with no minimum listenership so download the anchor up or go to Acre Dot F._M.. To get started so Mars twenty twenty now has a Super Cam and it's gearing up to to launch from Cape Canaveral Florida in July of Twenty twenty to land on Mars in February eighteenth of twenty twenty one now. We want to say thank you to everybody. Who's been listening to this podcast please?

Mars twenty twenty Mars Twenty Twenty Rover Twenty twenty Mars Twenty spotify France Nasr Cape Canaveral spacecraft Assembly Facility H Kem Kem Pasadena Cape Canaveral Florida NASA payload developer manager apple instagram California Kim Massa
Liftoff 120: Everything Got Jumbled and Fell Down

Liftoff

39:07 min | 1 year ago

Liftoff 120: Everything Got Jumbled and Fell Down

"Hello and welcome to lift off from your friends at this time by express. Vpn lift off as a fortnightly show. Where you don't have to be a rocket scientist to understand the latest news about space and related subjects. My name is Jason Snell. And I'm joined by my co host. Mr Stephen Hackett Hi Stephen. Hello Jason I have some bad news. Our our space mission has been postponed Ono because we have to remain inside. I was surprised for you. We're going to go to space. But now we can't so that's a big surprise. You can't just spring that on me. I got a pack of Fries. No you can't you don't bother me. We're not going anywhere is gonNA pretend from in our bunker. I actually am in a bunker. Pretty Much Yeah. I know you are. You withstand a lot. So we we compiled a whole bunch of Of News for this. There's lots of stuff going on. Yeah so we're going to talk about news about space and related subjects. But this just in. There's more news so we should start their Mo- News Maloney's network and Mars News Network Marginal News Network M M men and that's hard to say M men hit. The lesson is if something does it. Work hit with a shovel. Could've told them that. How many problems have you solve your life? That way very worried. I D you don't WanNa know can't say it on a public podcast we're talking about the mole. Its inability today coming out of the hole and we spoke several episodes ago about basically the only the only plan left was to use the robotic arm on insight to basically push put pressure on the mole as it digs from behind. Kind of shove it in there and so far. It seems to be working weren't talking about this later. A lot of NASA and JPL and other space agencies are are working from home or not working and so there actually isn't a link on the NASA or JPL news site about this but Someone issued a tweet saying that it seems that the approach Tuesday robotic arm to push the mole seems to be working which is fantastic again. This is basically the last trick up their sleeve and so far so good good. This is the you know. It's trying to dig down. Learn about. Mars can't dig down. They don't know more powdery or something than they thought. And they keep trying and this is a good one. Just yeah just whack whack a mole. I don't know again. We don't have a lot of information because everything shut down. I don't know how deep they can go with this method because at some point you can't push any deeper. The whole is not that big right in the end of the scoop is pretty big so I don't know how you know what the end game is here but any progress is better than where they were. It was basically just like sticking out of the whole halfway. Yup Yup good something you break it. You bought it though on Mars. That's that's true. There's no there's no repairing no no if you hit with a shovel in it and it breaks fine you can take the risks. That's space exploration was all about good luck mall and it's why this fix was last night. They tried everything else well. Apparently it's worth the risk to try to try to do this. Yeah all right. That's our weekly installment of the Mos News News Amendment and Im- in 'em and Jason. Yes it's the year of commercial crew is it. Maybe yeah we thought we were really rolling there until there was a global pandemic and now It'll get you we. We don't know. Yeah so the good news is that normally we would be on this episode saying Hey hey may targeted launch for Commercial Crew Crew Dragon American astronauts from American soil going to the International Space Station on a space x spacecraft to NASA astronauts on board the big step in commercial crew. They still have a few like parachute test to fix. But it basically looks like they were ready to go. They are setting march or something may as the date and they still are talking about it but it's unclear I. I just have some skepticism about whether this is going to come off because of life right now that to have to have those astronauts and have a crew and have all that stuff ready to go We're talking about a later. There's another mission that I think is more likely is still needs to be taken care of but I I'm I feel like they were at the point where they were going to launch may but now it will probably get delayed is my guest just because of People not being able to be working on it because of the Pandemic yeah there's also an issue a potential issue with the Falcon nine so a few days ago on March Eighteenth spacex. Put another sixty. Starlink satellites in orbit this did not land on the drone ship. This was the first booster to fly a fifth mission so number five and there is an issue actually at launch launch was supposed to be a few days earlier than this and I got up and My boys were up and you know they wanted to watch it and so on the IPAD streaming it and they basically ignited and then aborted at ignition. So just made a little puff of smoke and that was that. That's the sound it made me. There is an issue with Some out of class data with an engine throttle up into the computer boarded at they got that resolved during the mission on the eighteenth one of the first stage engines so those nine engines in the first stage one of them shut down prematurely SPACEX. They were still able to insert the second stage in orbit where it needed to go. But they couldn't recover the first stage because of this came in Raymond Short and SPACEX. Ns or looking at this before a commercial crew flight can take place now. The commercial crew. Nine is new. They're not going to be using a flight proven as they say. Yes recycled used car. They're not. It's not a used car. It's a new car. Certified pre-owned Falcon Nine May Can can own rocket. I think he just rent it but so they WANNA make sure that they understand what happened here before you put crew on one of these things so between the pandemic in this I expect that may that may date to slip but hopefully they can work out. What happened with this engine and Before from yeah I mean. I think it's always wise for them to watch stuff and and their partner and they WANNA look at any anomalies in the launch vehicle. But it seems to me like they'll figure it out and that's not going to be what what stops it's going to be the people you got people there to go. You GotTa make sure that the crew is healthy. Which we're GONNA talk about in a second and you don't WanNa you don't WanNa take the pain to space station so I think it's way safer for everybody. If this gets delayed a little further and look this is like the fifth year of commercial crew. A few more months is not a big deal to for everyone to be safe exactly right. I have some far out space news for you okay. Little Science news a couple little science items. I wanted to throw into our pre. Pre flight checklist. Prefre CHECKLIST IS PRE PRE CHECKLIST. So supernova one thousand nine hundred a so. This is a a nearby relatively was in the I think one of the magic clouds Supernova explosion. Thirty three years ago right after you're born with one This is a so. It's one of the most observed supernova explosions ever because it happened relatively close in in a modern era And we've learned a lot about super novas in watching the watching not only the moments after but the long term aftermath of this because these you know the long term the stuff is still all moving from that explosion and it keeps moving for a very long time so we can actually watch the explosion happening over the course of right now thirty three years but there have been some weird things about it that have not entirely understood even now thirty three years later It seems like the star that exploded was a blue supergiant star which is strange because they expect that a core collapse Supernova is gonNA come from a red supergiant a recent study and this is why. It's it's news is they. Ran It through a bunch of computer models to figure out they were looking at the dispersion of radioactive nickel which is a product of Supernova explosion and it was asymmetric there. Was this big lane of radioactive nickel going in one direction. They're like that's unusual. That doesn't seem like it's right. And so what the what they did in a lot of astronomers do this. You see the guys who doing Planet nine searching doing this. There are lots of astronomers who what they're doing is they run lots and lots and lots and lots of models and see which ones result in what to get an idea of what are the possibilities and so they ran a bunch of models for for trying to find out what would cause this kind of a nickel dispersion and they came up with an interesting result which is that it was a red supergiant star but then it merged with a main sequence star like our sun that was just doing its regular kind of burning and that turned into a blue supergiant and then boom basically and so you get this asymmetric core collapse. Which is why the Nicholas kind of shooting out in one direction? And and so that's interesting because it's like that's a that's kind of a twist to the story that there was a a a a merger of two stars that preceded the Supernova it also. They've been looking for an not really finding the remnant the neutron star that's left behind by the SUPERNOVA. They have a new place to look now. Because these models suggest that it's located in further north. Basically for you know astronomy values of north than previously thought. Because it's asymmetric so it would be blasted off to the side a little bit so it's just interesting more science more speculation You're on a bunch of these computer models and you you start to learn things about what you observe thirty three years before and continue to observe using the evidence and the scene in this case being radioactive nickel. It's just it's a pretty cool. Yeah having the technology and better understanding decades later to explain something we've seen for a long time. It's really cool. Yeah that's a bad day for that star you get collided with the explode. That was a that was a bad day. Yeah that is as Ralph. That's the truth at one morbid. Oh Science News for you. This is about back in the Solar System. Go go to mercury okay And there was an article in the New York Times this week about the search for life on Mercury which is a phrase ahead and used before and just going to say every space story seems to have a search for life angle on it and this is something that they know that people are interested in like NASA has really played it up. And this all I blame William Shatner. This all goes back to whatever that was nineteen ninety-five when there was that one report about like finding something in Iraq that was a Martian meteorite. And William Shatner tweeted that you. They've found life on Mars. Everybody the whole there was a media frenzy and it's like No not really anyway. Every history has that angle now so this this particular is actually more about how we learned some things about mercury and how conception of mercury up to now may not actually be right The idea is. There's this what they call chaotic terrain on Mercury. It looks like a whole bunch of stuff. Just got kind of dropped in a jumble on the surface which is unusual usually there are there are processes that we know that generate terrain and this is Toronto. Kind of didn't make any sense. Originally the thought was that it was an asteroid hit the other side of mercury and then caused Earthquakes that caused that terrain. Get jumbled but there's there's a new study that's just out that says the terrain being jumbled up happened thousands of years after the asteroid strike and their feeling is that this terrain was actually caused by a sudden drop of the crust below the surface. That like it dropped. And everything. Got Jumbled Okay and the best explanation for that is that some sort of volatile material basically sublimated it went from being solid to being liquid or gas and it and it erupted shot out of there and everything got jumbled and fell down now that could be water which is the source of this whole like life on is like water is now life on because there's water there could be life water on mercury probably not but still it could have been water. They probably wasn't water even but there was something there volatile. That's interesting we didn't really think about that before. It's something we didn't expect. It makes you wonder what else could be behind all this and another point in this article that I thought was fun. Was the idea that if you're beneath the surface of mercury sort of like when we were talking about the balloon around Venus Laden we think about these places uninhabitable because we think of their surface but in in the Venus's atmosphere there's a place where it's one earth atmospheric pressure and temperature sort of one hundred hundred ten degrees. It's actually habitable. Except you're going to need to wear a really good raincoat because they'll be Acid like drops of sulfuric acid. That will occasionally hit you. So don't it's not great but but pretty pretty habitable mercury similarly. We think about it is incredibly hot on the side that faces the sun and then the side that doesn't face the sun is incredibly cold. The truth is that underneath the surface there is probably a level at which there is a temperature that is conducive to at least some life to exist again. That's a long way to go to say there. There could be could be or have been life on mercury but it is an interesting idea that they're they're even on a place as inhabitable as mercury. There might be some place somewhere in Mercury. That is a quote. Unquote Habitable Zone. So just a again. We don't know a lot about mercury. We've talked on the show about the the limitations of the probes we've sent there by their and how hard it is to get there because of gravity and the gravity of the sun so little interesting like new way of thinking that there might be some volatile material that we didn't expect on. Mercury like in this article talk one of the scientists on but the other one I thought he had lost it at some point. It's a weird. It's a weird thing but like it. It's funny too because the scientists sort of saying okay. This part is totally right this. This seems very likely that this was an eruption of a volatile or something and the other part is like. Yeah maybe probably not. Maybe and there's a lot of that in science where it's like this part is solid and then we go into the speculation which is fun and a path for future investigation. But maybe on the whackier side I can. I can get behind wacky. Got Their study in the New York Times. I mean there is that the playing of the life on Mercury kind of angle in the New York Times. That's like I think everybody is realized. You talk about water. Put potentially being somewhere in the solar system and there's a science writer somewhere it was like what what'd you say water and then they come running. All right let's Let's take a break and then we'll get into how the space industry is dealing with this pandemic. How does that sound sounds great? I mean done something great. It's okay I mean I. It's a good plan execute that plan. We'll go with that. Failure is not an option. This episode of lift-off is brought to you by express. Vpn We all know how VPN protects our privacy and security online. 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Here kind of what's going on around the industry Do you WANNA start with Our favorite expandable company. Yeah bigalow so bigelow aerospace which made the beam module which is On the International Space Station and has been investigating inflatable habitats. The idea that you have something that's very small that can fit in a fairing to launch it into space and then when it gets to space you inflate it and you end up with lots more room for people and stuff in space. It's great idea. Love it. They laid off their workforce on March twenty third which is yesterday as we're recording. They Las Vegas based company. Nevada ordered that non essential businesses closed a spokesperson at bigelow said to space dot com. Jeff Faust that the company planned to hire the workers back once the directive was lifted. Although other people said that they interpreted as permanent. I have a hard time like maybe some of the layoffs are permanent. Ray I wouldn't. That wouldn't surprise me. I'd be surprised if they laid off everybody and they didn't hire anybody back. Because that's basically the company going out of business. They've got big government contracts. It seems unlikely but it may be you know I. I worked in businesses long enough to know that if you have a scenario where you where you get a prompted you you're gonNA have to lay off people anyway and now you're kind of have an excuse. I could see that happening. Where they lay off everybody and then they bring back not everybody later and that isn't perceived as a layoff even though it really is sure in some other states like California space companies are able to keep working because they're they're deemed essential California's shelter in place rule says that Aerospace is an essential industry. Here all if you work at Fedex at the Memphis airport where everyone's iphone goes through every year. Yeah that's still open but a bunch of places aren't it depends on state to state or if you're gonNA stay like my without a statewide rule really. It's like city by city so they've got I s and they announced plans to start an expandable space station module with three hundred and thirty cubic meters of internal volume on that was five rocket. That could have been as early as this year They declined to bid on a NASA project for report on a larger expandable module to be attached to the I s an second to support a free flying module. There are a lot of rumors that they have financial problems. That's clearly Could be worsening. Because of this it's unclear. What exactly is going on with bigelow aerospace. I think it got really great ideas And if they can make their company work than that would be great. I do feel like this sort of building is inevitable. I'm a little surprised that they pushed so hard for like the idea of their own stuff. When it would seem like expanding or replacing I s with a bunch of modules. That are more expansive. Might be a better fit for them but who knows yet and the the layoff yesterday was sixty eight people. They laid off about twenty people before this and so. I think you're right that maybe some of this already coming but clearly the situation has made it a lot worse so right. I don't know I hope to see them. Oh Gosh I hope to see them bounce back. I'm sorry I didn't mean for that to be a joke. I agree steven because this news is really deflating versus. Sorry we're GONNA go in the corner now. Goodbye the enlisted. I was holding the deflating joke. I wasn't going to make it but you ruined it. I'm sorry did and if you break the seal what Austin inflatable happy. Okay sorry about this is not the segment because this is the global pandemic segment with an SOS sub segment. But tell me what's going on with yes. Ls The segment has been quarantined. So it's singing in. Its own house. Several NASA facilities are what's called stage four so NASA has this Emergency Response Framework. I'M GONNA put a pdf of this in the show notes because it's just interesting to see how they consider these things but a lot of several facilities third looking for are at stage four that means mandatory telework. The facility is closed except to protect life or critical infrastructure. So if you're on a console at Johnson Space Center Keeping Astronauts. Going on the space station clue that to protect life and infrastructure but other things Don't fall under that so one. These facilities is Stennis Mississippi. Just south of me. That is where the first `solas booster is being prepped. For its green run that full length test and stage four means that that work has essentially stopped. There are still a few people stints. Mostly making sure everything is safe. But the work for the Greener intest has stopped and so it's bolted to the test and they but it is just hanging out there until this is lifted so that green run tests will get pushed back and the SOS is just kind of hanging out in Mississippi. There's going to be a lot of those stories here The James Webb Space Telescope often delayed at least they can say this delays on them but even though it is the bulk of the work is being done in California and California's we said is deemed aerospace essential. Many key James Webb Space Telescope workers are not in California and they will not be traveling so they have suspended what they were working on which was integration and testing operations and that will obviously impact the launch date because when they pick up integration and testing integration putting pieces together testing. You know they shake it and put it in a tube and do all sorts of stuff to it to make sure that it is all fine because they don't get another shot at this thing so Gyms will get pushed back but this was not on them. Yeah there's no doubt that both the James Webb and the timelines are being impacted especially James Webb. Which was it had a very tight margin to hit the the new launch date and I think that's out the window now. Yeah it's not all things being canceled so we do have some some missions continuing to move Ford. One of those is perseverance. The newly named Mars Twenty Twenty Rover member. We spoke last time. There is a very brief window every twenty six months to launch. Yeah to go to Mars. And so that is quickly approaching us and so a small team Kennedy continues to prep perseverance for its launcher doing things like installing the testing and sampling hardware that the rover will use to collect from the Martian surface test for things. There are two issues here right. There is the fact that it's so late in the game that there is not as much to do and they can do it with a small group which is the other thing is the launch window. Right which is all things being equal. They would rather not wait two years to launch this so you put those two together also NASA. This is an interesting little quirk. Nasa has its own. It's on planes. Yeah like it you fly there NASA jets so one thing. They can do what they need to get people from one. Nasa senator to another for for critical stuff like Mars twenty twenty. They can actually take their people on their own jets from one NASA site to another NASA site and reduce the chance of spreading anything and that is a big deal when it comes to this extent that small team size because they're actually has been one Kennedy employee who has tested positive for nineteen Nasa does say that they will stop this work to if it comes down to that to keep workers safe but at this point they feel like they can work safely and keep Mars Twenty Twenty Perseverance running on time because that time is quickly quickly running out speaking of humans and space the human spaceflight operation for the ISS. There's a transition there. I was making humans I believe. So there's a launch on a Soyuz April the ISS. That is still it. Sounds like going forward? I think they may already be essentially quarantined. And so the the Kazahkstan you know there. There's they're on lockdown there so those those people are ready to go up and Johnson. Space Center is supporting the Isis grew. Now in the you know those as we saw when we went there right there the different mission controls in the different places and there's a they're smaller crews but they're taking care to support the ISS U. S. astronaut Chris Cassidy is among the group that is quarantined. Basically already in Kazakhstan ready to go on this mission so It looks like it's all going to be safe but they will continue to monitor. It's the usual story right which they're planning on doing this. It looks like it's going to be okay. Situation could change and if it does then it'll change. Yeah hopefully that that quarantine is is enough. That IS STANDARD ASTRONAUTS. Have a two week quarantine before going to the space. Station's that's not something new for the current situation that the world finds itself in but hopefully it is enough to keep that crew safe and to safely go to the space station. Let's let's switch gears a little bit and talk about Isa. Isa has several active missions that are being put on sort of a a cruise control turning off scientific instruments and placing the spacecraft into what they call largely unattended safe configurations so A spacecraft can sort of be partially put asleep and continue to cruise. I said this includes several missions. One being the solar orbiter which just launched last month. It's en route to its science operation orbit around the Sun. So it's not doing much it's just going to be cruising towards the Sun Mars Express which is the The orbiter that has been imaging Mars since two thousand and three at that is also turning off at scientific instruments and will just be orbiting waiting for a command to to get back to work at some point when it's safe to do so same. Goes FOR EXTRA? Morris trace gas orbiter which launched three years later in two thousand sixteen again orbiting around Mars investigating the planet's atmosphere and then Lastly mission that actually wasn't super familiar with called cluster which is four spacecraft launched in two thousand orbiting Earth and studying the planet's magnetic environment. And how the solar wind interacts with that So I read a little bit. That was unfamiliar with that mission. But these four currently are the four that is saying we can put these sort of in standby to keep our people and keep them safe. And when this all clears up they should be able to wake these spacecraft back up and continue their missions. It's good it's good. That seems to be the really. The space story of the moment is what do we. What can we do while keeping safe and doing the things that we have to do to keep things running than not more than that so if you can put something to sleep or in safe mode or something like that? Then that's good. It's I guess it's okay that nobody can talk voyager. I thought about that. Actually if they're if they're still doing those upgrades I haven't actually followed up. I don't know if they're they're working on the Australian radio telescopes and if that has been slowed or stopped because of this too so one last thing that I thought was fun. A Fun story in the or bunch of different stories and social media posts about it but one thing that's happened during this crisis is that astronauts who spent a lot of time on the International Space Station have been giving advice for people who are quarantined or a self isolating or whatever you WanNa call it staying at home. The Peggy Whitson Chris Hadfield and Scott Kelly all have been on TV shows and posting on instagram and all sorts of other places talking about their advice. Because you know they were isolated with a small group of other people and they couldn't even go outside and breathe some fresh air and take a walk so Among their pieces of advice that I thought I would pass on advice from astronauts about being close quarters. work on your interpersonal relationships. Because they will be strained under the stress of everybody being in one roof so given give it some effort to make sure that everybody is being heard and that you're all connected. Remind yourself that you were working for a higher purpose. Obviously for Space it's about like we're GONNA do this. Because this is our mission. And we're going to further human understanding and we're on the frontier of humanity and all of those things for us. It's all about. We need to stay inside because we're going to reduce the spread of this disease and save people's lives by Having people not get infected or having the hospital capacities not be overwhelmed so remember. There's always a greater purpose that you're working on a focus on your personal goals. What what is your mission right now. In that can be getting work done it can be other fulfillment but think about like what are your goals. What am I supposed to do? I think making it about what your plan is and what your work is instead of getting overwhelmed with stuff that you can't control is a is a helpful suggestion make yourself a schedule and stick to it. One of the things that International Space Station astronauts say is that every moment is sort of logged where there's like you go over here for five minutes and do this experiment and you go over here and there's thirty minutes doing this and then you're going to prep for this space. Walk Tomorrow and that's GonNa take two hours today and then that'll be all day tomorrow and there are some relief in that that that you've got a schedule and you know what to do and that you've you build that schedule for yourself but then you get to rely on it and I've had that happen as a work at home person right is like I find it valuable to set myself a schedule Pace Yourself. Leave time for fun activities. That's that's another thing that like. They did movie night on the ISS when these astronauts were there like. It's don't make it all about you know your plans and your work. Try to give yourself some relief time some recreation time and And I think Chris Hadfield said consider a hobby. You know start Sir journaling or making art or something To to give yourself another outlet if you don't have an outlet right now because you're inside so I thought that was just it's a it's a fun story angle but also these are people who have had to grapple with pretty extreme isolation and figure out tools to deal with it and so. I think it's worth reminding everybody about. Yeah particularly like the one about a hobby. I think it's easy just to. Hey these are the books you should read the series. You should stream but you know. Pick up that guitar. You had since high school in the hall closet and relearn. There's it is an opportunity to sort of reshape ourselves and in this time and I think if you just I know for me at least if I just spend my time working or just like watch. Tv I will feel bad after a while. I need some sort of outlet. I think that's really important to consider finding something creative within the confines of being at home to do can do a lot for your brain in this time. We've one last topic and it's a sad one. An Apollo astronaut died last week. It's award and he was eight years old. He was a West Point graduate. He was an air force and he was part of the nineteen sixty six astronaut class. He served as a member of the astronaut support crew for Apollo Nine was the backup command module pilot for Apollo twelve and then was on Apollo fifteen. He flew the command module endeavor for three days while his two flatmates. Dave Scott and James. Irwin landed on the moon. He he was alone Stephen He was lonely man. The World Guinness Book of Records says he calls him the most isolated human being in fact during those seventy four orbits around the moon when his crew mates were on the surface The he was at the greatest distance from them Twenty two hundred miles or so so twenty two hundred miles away from any other human being which makes him the the most isolated human being in history because you think about it like when they go there there as a group and so you have a group going to the moon so they're isolated from humanity but they're together but then you send two of them down and that the one guy who's orbiting is essentially the most isolated and so it's it's a funny little quirk but But that and that's not all. He made the first deep space walk because he went out. Signed Endeavour to get film cancers all the other spacewalks are on. You know up to this point around the earth but he went outside the command module and got film canisters from cameras that were out there on the service module and then brought them back in He also set a record by releasing a sub satellite while he was orbiting the moon which is the first time they'd ever done that where they release something to keep orbiting the moon after they left and that was That was new down deep. Space Walk is how about that. It's wild it's thirty nine minutes outside of CSM one hundred ninety seven thousand miles from Earth. It's wild we're GONNA talk a lot about that when we get to Apollo fifteen but it is an outstanding little bit of mission history. It's pretty serious pretty serious now. Unfortunately Apollo fifteen is also known and. I'm sure we'll get into this more when we cover them For a scandal. They brought three hundred ninety eight basically envelopes commemorative envelopes. That had stamps on this part of a stamp collecting kind of thing which was a thing. It may still be sorry philatelists. If you're out there It was The idea was that they would take them around the moon with them and then they take them back to Earth and they'd sell them and they put the money from the sale in trust funds for their kids show. It was the idea. Now this is this was legal. Similar actions had been done by astronauts on previous flights and obviously NASA officials had to approve four hundred envelopes being part of the bill of lading for this spaceship right like they loaded four hundred envelopes on Apollo Fifteen. But this story got out there was negative publicity. How dare these astronauts try to you know? Make a profit from there from the and is the government money and I'm sure that there was a whole thing about it and NASA decided to make an example of them. They never flew again. One of them was going to retire anyway. But the other two were given desk jobs including warden and They never flew again. And it's unfortunate because it's one of those examples. Where like should they be doing something like this? I would say probably not but I think the application of of This the selectively this to them when other people had done it is kind of unfortunate but it is. It is definitely a minor a minor scandal but it ended their astronaut careers for sure Warden went onto. Let's he got the Distinguished Service Medal in nineteen seventy one. He was inducted into the International Space Hall of fame in Nineteen Ninety-three into the Astronaut Hall of fame in ninety-seven honored with NASA Ambassador of Exploration Award in two thousand nine and finally inducted into the international airspace hall of fame at the San Diego. Air and Space Museum in Two Thousand Sixteen That's a great then. By the way I've seen a laser show at the space Brielle. Nice pretty pretty awesome. Pretty Awesome. He has he had three children who he leaves behind. And Yeah I guess Summer Twenty One. We'll talk about Apollo fifteen. It's coming up quick. Not Quick Enough Stephen Not Quick Enough. Well our next episode. In two weeks we'll be talking about apollo thirteen. I mean it's the it's the second most famous Apollo mission right. Everyone knows everything about eleven and thirteen. But we're going to dig into it. I just have just finished Jim. Lovell's book which is really fascinating. Read good looking forward to digging into that next time. Yeah and then we will given the slowdown in space news. It's possible that we will have to dig out some of our other topics that we've been keeping in the hopper and Do those two but next time Apollo thirteen that I'm looking forward to it. That'll be great. Till then if you WANNA find links to the stories we spoke about their over in the show notes at relay dot FM slash liftoff slash one. Twenty while you're there you can send us an e mail with feedback or follow up or you can become a member to support the show directly which Jason I would appreciate. You can find US online as well. You can find Jason on twitter as J. Snell and you can find me there as I s M h until our next fortnight. Jason say goodbye goodbye. Everybody stay healthy audience

NASA International Space Station ISS Apollo Fifteen Mr Stephen Hackett New York Times Jason Snell Jason I bigelow aerospace California Jason William Shatner SPACEX Ono scientist Mars Twenty Twenty Rover
This Week @NASA, May 24, 2019

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00:00 sec | 2 years ago

This Week @NASA, May 24, 2019

"A key milestone for our lunar gateway rolling out for critical Orion safety tests, and a chance to send her name to Mars. A few of the stories to tell you about this week at man. In one of the first steps of our arguments lunar exploration plans, we have selected max our technologies to provide the power and propulsion element for our lunar gateway, the power and propulsion element is a spacecraft that will use high power. Solar electric propulsion to give our explorers aboard the gateway access to the entire surface of the moon. It will also enable the gateway to serve as a mobile command and service module by providing a communications relay for human and robotic expeditions to the lunar surface is critical capability for not just a sustainable lunar-return, but also in eventual journey to Mars Nasr's current lunar exploration plans call for a return to the moon within five years and a sustained human presence on round. The moon by twenty twenty eight the agency is targeting launch of the power and propulsion element in late twenty twenty two. The vehicle for our Orion spacecraft's asset. Abort to flight test was rolled out from Kennedy Space Center to Cape Canaveral air force station in preparation for its launch this summer. This will be full stress test of a Ryan's launch aboard system, which is designed to propel the spacecraft and its crew safely away from the rocket should a life threatening of in happened during an actual launch. This critical safety test will help pave the way for artists missions near the moon and enable astronauts to set foot on the lunar surface by twenty twenty four. Through September thirtieth. We are giving you an opportunity to send your name to Mars aboard are Mars twenty twenty Rover currently targeted for launch as early as July twenty twenty submitted names will be etched onto one or more dime size microchips that will ride on the Rover under a glass, cover each micro, chip can hold more than a million names and more than two million names were submitted in the first three days Mars twenty twenty will collect samples for future return to earth, and pave the way for human exploration of the red planet to add your name to the list and obtain a souvenir boarding pass, go to go dot NASA dot gov slash Mars. Twenty twenty pass. The final and most complex season of flight tests is underway for our unmanned aircraft systems, traffic management project, or UTM. This round of testing tackles, the unique challenges the flying small drones and the urban landscape with flights through August twenty nineteen in Reno, Nevada, and Corpus Christi Texas since two thousand fifteen NASA has researched the ins and outs of building a system to manage drone traffic safely, the project works with Federal Aviation Administration and other partners to understand how on nationwide system. For drone traffic could be created from scratch. Our green propellant infusion mission, or GPA, m is a small spacecraft the size of a mini refrigerator that will test a low toxicity propellant and compatible systems in space for the first time this cutting edge green technology could improve the performance of future missions by providing for longer mission. Durations using less. Propellant GPA is one of four unique NASA technology missions, targeted for launch in June twenty nineteen aboard space x launch of a US air force project. That's what's up this week at NASA for more on these and other stories, follow us on the web at NASA dot gov slash on.

Orion spacecraft NASA Mars twenty twenty Rover Mars Nasr twenty twenty Mars twenty twenty Cape Canaveral air force stati Kennedy Space Center US Reno Ryan Nevada Corpus Christi Texas Federal Aviation Administratio five years three days
Crime Dentures

Dear Hank & John

37:36 min | 1 year ago

Crime Dentures

"Each listener supported w NYC studios welcome in tier hiking. Josh Hang. It's a podcast for two brothers. Answer your questions give you you said vice and bring you on the week's news from Mars and AFC Wimbledon. John Do you know about my Jingle Bell Rock. No but I'm so excited to find out it's a rock that throw it people when they start singing Christmas songs before Thanksgiving. It's not really a dad joke. It's just a thing that you feel strongly about the No it's not even just upon that I liked. I actually like like Christmas music all the time. I don't like it all the time but I have no problem with it before Thanksgiving wchs giving. Here's the thing Hank We're all GONNA be dead in a few decades. It's all going back to dust tank this dust organized. It's an incredibly complicated thing that has opinions about Christmas music. And now you're just is going back to dust and whenever I hear people and I know I have a lot of hills I would die on. That are stupid hills Gleich most of them related to football. But whenever I hear people fighting about out Christmas songs in November I just WanNa like lean over and whispering into their ears. We're all GONNA be dead soon But the hard drives that hold Mariah Carey's all I want for Christmas on. You will outlast us all I. That's not the name of the song long second off. If that were the name of the song the song would be so much better. What the song all I want for Christmas is you what did I say you said all all I want for Christmas on you know I did it? let's can we play back Mariah Carey's all I want for Christmas on you. You our first question comes from John who writes Jordan Hank. I don't know when you're reading this me neither John but I know that it's has the cold. Embrace as of death approaches aluminium's John Dentistry student. I need your help. My final project is a group project. What what for Dentistry School? And it's a forty five minute film would oh Dente I am. I'm never going to see a dentist again. Yeah Hank listen. I think there's a place for group projects and I think there's a place for filming projects and I think the place for neither of those things is dentistry school. I don't want my dentist to be an excellent Youtuber. I want my dentist to not be a Youtuber. Keep hitting me. Maybe this will make sense if we keep going the twist that we need to incorporate the process of making complete dentures. There's into the film. Well I mean that is at least vaguely dentistry related since you both wrote books and John has the track record of having successful movies and series adapted from his books but of a dig. Get Hank there. I need ideas slash concepts for this film. The only place we can be allowed to film are in the school and in one of my classmates not settlement area which is like a condo. Are you going to school that there is a settlement area. Is this like are you. On a moon colony genre. There is a mix of comedy and drama. Well of course it's a mix of comedy and drama or either of the two okay so you can't just be drama dramatic the well it has to be. I mean when you're doing something so serious. Nobody who goes to this. Dental school should ever be allowed to become a dentist disaster. Mr Your help is greatly appreciated having dental dilemma. John so John. Here's the thing man. You're not having dental dilemma now. And that is what concerns me. Yeah yea you're having a filmmaking in dental school since that young person had to dress up as a clown for an advertisement for her college. I've been so disturbed by news from higher education. Forget about rising tuition forget about student loans. Crushing the souls of America's young people. We can't have our dentists becoming filmmakers But we're not solving the problem. John we've been asked to solve the specific problem. Which is how do you incorporate denture making into a forty five minute film? That is either a comedy or drama or both forty five minutes forty five minutes. I mean it's I've never made a forty five minute video and this is my job. It's an episode of Law and Order Order. Svu Make to get out of dental school. You you've done it John Okay you have to make the dentures So so that you can solve a crime. Yes it's crime dench shirts yes you did. You need like match a bite mark. Yes and so an I and the cops call you. And there's a crack team of denture dentists. Yes and they're working hard day and night to solve the crime in the crime. People come to you because because they know your about to solve the crime so the crime people are now trying to murder you and you're locked the dentist office and you have to dig your way out through the secret dental cavern ever. Not Every dentist office has yes. And that's a complete secret. Nobody knows about it because the super creepy right everything except for the last thing hang you you taking my joke about law and order. SVU and turning it into a realistic plot is a wonderful example of the difference between your books and my books because that is brilliantly plotted. It's airtight it's wonderful. It's got everything my idea. Uh Wise to have two dental students Slowly Fall in love. Sure Wall building this set of dentures. There's over forty five minutes and literally. Nothing happens right except the dentures get built and they have a conversation at the end of the conversation as they're like pudding in the last fake tooth one of them says to the other I think the most beautiful smile in the world. Is this denture. Second most beautiful smile when the the world is yours and then they kiss if absolutely wonderful John. You're welcome for having given you to top notch. Ideas is to complete this terrible terrible assignment and in either case At least one of the characters has to die. Yo Yeah of course this next question in comes from Allison who asks dear Haing John in art class. Oh God what's going to happen now. Shame in anglerfish sounds great. It can art class. I had to drill a hole in a molar and stuff it full of them amalgam to treat a cavity. I'm look I'm all. I'm all for Liberal Arts Education and right cutting lots of things but in art class you make art and in dentist class you learn dentist thing okay so so you may a paper Michelle anglerfish great. I very much like my anglerfish and I would like to display it. But it really doesn't match my room decor should I go full anglerfish and completely to redecorate my room or just burned the anglerfish anglerfish apples allison. Also what do I name at. PS So it's taking the the latter part the question. I John. What is it good? You need to give me five names. The next five seconds Alvis. I'll lister Alfie. Algae algae and Al Gore given okay so pick one of those five okay perfect and for the former part of your question John on should we have an anglerfish bonfire or go all anglerfish in the room decor. I'm a big fan of making the destruction of your art part of Your Art One of my favorite things that contemporary artists do sometimes so that would be my preference just from a pure art perspective perspective and and I actually have to recommend against fire in this case. So here's the situation. When an Anglerfish is in the deep sea it is under extreme pressure? Sure of all of that water up above it and then when it's it's caught by a scientist oftentimes on the way up if you don't actually put them in a pressure chamber the difference different so it's not like it's terrible for the English beat on there. It's supposed to be there but the difference as it rises through the water column of that pressure. It's it's such a shocking difference that the anglerfish can actually explode so if you want to really make this like part of your art you need to blow up the anglerfish. Now you're GONNA have to be careful well about this but this is what art is about. It's about taking risks as as is so often the case. If if you just end hangs advice before the last the sentence it's great advice. I have an alternate way of blowing of your anglerfish that does not involve the acquisition and utilization of dynamite. It's called a balloon loon. Oh that's fun. An actual air pressure situation. Yeah Yeah you get one of those big balloons and you just pump it full until the whole thing pops. Yeah that that's beautiful four. Okay sure we've solved problems in your welcome but but far be it from me to say don't like once you do explode your anglerfish you should then go and do a hole deep sea decor switch in your bedroom but not related to the existence of the anglerfish just. Because that's a good idea. All right hank we have another question. It's from an anonymous and it's one of those questions that we get every so often that's just so perfect. I almost can't believe it. But then there is photo evidence that makes me inclined to believe it. Anonymous writes dear John and Hank Hypothetically if one were to stumble upon say a bag containing roughly roughly one thousand five hundred tiny pictures of a pregnant Harry styles. What should one do with them anonymous? Oh this is very we good. I mean first of all you just have to drop to your knees and thank the universe right. You know like sometimes when you're walking around you'll find a ten dollar bill on the on the ground or something and you'll pick it up and you'll say like all things must be going okay for me for the next couple of days but when you look look down and you see what appears to be a very large plastic bag that is literally full of fifteen hundred maybe like three three inch high one and a half yes sixers of a pregnant Harry styles. That's when you know that like the whole rest of your life he's GonNa be Great. I don't mean to like stop on any ideas you've had but the obvious thing to do here is to send those pregnant. Harry styles is is to Missoula Montana where we will then distribute them as project for awesome perks. I mean I don't really care how I get one of these pictures of the fragment Harry styles but I feel very strongly that I get one right John that I send them to Indianapolis John will sign them. Then some them to Missoula I I will sign them. I mean He. He looked so happy about being pregnant to have you seen the picture. It's in the file. It is growing. I'm so I was worried. It wasn't real. Oh Gosh does look so how. He's just he's he's glowing. He's going well. No I mean this is perfect. Those are APPs there were asking to be signed by Hang John Green. Maybe we could get Mr Styles himself involved probably not he seems like a busy guy he have but it's for charity eighty. Somebody's got to know him. He's got friends and his friends have. I don't know I don't I don't like quick tweet. Oh God does he have a twitter. Hopefully no here's to not have a twitter. You're not too bad too bad hank or did Harry styles make exactly the right call. Oh No there is oh okay. He's not following me so I can't. Dm Him Oh God awed the how do you make it through the day boy. He looks great. I'm looking at his At at his twitter bio PIC I can't get to twitter but I can get to all of these twitter clones. It's terrible I don't even want to tell you about the the dark habits of people who don't have twitter's but still can get to twitter. Yeah but but anyway. His picture is phenomenal this week. In riads. Okay we're GONNA make Harry styles this week. This week's Ryan Harry Ryan Ryan styles you can go to find out more at Patriot dot com slash dear. John and access are really really bad weekly. podcast called this week and Ryan which is wrapping up. We should add yeah we will be finishing at introducing a new podcast shortly. Yes if you have any suggestions for new Patriot fan only podcast. That are like five minutes long. That are not hank and a high talking about the life and career of a random human being. We'd love to hear your ideas. This next question comes Mr Mary who asks. Do I need to comment or talk to my boss about the book that they lent me. I'm almost done not the mother of Christ Mary. Sorry thanks for clarifying that. Mary I did this what I I had employs I was I started to like like be like this would be a good book for everybody at the company to read and then immediately I stopped doing that. Yeah there was another question this week from someone who said Hey. My boss asked me to come into their office so that they could show me them them. Doing one push up and then they did one push up. What do I say? After I watched my boss one push off and the answer is it is not your fault that your boss has not yet figured out how to be a boss and hopefully there's nothing malicious or weird in that whoa weird in it but hopefully there's nothing nothing malicious in it. It's just that they're weird and they're uncomfortable and they think that this is going to to build team or something and they're just mistaken. Yeah and I I feel the same way like I have. I have pointedly not given space struck too complexly flexibly employees precisely. Because I don't want them to be like. Oh I got to talk to the boss about this thing. I have to read this and then like a firm their existing beliefs if you were part of the narrative of the push up like if you would know that this is part of an existing story and they'd be like working toward this push-up shop. Didn't that's a totally normal thing to do. But it is such a not normal thing to do without any context listen. I don't even know that it's a totally normal thing to do with context like imagine that over the last three months I've been talking in the office about how I really WanNa do. One hundred push ups in a row and then I come in when Dan I say Oh yeah. You're right all I can do. One hundred push ups in a row now. Everyone would be like. Hey that's great what's What's going on with crash course this week and I'm GonNa do one hundred in push ups right now? You're all going to look at. Yeah let's stop work. Let's let's stop what we do. Fear generate income together and instead witness one hundred consecutive pushups. Like that's weird. Hank be apart be apart of my story. Yes I agree you are right. I think that ultimately Lee you probably should and this is the thing right is that this imbalance in power is is what the problem is because you kind of have to now. How say an inciteful positive thing about the book you're left and also it might be that the book is not reflective of your values or that like the book Qassam right and it's like or something and then you're studying like? Oh Yeah No. I was really interested to read. This spirited defensive fascism. Thank you for sharing it with me like you don't have to but it's it's the thing to do if you want to like maintain a good standing like ed or or increase your standing in your bosses is. It's like an opportunity to I hate though the ball. It's the thing to do. Yeah it's all on the boss but like they're the person in power and so you. I agree that it's the wrong way to be a boss but like responding to it one way or the other except for like doing the thing that hurts your career and saying this is weird like you can't do that because they're the one in power right but like not doing anything doesn't tell them that this is a bad boss strategy that's a good ny. Yeah okay so there is a there is a time when it's okay for a boss to give employees of book right which is when the book is about how how do companies like ours do better and this is my new management strategy and I'm introducing it to you in the form of a book like maybe that's okay maybe be but that's in that case it's asking for out of hours work right that's true. That's a good point so no that's not okay I take it back. I here's what I listen to. Unless you're like a sea level employees employees off-topic. Yeah when people refer to sea level employees Until like two weeks ago I thought that they will referring to like I can't wait. It's subpar employees study level. I never would be like well. I mean not not your sea level employees is and I'd be like okay and there'd be like Oh you know you really got to protect those C- level and I'd be like do you do you. Do you like the last people there I I. I read one article in The Wall Street Journal that was talking about how sea level employees need different kinds of healthcare. And I was like do they. And then I anyway so it turns out and Y'all may already know this but it turns out it's referring to like the Sea of CEO Pto or see. Oh Oh it's you're referring to the word chief. Yes Ed really made every business article I've ever read change meaning completely yup anyway. It's Wilde's Mary if your boss sent you. A book called how to be a good sea level employees that may have been a compliment and and it may have been an attempt to give you a massive promotion at don't interpreted the way I did as being like. Are you saying that I'm slightly just average. Oh boy this is wild. Well it all makes sense now John as to why. I'm the one running the company's true. I mean that's not the only reason but it is one of the reasons so mary. You're doing great. Your boss didn't crush it here. Yeah just tried to get out of this quickly and elegantly as you can you. Don't you don't need lead to comment. But it is like if you manage to say something positive and insightful it will in dear your boss to you I now. This next question comes from Abbey. It's and Hank. Yeah we've been doing this podcast long time. Yeah we've never gotten a question that hurt my feelings as as much as this one John. If I'm making a key lime pie and I need lime zest Can I go to the store. The war with a disaster and just sort of zest a bit of law more now. I don't need the whole time. What about the other citrus citrus? Could I do this with oranges. Is it stealing. Yes yeah it yes. It's it's it's not not like it's not just stealing. It's tampering with other people's right. It's much worse than stealing. Because it's it's as esther I don't know how clean seniors abby no the how do you disinfect. Your sister. I don't know where this person has been exact no so obviously. You can't do this but this does. Does I understand where you're coming from. Because the zest of a lime seems like the trash part. That's not the part I want when I buy a lime usually usually though this seems to have changed in the last fifteen years when now suddenly every recipe is asking me to zest something. Well here's the thing abby first off. If you shouldn't be zest the lime you should be testing Akilah if you're making Q.. I'm fine I don't WanNa get into the weeds of this. But if you're making key lime pie with regular limes you're not making Q.. I'm by your making time. Do People know about you and key lime pies for a while. John was a semi professional key. Lime Pie Tester you. You were really into this I was really. I was really good. Key Lime Pie Tester and I do have very strong opinions about key Lime Pie. But that's that's not what we're here for. We're here to get a happy to stop. Stop stealing limes. And then returning them back. Grocery store mangled so really at the Ashton becomes like what do you do with the rest of the because you don't like you're using the trash part of the lime to to disaster your key Lime Pie. What do you do with the rest of the lime? There are so many things to do with ally. Yes you do want them gentlemen. Thanks right you put it in your bubbly water you I mean it. Align is is perhaps the single most usable food food in that entire section of the grocery store. Yeah there's literally anything you could just score the lime juice directly into your mouth it's delicious slightly lately soured but delicious. What baffles me about? This is that anytime. I get a recipe where I have to zest the lime. My first thought is thank God. A new. You Line is coming into my life. The only time I don't feel good about a lime coming into my life is when it's one of those scooters what's that it's the now. The scooter accompany John. You're making A mechanized scooter joke. Yes okay boomer. Okay that phrases over John Killed it happened did it. That did it boomers learned about it. One of the things I love about without being forty two is that people are accusing me of being a baby boomer. Yet it's amazing. I'm a people calling me boomer. I'm barely genetic. It's almost like all all these things are made up and what really happens. Is that as people get older They seek to conserve the power that they have acquired or have had handed handed down to them Regardless of what the name of their generation is Yep our next question comes from a Livia who writes dear John and Hank I currently have a concussion. Cussin' I'm sorry to hear that. Olivia a can't read or look at screens. So I've taken to listen to podcasts ice however I have now listened to every deer hanging John many any of them multiple times and he podcast recommendations. Oh yeah I I want to say that I once had a concussion but I didn't know it until I went into records. I show and looked at the teleprompter and was like none of those are words. And if I can't do this anymore than this is very bad so I went to the doctor. 'cause I walked into the piece of wood at a construction site but I got better. So that's the good news. Good story boomer. That's how that works. Oh It's getting you. I'm just getting started okay. I am also glad you're okay because I would make a terrible say show host via my first recommendation is to listen to our other podcasts Especially right yeah. I am especially a fan of delete this but sideshow tangents is is also great I make a podcast With WNYC called the anthrocene reviewed which is a nice little twenty minute bite of writing. He didn't that you can get once a month in your podcast ears. I mean the wild thing to me is that you don't know about all the PA- There are so many pod. There's IT's unlimited. I will make suggestions Russians though The bright sessions is a very good fictional. podcast Harry Potter in the sacred text is wonderful exploration of being human ninety nine percent invisible. All I listen to pretty much every episode of also of the illusionist. Oh Yes soda. A L L U S I o etc I listen to today explained aimed and the daily sometimes not every time when I was like no more about an issue and actually get a fairly nuanced and deeper take than I would get from twitter twitter or even television news if you like. Soccer men in Blazers is an amazing podcast also to reveal myself as an old school fan of public radio. There are three public radio PODCASTS. I listened to every single new episode of they are Planning Money Radio Lab and this American Life. I also still really enjoy the fresh air interviews. That Terry Gross does So there's just so many good podcasts out there is so many. PODCASTS swearing a golden age of podcasts. And like a silver age of PODCAST listenership starting true I I with every episode of a very similar thing to dear hinton John But funnier of course my brother my brother and me and I also listen to every episode of the Adventures Zone and also. They're like side podcasts. Wonderful and sh- manners and SABA are all hilarious. Those boys are the best. I completely agree hank. Which reminds me that today's podcast is brought brought to you by the mcelroy brothers? The mcelroy brothers making dozens possibly even hundreds of high quality podcasts. For your listening enjoyment the podcast is also brought to you by law and Order Special Dentist Union. They're they're they're here with teeth. Solve your crime. Today's podcast brought to you by pregnant Harry styles pregnant Harry styles coming soon to a project for awesome near you. I hope so. And also this podcast is brought to you by the popping paperless Shea anglerfish. It's just like what happens when you bring a deep sea creature up from the depths of the ocean presenting the acclaimed new fiction podcast from WNYC studios and Knightdale Hi of Paris near the very top of the Eiffel Tower. The new story the Guardian calls one of the best of two thousand nineteen addictive. You've funny it's about this janitor. I can come these stagehand Jack and this drunken out of control diva flattery. Oh can't you know where except my dressing room. A brand new orbiting human circus. Listen wherever you get your podcasts. All right and before we get to the for news from Mars and AFC Wimbledon. I want to get to one more question. It's from Laura and she writes dear John and Hank. My Church has always had a steeple with a bell that they would ring by hand every Sunday. Unfortunately we switched over to a digital prerecorded bell that plays through the steeple. It's run through through a computer and speaker system. It doesn't really make sense to me why we don't use are perfectly good bell anymore. But that's not my question My question is I run a lot of the sound equipment for services and the bands that play at the church and I was shown how the steeple music works. You can literally play. Any song grew so my question is what Song Song should I blast through the church steeple. I I mean we have. We have a somewhat similar thing at my church. Where are with Piscopo aliens you know? They're like a little bit more Catholic than most Protestants. And so there's there's some kneeling and there's there's a certain solemnity unity around the the Eucharist. Anyway there's a moment where like the bread gets broken by the priest and in that moment the Bell Rings Three three times and I used to be so impressed back in the old days when the bell would be really well timed and then sometimes it wouldn't be. Sometimes the bill would come in like four seconds early. And and everyone and Kinda giggle but now I think the priest just like has to hit a button and the bell rings three times with has kind of taken the magic out of it for me yet but I have often thought like it would be so bad ass if one just one time it was the riff from Stairway to heaven I gene. So what are what are we. What is the point that we want to get across through the bells? Is it like like hall and OATES private is. What do you mean like what is trying to be accomplished religiously in that moment no it is not like Halwa notes? Private is Scott. Scott is here and they're watching and got his watching. No no no. So that is a great the bells version where thing Ding Ding Ding Ding Ding Ding Ding like that. I want to hear more about coat what you think. The Contemporary Liberal Protestant Christianity is all about because that that initial glimpse into it is fascinating to me. What about what about you know for like when Like on Easter is that when Jesus comes back there. That's Good Friday. My God sorry he comes back right. Yes wha what about since you've been gone by Kelly Clarkson uh-huh Ding Ding Ding. Oh God that's such a good idea. Good okay it is really a really celebratory. You can get away with all kinds of things on Easter Sunday at Church so that's not impossible okay. I almost almost want to give you money to start your own church because I think I I think you would just make it bananas and really great. Yeah no that always goes. Well yes in my experience when you take charismatic people with extremely healthy Egos and you tell them to start a religion works out perfectly goes goes fine the to show after the Hank Greene Story Story. First there's the first chapter the first forty years we're great and then his brother gave him four thousand dollars of startup capital. And that's how we ended up with him I'd give me the baddest taste all right. He could get to the. It's time for million dollar India. Another million dollar idea. Somebody tweeted on the Internet. They had a million dollar idea. It's from Alex. Says a million dollar idea Uber Express. It's like normal uber. But all traffic laws are thrown out the window. And you get where you need to go on time with minimum of five hundred horsepower. Everything about that idea ideas bad. Oh it's so bad. That's that that would be a catastrophe. They have this in Russia Where oligarchs can pay extra money to have a blue light that they put on their car and they get to violate traffic rules so that I'm sure that it goes great there? I'M GONNA throw it out there. I don't think we want to emulate that no also so I will pay for the opposite of this. What's the opposite of this? A special uber for going very slowly and carefully so true that that I would pay a premium for if there's like a list of pre approved uber drivers who err on the side of caution yet no I had Lubar Dr recently from this guy who was in an absolutely no hurry to get me anywhere and I was like. I'm going to give you a ten dollar tip. This was great thaw. That's that's great. That's great that can be one of the tenants of Hank Ism. Yeah just nice and slow you know ultimately ultimately we waste a lot of time in our lives and more of that time should be wasted trying to not die during the most dangerous moments of our day. You really think the most dangerous moment of your day is when when you're driving yes scientifically absolute. No not for me for me. It's when I'm juggling fire. All right yes. Of course Jon does live on the edge. I yeah it's just the only way I can feel alive you it's for for me like probably the most dangerous part of my days when I'm free sewing large flat. Rock faces Jumping out of airplanes bungee jumping. John what is what. What is the the actual thing that you do that that gets your adrenaline pumping fish? I I don't really need to do anything I it's mostly a thought based thing for me like I can get my adrenaline pumping up yet. In fact when you ask that question my mom's got sweaty felt my heart rate increase. Because I I mean the difference between me and somebody likes Alex Honolulu who who in order to feel alive has to like climb up El Capitan or whatever Is that I am never more than one. Quick thought away from. I'm feeling all that rush all that tear are. I'm going to try and junkie for my own thoughts. Yeah it's like a superpower where like Oh that's you won't feel that easy closure is an imagined the coming doom. Oh Man. We had so many questions this week. That were great and we will thank you for to everybody for sending them and you can send them to hank and John at gmail.com. If you want us to answer your questions John Do you have news from AFC Wimbledon. Yeah yeah so I mean look the good news is that There have been some new visuals rules released for the AFC Wimbledon stadium for what the inside of it is going to look like. It's going to have some. It's GonNa Look Really Nice. I mean who knows our if architectural drawings search things actually look like but I'll I'll put one or two of these on the Patriots. It looks like it's going to be a beauty of a stadium. It's going to seat nine thousand people which is about right I think for for Wimbledon good and It's GONNA BE Small Compact you're gonNA feel close to the action. There are luxury boxes along one side which is a super thing for revenue generation And it looks really good blue and yellow theme for the furniture. which is what you'd expect? The News on the pitch is pretty minimal. At the moment were still in twenty first place which is the It's the place we don't want to be in. We Really Want to be in twentieth place. We just want to write up spots. Currently sitting in twentieth place is the franchise currently plying. Its trade in Milton. Keynes it'd be great to just just have a quick swap with them They have experienced taking stuff from right so degrade if they could just Take that twenty-first spot from this week's Mars News the Mars Twenty Twenty rover is up it standing. It's like a baby with six titanium legs and aluminum. I'm twenty point seven inch diameter motorized wheels. This is the first time the rover has put all of its weight on. Its legs the current wheels in the river actually just for testing but they we'll be replaced with the eventual flight models. That will actually go to Mars. When it comes time to launch their designed to allow the river to turn three hundred sixty degrees in-place and to handle tilts of up to forty five degrees without tipping over in addition to the wheels engineers at JPL unwrapped the rover and fully wiped it down? which kind of extends the baby comparison that? We're doing to a weird place. The engineers have removed a protective layer of foil and they wiped it down with ISOPROPYL alcohol. All to make sure that it doesn't contaminate any future samples from Mars with stuff from our planet. So it's happening John Well and is it going into into space in two thousand twenty or is it going to Mars in twenty twenty. The plan is for it to launch and twenty twenty and land in February of Twenty twenty. One okay so so. It's really the Earth Twenty Twenty Rover and the Mars Twenty twenty one over just just to be clear you know. It's it's fine to name the things the the way that NASA named them. I'm not gonNA step on that. All right I agree. It's exciting to know that this beautiful titanium baby is on its way to Mars. I'm super excited. Did I and I really am get ready for them to actually name this thing and won't it will not eventually be called the Mars. Two Thousand Twenty Zero. No it'll kind of noun right like curiosity acidy. Yes right usually yes. So it'll get. It should get some name like that. I hope I have. I have an idea for a good noun Hank it'd be hilarious if it's like. This is our Opportunity Rover. And this is our curiosity rover over here. We have hank the contest to name. The rover actually closed on November. I I know I already submitted my name. Okay it was. Was it Hank Hank right well. Hopefully they will decide on a name and hopefully it won't be hang very soon all right. Thanks for the. Thanks for listening to this. PODCAST is a CO production of complexly flexibly and WNYC's studios produced by Roseana Hall Throw Hossam Sheridan Gibson edited by Joseph Tuna and our head of community and communications. Is Victoria about Giorno. The the music you're hearing now and it's the beginning of the podcast is by the Great GonNa Roll. You can email us at Hank. John at gmail.com GonNa find our patron only podcast patriots. John Dot com slash dear John and as they say it our hometown. Don't forget to be awesome.

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This Week @NASA, November 23, 2018

NASACast Audio

03:02 min | 2 years ago

This Week @NASA, November 23, 2018

"A landing site is selected for our next Mars Rover. Our inside mission is in the home stretch of its Dernie to the red planet and a week of celebration on the space station a few of the stories to tell you about this week at NASA. On November nineteenth. We announced that after a five year. Search that included more than sixty candidate locations on Mars Jezero crater has been selected as the landing site for upcoming Mars twenty twenty Rover mission decision today could determine what happens and the next day Kate or more of Marce expiration. Boasts robotic and human that technologies to be Ruth here. Feed forward into a program that gets ever more exciting. The mission is scheduled to launch into lie. Twenty twenty as the next step in exploration of the red planet. It will not only look for signs of ancient habitable conditions and pass microbial life, but will also collect rock and soil samples that could be retrieved for return to earth by a potential future Mars mission. A series of news briefings on November twenty first focused on the upcoming landing on Mars of insight. Our next mission to the red planet and our first Mars landing since the curiosity Rover in two thousand twelve the inside Landers scheduled to touch down on the twenty sixth at approximately three PM eastern standard time. We'll carry live coverage of the event on NASA television on NASA dot gov, and on the agencies social media platforms inside will be the first spacecraft to study the red planet's deep interior to help us better understand the formation of all rocky worlds, including earth. It was a busy week full of celebration. Aboard the international space station on November twentieth. The crew celebrated the twenty year anniversary of the nineteen ninety eight launch of the Russian built Zarya module, the first element of the space station. Meanwhile are Serena on chancellor, enter space station, crewmates Alexander's visa and Russia's Sergei Prokofiev. We're busy welcoming a couple of resupply. Vehicles a Russian progress. Spacecraft arrived with cargo on November eighteenth, followed by Northrop Grumman's cygnus cargo spacecraft which arrived on November nineteenth with about seventy four hundred pounds of research and supplies. On chancellor and girst also recorded a video message to talk about the cruise plans for thanksgiving dinner, and this. His our Turkey along with Russian colleague Sergei Prokofiev. Their plans included a little downtime from their daily activities to reflect on the things for which there thankful from the crew of expedition Fifty-seven from our home to yours. We wish you a very happy thanksgiving. That's what's up this week at Manson for more on these and other stories. Follow us on the web at NASA dot gov slash.

NASA Mars twenty twenty Rover Sergei Prokofiev Mars Jezero crater chancellor Twenty twenty Northrop Grumman Ruth Landers Manson crewmates Alexander Russia Kate Serena seventy four hundred pounds twenty year five year
Liftoff 119: A Rovey McRoverface Situation

Liftoff

35:02 min | 1 year ago

Liftoff 119: A Rovey McRoverface Situation

"Welcome to lift off from your friends at really. Fm brought to you this time by score. Space Liftoff is a fortnightly. Show when you don't have to be a rocket scientist to understand the latest news about space and related subjects. My name is Stephen Hackett. I'm joined is always by my co Jason. Snow are Stephen. Hello Jason Good. Be Back as always to talk about space so many things somebody spacecraft. Somebody would be spacecraft. That's pretty much the whole show this week. I think yeah pretty much pretty much. There's a lot going on in space. Unlock going on on earth of stuff that is supposed to go to space. Let's talk about one of those. So the Mars Twenty Twenty Rover. Then have a name for a long time. Nasa held this really wide reaching. I don't Wanna say competition but competition to name the rover and as of last week. It has a name so ours. Twenty twenty is now known as perseverance. I think is an excellent name. Yeah that's my my take on the name. That's good name. Fits in with the theme right. We've had spirit and opportunity and curiosity right so it fits in there. Yeah and those also had their names chosen by students. What is really cool so this competition was open to to students. You and I put. Our Name came from school age children and the winner. This time was a seventh grader. By the name of Alexander Mathur from Virginia. His name was with multiple rounds so they had like forty seven hundred volunteer judges teachers professional space enthusiasts. They're viewed the submissions that narrowed the pool down to one hundred and fifty five and then down to nine and in the public could vote on those. And after seven. Hundred seventy thousand votes The results were submitted to NASA for consideration. You don't AEROBIC AEROBIC MIC rover. Face situation exactly. You don't want that. They don't want that everyone's learned their lesson about letting the Internet name things and perseverance was chosen which I think is fantastic. It's good name. Fits with the theme and So we'll talk about hopefully everything works out. Perseverance scrambling around on the surface of Mars. And like we said. Alexander's seventh grade in Virginia and he became a space enthusiast through attending space camp in Huntsville. Which I've not been to space camp but I've been to where they hold it and it's awesome. He saw the Saturn five on display there. And there's this quote that NASA has of him saying this is a chance to help the agency that put humans on the moon will soon do it again. This Mars rover will help pave the way for human presence there. I want to try to help in any way that I could. Refusal of the challenge was not an option. That's awesome you. Want to tell us about. Voyager yeah so voyager two. We talked about actually two episodes ago. We talked about how voyager two had a little problem It had like a partial shutdown reset it and fix it. It's amazing remember keeping in mind that this is a space probe. It's been in space for forty three years. It's eleven billion miles from Earth but we still keep tabs on it. It's still teaching US things. Its primary mission long since complete a flying by planets in the solar system. But it's still teaching US things about the outer solar system and the edge of the sun's influence in interstellar space will keep it going. There's a there's a small team that works on it And it had this prob woman and a fixed it. But what's interesting is we're not going to be able if it comes up with other problems to fix them for a while because of how we communicate with space probes which is actually kind of an interesting thing to think about like. How do we communicate over these long distances and the answer is we have really big powerful antennas to send and receive from far out in space? It's called the deep space network. It's generally what's used to talk to. Space probes all over the place. They are the most powerful radio. Antennas in the world There are three locations which with multiple antennas at each location. Goldstone in California Canberra Australia and Madrid in Spain We've been using the deep space network. Ds N To communicate for fifty seven years it's used by NASA ESA and several other international agencies. I think that that new Mars probe that's coming from what is it the UAE. In if that's going to launch a twenty twenty it's also using this like all. A lot of international agencies at each station is three thirty four meter antennas and one Gargantuan seventy meter antenna and there's actually a pretty cool website you can go to the DSM now website NASA. And you've probably seen this if you've been on space twitter at all people linked to this all the time. It is a really cool site that actually shows you all of the dishes all of the antenna and who they're communicating with like in outer space. You see all four at each location. But if you go there now you'll discover. Is that the big dish in? Canberra is great out. It's faded away. And why is that? The answer is in Tennessee maintenance. And in fact it's more than that as we just mentioned. Mars twenty twenty three of the four Mars missions that are planning to launch. This summer are gonNA use the deep space network. Only China is using. Its own antenna to communicate. And what that means is they want to do some maintenance on the deep space network before that happens before those Mars missions reach Mars and they need to do maintenance on the seventy meter dish at Canberra but because of where voyager two is if you've ever wondered where Voyager Two is relative to Earth. The answer is it's Kinda down because only Canberra's dish can see it. So that's the direction. Voyager two is it's an area of space that's only visible from the Southern Hemisphere. Not from Madrid or Goldstone and so If they're GonNa Fix Canberra's twenty meter or seventy meter dish. They can't talk to voyager and that that for the next eleven months. We won't be able to send messages to voyager. Although the smaller antenna at camera can receive messages from Voyager. So what it means. Is that the voice. Your team has to keep cross. It's fingers a little bit. Hope that nothing really bad happens Hope IT keeps itself oriented properly with its antenna pointing back at the earth. I didn't actually know this. But Voyager to to this day has to fire thrusters more than a dozen times a day. Just little tiny bit just to make sure that it stays properly oriented and its onboard automation to handle the orientation process but it has to work correctly and if something bad happens something goes wrong. There's nothing the voyage your team can send to the spacecraft to fix it so they will just have to watch and wait and hope although can still get data back. So it's a probably nerve wracking Almost year for that voyager team although they can still receive messages but this is also something that we need to do in terms of maintenance because these antennas are what we used to talk to. All you know all of the spacecraft NASA and Esa in many other countries. And if you haven't been to that page before it is a lot of fun to watch as new craft go up there. You can actually go to that page and see you know. Where are we communicating with the you know the current Mars rover or one of the Mars? Orbiters or you know if there's something on the moon you know are are. Are we communicating with that or are we talking to something in the outer solar system all of that information is there like new horizons data? You'll find out where that's coming down if new horizons is talking so these face network needs to be updated. That sounds good but it is going to be this silent period for voyager two in terms of like it won't hear from us. I'm sure that is a little nerve racking for the voyager team but the spacecraft has behaved well for really long time and hopefully it continues to do so during this This downtime yeah. We'll cross our fingers for Voyager. It is forty three years in space. Pretty impressive. Pretty Amazing. Very impressive Let's switch gears. A little bit and talk about SPACEX. So there's a couple of stories here One you may have seen a couple of weeks ago pictures of a blown-up prototype in the Texas desert. Where Elon Musk and SPACEX or building pressure vessels in progress of the starship hardware that they're putting together they're doing all this prototyping and they had S In one which was this ruptured tank. It kind of went off and they think it was due to bad welds on the tank. And so this is all going on and Eric of our San Diego. Actually what a Texas interviewed at SPACEX and historian simply amazing. And you should definitely go read it. But it seems like spacex in this team in Texas are just burning the candle at both ends to get starship. Prototyping and construction underway historian opens with this. This crazy picture of musk holding a meeting at one o'clock in the morning to approve a bunch of hiring and then by the end of the next day they'd hire two hundred and fifty people from the local area. Yeah it's pretty wild right real wild. That was a story with Tesla years ago. Their so called production hell. Musk was just like sleeping on the line. Trying to figure out all of its automation and stuff and it seems to be that. He's repeating that here now with spacex but there's also the story an article about the S. and once that task bed that had exploded on the stand again. It's a pressurization tank so it's holding really cold liquid oxygen and has taken in this case and it had ruptured and they were meeting about that and some engineers sort of voice will. We were worried about it but we did the test anyways you know. We were told to keep moving forward and Musk said. Engineer didn't fill her to contact him directly by all accounts he seems to be on the premise. Basically nonstop right now. Yeah there in Texas trying to get this moving because he wants to build a production line for starship hopefully building one a week and then one every seventy two hours yep. Ll Musk time but clearly. The company is moving quickly in this development stage. Yeah Elon Musk. That's a lot of things but is space. X has proved to be quite impressive with what it's able to do even if that is not. I think there's a. There's a factor of this that is. I'm GonNa ask for everything and then you're going to give me a lot and that's what I want is a lot you know. He's he's overdoing it here. A little bit but I think it's interesting that you know in saying if you think there's a reason that this isn't working come talk to me that you know we don't want a a culture here where we we know there's something wrong and we go ahead anyway because that's a bad idea but he also is definitely you know trying to cultivate a culture of Not being failure averse right like he wants them to be smart. But it's okay of stuff breaks so If the first Starship blows apart. You know we WANNA know why and that might not have been good reason but they've also got another one coming and this is how you learn and all of those things so I think a fascinating right to see him. How do you? How do you get a project off the ground literally off the ground? Yeah IT'S PRETTY. It's pretty wild and it's a it's all kind of building on his whole thing of we want to get to Mars. We want to put people on Mars and he sees the starship needing a whole fleet of them to make that possible. And even though it's very early days I mean again. They're just testing pressure vessels. And they're coming up with new ways to wealth things. They're working on this machine to make the welding more or I guess. More consistent across multiple finishes like all the stuff got the the welding Zipper machine fam- inventing and all that it's it's cool. It's it's it's a great article it really is like so visited. Elon. Musk and Texas. And this is what it's like and it's it's it's very good. It's easy to look at this and think well musk's sort of out there on a limb with this and something to be said for that but like you said they have a proven track record at this point and I just keep thinking about this in conjunction or I guess in conjunction to you but in contrast to the SOS which has moved very slowly for a whole lot more money and how different the two programs couldn't be more different. I think for sure and that just really really is interesting to consider when you think that starship some point we'll be put into service and NASA will polly by flights on it. It's like well it's comes from a different place than Nassar's in hardware hip to while everyone's in the desert building rockets in the middle of the night. So what we're saying and blowing them up repeatedly but it's how they did. That's how the Falcon came to be right. They were on an island and tried to launch them and finally the last one worked and and here we are in fact in conjunction with the story. There's another story about SPACEX that Over the weekend it had a successful launch. An International Space Station resupply mission. It was its twentieth successful resupply mission and it was the fiftieth landing of the Falcon nine. Putsches I mean I remember the first one right now fifty and it's it's almost routine thing that people talk about with space space not routine and yet to make it look routine to have gone through fifty of them. It's still amazing. I still like to watch it every single time. But the fact that there are fifty first-stage landings that they've done crazy. It is crazy it was also the last launch of the Dragon. One capsule they'll be using dragon to moving forward which is very similar to the crew. Dragon Council for yeah commercial crew. It's based on the same same platform it comes with revised Parachute System. Twenty percent greater cargo capacity and can be reused up to five times where the dragon one to be reused up to three times again making that reusability case stronger and stronger and a big improvement is dragon to can dock automatically with the Space Station Dragon. One had to be snatched out of orbit with the robotic arm which meant the astronauts on the space station had to be involved in that and now the astronauts were still monitor the automated docking. But they're not responsible for birthing it to the station and then disconnecting it and setting it free so it is Improvement all the way around and I like these stories camp at the same time because it shows just how interesting company SPACEX says where on one hand they're celebrating this milestone and other hand like Elon. Musk is running around at one o'clock in the morning hiring a bunch of people from Texas. It's so interesting company. And they oh the road all the congratulations of the world for the milestone of course and it is really truly impressive. But they're still just so unusual when it comes to the industry they're in. I like the idea that the dragon too has. A has tesla autopilot. That's basically what's going on here but it is like you want automated CHR cargo. That's how it should work right is it should be out of it. You shouldn't have to grab it with an arm and then attach it so. Yeah modern platform based on the same stuff crew. Dragon. It's great. Yeah. Yeah spacex doing the doing the outlandish also doing the kind of almost boring and that says it all. I think about where they are right now. And it's using a docking adapter that SPACEX Self delivered to the space station right. They are. They are supporting things for their future endeavors as well. Yeah all right. Let's take a break and talk about our sponsor this week. This episode of lift-off is brought to you by squarespace. Make your next move squarespace. Let's you easily create a website for your next idea with unique domain name. A bunch of Award Wing. Tillis to choose from and much more think about what's on a regular website. Now maybe an online store portfolio galleries blogs podcast. Squarespace is the platform that lets you all that stuff on one site really easily because there's nothing to install the new patches story about upgrades are needed. You don't have to worry about that stuff. Because squarespace has got it covered. They have award winning. Twenty four seven customer support if you need any help but you quickly and easily grab unique to May name and all of those award-winning templates. Beautifully designed for you to show off your great ideas. We just relaunched. My brother's profit website on squarespace. Just a couple of weeks ago and one thing that's really neat about it is this themes are really beautiful and there's lots of optimization customization you can do with them but you can also override it with your own. Css If somebody like me. Who want something a little beyond with themes give you you can go in there and tinker with it and I've got several lines of custom. Css and it just really easy to do. And I can adjust it really quickly so you can get nerdy if you want to but by no means. Do you have to squarespace plans? Start at just twenty dollars a month but you can start trial. No credit card required by going to squarespace dot com slash liftoff. And when you decide to sign up is the offer code liftoff to get ten percent off your first purchase of a website or domain name and to show support for the show. Once again that squarespace.com. I slipped off and the code liftoff to get ten percent off your first purchase would like to thank squarespace for the support of the show and all of relay. Fm squarespace. Make your next move. Make your next website all right now. We have a meaty topic. Which is what is going on with Boeing and star liner and the fact of a TAD issues We talked about it. There was a big conference call about it. This is. This is Boeing's entry into commercial crew and as everybody knows it had a flight but it didn't go to the ISS in and then there turned out to be issues. We didn't know how many issues it turns out that there are a lot like a lot. Lot Stephen Tell me about what went wrong. Yeah a lot of things went wrong so this is unfolded since December flight. But you had the incorrect mission elapsed timer where the star liner capsule didn't know what time it was. You add software errors around the jettisoning of the service module before re entry. We spoke with the last time that there was concern that the service module could've struck the the capsule before injury that super bad and then of course there was the loss of space to ground communication during some of these really critical times during the mission and NASA and Boeing have worked together to to understand what happened and understand the causes for which in this sort of engineering the causes for what happened or actually maybe more important than what actually took place. You need to understand the failures kind of behind the failures and the big number here is a sixty one so the review teams analysis identified sixty one corrective and preventative actions to address the software issues. Being the missing laps timer and the issue with the service module jettison and and and burn to sixty one things to look at that with four main areas which work will be done so Boeing will review correct the code for the mission elapsed timer and the disposal burn for the service module they will strengthen its internal review process including better peer in control board reviews and improve it software process training. So if you've never worked in software peer and manager reviews are a big deal. Preview is where you're working with somebody side by side they're more or less on your level and you're reviewing each other's work and then it kind of goes to the next step up in the chain reviewed by manager this case control board where people with more expertise and a broader picture of what's happening. Look at your software and they should understand how. It's going to integrate with other pieces because I would guess that software engineers working on this there only very small part of it right and just a couple of you know desks over. Could be somebody working on something totally different. So you need this overarching understanding of how the pieces fit together. And that seems to be a real sore spot. And the way the star Leonard Software has been developed. So far a Boeing will increase the fidelity in the testing of its offer during all phases of flight. I think last week or the week before. We spoke about the end to end testing and improve that using more simulations more emulation and make that more similar to actual flight systems. So there seems to be have been some sort of breakdown in the way we're testing this and the way the code has developed on its own had sort of diverged and they want to put those back on the same path and say the testing is GonNa reflect what we're actually doing as opposed to what we thought we were going to do a year ago or two years ago if that makes sense and then we'll check its offer coding as hardware design changes are implemented so you have hardware software being developed at the same time it seems like maybe there was a breakdown of communication. Between those parts of Boeing. And they're gonNA work better to bring those people to the table together and make sure they understand. The left hand is at the right. Hand is doing if you will all good things. Sure Olga things. There's all sound reasonable to me. The communication issues seemed to have been hardware based and Boeing working now to change out ground components that should allow better communication with star liner. When it's in orbit intended radio. I couldn't find a lot of detail on exactly what that covers but they are working on it with additional testing going on later in March. But let's get to the number right like there was a number. I remember when this came out. I sent you and you're like Oh boy sixty-one corrective and preventative actions and forty nine gaps in software testing. Yeah this the star lender issues really seem to fall into sides of the same coin where you had issues with the software and the programs written and you had issues and testing. Didn't catch those those other problems. And so you know it's one thing to have bugs. Bugs happen but testing should catch them and it seems like those gaps and Testing. Or what allowed some of those other sixty one things to get through? What troubles me about? This is not that there are issues right like this is a new human spaceflight system. It is going to have issues. This is why we test this is why we try to have these overviews. This is why NASA works with Boeing on on the issues. That it's facing that's all acceptable. What bothers me is that there still seems to be a lack of clarity about whether they're going to do a test flight find one hundred things wrong and then say we don't need another test flight. That was the most surprising thing to me. Is that When unrolling these is still undecided. There'll be a second test flight that I was certainly by the time I got to the bottom of these articles. It would say and they're going to schedule a test flight for some time over the summer. I think the way I understand it. They're required to unless NASA waves that requirement. Yeah I mean the the client which is NASA can say. Nah Right I. I think the NASA is concerned tutoring. I think the answer is concerned. About the about the cost of Boeing and like wants to be the they want to be fair but at the same time I do worry that it's also that relationship is too cozy. And they're Doing Boeing favors. They need to not do but yes as as the client NASA seems to be able to say. This is not good enough to do another test. Redo your test which is going to cost money but it has to happen. It has to happen. And there's one hundred and forty million dollars in the NASA budget for another test. Flight I really hope to do it because you have this many issues. I don't think it's smart to have the next flight of this thing to have crew members on it. No and I totally agree and get what you're saying about the coziness. That something that I worry about two part of this is that NASA will co locate personnel embed NASA engineers in the Boeing soffer team to improve the verification tests. I don't know if that was already happening. Or not at an F. as an increase in the number of personnel who are in this role. Or it's a new position but if it's a new position that's SORTA scary to me like yes. Boeing's doing this yes. Nasa is the customer but this has got to be built like hand-in-hand. It seems like it hasn't been at least to the extent that it needs to be. And maybe it is that because NASA Boeing do so much together bones also building the remember a lot of other things that they sort of okay. We know what you guys can do. We trust you ought to do this. And then you know it went south and now they're trying to fix. It may be the case but I do have the sense. That NASA needs to ride Boeing. Harder when it comes to this sort of thing and it's one thing to talk about the Essa Lesson Budget and that sort of thing but when you're talking about gaps in testing those are really basic things that need to be addressed before you put human beings aboard spacecraft. Yep I agree completely Boeing. So we'll see where this goes. I expect this'll be quiet for a while. And then we'll hear at some point in the next couple of months what they're gonNA do about a second a second crew test. Well it's let's move on to something a little more. Fun Is Digging on the Moon. Let's dig and dig in the lunar soil with a new. It's a new space probe concept with a new acronym so today we are talking about Viper. Which is a rover designed to go to the moon and look for Water Ice Viper by the way Jason Jason Union? Tell us what it stands for. Have you read this yet? Volatile investigating polar exploration rover. So it's a little bit backward but it does actually make sense. Polar Exploration Rover that is investigating volatile. But if you say. Volatile investigating polar exploration rover. Should there be a hyphen in there. I don't know it's viper good. It's pretty good. I'll give this a thumbs up. I think that it It's literally every letter stands for every word that's in the name of that's important to you and that for me that that is the biggest way that these these names cheat. So I'm I'M GONNA give it a thumbs up to viper plus. It's kind of Cool Viper. Where Viper Moon Vipers an awesome name? Right like five right cool. It is scheduled to be on the lunar surface by December. Twenty twenty three. That is one year later than its initial date. But still aiming for this which would be before Artemis Lands on the Moon in twenty twenty four or whenever Artemis does that it will work around the Moon's south pole again in areas targeted for artists landings. Because it is believed to be resource rich with water ice which is a big deal. The plan is to combine vipers findings on the surface with orbital readings and begin to build a map of the location of water ice on the moon. Now this is could be at the bottom of craters. It could be under the soil but over time. They want to have an understanding of where water. Ice Is Is Available and easily available on the polls of the Moon Right. It could be on the South Pole. But if it's you know the bottom of five hundred foot crater that is a little bit tricky but they're hoping that it's much closer to the surface. And that's what vipers all about. It's going to roll around is about the size of a golf cart. It's going to have four instruments on board to for detecting and hopefully finding water ice than to for analyzing samples to look for it so the first instrument is the Neutron Spectrometer system or Miss. I guess an s the it's the NSS right. It's just it's just an acronym saying it like a snake. It's a snake. It's a viper. I'm GONNA go okay. I don't give that a thumbs up. Okay that's fine. That's terrible so it will work to detect water below the surface and guide vipers team aware to dig. And this is where Vipers sort of party piece comes in. They one meter drill that it can put on the surface and and core into the lunar surface. This is called. Tried it new you and tell us what this stands for because I wanNA see your head explode the regular lith- ice drill for exploring new terrain. You got quiet there for a second. Did you skip some words? I can't Yeah by downplay. The words that aren't actually in it because then it would be called trae. Defend has not as good. And that's not as good as trident. So yes the regular and ice drill for exploring new terrain I can feel like a solid like thumb. Seventy percent up because again it's cool. It's like you're there's a snake on the moon and it's digging with a trident great. How could you Davey upset about this? And so like I said it will core soil samples to three feet below the surface and then it will analyze them on board to determine the composition and concentration of various resources but again water isis. The main thing. They're after here. These will be put through a couple of tools. One is called 'em Solo which is mass spectrometer observing lunar operations not too bad and the nervous nervous near infrared so the doubling up their volatile spectrometer system. Yeah Okay it's I mean it's it's not spelling an actual word and then you pronounce where it's all go with it. Nervous nervous in people are afraid of snakes. It all ties together and makes you nervous at all on the theme yes. This is a big deal. Finding water ice on the moon would be huge in terms of future missions. Not only having water available but turning the elements within water the hydrogen and the oxygen into all sorts of things. You can use it for power you can use it for fuel would be a big deal and viper is another step down that road. It will collect up to one hundred days worth of data. That data will be overlaid what we know like. I said from orbital measurements and try to piece together. Try to understand where this water is may be. The Viper Rover will be delivered as part of Nasr's commercial lunar payload services or clips and as of last month it asked NASA ask commercial partners to start bidding on launching to the moon by twenty twenty three. So so. Here's here's this is the. This is the catch right like this is. We're going to build this rover Who WANTS TO DELIVER IT? And that's the that's the other part of that says getting getting stuff down onto the surface of the moon like this and the commercial partners are going to bid on it right. You know. Maybe we'll get this by twenty twenty three a A lunar little lunar prospector. If you but don't call it that because that was a different thing that they cancelled yeah here. Is something very similar? Yeah the Viper killed. The prospector got gin. It works man. They're on top of IT IS I. I think it's because the prosper didn't look in his boot and there's a viper in their whole story to be told a story told acronyms. Yeah everyone's nervous about the ending anyways paper. We did want to let people know. Apollo Thirteen episode is coming up month but thirteen minutes to the moon the BBC podcast where they covered apollo eleven and the bay really focusing on the landing quits on. The Moon is back with season two or they are covering apollo thirteen. And I'm about halfway through episode one and so far it's really enjoyable. They've got Jim Lovell on it for Hayes on it and I think it's going to be a really enjoyable show that it a great job season once if you're itching for Apollo thirteen stuff You can go in and get started with that. I think you'll really enjoy it. Yeah talking about great podcasting. That does it Jason. Yeah all right. Well that wraps up this episode of lift-off I guess but you know we'll be back in a fortnight. It's fine we will. We'll be back and until then you've you wanna find more about the stories. We spoke about the website relay dot. Fm SUSS LIFTOFFS US one. Nineteen while you're there you can send us an email with feedback or follow up. There's a link on that site over to our Tumbler. Where we post Stories in between episodes you can become a member and support liftoff directly there as well and then you can find us over on twitter. Jason is j Snell and you can find me there as I s M until our next for Jason. Say Goodbye. Goodbye everybody on us.

Nasa SPACEX Boeing Elon Musk Twenty twenty Viper Jason Jason Union Squarespace Boeing Texas Mars Twenty Twenty Rover Stephen Hackett Canberra twitter Alexander Mathur Virginia Goldstone Jason Good Space Station Dragon
This Week @NASA, September 20, 2019

NASACast Audio

04:28 min | 1 year ago

This Week @NASA, September 20, 2019

"I lighting Artemis with help from Hollywood preparing to launch to the only laboratory in microgravity and testing new lunar landing technology few of the stories to tell you about this week at NASA NASA provided some technical expertise and imagery for Twentieth Century Fox's new film ad Astra a fictional space thriller starring actor Brad Pitt while the film does not have a NASA storyline. We continued the collaboration leading up to its release by participating in activities to generate awareness about space and our arts program the next step in human exploration. What are the repercussions on your body. In Zero G on September sixteenth pit stop to buy our headquarters for space to ground question and answer session with astronaut Nick Aig they talked about a number of topics vicks including the work being done on the International Space Station. Some of the experiments were doing here our technology demonstrations to prove out a concept that we hope to apply as we go back to the moon as part of the optimist program in early. September we hosted pit during a tour of our Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena California. He received a boarding pass as part of the Mars Twenty Twenty Rover Missions Center name to Mars campaign. That mission is scheduled to launch next summer. We also also participated in red carpet events with pit and other cast members of the film which presented opportunities to not only highlight our efforts to return humans to the moon by twenty twenty four but to also explain why we're not just going to stay at the moon that we're developing the capability for an eventual mission to Mars. Human physiology is a big piece of that and we gotta to make sure we get that right for everybody to be saying. This is a really excitement for the possibilities where we can learn about beyond can learn about ourselves yourselves films like this contribute to that you can learn more about artists and armone to Mars exploration approach at NASA dot Gov Slash Artemis the next crew headed to the International Space Station including our Jessica. Mir is conducting final training for its upcoming launch at the bike cosmodrome Roman Catholics dumb mirror all extra poach of roscosmos and spaceflight participant Hussan. Ali Pur of the United Arab Emirates are scheduled to launch to to the station on September twenty fifth our flight opportunities game changing development programs supported attest near Armstrong Flight Research Center here in California of a developmental vision aided terrain relative navigation system the system could help a future lunar lander targeted desired landing location and know exactly where it is by using a camera and preloaded satellite maps that include unique terrain features this was the first test of the system with both a descent altitude and a landing trajectory similar to what is expected on a lunar mission a high speed rocket sled tests that California's Naval Naval air weapons station China Lake was used to test a new landy technology designed to avoid hazards and help perform extremely safe and precise landings is on planetary surfaces. The technology which is being developed by are Langley Research Center uses laser beams reflected off the ground to help a sensor provide ultra precise is measurements that identify exactly how high are human or robotic lander is and how fast food is traveling. NASA has been recognized for Arabia award-winning coverage of two space missions team multimedia coverage of demonstration mission one by our Kennedy Space Center Johnson Space Center and Commercial Partner SPACEX A-6 won an Emmy in the category of Outstanding Interactive Program the March Twenty. One thousand nine mission was an UN- crew test flight of Space Excess Crew Dragon spacecraft grabbed to the International Space Station. Meanwhile an emmy also went to our jet propulsion laboratory and the outstanding original interactive program category for coverage including leading news web education television and social media efforts of Nassau's insight mission to Mars which launched in May twenty eighteen congratulations to all for well-deserved honors. That's what's up this week at NASA for more on these and other stories follow us on the web at massive dot Gov Slash Thuan John.

International Space Station NASA Mars Twenty Twenty Rover Missi Kennedy Space Center Johnson S Jet Propulsion Laboratory twenty twenty California Nick Aig Emmy Langley Research Center Twentieth Century Fox Brad Pitt Hollywood Astra Armstrong Flight Research Cent Pasadena UN United Arab Emirates Nassau
When Worlds Collide  the titanic collision of two asteroids

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

34:46 min | 1 year ago

When Worlds Collide the titanic collision of two asteroids

"The Space Time series twenty-three episode forty four broadcast on the first of May twenty twenty coming up on space time when worlds collide the titanic collision of two asteroids. Why NASA chose JETHRO credit for the Myers Twenty Twenty Perseverance Rover mission and it seems belief in ufo's in alien abductions of falling because well people have more important things to worry about right now. All that and more coming up on space time WILCO. To Space Time we'd stupid. Gary astronomers have observed that expanding cloud of icy debris caused by the catastrophic collision of two asteroids in India by star system that abry cloud was originally thought to be an exoplanet orbiting the bright staff former hall located some twenty five light years away the object previously believed to be the planet former. Hobie was first announced in twenty eight based on data taken in two thousand four and two thousand six but a report in the Journal. The proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences claims new observations using the Hubble Space Telescope show that what astronomers originally thought was the planet as now seemingly vanished from side and instead replaced by cloud of very fine dust. Particles Wall has been hates have evidence of similar stored collisions in other systems. Nothing of this magnitude is ever been observed before the study's Alita with Andrea Gas spa from the University of Arizona. Steward Observatory says that makes this a big deal. It means it's really a kind of blueprint for how planets destroy each other for Hope Bay was clearly visible in several years of hobble observations. That revealed it as a moving dot but unlike other directly image exoplanets nagging puzzles with former hope arose early on for example. The object was unusually bright invisible light. But it didn't have any detectable infrared heat signature at the time. Astronomers hypothesized that this added brightness may have come from a huge shell or ring of dust circling the planet that may have been the result of some sort of collision and other problem. Was that early. Hobble observation suggested the object wasn't following a normal elliptical orbit around the Star as planets. Usually do so. The authors analyzed only available archival Hubble data from hoppy including the most recent images taken by hobble and when everything's combined it reveals several characteristics that paint a picture that this planet sized object may never have existed in the first place in fact Hubble images from two thousand fourteen showed the object vanished much to the disbelief of astronomers adding to the mystery earlier images showing the object was continuously fading over time. Gaspar says former Hall Bay was clearly doing things that a planet should not be doing so with all the evidence the authors have now included former hope was not a planet at all but rather a slowly expanding cloud blasted into space as a result of a collision between two large bodies. Research is believed the collision probably occurred not long prior to the first observations taken back in twenty. Oh four by now. The dust cloud consisting of product was around. A Micron in size is well below. Hobbles detection limit? Now the other capable of course was this object wasn't on an elliptical orbit as expected planets. But it seemed to be on an escape trajectory in other words a hyperbolic path despise says a recently created massive dust cloud experiencing considerable radi forces from the central staff. Omaha would be placed on just such a project because from hope is presently inside a vast ring of icy debris encircling the host star declining buddies. We're likely mixture of ice and dust similar to the cop about objects which orbit the sun out beyond Neptune in our own solar system. The authors estimate that each of the buddies involved in this cataclysmic collision would've been around two hundred kilometers across and they also suggested that former hot system could be experiencing similar collision events of this type every two hundred thousand or so years. A clear case of worlds colliding. This space time still to come. Why NASA CHOSE JESS row? Credit for the Myers Twenty Twenty Perseverance Rover mission and it seems belief in Universe in alien abductions of falling because well people have more important things to worry about right now all that and more still to come on space time well as we mentioned last week preparations that continuing the Kennedy Space Center at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Base in Florida. Could July's planned launch of the Mars? Twenty Twenty Perseverance Rover aboard an atlas five rocket to two thousand five kilograms. Six-wheeled Kasai's mobile bar tree will arrive on Mars. In February landing crater to mission will study the local geology and such signs of past or maybe even prison life on the Red Planet. Which is why just rope. Craig was chosen. Just wrote selection was the combination of Five Year. Search looking at more than sixty candidate locations. Just recreate is located on the western edge of the city's planet here. A giant impact basin just north of the Martian equator was. The city is present. Some of the oldest most scientifically interesting landscapes mass has to offer. The landing site has geologically rich terrain with landforms riches. Far Back as three point six billion years which could potentially answer important questions about planetary dilution and even Astro Biology Vision. Scientists believe the forty five kilometer wide crater once home to an ancient river delta could have collected and preserved ancient organic molecules and other potential signs of microbial live from the water and sediments that would have flowed into the credit billions of years ago in fact. Giro's agent lake daughter system offers many promising sampling targets of at least five kinds of rocks including clays and cabinets have a high potential to preserve signatures of past life. In addition all these materials being carried into the data from what was a very large watershed could contain a wide variety of Monroe's birth from inside and outside the crater and that's important because one of the missions goals will involve collecting rock and soil samples and storing them in a cash on the Red Planet surface with Nassar in the European Space Agency looking at future sample return mission concepts to retrieve the apples and bring them back to earth the geologic diversity that makes so appealing for mission. Scientists also makes it a challenge for the teams ad L. entry descent and landing tain who had charged with the difficult job of flying the robot down at the surface or at least pre-programme to do so while still trying to take account of all possible contingencies along with a massive nearby river delta and small crowder. Impac sites the leading side also contains numerous boulders and rocks to the east cliffs to the West and depressions filled with sand dunes that could easily blocked the rover Mass Twenty Twenty Rover Project. Scientists can finally from NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Passing California says. The mass community has long coveted. The scientific value of sites that's his just crater and the previous mission even contemplated going but the challenges for safely landing on the site was simply considered to prohibitive but thanks to modern technologies. What was once out of reach? Is now conceivable win. The landing site search began mission. Engineers had already refined the landing system to the extent whereby they could reduce the twenty landing zone to an area fifty percents smaller than what was needed for. Its twin Myers curiosity rover which landed Gal Crater back in two thousand twelve and this allowed. The science community considered more challenging landing sites among the critical science instruments aboard the twenty twenty perseverance. Rover is Super Cam which includes a telescope with the Lazy Unit Mad at a top mast and a spectrometer Matt Inside. The body of the rover should became principal investigator. Roger Wins from the Los Alamos National Laboratory says the system works who the laser blasting a tiny portion of geological formation say Rocco soil sample. They by creating a plasma the telescope then catches the spectrum emitted by the plasma and that's passed under the spectrometer terminates elemental and molecular composition as well as physical properties like hardness Super Camas is basically a geological observatory on the Mars Rover. We have a telescope that sits on the mask of the rover and out of that telescope. We fire laser pulses to interrogate rocks and soils and then using that we actually have several techniques that this instrument observatory uses to understand the composition of the rocks. Both chemically and men are logically and physical properties like their hardness. We chosen to build this instrument from the ground up following to some extent the successful Kim Cam instrument that is exploring Mars since thousand twelve on the curiosity rover. We have been developing this instrument in partnership with the French Space Agency Organization. I rap into lose France and with Some Spanish colleagues as well and so the the whole consortium is led by Los Alamos to make sure that spacecraft instruments survive. We have to give them a barrage of tests environmental tests as well as performance tests. Some of the environmental tests are vibration tests to make sure they survive the launch thermal tests to make sure they will work well at cold and hot temperatures and also in a vacuum or in this case in the Mars atmosphere after all of the environmental tests. Then we give it a the performance testing to understand how well do the spectra work? How well does imaging work the microphone? Does it work? So we've tested that as well. This is the voice of Roger. Speaking to you through the Mars. Microphone Super Cam. And so we've completed that testing and we're ready to send this instrument off to Jet Propulsion Laboratory to get bolted onto the reverend. This launch will take place in late July of two thousand twenty. It then takes about nine months to get to Mars so we're heading for a landing on February eighteen. Twenty twenty one fits Roger. Wiens the Super Cam. Principal investigator with the Los Alamos National Laboratory and this is space time still the come believe in. Ufo's and alien abductions at falling because people more important things these days to worry about and later in the science report growing concerns that the covered nineteen virus can be spread simply through breathing and talking all that moss to the come on space time. Okay let's take a break from our show for word from our sponsor express. Vpn rated number one by Tick Raider may be wondering why you need a virtual private network. Well it's in the name. It's all about privacy. Do you really want big brother? Take companies hackers governments. And who knows who else. Knew Ping in on your mind activities now you might not have anything to hide but it's still really creepy and it could be dangerous for you and those you care about. Also how often do you run across a website and you want to get information from it but you find out that the GEO blocked? It's all very frustrating and it's becoming an increasing problem and that's where expressed VPN can help you express VPN's a simple and efficient way to protect your online privacy. It's Internet without Borders from the world's leading VPN provider so particular online privacy today. And find out how you can get three months free at tracks. Brits VPN DOT com slash space. That's try express. Vpn DOT com slash space for three months free with a one package visit try express VPN DOT com slash space to learn more. And of course you'll find the link details in the show notes and on our website. That's try express. Vpn DOT com slash space? And now it's back to our show. You're listening to spend time with Stewart Gary belief in extraterrestrial life in aliens visiting Earth in flying sources to gauge. In a bit of late night probing has been a mainstay for science fiction for well over one hundred years. And it's been in the human psyche for much longer than that in fact you can go back. Thousands of years two passages from the Prophet Ezekiel and the Old Testament. Judeo Christian Bible referring to strange heavenly visions of cherubs with four faces and machines that appeared as wheels within wheels with RIMS. Full of is then. There's the story of fiery disk sit in the sky by the Ferret. Utmost is the third. I guess the Modern Day your era probably began with pilot case annals her sightings near Mount Rainier in Washington state that was also the first time the term flying discs flying sources was used by the way that citing well that's believed to have been a squadron of early Air Force jets. Of course there's the famous nineteen forty seven. Roswell incident apparently involving the crash of alien spacecraft in New Mexico. More likely the crash of a secret military black OPS project although probably not the project mogul balloon train often talked about then in nineteen sixty. One came the case of Betty and Barney Hill who claimed to have witnessed art lights and experienced missing time lost memories on driving home through New Hampshire later. Regressive hypnosis therapy unearth stories of alien abductions and strange experiments which have since been attributed to the accidental implanting false memories by the hypnotist and because of hills pre existing fascination with UFO's and of course there's one of my favorite kicks Berg incident Pennsylvania nineteen sixty five when ufo now known to the Soviet Union Cosmos Ninety six nearest spacecraft caused widespread panic when it crashed in local woods after a failed launch early from the biking or cosmodrome placed it in a decaying audit. But these days there are few and you stories about and that's because the number of people who believe in ufo's alien abductions appears to be steadily declining to find out more and you're definitely speaking with astronomer Professor Fred Watson Guide to look into this phenomenon of alien abductions. This has been the subject of movies documentaries. Tv shows for years and years and years with so many people claiming to have been abducted by Little Grey islands and of course we know about the Roswell incident. What's happening at the moment? Is that the the reports of alien abductions Down rather drastically apparently and that makes One one what's going on now the jury's out I tend to think that this is some sort of hysteria type of situation but the people who who climbed those things have happened incredibly convincing and obviously truly believe. What happened was an alien abduction. So I don't know where we start with this one. What's your take on it over to you? I'm going to start with the knowledge in the Boston Globe. This investigation one of the investigative journalists has looked at. This is a very nice story. So there's a number of statistics that quite surprising. I think one is that and this is actually a rather old poll done by National Geographic but apparently seventy seven percent of Americans believe that aliens have visited the Earth which is a colossal number and thirty percent of Americans believe that the government has covered up evidence of alien visitation. That's a more recent poll. These are very very high statistics. Another poll in the UK showed that one in twenty five of the respondents who who came back to this poll believe they'd been abducted violins. That was in two thousand fourteen so it's Incredibly POPULAR IDEA. That aliens have been around that they've actually. I can people away and brought them back and think the history of that goes back to nineteen sixty one when there was something. That's very a very famous case Within the alien abduction community of Betty in Body Hill. Who Radio Story yes. Something was following them in the car and then found themselves at thirty miles away or something with no memory of what it actually happened. Regressive hypnosis demonstrated. They went through all kinds of interesting things. And the whole alien abduction. Well guess what you'd call it grew from there and of course movies books. The whole deal appealing things so sober voice at the story comes from people like a doctor. Chris French who's actually at Goldsmiths College in London. I love the name of the department that he heads up. It's the Nama Listrik psychology more. How cool is that absolutely work? I work at a normal listrik. Something something couldn't remember the rest of it already. Ballistic Psychology Department. We should have one of those here and a lot of studies of course relied these things to phenomena which go on in our brain. The facts that the number of reported abductions seems to have fallen as what they're really interested in. Because that really comes about by okay. What are the things that concern people now and one of the things that uppermost in our thoughts and immagination as we conduct our day-to-day lives and also with things like a number? Listrik psychology dot sort of thing. How does that play into it? So there is essentially a reduction as you said in the headline reduction of these so-called abductions and one of the reasons that's being put down for this is actually the Internet and you might think it would work the other way I mean. It's just chock full Agabi Jimmy well joining that would increase the numbers but yes so tell so the theory is that because of the way we communicate with each other these days which is very different from what it was like in the sixties when there were three radio stations and TV stations certainly in the UK. That's the way it was in the sixties anyway so everybody was watching the same stuff nowadays. We've got completely fragmented media saying and a theory. Is that some of these people who who are interested in Ireland. Abductions believe they might have been abducted really. Keep themselves to themselves. They took to like minded people on the Internet. But you don't get these large-scale media reports you don't get the so we've basically created electronic segregation in a way. That's right yes. That's absolutely right so this is one of the reasons why this is thought to have been on the fact that there are others that Some of these researchers point to one is the dramatic change. I mean it was a total change in our outlook with nine eleven. Nine eleven kind of brought a lot of us to our senses. In the sense that people believing in abductions suddenly something else to concentrate on what we knew very very real maybe focused on minds in sort of global sense just a few more polls though there is still a large number of people and again these are American statistics. Fifty six percent of Americans believed in you foes now that Maine's unidentified flying objects that does not necessarily mean aliens but the belief in new foes is very very prevalent that there is something that we don't understand whatever it is an I think. Actually signs takes a fatty sanguine view of this as well. We look at you fo- Reports and most of them turn out to be. Actually most of them are not to the planet Venus but a lot of them turn out to be other things as well but this seems to be a handful that defy any kind of rational explanation and and you and I've spoken about some of those before some of these remarkable results that have come from the US military where they've seen things moving very rapidly across the sky and we talked about pilots. I think I put it down to military activity. I think at the end of the day. That's what we decided. It might have been so. That's all of certainly where most of these things will end up but it is interesting. That a large number of piglets Mind about you foes we have to you know on the other side of the coin they They are certainly a handful of unexplained phenomena involving alien abduction cases. So you know they might be a reasonable explanation but we don't know what it is. That's right draws me to something you and I talked about using these ago and that is the potential for intelligent life other than that on earth. Your seeming were intelligent but we I think you and I talked about it quite some time ago. What are the odds in terms of the development of the universe? And the age of the universe and the expansion of the universe. What are the odds of an intelligent rice? Developing coexisting in the universe with US and being technology technologically advanced enough. Not only to find but visit us at the same time was around. Yeah yeah the thinking. Among Astro biology is now that higher species and by God. I mean anything. Other than a single celled organism while single celled organisms might be relatively commonplace throughout the universe and hopefully. We'll find the answer to that soon. The transition to get from a single celled organism up to higher order life form let alone vertebrae but something with multi cells dots apparently seen as very difficult. No it only happened once on the Earth for example where your old directly descended from something called the last universal ancestor. And if it's been as rare as on earth where conditions are absolutely ideal for the development of life. We've got of the moon stabilizing this rotation tides kind of washing the the The Ocean chose all of that sort of stuff seems to become Yousef to the development of evolution of life and that some of those features could be quite rare so people are now thinking well intelligent species within the universe. Maybe so far apart so rare that the never gonna be able to know about each other. You know if if we've got a species on the other side of the universe that existed affability in years ago not going to know about it and that's a fairly depressing picture. It is rather and suggest that we're just GONNA have to learn to live a line. Well I think it means we've got to learn to after the planet that we we are we are we inhabit. That's Dr Fred Watson at Astronomy Department of Science speaking with Andrew Dunkley on assist program space nuts and this space time. I'm Stewart Gary still to come the science report and growing concerns that covered nineteen can be spread simply through breathing and talking and new warnings that Arctic some could disappear before twenty fifty two to the growing impact of climate change. All that and more still to come on Space Time Anton. That'd take another look at some of the other stories making us insides this week. With a science report there are growing concerns that the covered nineteen virus can be spread simply through breathing and talking and not just through coughs and sneezes as previously thought. It's already known that people sneezing coughing can spread the virus up to a meter or more infecting others. Need by. That's why one point five to two made a social distancing is being encouraged because other fluids attached to these respiratory droplets. Weigh them down causing them. The for the grant of long distances but new research at the University of Nebraska has found curve at nineteen viral DNA in fast smaller lighter bio aerosol. Listen five microns in diameter now. Panic was this small can travel much further floating in the air for far longer possibly even hours and consequently that can why the positive on a foul wider range of surfaces scientists. Say It's this speech and breath related spread. Which could help explain why a symptomatic people can spread the virus then finding support a systematic review published in the Journal of Infectious Diseases by scientists with the University of New South Wales and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology not which the only available on the horizontal distance traveled by respiratory droplets? They found that all the available scientific evidence doesn't support the assumption that contamination from symptomatic patients would only occur within a one to two meters safe distance instead ten studies found respiratory droplets and aerosols of various sizes emanating from people eighty percent of which transported more than two and even as far as ages from the person meeting them new study suggests that drying your hands with paper towels is better at removing viruses than htay handwriting is. The findings reported by the European Congress on clinical microbiology. Infectious Diseases follows a British study showing their hands dried on paper. Towels spread lyssavirus to other services. When compared to hand stride with holiday hand-driers researches deliberately contaminated for people's hands with a harmless virus and then looked at which drying method was better able to get rid of viruses and stop them. Being spread to other services they found average surface. Contamination was ever ten times higher after using holiday. Hendra competed those who use paper towels. And you studied by scientists from flinders university to coincide with Earth Day has highlighted the plight of some of the planet's most vulnerable creatures and also shortfalls in most conservation efforts more than birds in most mammals. And including frogs and Salamanders are on the front line of extinction in a hotter drier. Climate a wetlands and environmental water flows are under pressure and facing inadequate management scientists fat and Fabian populations are in decline. Globally with water resource used dramatically changing surface water hydrology distribution the report published in the Journal Conservation. Biology also found that many conservation measures simply are not enough to arrest the decline. In fact it shows that forty one percent of species assist are at threat of extinction much of Australia's drying as a result of climate. Change water extraction and landscape modification with multiple reports of mass death of native fish hitting the headlines last summer being a good example of the damage. Doing a new report was that some of Arctic Sea ice is predicted to dissipate before twenty-fifty resulting in devastating consequences for the Arctic ecosystem. The grave warning reported in the Journal. Geophysical Research Letters is based on studies by twenty one research institutes around the world. The North Pole is presently covered by is all year round however global warming is meant the overall area of the Arctic Ocean now covered by ice has reduced rapidly over the past few decades and of course the sea ice cover is a hunting ground and habitat for polar bears and seals. The new study analyzed recent results from forty different climate models. How often the Arctic balloons at sea ice cover in the future critically depends on future. Co Two emissions if co two emissions are reduced rapidly is free will only occur occasionally but with higher emissions. The Arctic Ocean will become ice free in most years. Well it seems covered nineteen proving that a fool and his money as soon parted with a pandemic bringing out all the usual con artists shanks and women's promoting their fake products and conspiracy theories. It's a time when you need to be aware that these products and claims like any scientific substance and the goal is to get your money. Tim Mendham from Australian. Skeptic says simple rule is the follow the advice of your family. Doctor obviously with anything like this any sort of medical emergency. There's a lot of people out there offering instant queues patiently with tightly unqualified to do so. Not that even the qualified people have a cure this state but they're kind of people taking advantage of the fear and panic and the uncertainty. That's the rant. Dick Lee opportunistic. The question is These people offering set of shonky unsubstantiated treatment so cues a genuinely believe it missing foams rally opportunists or all of the above. I've certainly you can get a pretty good combination of people across those three different aspects to see who they are a couple of examples. There was woman who's a kinesiology which is one of the people who stick your arms out and see if I can push you can easy Allah Gis. That sounds like she's definitely a scientific supply. Kinesiology to give away these the people who You've probably seen them. Everywhere they say staying he put her on that and I pushed into your arm and leg and you fall over and then that's I tried again now that the I can see you with energies and center trying again. I'm a COP. Push them many because the second time you're prepared for giving US quickly and the person is pushing it down pushing anyone a different direction. So you're not going down but this was someone who could do assessments of this for you but I know they got five dollars a minute or something wonder. Oh bargain basement price. I live with Lexi list of her price of two dollars. Fifty minutes for it is by basement. But she's obviously doing out of the goodness heart. Because basically it's to check energetically energetically check your respiratory system in depth over the side of quantum waves. And all this definitely quantum in there. I think there's a lot of quantum the idea the plan is that so you can stop the unnecessary worry and deal with what Israel which. I think is probably. That's wonderful stuff. The trouble is the people response to this outright addicted furiously to these things saying it's It's Chunky stuff. And if saw facebook price and that was taken down pretty quickly. But she's not the only one there. There's a lot of people doing this Form of bent spoon skipped expense Bruna. Who runs a I cycled plus was screwing conspiracy that a couple of homeopaths of sand? I for nineteen but of course easily their their findings were suppressed. Van Yeah it sent me the link to it doesn't exist anymore. I can still at Meister. These claims are still at the that People I think taking them in this sort of has outraged skeptics. As most of the week's ninety think seriously let's do something about the slits. Get these gannets. Fight back against these things. The lightest one. I just saw it with someone. Who's promoting the KARENNA virus? The virus doesn't exist. It's actually Five Day radiation which is causing these illnesses. Which the governments can turn on and off just to control you. Home-ice sort of threatened that I can sort of make you can make it will make you seek make you will anything. There's nothing in it that there's actually nothing in it. There's a gazillion people out. There who are making sort of similar conspiracy claims false product claims Q. Is All sorts of things we were talking about the the noodles. Cosio weekdays six nine. That's the wasn't as the noodles. It's also yet cold coke in and also so the me goering noodles which is not made in China and also Langer base which is scary. That's also not my little of south describing the strength but yeah there's a Klein for everything can always find someone putting with some sort of particular. Climate doesn't take long to find a lot of this stuff. That's the trouble Eddie. After putting these stuff Ford and there's no filter on what's reasonable and what's not reasonable. And what's a canoe theologist? That's to minimum from Australian skeptics. And that's the show now. Space-time is broadcast on science on radio by the National Science Foundation in Washington. Dc and through both IHEART radio and on Hsun radio or you can subscribe and Download Space Time as a free podcast through apple. Stitcher BITES DOT COM pucca cast soundcloud spotify YouTube audio boom Pud Beim android cashbox from space. Time with Stewart Gary Dot com or from your favorite download podcasts provider. You can help support the show and the work we do by visiting the Space Time online shop and grabbing yourself a few goodies or by becoming a space time patron which gives you access to commercial free double episode versions of the show as well as Bernie's audio content and other awards. Just go to a patron page through space time with Stewart Gary Dot Com for all the details. If you want more space time check out our blog. You'll find all the stuff we couldn't fit in the show as well as loads of images news stories videos and things on the web. I find interesting or amusing. Just go to space time with Stewart Gary Dot TAMLA DOT COM. That's all one word and in lower case and that's Tamba without the it can also follow us throw at Jewett Gary on twitter at Space Time with Stewart Gary on instagram through Space Time Youtube Channel on facebook just go to www dot facebook dot com slash space time with Stewart Gary space-time is brought to you in collaboration with Australian sky and Telescope magazine. Your window on the universe. You've been listening to space time with Stewart Gary. This has been another quality. Podcast PRODUCTION FROM DOT COM.

Stewart Gary Ufo Myers Twenty Twenty Perseveran US NASA Stewart Gary Dot Twenty Twenty Perseverance Rov Mass Twenty Twenty Rover Proje UK Dr Fred Watson apple facebook Arctic Ocean Hubble Space Telescope Roger Wins Twenty twenty Betty Steward Observatory National Academy of Sciences
Perseverance

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 1 year ago

Perseverance

"Millions of names are hitching a ride on the Mars. Twenty Twenty rover this is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shape our future more than ten point. Nine million people submitted their names to ride aboard masses next rover to the Red Planet. Now those names have been carefully stenciled on three silicon chips and fastened to a plate at the center of perseverance is aft crossbeam Alexander. Mathur a seventh grade student from Virginia wrote the winning essay that gave the Mars. Two Thousand Twenty rover. It's official name. So it seems only fitting that Alex's essay along with the essays of all one hundred fifty five finalists Nasr's contest were also stencilled onto the fingernail sized chips. The chips share space on the aluminum plate. With a laser etched. Graphic depicting earth and Mars joined by the star that gives light to both. Here's Alex to explain why he chose the name now. Permanently etched on the rover's robotic arm to me. Perseverance means that in the inevitable setbacks that we're going to face on the way to Mars humans won't give up for innovation now. I'm Jennifer poet. Innovation now is produced by the National Institute of Aerospace Through Collaboration with NASA and is distributed by w HR V. Visit US online at innovation now dot us.

Twenty Twenty Alex National Institute of Aerospac US crossbeam Alexander Mathur Nasr Virginia official NASA
All Aboard Virtually

Innovation Now

01:29 min | 1 year ago

All Aboard Virtually

"Nasa is giving the public a chance to send their names stenciled on a chip to the red planet. This is innovation now. Bringing you stories of revolutionary ideas emerging technologies in the people behind the concepts that shape the future from now until september thirtieth. You can submit your name gene to fly aboard the next mars rover members of the public who send their names will get a souvenir boarding pass and earn about three hundred million nasa nasa frequent flyer points the micro devices laboratory at nasa's jet propulsion laboratory will use an electron beam to stencil the names james onto a silicon chip about the size of a dime with lines of text smaller than one thousandth the width of a human hair more than a million names teams can be written on a single chip. The chips will ride on the mars twenty twenty rover on a glass cover the rover a robotic scientists weighing more more than a ton will search for signs of past microbial life collect samples for future return to earth and pave the way for human exploration and now you or at least your name can go along for the ride for innovation now. I'm jennifer pulley. Innovation now is produced by the national national institute of aerospace through collaboration with nasa and is distributed by w h._r. v.

Nasa national national institute of jennifer pulley james
Working in Tandem

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 1 year ago

Working in Tandem

"NASA optometrist's verify that March twenty twenty has twenty twenty vision. This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future. The Moore's Twenty Twenty rover contains an armada of imaging equipment from wide-angle landscape cameras to narrow angle, high resolution zoom lenses, but the cameras aren't just there to capture pretty pictures. Some of the cameras will help perseverance carry out its tasks as a robotic geologist. Looking for organic compounds could be related to pass life on Mars. Other cameras will work together to acquire panoramic three d data that support route planning, robotic arm, operations and trilling, working in tandem cameras will. Will provide complementary views of the terrain to safeguard the rover against getting lost or crashing into unexpected obstacles, and the cameras will be used by software, enabling the rover to perform self driving over the Martian to terrain to ensure the equipment is calibrated for resolution and geometric accuracy. Every camera on the rover must undergo an eye exam before launch, so when those visionary science instruments begin capturing images on Mars, it will truly be an eye opening experience for all. For Innovation, now I'm Jennifer. pulley innovation now is produced by the National Institute of Aerospace Through collaboration with NASA.

Twenty Twenty NASA National Institute of Aerospac trilling geologist Jennifer. pulley Moore