35 Burst results for "twenty thirty years"

How to Pick a Great Contractor

Tiny House Lifestyle Podcast

04:16 min | 3 months ago

How to Pick a Great Contractor

"Home building is a bit of like the wild west. Right now there's Explosive demand a lot of people who want to build or buy tiny houses and regulations are starting to catch up With with the tiny house building process but On all there are a lot of great builders out there but also some bad ones and so A question that. I see all time from people in my online community. Tiny house engaged elsewhere. Is you know what. What should i look for when i'm talking to a builder when i'm when i'm hiring a builder and I was curious if we could just start at the very beginning. Maybe what are your tips like before you even pick up the phone or write an email to a contractor a builder you know. Is there anything that that you know what. What should that person have like ready before. They contact even contact anyone. Let me back you up a little bit further than that and then yeah please john walk you through. You know out of the tip but if you sort of think about it. Here's the reason we started. Great bill you sort of think about the process to find a contract very different than the search to find anything but they onli- a laptop or aristocracy whatever obviously buried and so and we started great built the realize that there is no great way to do this really the way that people have been doing this than the stone ages is a. Ask a friend you know. What kind of contractor do you recommend you know. who did you use it. you like. Who built your kate right now. That same person. So that's that's been working forever but then option number two kind of sock option number two. Is you get online. And through other review sites all the yelps and all the various sites and opened the reviews are true which these days you know and look at pictures and all the contractors rate at four or five stars and that process is not great. That's what the yellow pages was like twenty thirty years ago i'm probably dating myself here right and And so there's no really good way way option for once. Great option number. Two kinda sucked but we thought like. How do you really figure out a way to find great contractor if you If you don't know someone personally or if you don't have a friend that knows somebody because the problem is that you know you're where we work in southern california in la county alone one county with twenty thousand licensed general contractor. Okay so again tons to choose from right and the other statistic. We found that is amazing and i. I bet you'd be surprised by this. Is that fifty percent of people who work with contractor who hire contractor. There was a survey done about this. Have a bad experience with it. So of those twenty thousand you pick ten thousand. You can have a good experience. You pick the other two thousand. You have terrible experience so we said there's gotta be a better way and that's why we started great bills and all john kind of continue the conversation about what it means to then a good contractor and how we seek out good contractors. You're so as as paul said we always. We agree with it. The number one best way to find a good contractor is from referral. Someone you know either in the industry or with relevant experience that has done a project like this before it. My neighbor just finished the kitchen remodel. i talked to them. It came in at a good price and they were happy with the experience. My search is over. I'd probably already found a good fit. But if i'm not fortunate enough to have the just the right neighbor next door or a coworker or a real estate agent who can refer me to a good contractor. I'm left with the many many options on all the other sites in yellow pages and otherwise so what we do to kind of reinforce good contractor or all the same things that anyone can be doing It just takes time. It takes for expensive and so it's not so much finding a good contractor but more so screening out the bad contractor

Tiny House La County John Southern California Paul
Creating super-human voice assistants with Nikola Mrki, CEO of PolyAI

VUX World

08:41 min | 3 months ago

Creating super-human voice assistants with Nikola Mrki, CEO of PolyAI

"Apple for a while and then you win and create polly ai. What was it specifically the kind of took in that direction. What was it that you enormous in wasn't working either necessarily broadly speaking invoice technology. What was it that you saw wasn't quite right. In what problem did you think you could solve by by creating paula. I absolutely so What i think the challenger creating a horse assisted. Level thrive people through any of these media kardashian mobile phone speaker. Second thing it's different. Hotter product has many uses. The finish quality and other food is very different. People inside cleanable the to clear those the ottawa Negative while we're kind of like you know the future Know say amazon charged enough to have On every two will not when you aggregate fact their fifteen thousand equal working at alexa do actually as long as someone who worked on this before it was as huge as opulent as it is today. You can't help but things have not achieved back much when you know like the few scenarios that he knew any of these technology despite music you know setting larssen timers asking you questions when playing board games navigation of exiting but overall. It's really not that overwhelming. There wasn't hope that this would be the next thing after mobile really. it's kind of growing. It's growing the read. The say laptops grew up in the ninety s and the group right in compound. Interest is miraculous dion here with a laptop. But it's definitely not exploded in the way to save the iphone. Did even though. I think many of these companies that would now you hear these very articulate narrative Directly to shop is enter. Be really materialized when we have a are in vr blindly. Those are all things that will build into insomnia clear where He conditioned from the ecology by co founders through our senior research team. We were all brought up by. Crm's steve is less cambridge professor. Almost one of the guy had species mission for years. Was the leading person. Pushing hidden markov models. We wanted only way. You'd bisbee shirt mission until these learning got an and really as a matter of ernst and they were more efficient methods previously Westchester kangaroos he sold three counties As he you know supple the see that since two thousand six hundred billion dollars bermudian six Missionaries are twenty thirty years. It is impossible for measuring that you can have a sophisticated conversation with us. But see sorta developing formalism the models these errors is waste recovered specials severe to really bring converse in to the understanding. So that you're able to really elevates something we really awesome A few people in the company that there are similar problems leader in the battle management decided save depending on. Both the of the user might have met Sheet metal wall seats available shop inventory or reservation book and so on. Yeah i mean when when when you think about what has been built in where you go. Silence made sure to make progress. The most isolated followed that as scientists Both saw its customers. There's a lot of data. There's a genuine genuine. Consumer eve right at All these fools and interestingly i land look you go into a large People customer experience with people bought line of the cio's and they all really end up on with your yard also. And if you haven't done this before we ever all happened so you are brighter citizens. We were the city when we had a lot of success for us. Few years is really a shame of systems that are incredible airless. Some of the most sophisticated thought An employee narrow the bird. They're not here and talk to you about anything we can talk to you but meeting life but you know you want to book a table and you really or schedule. Data's choosier through the evening. Not after learning must really complex stuff. The the more by the customer service is are actually able to evaluate the systems breath. And how he florida track assistant done and that. The second problem is blake all frustrated. Leave users fears to Speaking we choose our battles but out we're able to perform the most human agents quite often we beyond to be probably won't really into application just until how do mean by outperform humans in in what respect to outperform. So that's your accomplice crush on the on the one hand just reaching characteristics. Aw a support. Asians or human didn't make them popular the audio voice. Speeders your other understand. The user meets all jeering answer. It didn't constraints where it is more narrow occasions where eagles Now when he reforming hugh. If i stayed in my last elections naza were. Wade's speakers Are you paying and quickly. Say that my vote is was that might or bamberg for the for scherzer. God's actually slow surprise a matter of fact but now we're able to mav performed see humans wanting to actual research the school of cool still understand really talk to the salsa just beating the baseline but there are very few most sectors so well we've been there for long enough to receive a very product where they're hundred about it like sizes of all those questions even though the answer because it's more bright they how the answers. They're connected to social system. The answer changes you know media the people because they straightaway. Don't get tired whatever language you need them to use Something's the edged. Change the So there are many hours which museums are falling like. We speak a few languages. You know we don't know the answers. We will startle both codes and in many of these many of these problems we have transactional but really currently functional assistance in place authors.

Polly Ai Larssen Westchester Kangaroos Kardashian Paula Dion Ottawa Apple Amazon Insomnia Steve CIO Blake Scherzer Florida Hugh Eagles Wade
Life insurance advice with Clark Howard

Clark Howard Show

02:47 min | 5 months ago

Life insurance advice with Clark Howard

"Right. Clark yolanda in north carolina says. I'm a forty one year old single parent. I'm looking at life insurance. But i'm not sure how to determine what i need. I've a two year old son have policy through my employer currently in a small policy that should cover funeral. Expenses checked a few companies. But i'm just not sure where to start on this. Okay wonderful the you're looking out for your kids and what i recommend as just a back of the envelope. Simple way to come up with an amount is that you buy a policy that covers ten times. Your annual income that will provide a decent pool of funds to provide for your children in the event of your untimely devise. so that may sound cost prohibitive. But it's not if you buy the right kind of life. Insurance which is known as a level term insurance level term is where you buy for a set amount a set amount of life insurance or face amount of you know how many hundreds of thousands of dollars or whatever it would be for a period of time. You're worried about protecting your children. Ten fifteen twenty thirty years. Whatever that period is on clark dot com. You'll see my guide to buying level term insurance and there are many quotation sites. You can go to to get quotes for many different insurance companies. Whether things. I want to focus your attention on. Is that particularly if you go out. More than fifteen years on level term. I want you to buy a policy from a company rated a double plus by a m best on any of the shopping services that i would direct you to they will show you the a. m. best rating. Which tells you how healthy the insurer is itself. So the eight double plus means they have the highest level of ability to pay claims in the future. Because you wouldn't wanna pay for life insurance policy that later isn't going to pay out for you. Level term insurance has no goofy Savings accounts are investment accounts. It only pays a death benefit to your survivors period. That's all it does in the case of buying policy where you're a single parent and you have minor children. That policy usually will be done in a trust kind of arrangement. Don't be intimidated by that. The online sellers are very familiar with this. And you will be able to have someone you trust. Named is the trustee of that in the event that you pass away while your children are still minors

Clark Yolanda North Carolina Clark
Chevron CEO says company is embracing, investing in a lower carbon energy system

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

08:40 min | 6 months ago

Chevron CEO says company is embracing, investing in a lower carbon energy system

"What's best performing sector since election day. You'll never believe it energy and we talked about energy. I mean fossil fuels with multiple co vaccines. Right around the corner. The economy will soon be able to reopen which means more demand for oil and gas ray of yours. No i'm not a fan of this industry anymore. I think the long-term press but posthumous have gotten grimmer but there are two fossil fuel stocks that i still consider investable one of them is chevron the big integrated the king of the oils the best of the best chevrons held up surprising well during the pandemic. And it's got a powerful safe dividend of five point seven percent. The only problem the stock is now thirty five percent in the last six weeks. So kennedy keep climbing. Let's take a closer look with mike. He's the chairman ceo of chevron corporation. Get clear picture of the industry and his company said mr. Moore's welcome demand money jim. It's good to be with you all right so you got to solve this for me. As long as i've been in the business always one company that was the best and it wasn't as yours. It was a company called back son. There are a lot of others that were doing. Well now they're chevron and there really is everybody else everybody else being companies. I'm worried about the dividend that article in production. That aren't conservative. What happened to chevron at the other guy should have listened to well jim. Different companies have made different choices as As we came into this and as as we've gone through this so have changed their dividend policies. Some of changed their strategy. Some of change their financial priorities. We haven't our dividend to secure as you mentioned are balance is strong our strategies are intact and there's no they can count on us so we were we were well prepared as As we went through the cycle. And i think that people realize that we've been constant at a time when many others have changed. Now you'll have when it's necessary been aggressive for instance. You were very aggressive in the gulf of mexico drilling wells that are going to produce oil for year. They don't run out those wells. I mean that's just something that you did. Everybody else went away from it. How did she have the dish do that. Jim it's a long term business. Demand for energy in the world is enormous seven and a half billion people on the planet today. By twenty forty there will be nine billion in all of them deserve the things that affordable reliable energy can provide. so we've got to take a long view on investments and at the same time you've got to take a short view in terms of being prepared for markets that are very volatile and unpredictable. So it's an and world actually have to do both. We have to look out the front window. Twenty years down the road and we look out the window of the house today and see what's going on the world today and manage our way through both of those. Let go out twenty years. You bought a company called no one. None well terrific. I visited leviathan. It's an incredible field in metro. Train off the coast of israel. I could see a visionary saying you know what it's time to disenfranchise gas prom company bringing its gas to the west and make it. So there's a pipeline from israel all the way up through central europe and that could be something that's a twenty five year project pie in the sky. Well that's certainly one of the opportunities to commercialise. What is a large gas resource in the waters of the eastern mediterranean office. Real right now at feeds markets in israel egypt and jordan their opportunities to take liquefied natural gas to other markets and certainly longer term. These types of resources often lend themselves to infrastructure developments to feed market. Europe is not not far away so those are all options to commercially develop that resource and supply markets in an affordable reliable manner. So that that's the type of thing that our company does really well and it's a long term view that we have to have to sustain our company at the same time. I've noticed that you need to be able to have common ground with whoever's in the white house. I'm not going to try to say you have to do this do that. Because you're reasonable person. Have come up with it. But if you have a really aggressive. Climate change president and team. Is it perhaps possible that they make it. So that you that you're not able to enjoy your own properties. Well jim we've been in business for over one hundred forty years we've worked with republican administrations with democrat administrations with split government with unified government. And we always start with common ground. Government wants economic development and prosperity for its people and governments want a cleaner environment We look for the common ground and there's always common ground because we're critical part of the economy. We may not agree. One hundred percent with any given administration on everything. But there's usually much more we're aligned on than we're different have different views on and then we sit down at the table and we work our way through those things. We've got different points of view and that's exactly what we expect to do. with this administration and every other one that follows but mike how do you sit down with fund. Managers younger financials. You say you know what we're about trying to be carbon neutral even make it so carbon negative so to speak so chevron can never be a holding embarrassed and better. How much do you think that works good. And they have great dividend policy. We can own what happens if too many managers start thinking that way. Well jim what managers really want out of our industry and out of our company. It's better returns and boil our strategy down to four simple words. Higher returns lower carbon. And we need to do both. And we need to find ways to invest in things that are good for shareholders and also good for the environment if we do just just invest and things are good for the shareholders and ignore the environment. That's not sustainable. And if all we do is invest in things that have an environmental case and they don't create value and returns for shareholders. That's not sustainable. Either so we sit down with portfolio managers of all ages and all levels of experience and talk about how to deliver higher returns and lower carbon That's what people. I think that's been investors are looking for well. How about another way to look at it. Some people feel jim. Do not see the future. Do you not see tesla. Do you not see the hydrogen fuel cells. Judah there's no room in portfolio because it's going to happen fast than you think you think the demands big al twenty thirty years. Probably the way. I too but they feel no mike they feel. It's gone away. Fashion than you. And i think and that has caused me to pull in my horns about a group i really like. Would you have we embrace a lower carbon future. We expect lower carbon energy system. In fact the energy systems always been moving towards lower carbon hundred. And fifty years ago cole came along a displaced would eat and then you had oil and gas and then you had nuclear hydro wind solar hydrogen now. The energy systems always been in transition. And we're investing today in. I'll give you an example renewable natural gas if you've ever driven by dairy farm or a feed lot. There's there's a certain aroma that you you may recall We're actually capturing the waste products from dairy farms now fermenting the those products to create the natural gas product cleaning it up moving it into a pipeline so it can displace fossil fuels so we reduce methane emissions and we create a salable renewable product. So we're investing in things like that. We're investing in nuclear fusion. we're investing in hydrogen. We're investing technologies that can scale and make a real difference and be part of a carbon energy system. This is the history of our company. And i believe it's the future of putting a hydrogen fuel cells all of your incredible gas stations. How about making that statement saying to the rest of the industry and all the espn enthusiasts. Look we are doing something right now. That's economic but it is gonna kill it in the five six years you could do that. Might your this and you've got the balance what we're working on these kinds of things. Jim we come back to. It's an world we've got to have higher returns and lower carbon and so we've gotta find things that work for shareholders and work for the environment and that's exactly what we're working on so i think i think you're going to see our company and you'll see others in our industry that continue to find solutions and this is a challenge that is too big for any one company anyone industry or anyone one country in the world to completely address We're gonna work in partnership with others and continue to advance the you know the state of the energy system which will only grow. Well mike. you've always been the you've been the voice of reason. Your company's been the scientific company all along people should know that chevron has always had the most scientists and engineers at the top might worth chairman. Ceo of chevron sir.

Chevron JIM Israel Mike Gulf Of Mexico Kennedy Moore MR Mediterranean Egypt Jordan White House Europe Tesla Judah
What If Its Not Depression with Dr. Achina Stein

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

04:53 min | 7 months ago

What If Its Not Depression with Dr. Achina Stein

"To the broken. Bring podcast where we dive. Deep into the topics of neuro plasticity epigenetics. Mindfulness functional medicine mindset and more. I'm your host. Drew royden each week by team. And i bring on a new guest who we think can help improve your brain health feel better and most importantly live more. This week's guest is dr akina stein. Stein is an osteopathic physician who has been in practice as a board certified psychiatrist for more than twenty five years. Her story is super fascinating propelled by her son's mental health crisis in two thousand ten. She found functional medicine which result his health problems as well as her own and has since been practicing functional medicine. Doctor sign certified by the american board of integrative and holistic medicine and is a certified practitioner of the institute of functional medicine. She is a distinguished fellow of the american psychiatric association and was awarded the expeditionary psychiatric award by n. a. m. i. rhode island in two thousand and eight. She is presently in private practice in rhode island and she recently launched her online health. Coaching program healthy self boot camp to assist people from a distance to reach their health goal. Health goals super born covid and also is the author of the up and coming book. What if it's not depression doctor. Stein welcome to the broken brain. Podcast thank you. Thank you for having me. It's an honor to have you here. And i'd love to start with origin story. You know when. I read your book and i had a chance to meet you over email. Your story reminded me of the story of so many doctors who come on this podcast. Their interest in holistic health and functional medicine started with their own or a close family members personal health crisis. So if before we get to your son tell me a little about your own health over the years prior to finding functions. Oh wow where do i start. So i I had a pretty rough childhood so my health when their stress in the family from having a disabled mother in many ways and a father who wasn't really the best father will just be kind there in saying that But just having a lot of stress growing up as a child. I had a lot of Allergies and eczema. Asthma as a child But then as i got older i actually had a health crisis in two thousand and three where combination of things happen where i had a i had just delivered my third daughter had epstein barr virus. Which made me feel like. I was hit by train which then triggered a hashimoto's vira died is crisis coaster on that. Got me to be come. Very depressed and Was put on thyroid. Medication also is the first time in my life where i needed to be put on temporary disability or a couple of weeks and was put on an antidepressant at time and it's It's gotten better ever since ever since. I found functional medicine and i got my son. All his issues began in twenty ten. But i didn't really address my issues. Until after i got him settled. Because we you know we as moms. We was kids. I you know and then i use the functional medicine approach to handle my issues and a lot of things significantly improved. I feel twenty years younger and And people are surprised that i am the age that i am because of some of the things that i do on a fifty. I'll be fifty seven this year. And i play ultimate frisbee with twenty thirty year olds zil and so people are always shocked to hear something like that but i am the in the best shape i've ever been in in my life. Immensely is and spiritually. So and i am. I'm telling you're the first person for me to tell you this but i've actually been off antidepressants for a year. Yeah so. I want to mention that until i actually said. Been off of it or year. But it's actually a year anniversary will be actually a year on november sixteenth. So yeah it's It's definitely Been a journey for me in so many ways.

Drew Royden Dr Akina Stein American Board Of Integrative Institute Of Functional Medici Stein Rhode Island American Psychiatric Associati Epstein Barr Depression Hashimoto Eczema Allergies Asthma
Redlining left neighborhoods vulnerable to heat

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 7 months ago

Redlining left neighborhoods vulnerable to heat

"For decades. Many banks refuse loans to people buying homes in certain urban neighborhoods. the lenders claim the loans. Were too risky. But that assessment was heavily influenced by the race of residence. This practice is called redlining and it left lasting damage. In many communities reduced individual wealth home ownership and investment in schools and transportation in recent research shows that formerly redlined areas are also more vulnerable to extreme heat. Jeremy hoffman of the science museum of virginia says these neighborhoods tend to have fewer shade trees and more pavement making them hotter nationally. It ends up being about four and a half degrees. Fahrenheit warmer on average during the summer in these formerly red light areas than in their non redline neighbors the problem will get worse as the climate warms so hoffmann says to protect residents health. It's important to find immediate solutions like building. Shade structures at bus stopped planting trees and adding parts could also help cool neighborhoods in the long-term reimagining with of the individuals in the communities that were redlined. What's their vision for what their community looks like in the next ten twenty thirty years

Jeremy Hoffman Science Museum Of Virginia Hoffmann
Why Buchanan County, Virginia’s election results are important

WSJ What's News

05:18 min | 8 months ago

Why Buchanan County, Virginia’s election results are important

"Buchanan County gave President trump his biggest margin of victory in the two thousand sixteen presidential election nearly eighty percent voted for him compared to just over eighteen percent for Hillary Clinton. President trump has done little to expand his political base since then and to secure victory this time around, he'll need to maintain his base in working class comedies like the Canon. So how is support in Buchanan holding up this time around and what can you tell us about trump's base across the country? We turn now to our senior editor Bob Davis Hi Bob thanks for being here. Sure. Thanks for inviting me. So, tell us a little bit more about the canons economy which has relied heavily on coal mining has that changed during the pandemic what's going on there now? Will you know you voted Cannon County and you can read about the pandemic and people will tell you how it's affected them. But you don't honestly see it. It is a place where few people wear masks where people are back in their offices not in general not observing social distancing and it is a place where the pandemic has moved through the county just as it has in other places. So what? You see for the pandemic is, for instance, the high school which was went virtual in the spring they tried a mixture of in-person and virtual mostly in person for the full the issue there one reason an additional reason there to go in person compared to other places is you know it's it's a place that's full of mountains and valleys, and the the Internet reception's not very good in a lot of places so. That would argue to have kids come back and go to school in person. Well, when I was there, it happened that three kids tested positive and they wound up going off virtual. School. Which of course had the usual effect on parents who have to take care of the kids so I mean there's that and then the economy. The economy's slowing. As again as you would see around the country, the coal mines shut or slowed. During the spring, but they're back shopping is down retail sales are down and it's a place where the unemployment rate you know went up to eleven percent. It's now the most recent is around nine percent. So even a place that's used to having a weak economy. In What is clearly recession? President trump is still expected to win the county in this election, but a lot has changed for many of his supporters there're especially during the pandemic. Bob, can you tell us more about what you heard from them and how they're thinking about voting this time around sure I mean they are still overwhelmingly in favor of president trump overwhelmingly but. Then you have to define what is overwhelmingly mean in two thousand sixteen. He got eighty percent of the vote in the general election. So will he get eighty percent of the vote? Will he get seventy percent of the vote will as many people show up to vote for him? These are all questions that are uncertain at this point, the answers to which. Are, uncertain as I say the people there in general are still quite supportive but even his supporters wonder if other supporters are basically suffering from what you might call trump fatigue, the four years of controversy the pandemic which it's Cannon County as much as it hits, you know anywhere else you know all the controversies and so even his supporters wonder whether they'll get. As larger turn out, it doesn't mean necessarily vote for Joe Biden mean that they don't show up to vote another issue is that it's a place with the weak economy as I said and the number and people are leaving people the population there is being greatly reduced over the past twenty thirty years and even from two thousand, sixteen to two, thousand twenty, there are fewer people in the county. So there are fewer potential voters for the president. Did you talk to any voters who did vote for trump in two thousand sixteen and are now considering voting for? Biden. Yes. I spoke particularly to a couple. Francis and Rayburn. Minton who run a clinic in Grundy it's tucked away in a food city supermarket and they as are many people in that area they were Democrats. This is an area that until Brock Obama actually voted democratic in the presidential election like a Lotta places in West Virginia and in South West Virginia, and then they had voted for president trump largely. Because of his promises about the coal economy bring back know the local economy to stronger state and they now are voting against him because they are upset at the way they feel he is mismanaged the response to cove it. I mean they see it up front you know they do testing for covid and the they have arguments with patients, potential patients, potential customers who WANNA test but we're we're a mask and a attributed a lot of the resistance to wear masks to the president's often disdainful attitude toward mass square.

Donald Trump President Trump Cannon County Bob Davis Joe Biden Buchanan County Hillary Clinton Buchanan Senior Editor Brock Obama Canon Minton West Virginia Grundy Francis South West Virginia Rayburn
The Surprising Truth About Environmentalists and Voting

Warm Regards

07:53 min | 8 months ago

The Surprising Truth About Environmentalists and Voting

"Nathaniel I'm really excited to have you on the show today. I have never seen so much discussion about get out the vote efforts around a midterm election. So were really here. We're really happy to have you here in excited to have you on the show. Well thank you jacqueline and thank you Ramesh I'm I'm really excited to be here with you guys. So, do you do you feel like we're seeing something different in this election we keep hearing all these projections about how college students are really GonNa vote this time and You know the projected voter turnout is really high in various places and I think I just read an article that my home state of Vermont has something like a ninety two percent. Voter registration rate for the state, which is crazy. Awesome. So do you do you feel something's different? Are we going to see a shift from the from the recent past? Yes. I absolutely feel like something is different. A field director just told me about an hour ago that a million people have already voted in Florida so far as also voting. and they're in person early voting hasn't started yet. So all of these people are people who requested that ballots be mailed to them. And have already made them back in and just to put that number in context just to give you a denominator I think barely six million people voted in the twenty fourteen midterms and Florida. So the hot a million people have already voted mean something's going on now who are those people that I can't tell you? I can't tell you with whether these are young people storm in the polls or liberals or conservatives I don't know. But you're right that there's a new energy going on this time around. Suspending of demographics mean you focus mostly on on kind of an untapped group, the the environmental movements, and we often think of environmentalists is really active in terms of making lifestyle choices. giving up meat or dairy, or or abandoning abandoning your car for a bicycle that takes a lot of effort and a lot more than going to the polls. So my question for you is, how are we doing? Are we actually voting as a group? Jacqueline you you ask the the sixty four, thousand dollar question no, we're not we're not laugh. Yeah environmentalists awful voters. I'm not going to sugarcoat it. We. We've done a lot of research on this and it's pretty easy to measure because weather you vote or not, and a lot of Americans don't know this. Whether you voter not as public, record. Now. I'll never be able to look up who Ramesh voted for or who jacqueline voted for but I can absolutely look up which elections you vote in in which elections you don't. And so people are able to run large polls and build predictive models and identify all the environmentalists in various states. And it turns out. That environmentalists. Habitually under vote they vote far less often than the average voter in almost every other state and just to give you some context here, I'll use say the two thousand, sixteen presidential election as an example. In two, thousand, sixteen, Sixteen, nine percent of registered voters voted. But only fifty percent of environmentalists did. Wow Yeah and if you go back to twenty fourteen, it's even worse. Forty four percent of registered voters voted but only twenty one percent of environmentalists did. Okay. So the obvious follow up question there is why? Yeah. Why? Is that one hundred, thirty, five, thousand dollars. That's Before thousand. In one dollars. So we know some of the reasons but only some of the reasons. So part of what's going on here is just demographic correlations so I don't know what the Environmental Movement was like ten twenty thirty years ago but. It certainly isn't now. What People Imagine as the stereotypical environmentalist. The typical environmentalists now is not well, it's not me it's not some white Yuppie who hops into their electric vehicle to get to their job downtown. people who deeply care about climate and the environment are now much more likely to make less than fifty thousand dollars a year. Be African American or Latino, and live within five miles of an urban core end they are predominantly younger but that's not. Not so much the case anymore. And all of those demographic groups that I just mentioned right now. Vote less often than the average American. So part of what's going on here is just that environmentalists are likely to be part of demographic groups that just habitually under vote. But the really interesting thing. Is that's not all that's going on here because even if you look at just young. Environmentalists vote less often than the other young people. Were even if you've looked just at Latinos, the Environmental Latinos vote less often than the other Latinos. So something else is going on here and the honest answer guys is we don't know what it is because it's really easy for behavioral scientists to measure why someone takes an action. So it's really easy to set up an experiment to to figure out how to get someone to vote. What's really hard? is to figure out the opposite. What's really hard is to set up an experiment to figure out why people don't take an action like exercising or voting or or vaccinating their children or something like that. the best you can do is ask them. And when we ask environmentalists why they're not voting. They lied their pants off. They lie France off and so and I'm. That other people or So, so no not more than other people and that's a good question but no, I mean no matter how you ask the question if you try to determine why people don't vote. The responses they'll give. Our responses that they think you want to hear. What we've realized is that even non voters still buy into the societal norm that voting is a good thing. So everybody wants to be known as a voter. Just, like everybody wants you to think that they brush your teeth, brush their teeth or or wash their hands every time or something like that. This voting is a societal norm that we all buy into and so I ask people why they don't vote. They will often before they even give you an excuse guys. They will lie their pants off and say, Oh, no, I vote all the time Jacqueline. And we that's a lie because whether you voted not as public record, right? These people looking at their voting histories and we know that they've never voted their entire lives and they swear up and down all the time that they vote whenever there's an election and so. The honest answer to your question and it's a good one is. We. Don't know why environmentalists aren't voting, but we've got some good ideas as to how to get them

Jacqueline Ramesh Environmental Movement Florida Vermont Nathaniel Environmental Latinos Director France
A conversation with meditation teacher Light Watkins

The Model Health Show

05:13 min | 9 months ago

A conversation with meditation teacher Light Watkins

"Our guest today is Light Watkins and he's been operating in the health. And wellness space since one, thousand, nine, hundred, Ninety, eight, and a world renowned meditation teacher and his passion is teaching people from all walks of life simple tools for increasing happiness finding new purpose and today light has work with thousands of people in trainings and retreats all around the world, as well as fortune five, hundred companies in championship sports teams. He's also the author of two books on Happiness and productivity called the gym and his most recent book bliss more how to succeed in meditation without really trying. This is his second appearance here on the motto Ho show and he's just a really good friend of mine. Again, this is such an insightful and powerful episode. So let's get ready and tune in very closely for this incredible conversation with the Amazing Light Watkins. Crutches. You're crushing man. We're just broke down over here. We're going in numbers. You I gotta get out of here. For some. Happen to be. A. Hurry up. Real quick. Back. We just puts it a fireman. You spend a you have to. Bear. Army leafs everything. Man here sharp come over here. Be Ready. So last time we talked you were doing when you're like I, think about you. Avatar like there's this cartoon, my son and I watch this for back in the day but there's his character named and he's Avatar and he's traveling from place to place you know. In the energy around learning, and then you move onto the next place you know you had your bag you was out there. You know and obviously things have changed. So first of all, how was that experience of traveling what is far to do that in that capacity in house have been the pivot being back home this kind of home spot here. With US and Callie. Yes. So I I went. In two thousand in May of two, thousand, eighteen, I got rid of all of my. Belongings that didn't fit in a carry on bag and I was in Santa Monica and a two bedroom apartment. I was forty five at the time so. At forty something years of stuff. Literally like baby albums had shoe boxes full of letters from you know twenty thirty years just being an adult. and. So. I sort of methodically got rid of everything and. All the memorabilia out and took photos of most of it. So I had it in the cloud. And I did it because I had A. I don't know I had. I don't know I. Think I feel like minimalism nomadic lifestyle was in the Zeitgeist at the time so I was getting this strong urge to. To have that experience, and so I just said Yes to it because I had been practising saying yes to stuff like that my you know my entire. Adult life. And I did it and so I started hopping around different cities who my carry on bag in backpack, and then I was like I can do better than this. and. Merged everything into a backpack. So got rid of the carry on. Bag. Onto that Dora the explorer. Yeah exactly and. Yes I've been doing that for the last couple of years and honestly man I have not missed having. A stability. And in fact, what I discover was that the true stability was inside right And so if you have that, you can be anywhere and you can be fine. And so when the pandemic hit. Obviously changed a lot of things because I was going international a lot. And I couldn't do that, and so I just kind of got an AIRBNB and grounded for a while but I'm still living out of my backpack. So I'm still living the lifestyle, but I'm just in one place for longer and then you know. So now what's interesting about it is that people are asking me. Do you miss being on the road all the time and I'm actually now I don't miss it at all I'm happy to be in one place because in the last couple years, I've literally been around the World Two or three times over and so you know It's nice to be able to kind of ground and focus on some projects. I got my podcast off the ground and got my third book turned in and all these other things that I was like asking for time to stop knowing that that's not a realistic ask but I was putting it out in the universe anyway and very low and behold. So is your fault times. Which is why? Twenty twenty because I know what I was.

Light Watkins Callie United States Santa Monica Airbnb Leafs Army
Protecting Your Brain from Alzheimers Disease and Cognitive Decline

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

03:54 min | 9 months ago

Protecting Your Brain from Alzheimers Disease and Cognitive Decline

"In this mini episode, I speak with Dr David Perimeter Dr, Lisa, Mosconi Dr Dale, Br Edison about why Alzheimer's is a preventable disease and the lifestyle factors that can set the stage for Alzheimer's years from. Now, we also talk about this disticts of Alzheimer's disease and its impact on women, and what you can do today today to prevent cognitive decline in the future. Let's listen in starting with interview with Dr. David Pearl Mutter, a board certified neurologist and four-time New York. Times bestselling author, we do know that a for the most part Alzheimer's is a preventable disease. This is a disease costing Americans two hundred and thirty billion dollars affecting five point four million of us. That is dramatically exploding in terms of its incidence and prevalence globally, and yet you know the notion that our lifestyle choices are not relevant is it does take my breath away. You know it's all about living a life that is less inflammatory and that certainly transcends are narrative as it relates to Alzheimer's but. Involves Parkinson's and involves coronary artery disease diabetes and cancer, and all of the chronic degenerative conditions, and you know what really is so very important and I think sort of stands in our way of getting this information to really have traction is the time table that this is effective over for example, you tell somebody wear your seatbelt that'll be good for you. They get in a car accident they're wearing their seat belt and they say, Hey, I get it that worked yesterday I was in that accident worked. But the inflammation issues that are relevant in terms of causing the brain to degenerate or narrowing the coronary arteries. These are issues that are beginning to take shape ten, twenty, thirty years prior to actual disease manifestation, and therefore it makes it very challenging for the consumer to connect those dots. Let me give you an example. In the journal Neurology, which is arguably one of our most well respected neurology journals on the planet period viewed. There was an interesting study that was published and it measured in a group of several thousand individuals who were in their forties and fifties. At the time it measured markers in their blood of inflammation and the study then came back and looked at the same group of individuals twenty four years later, the study again was just. And what it found was really quite remarkable. There was very direct relationship between risk for developing Alzheimer's disease and having had higher measurement of blood inflammatory markers twenty four years ago. So what does it say? It says that if you? Elevated Markers of inflammation in your blood today, you are setting the stage for Alzheimer's years from now and so that your lifestyle choices today whether you choose to eat low carb high carb high fat low-fat whether you choose said integrity vs physical activity the amount of sleep that you get. Hopefully that is restorative the amount of stress in your life, etc. these are all extremely important variables. Which you have control that clearly are connected to your brains Dini. This is not live your life come what may and we have a pill for you. If you're suddenly cognitively impaired is the other story. The story is that you make lifestyle choices today that will dramatically impact how your brain works to three decades from now

Alzheimer Alzheimer's Disease Dr David Perimeter Dr Dr. David Pearl Mutter Neurology Dr Dale New York Br Edison Parkinson Times Lisa
Release Stress With Grounded Logic

The Daily Boost

05:38 min | 9 months ago

Release Stress With Grounded Logic

"Let's start by getting the big question on the way. Have you done your homework? Did you sit down and say where's my life going? How's it doing? Do I like? What do I want to get rid of some of the stuff I don't like do I want to bring more good stuff in my life if you will stop for just a couple of minutes today and think about pat? Things will change. So it works kind of law of attraction. It gets in the back of your mind you go about your day not thinking too much about it, and suddenly you're world changes do your homework. So. Let's talk stress. Are. You stressed I'm not saying you are, but you know in this time that we're living right now I think all of us come up with moments where. We'll stressed I know I've seen that started in March didn't it and it just keeps on going we have had nothing that they talk gal politically about October surprises we've had march and April or may own July August September October It's GonNa. Keep going and. What do you do about it? But one way idea with it and one way a lot of folks I know deal with it even though it's piling on top of you and sometimes a man what the heck to have trapped at home with my kids. By Dogs my wife, my husband, a staff I need to get out. Oh my gosh. What do I do? If, you're feeling a little bit more stressed. There is time proven way I've used in. So many other folks views. It's a very human way. By the way I began to use I think probably naturally Oh twenty, thirty years ago But when I began to study STOIC philosophy, it really began to make a lot of sense to me. Along with a Kind of came together my life. So I want to give you a very simple way of thinking about the say and you may not believe me but you gotta go with it. Okay. It's real simple. It's GonNa make sense to you, and if you will do this. Ever. By Car have. You ever gone to buy car. And you just have this beautiful carcass, put the best one I, right Oh, my God Gar car, and your Motion Starts Spinning and Spinning and spinning, and then the salesman sits down and you start talking numbers and. I don't know I. Don't know. I don't know, and then you finally got gotta deals like well. And you get the car. or You decide not to it? It's okay. Right. Is that ever happened to you. That's what you're going to do right now starting today with everything you do. Okay. So here we go. Number One. If you feeling, it'll stress. Do me favor just kind of recognize that you're there And also do this just remember Scott in your ear right now you're in an emotional state of mind. How do I know that? Because, everybody is emotional right. We all we're emotional beings. That's half the trouble we get into where it on our sleeves. We react emotionally it's there. It's like buying a new car right? Well, I love it I love it. If you recognize your in an emotional state. And Stress Real or otherwise. Is being felt by emotions. We all do that. But significant and usually good decisions rarely come from a place of emotions right? Even if somebody asked you to marry him, you're like, okay. Hang on let me think about it I. Love My lover going to you think about this I. You know what I mean right. So recognized where you are I know it's hard I know it's not gonNa make any sense at all like but man the world's falling apart. What am I going to do to get through this? Number two. Lounge paused even if it's for millisecond. Start Gathering facts about how you feel when I do this, when I have to balance my business growth and family and farm and Alpacas and all the stuff that I have run here. To spreadsheets I go to I go to checklist, I go to things that I keep track of data if you will. That's what it is. It's hard data it could be bad data I don't really care, but I just want to know what their information is power, right so I'm paused emotions are in check right now and I'm going to pull the data just facts because that's driving home feeling. Now to understand and give myself a chance to do the the next step, I want to be able to logically think this through as humans like buying a car. When you get emotional. The next thing you're going to do is logically think through it now. Emotions are wanted him things, right? You can logically come the conclusion that is good for you, but you might not agree with emotionally right it happens. So you gotta stay in the game here right? Emotional state of mind we're getting the data we're logically looking at it and no more looking for is not answers that make you happy. That's not necessarily case. We're looking for anything driving the stressing causing the stress and we're looking for options and opportunities for getting yourself out of it. So if you gather the data and the day is really bad. Okay I. got a reason to be stressed that in it's so should remove some of the stress, but then you flip to the next side. Okay. Great. I've looked at the data. And I'm stress were going to do about it. And you begin to find a way out I'm gonNA tell you this. In. I'm going to say ninety nine point not Naza hundred percent hundred percent of the cases warriors warriors worry just kind of happens, right? It most of it doesn't ever come true when you stop and pull a logical look at the data. You're gonNA find that it's not as bad as you think it is and you're GonNa find that certainly not everything is terrible. There's lots of cool things in lots of things you can do lots of options you have you're GonNa Begin to see if you'll look for it. And just that all by itself will calm you like I said, I'm a business guy right I'm kind of a data guy I'm a rule emotional guy but I'm also very logically driven. So I'm the guy that when I see things that are going not the way, I want them to go and starts to spin me a little bit and we all get. There we all do. The data settles me down now I don't always see it the first time give you this as well. I don't always the first time and sometimes it's a few days or even weeks before I even think to figure out which set a data to look at. Look at that. That's bad. That's bad. That's bad. That's bad. But if I keep going eventually going to find. Something that says, Oh okay. I'm just kind of overthinking this.

PAT Salesman Naza Scott
Humans Have Caused the Most Dramatic Climate Change in 3 Million Years

The Science Show

11:14 min | 9 months ago

Humans Have Caused the Most Dramatic Climate Change in 3 Million Years

"Recently Assad with some research colleagues at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, a look at a brand new science article in which are climate model for the first time had recreated the climate on earth over the last three million years, which covers the entire geological pleistocene epoch. The Pleistocene is so important as it constitutes a point of reference for life on. Earth. Because although sure our planet has existed for four point, five, billion years it's only in the last million years. That earth has looked at least roughly in the way as we know it, the continents were roughly where they are today. The North and South Poles were covered with ice. The atmosphere had a similar chemical composition to what we have today. Planet, Earth. Our earth has only existed for three million years. All, comparisons further back in time are quite meaningless. And the manuscript I hold in my hand is not just reaching. My brain is also striking straight into my heart. A deep humility settles in when look at the graph showing the variations in mean global temperature on earth over the past three, million years it shows that we have never throughout the whole plasticine exceeded two degrees global warming compared to our pre industrial average temperature of approximately fourteen degrees. Never. This means that Earth despite all the stresses and natural shocks from fluctuations and Solar Radiation Volcanic eruptions, asteroid impacts and earthquakes has regulated itself within an incredibly narrow range minus four degrees. Celsius were in deep ice age plus two degree Celsius. We're in a warm interglacial period lasting three million years. It's absolutely incredible. Especially since we know why. It's earth's ability to self regulate the ability of the oceans to absorb and store heat the ability of the ice sheets to reflect solar radiation the ability of the forests to absorb carbon dioxide and the ability to be a safe and store greenhouse gases. The planet is a biophysical self playing piano whose music sheet stays. Within the minus four plus to scale. If that is not caused for humidity than I do not know what humidity is. And a deep concern in hundred and fifty years. In the geological blink of an eye, we risk now tearing this Planetary Symphony to shreds. Let that sink in. The global average temperature is now changing hundred and seventy times faster than over the last seven thousand years and it's doing. So in the wrong direction upwards when the current orbital forcing meaning are distance to the sun and the current low level of solar activity means that the temperature should in fact, be slowing down. You don't have to be a physicist to understand that we have a problem. Climate skeptics like to argue that historically the climate has fluctuated so much. So why shouldn't it be fluctuating now? Obviously. It fluctuates. But we are now racing towards plus three to plus four degrees warming. Sceptics like to bring up the little ice age the time when Swedish King Call The tenth Gustav Marched His army across the deep frozen great belt and the little belt in sixteen fifty eight to beat the Danes or that the vikings grew grapes in Greenland during the medieval warm period. Yes. Of course, this is true but it all occurred within the natural boundaries of minus four and plus two degrees. And it's here within this sweet spot that we must remain for our own sakes and our future? In August two, thousand, eighteen at the peak of that year's drought and fires in Sweden and Europe. We published a scientific paper where we tried to establish whether we are at risk of pushing the entire planet away from its current state of equilibrium, the Holocene epoch where we have been since the last ice age. This is fundamental. Our Planet Earth can be in three different states. It can be in a deep ice age as it was twenty thousand years ago with large is. Extending over the northern and Southern Hemisphere with over two kilometers of ice above our heads here in Sweden an ice extending as far south as Berlin. This is an equilibrium state as it is not only lower solar radiation that keeps earth in an ice age. It is also the feedbacks caused by ice. As the ice sheets grow earth gets whiter, which means that more more incoming heat from the sun is reflected back to space more ice means it gets colder which means even more is and suddenly you have a self reinforcing mechanism. This is what makes an ice age and equilibrium earth remains. They're not only because of the external forces from the sun but also thanks to these inbuilt biophysical processes in this case, the color of ice. Earth can also be in an interglacial an intermediate state, which is what we have today where was still have permanent is sites at the polls and we have glaciers on land and the biosphere with forests, grasslands, and lakes roughly as Earth as we know it. It is these two equilibrium states and only these two states that the planet has been over the last three million years that is during the entire Pleistocene. But then there is a third state when earth tips over from self cooling feedback loops to self heating feedback loops, which leads to an inevitable journey to becoming a hot tropical planet that is four, five, six, potentially seven, eight degrees warmer than today where in principle, all the ice has gone and the surface of the ocean is more than fifty meters higher than it is today and where the conditions for live is fundamentally different all over the entire planet. This is what we call hothouse earth. Or Highs Zaid hot time in German where the article when we published it drew so much attention doing this burning heat wave in the summer of twenty eighteen that highs Zaid was chosen as the word of the year in Germany. In this research, we tried for the first time to identify the global mean temperature at which we are in danger of tipping over from our current state, the Holocene interglacial, and embarking on a journey that would inevitably take us to highlight our conclusion is that we cannot exclude that the planetary threshold. The tipping point where we kickoff unstoppable processes of self amplified warming is at two degrees. Bear in mind we are today at one point one very mind were moving fast along a path that reaches one point five in potentially only twenty, thirty years and two degrees in forty fifty years. This is one I would argue of the biggest. Challenges of all to test whether we are right. Can the planet cope with or Canet not cope with higher temperatures than two degrees? But. My conclusion based on the knowledge we have today is that the planetary threshold to avoid triggering high Zaid is most likely at two degrees. Of course, it's not so that Earth will fall off a cliff at two degrees. The risk is rather that we would then pass a threshold where the shift towards hindsight would become unstoppable. In other words, we face an urgency at the timeframe whether we pushed the on button on not triggering stoppable warming is within the next few decades meaning essentially. Now, if we pressed the UNBUTTON and kick off the great planetary machinery with feedback loops causing self warming, then the full impacts may play out over three four, five, hundred years before we reach a new equilibrium state hothouse. A planet with over ten meters, sea level rise temperatures, and extreme droughts, floods, and heatwaves making large parts of earth uninhabitable a planet we do not want a planet that cannot support US humans. This requires from us that we understand two different time horizons. The short term time of commitment. When do we push the unbutton but then also the long term time horizon when we have the full impact hitting on people these are different but ethically, I would argue only the trigger moment counts, we cannot leave a damaged planet beyond repair to future generations. So to summarize the decisive moment when we press don't press the button lies within the next ten to twenty years. With consequences for all future generations a moral, bum. Are High site article concluded that degree Celsius is our ultimate planetary threshold that we need to stay away from. This article actually came out six months before our climate modeling showed that we've never exceeded two degrees throughout the whole pleistocene, the last three million years. In Two thousand nine, our planetary boundaries size showed that one point five degrees is a boundary we should not transgress because then we enter a danger zone of uncertainty. So perhaps you do understand my feeling a deep concern of humility in the face of our latest scientific findings, which really only says, one thing tipping points are real and if they're crossed, they lead to unstoppable changes, which requires a new relationship between us and our planet, and that we realize that we are facing a new ethics. What we do today will determine the future on earth for all our children and their children.

Zaid Sweden Potsdam Institute For Climate Assad Physicist Holocene Europe Gustav Vikings United States Canet Southern Hemisphere Germany Berlin
Tantra for High Performance with Victoria Redbard

Entrepreneur on FIRE

05:46 min | 10 months ago

Tantra for High Performance with Victoria Redbard

"As I mentioned in the introduction will be talking about entre for high performance and my pronouncing that correctly Victoria is tawny tra-. Yeah. I like the way act and you sound with your accent. Very. Cool. We're GonNa Fun Conversation Today and I WanNa Know What this New Paradigm leadership looks like. So break it down for us. What does that mean the New Paradigm leadership and what does it look like? It's the kind of a change in the economy know it's like A. With, things have been in this overpowered I'm it's. Like building fair and kind of creating from that place stress on I think that this new pattern is coming through is just like this place of abundance in giving and Really. Comes in where we are in this place of like the love with ourselves and connection to to every pot about like no pot of us get left behind and when we create from that place like awareness that flow site from the expansion of a renewed like organic state is so much that can. Change the way that you know everything that the ripple effect on from there is huge. Do want to really dive into this mentality about abundance versus scarcity because let's be honest. You know twenty thirty years ago. There is some reason as some understanding why people had this scarcity mindset we all like lived in these small towns spread out across the world and it was like well, Hey, if like I opened a car dealership next to the other car dealership like. Like if I sell a car that means he or she's not selling your car like this mindset of scarcity was pretty prevalent in the world, and then of course, the Internet came in changed everything. Now, we just have this opportunity for abundance because there's so many pieces of Pie. In fact, you know there's like all this abundant pieces of the pie for everybody in every niche and that's why I. Love talking to people who are really carved out these specific cool niches in their life and they're able to have an abundance mindset around that. So I really love the world the we've evolved into and I. Want to dive more into this as we kind of have this conversation. But let's go to get into how tantric practices can actually change the way you lead your company like how can we apply? Your expertise in tantric practices for fire nation leading their businesses entrepreneurs love that that she something that I'm really exploring right now I feel like the the major pace of Light Hal i. do things a little differently is like really by trusting in like the energy of Aeros United States like these energy in our body it's like this life force energy is always there and I feel like we get to have a choice with it and I think most the time when people think about our energy like there's like a fear of it you know it's like arousal it's Yet it's kind of like this overriding energy and I think that when we start to gain mosque with, it actually allows us to kind of build on that plane abundance that we just spoke. Oh, so it's likely coming back to that baseline of life thought we come from sex we come from this vibration that is a much deeper than the polarity that that is built around. And often even the way that most people having sex in the world right now is from this place of like not wanting to feel their emotions and wanting to just jump like away from any kind of feeling to do the job. And I feel that. This is really about you know building from. mcclay solves. expansive energy I think one of the reasons why people are so fearful of their Kenji because it is expensive in if we think about like. Times that we felt contracted triggered or. Via and we make decisions in our business from that place. It always kind of leads to like a string on effect of war things going wrong in the business more problems to kind of do with because we've made these decisions were placed feel or as I feel like when we come into this bicycle arousal this kind of. Energy that's actually naturally pumping body and we're not leaving any mess behind. It's someone's like we get into this state so. In the big difference in May when people masturbate pleasure and they kind of just rushing with disco to get little Gaza. Pushing possible without of their emotional body to. His goal so they can have a stress relief. On. The other side of that is when we actually like slowly build the energy in the body and allow the parts of is that have been behind that day possible is it might be vulnerable must. Micro survival scarcity that she kinda come back to ourselves really like a rise from that play when people go into that kind of orgasmic state from the is this You know it's like I would connect into that dot oneness feeling that. Feeling of unity with everything and they're not operating that place of scarcity competition or any of those places, and that locked the non-effective that flows that comes into. Everyday life into your business is huge and he started light bring that every single moment of my life in the way that I describe I'm seth pleasure is to conduct like be with the body in in every moment rather than actually just like going into my body and I'm going to have an orgasm I'm GonNa Pleasure I'm GonNa have arousal right now it's like as she would've out of my body want to be with me. And so it's one of listening to the body and I feel like we saw to do that in a business. Then when not going to be stuck in these making decisions from fear spies or you know thinking like we need to compete against others, we kinda going to be disconnected your essence and entrust for that and You know trust that we're actually really supported moving from that place. I think that's rijn if like everybody was was making business decisions from that kind of expansive flow state when I'm influence, I have the experience like now all my decisions Econo- the right decision is a con. Get it wrong when I'm in

Victoria United States Kenji
Should You Offer a Lifetime Deal?

The $100 MBA Show

06:05 min | 11 months ago

Should You Offer a Lifetime Deal?

"WanNa. Start today's than by explaining why businesses consider offering lifetime deals. The bottom line is, is that lifetime he is often generate a large lump sum of revenue of cash. It's a cash grab really they might partner with a deal signed with large affiliates or they offer it to their list, and because such an incredible deal, it's a lifetime deal. They'll get lots of sales at the start people see this as a way. To Fund, their business at the star. So that's kind of the motivation behind lifetime deals outside of that. It also gives you new users, new customers, people to give you feedback the star and people that are invested. That's really the positives and and there's not really much outside of that. That's positive. Just being frank but for many people, that's a lot. You know making a lot of money at the start to fund the business. Can, really help them and really propel the business to avaiable full-time option for them and allow them to make some hires and scale quickly the issue is that most products and services have a running cost. So even if you say for example, sell a lifetime deal for a thousand dollars per customer yes. You'll earn a thousand dollars, but each customer will have a cost for each subsequent year to come. Agree. Thirty forty, fifty, sixty years for long as that person is alive right and some of us don't really do the math and that leads me to my I tip. You got to do the math. How much does it cost you per customer per year and a lot of people are like well, I sell my product it's course it's a forum it's something that really has a minimal cost on my end. And that's pretty much it. No you gotta dig deeper. You have cost Phantom costs that you're not counting like how much it cost you per customer for your web hosting to host your community to host your APP how much that cost on a monthly basis divided by the number of customers is cost more per customer. It's not a once in done kind of thing, the more traffic you have the more you have to pay what about customer support the more customers you have the more support staff you need the more time take from them you need. To factor that in, are there any other costs whether it's your time or money that's involved every time you have a customer, break it down because you might find out yes. This might be a very small amount per customer in it's worth to offer the lifetime deal but often more times than not when we do the math, you're like, wow, we start to break-even after five years and after five years we're losing money. Then after ten years, we're really losing money. So this really is a red flag that you can raise before you offer a lifetime deal. My next tip is you have to make sure that if you're going to offer a lifetime deal, you don't offer a deal or a plan or a product that they will not outgrow. The play of the lifetime deal is to give them something that is valuable, but is just to get them started. The point here is that get them onto your platform onto your product. And therefore get used to it. Love it enjoy it. But at some point, they're going to outgrow whether they need more contacts in your APP or the want to get access to more training. Basically, we're talking about here is you want to offer them the basic of basic plans. It's still valuable. It's still something that you would charge a monthly or annual basis for normally but. You, WanNa push them towards upgrading anytime. You're running a lifetime plan you should aim for seventy percent of the people that by will upgrade out of the lifetime plan. So lifetime is something that's basically temporary this takes a bit planning the six a bit of a branding and package INC when it comes to offering this lifetime deal so don't rush into a lifetime deal if. You're not ready. Make sure you're crafting the right one. So you know that people will be graduating to different plants off the lifetime. The third thing I want to mention is often in my experience lifetime customers in general, not all of them of course, but in general will tend to be difficult customers to deal with what you mean by that well, people that don't invest much. Will actually cost you more time and more headaches people that actually pay you a lot of money. They do the work that get the most out of it and they're professional they get it. They understand the onus is on them to make it happen. But those who pay the minimum and Gopher lifetime deals people that maybe don't really take action but they will complain about every little thing if they have the opportunity of course, I'm speaking in. Generalities of course, there are lifetime deal customers that are hard working that are serious about their business and they are great and they're not headaches. But if we're talking about a percentage or a majority of the users, higher paying customers are lower maintenance customers that's just the facts of business. So I want to give you some direct advice. If you do the math, you have a graduation plan a plan to get them to upgrade out a lifetime. And everything pans out and it's very, very minimal cost on you. Even if you stretch out of twenty thirty years of this customer being active, then go for the lifetime plan if not avoided if you can even if it means growing slower if you're still looking for that cash grab, my advice is limit the number of lifetime members whether it's one hundred or two hundred people Max and then you. Close it. This will create scarcity and it will also allow you to say, Hey, this is the amount of money I will get from this lifetime offer I can work with us the influx of cash I need, and from there you're only dealing with a minimal number of customers that are dealing with the lifetime planet you have to pay for for the longevity of your business in for their

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July Mailbag with Jason Moser

Motley Fool Answers

44:21 min | 11 months ago

July Mailbag with Jason Moser

"The. Multiple answers I'm out Southwick and I'm joined, is always by broke camp. Personal Finance expert here at the Motley Fool. Hey, BRO, well! Hello Alison. It's the July mailbag where we answer your questions and this month it's with the help of multiple analyst Jason Moser. Should you buy a house now? What is modern portfolio theory and also here Jason's thoughts on a lot of stocks all that and more on this week's episode of Molly fully answers. Jason thanks coming back. you know I mean i. told you you invite me. I'M GONNA. Be here every single time. Thanks for having me back. I mean we appreciate it because we know you're a busy man, and so we do appreciate that you carve out time for us in our little show, don't. Always always make time for those important people in my life rule number one make time for allison and Bro I love. It sounds like a good one to me. Everybody wins. All right well, I guess we should just get into it, so the first question comes from Darren I've subscribed to the full for over a year and I'm really pleased with the service. I would like to know your thoughts about my holdings in Shop Affi- I've bought several times over the last three years, and it's now over thirty five percent of my portfolio and I. Don't know if I should continue holding or trimmed down. What would you advise a good problem to have I was gonna say that exact same thing? That's a good problem have? In a very glad, you have subscribed to our services in your really pleased. That's that's what we aim to to do. We aim to please help you make money and so yeah. This is one of those situations that we will find ourselves in from time to time as investors. A nice problem to have but something you do need to address at some point because it is going to be a little bit different for everybody. In so coming from the perspective of I, also own shop, a Fi stock in it's it's a wonderful investment. It certainly is taking up a bigger. Part of my portfolio a not at thirty five percent where you are. I think for me. It really does boil down to. That sleeping at night test in other words, you need to be able to go to sleep at night without worrying about this kind of stuff, and if you feel like shop, a Fi represents too much. Of your portfolio if you feel like you're overly allocated their, then, you may need to consider pulling it back a little, but now I mean it's. It's I think it's always important. Note you know. It's a big difference between building up a position buying a position to make this size to make this type of allocation in your portfolio. It's another thing entirely to have position grow into beat into becoming that size i. mean that that is that is in a little bit of a different dynamic there, so people all the different ways, some sometimes folks will, they will just sort of looking at it from the house money, concept or you. You just sell enough shares to recoup your initial investment, and then you let the rest of it go. Some people are perfectly fine with thirty five percent. Some people are not. They want a pair back so i. do think you need to kind of figure out what helps you sleep at night I do think that shop by a great business. I think the biggest risk in only shop, if I right now is valuation, just because it's dominating, it's space, but it's not making any money yet, and it's probably going to be a little while until they do so that valuation risk is there, but ultimately yeah I think determine. Where you feel most comfortable with it, and if you feel like you need to put a little bit of that money off the table, and he thirty five percents a lot, certainly very understandable. If they've said something you need to do if you do decide to pair it back a little bit. You've made multiple purchases, so you can identify the shares to sell to manage the tax consequence if this isn't a brokerage account and not an IRA. All right next question comes from Steven. If you are forced into unemployment, you are paying federal income taxes on unemployment payments are not contributing to social security nor to Medicare. How does this affect your future calculation of social security benefits and can one contribute to the social security fund during unemployment to mitigate any adverse effects on benefits, it is a little bit adding insult to injury, but you do owe federal income taxes on your unemployment benefits, and if your state charges has a state income tax, you probably have to pay state tax on that, although there are a handful of states that exempt unemployment benefits, so that's good news. And by the way you, you could have taxes withheld from your unemployment benefits you file. This form called form w four V. if you want, they withhold ten percent, or you can do quarterly estimated payments if you wanNA avoid that big tax bill at the end of the year, but if you're strapped for cash is probably just better to get the money now worried about your taxes later Eh. Stephen notes out. You do not pay payroll taxes. Those are the things that go into social security and Medicare so. So. It could result in a lower social security benefit, however, keep in mind that social security is based on your thirty five highest earning years, so if you enter the workforce at say twenty two and you work until you're mid to late sixties. That's more than forty years where the working so hopefully. If you miss out, if this year is not so good somewhere among those other forty, five or so years, you've had thirty five really good year so that this year won't be that big of a deal. So it probably will be okay. And then to address the last question. Unfortunately, no, you cannot make voluntary contributions to social security. There is at least one academic working paper out there. That suggested that people could buy into social security by like extra credits as opposed to contributing to your 401k, but so far that has not been passed by Congress I had an ex. Question comes from Sam. I heard to stocks discussed on another full podcast. When I read articles about them, it mentions they are thinly traded. I have two questions one I'm sure my position would still be quite small so I think I'd still be able to get in and out, but are there other things I should think about when it's a thinly traded stock and question number two. Is there a certain amount of? Daily volume you like to look for when considering a stock foreign investment. What volume do you want to see to not be? Quote thinly traded stock. Yes very good question in thinly traded stock just refers to the either the amount of shares or the dollar volume of shares that would trade on any given. Market Day and so. The. Thinly traded stock. The the problem is that you may not necessarily able to buy and or sell at the prices. You necessarily think you might be able to in other words when you look at a stock's price and you're looking through the. What what's going on throughout the day on the market, you'll see that did ask spread, which is essentially the bid. Ask spread is it's what someone's willing to pay for the stock versus what someone is asking to be paid for the stock? Because you know you have a buyer and a seller on on in every transaction they're. Normally most cases, these business business bread is very tiny, the couple of pennies maybe for most stocks because they're. They're heavily traded right there. There are plenty of dollar volume. But there are a lot of smaller companies small caps in particular in in you know a micro cap, specifically that don't necessarily meet these kinds of thresholds, and so you definitely have to be aware of that now I'll go back in time just a little bit, too. When we were running the service here at the fool called million dollar portfolios Roman Romani portfolio that we help manage members, and it was never really a problem, but we did have a condition in there. We were always looking for at least ten million dollars in average. Trading volume total daily volume now understand I'm not saying the number of shares saying the amount of money so basically shares times price, but we're always looking for at least ten million dollars. That wasn't set in stone it. It was an idea for us. It wasn't ever really a problem because we had a very diversified portfolio with a number of different types of companies, but when you're looking for smaller companies, you would've just keep that in mind that did ask. Spread is is something that just because it says the stock is twenty dollars. That doesn't necessarily mean you'll pay twenty dollars if there is a a big spread there between the bid, and the ask in so I think whenever you're considering stocks that have any lighter trading volume or thinly traded stock. Just be sure to use limit orders. Limit Orders of let us stipulate the price that you are willing to pay for or that you're willing to. To accept a if you're selling a limit, order is just a really good way to protect yourself from any unwanted surprise thinly traded stocks. You might not always necessarily get them when you want them, so you might have to lead that limited are in there for a little while, but but a limit order is a great way to protect you from any unwanted surprises. Next question comes from Randall. I'm in my late thirties now, but earlier in my life. I was very very bad with my money. Collection Calls Welfare and bankruptcy or not strangers to me. I've been at the bottom then I met the love of my life, and she convinced me to turn things around ten, and a half years later and I have done a complete one eighty, I took control of our finances rebuilt my credit and started investing and listening to all you find folks all. I opened it investing account with the goal of saving and building enough a down payment on a home. I'm happy to say we've now reached that goal. I recently sold at a profit because I didn't want that. Money tied up in the market. If we are close to needing it for a house, but now that we're here, I'm not sure what to do. We currently rent a basement apartment and our neighbors general living situation are less than ideal to put it mildly. So, we're champing at the bit to jump into the housing market that being said the experts have been calling for a drop in the housing market for a while, and that was before the pandemic hit now I'm worried that if we buy right away a year or two or three from now, interest rates will spike, and we could be put in a difficult situation. I live near Toronto. Canada or the housing market is already highly inflated in relation to the rest of the country should I be worried? While Randall first of all congrats on turning your financial life around love hearing success stories like that so good job on that. So I'll start with my standard answer with the rent versus buy decision, and that is just pull up spreadsheet and compare the all in cost of renting, including what you could earn on the money that use for down payment versus the all in cost of buying including the opportunity cost of putting down payment as opposed to having invested as well as insurance and taxes and maintenance, and all that stuff and project, where you might be in five to ten years based on various scenarios on what happens to stocks, if you. Rent an invest the down payment versus what happens to? What you'd look like depending on where home prices go. Generally speaking. If mortgage rates go up, that could way down on real estate prices we did see mortgage rates. Go Up for a bit a few years ago, but the housing market did find, but you could certainly envision a scenario where rates went much much higher, making houses, much less affordable and prices would have to adjust. But I don't expect that to happen anytime soon. I think we're. GonNa have low rates for awhile, but beyond that I don't know I've given up trying to predict where interest rates are going or even paying attention to people who try to predict where interest rates are going, so who knows? That said since you live in Canada. I thought I'd check. In where rates are these days and I and I got a brief reminder that things are actually different in Canada so I did a little bit of research. And then realize I had reach out to someone who knows, I reached out to Canadian Motley fool analysts Jim Gillies, and he had some thoughts so first of all just for you non-canadians out there. It is really different so in America. We get this thirty year mortgage than we have the same payment for thirty years. It's fixed. They don't have that in Canada. What's the most common is a twenty five year? But only the first few years or fixed. And then adjusts so in that context you can understand why Randall is worried about interest rates going up because over the next depending on which alone he gets the most popular is a five year fixed, and then you basically have to go get a new loan probably. So that put that in context, a little more, but also Toronto, really is crazy expensive. Vs from the end of last year that put it as the most overvalued real estate market in the world behind Munich. As Jim pointed out in our call here in the US we had our housing peak in two, thousand, six, two, thousand seven, and then we had what he called a reset, which is basically prices came down significantly candidate and have that slight downturn at home prices, but then they just kept on going up, so it really is different there, so when Jim explain all this to me, the difference in mortgages and the difference in home prices. Frankly he was inclined to say to this guy. You Might WanNa rent for while more and see what happens, but he also had the good advice of okay. What if you buy in prices? Come Down Fifteen percent twenty percent. What if they come down to a point where he upside down? You owe more than the home is worth. Are you okay with that? If. You're okay with that. Maybe it's okay to do that. But it certainly sounds like dicey situation than if someone were telling me like I'm thinking of do this in Dubuque Iowa or something like that. couple of other differences. In case you're curious about Canada in the US. Your mortgage is portable in Canada south. You Buy A. Get the five year mortgage, but then move get to take the mortgage with you for the next house and interest is not tax deductible. US Look at you, Robert, broke? Camp Can Canadian real estate experts there you go. Next! Question comes from Chris. I was on twitter the other day and saw that one of your contributors Brian Feroldi tweeted that he doesn't believe in a long list of technical trading terms and then modern portfolio theory. Can you help me understand what not believing an MP? T with mean this? He believed that diversification doesn't reduce risk. Also every financial adviser I've ever talked to his preached empty, so I would love to hear the counterargument. Jason you're not Brian for all the. Question I am not Brian for all the do get the talk of Brian Pretty good bit though. I I must admit I. Don't know what he said here in regard to modern portfolio theory and all of these technical trading arms. But I think I can take a guess. Generally speaking I agree with them, and I think you could sit there and look up the portfolio theory in you know read about it as much as you want. Just go to google modern portfolio theory, and you can dig right in there, but in a nutshell ultimately, what modern portfolio theory is the intention behind it? It's meant to reduce risk while maximizing returns. It assumes that investors don't like risk. They prefer less risky portfolios to riskier ones in order to achieve a certain level of return so right there. I kind of kind of lost me right there because I don't believe that every ever investors risk averse I think some investors have a very. Healthy, appetite for risk, and frankly I would say I got a pretty high tolerance for risk when it comes to investing, made it just because of what I do for a living but I. You know to me I like having that trade off least unhappy. Happy to take some risks there. If I feel like that upside, it's going to be potentially worth. So with modern portfolio theory, it introduces a lot of fancy math in the form of variances and correlations in order to come up with this. Quantifiable, investing strategy that ultimately helps reduce risk while allowing the investor to achieve. Certain returns in. Maybe it works for some not I'm not dismissing it personally I. Don't use it, I don't personally subscribe to it I. Don't need it. I think honestly for us. In a really believe it's extends to to most people in our full universe is that is individual investors I think a more meaningful way to reduce risk. is to just extend your timeline like invest longer. So like Tom Gardner said a number of years back when we were. Working on Motley, fool one basically take your take the time line that you think you want to own any individual stocks you buy shares of starbucks and I plan on owning it for you know five years. Okay, we'll just double it. Cloning it for ten in all of a sudden right there. You've given yourself more time. Time is one of the big advantages we have is individual investors. Money managers don't have that advantage, Wall Street done generally handed abandoned, either, but if you can be patient and just invest in good businesses. That risk really starts to come down over time. There are plenty of studies out there. That show that risk comes down the longer you hold onto those stocks, which into me, just renders modern portfolio, theory, more or less not useful mean on things, not useful for everybody, but it's not useful for me and based on Chris. Question It sounds like a agree with what Brian was saying there. We think I'll add to. That is I agree that risk is really not that much of a consideration if you are saving for retirement. But once you are in retirement man, and just say like you know what the market's not I'm going to extend my time highs in ten years. Because you need to spend money in that situation, I think diversification is important. It's important to have assets that don't always move the same direction at the same time. For some fools. That's just as simple as keeping any money need the next five years in cash, so you're right out any ups and downs, and that can be fine. But I. do think it makes sense to have. A mix of investment so that right now, technology stocks are doing very well, and we hope that continues to do well, but we remember was that happened in two thousand from two thousand to two, and there were down for quite a while anyone who retired in one, thousand, nine, hundred nine, or so it was very happy to have some small caps value maybe a. A little international, some reits to ride out the storm Yeah I think we talk about that often like recognizing where you are as an investor in life, are you in the grow your wealth stage, or are you in the protector stage, because they are two very different strategies, and we're all hopefully going to be in both of them at one point or another right? I personally and still on the grow your wealth stage I. Think we all probably are, but you will at some point get to where you need to focus on protecting the wealth that you've made so that you can then have that money to spend, and that definitely will dictate your investment strategy things that you're invested in and whatnot. Generally speaking I do like the idea for people who are just risk averse and have this notion that investing is just too risky. I mean the fact of the matter is not investing as far away greater risk like not investing. You will never grow your money if you don't the best, so if if if risk is a problem, I think generally speaking. Along the lines of diversification idea that that bros. talking about him, he just invest in invest in SNP index fund is something that just follows the progress and p. you know you're going to be participating in and if you look at that over the over the stretch of time, their five ten twenty thirty years, I mean that trend does go one way. It, but clearly the older you get, the more you need to start focusing on protecting your wealth, and that will change the way you view things. Right next question comes from Alex from Alexandria if I buy Muny bonds from another state in my IRA. Is it still taxable and Alexander with who we have a bond on and we do have a bunch. I know Alex up super excited about having a bunch on in Alexandria to I can't believe I haven't been there. It's like two miles from my house, but we still haven't been oh i. know because there's a global pandemic going on and we. saw. Alyx if we buy me bonds from another state in my IRA is still taxable. Bro, help him out or her or so Muny Barnes. People Invest Immunity bonds because they're free of federal taxes and in many cases. If you're buying bonds issued by the place you live, they might be free of state and local taxes, so that can be doubly triply tax free. That's why people buy 'em. There are some times, however that if you own immune, abound outside of an IRA. Pay Taxes and this surprises some people. There's something called the minimum tax. If you buy immunity bond at a discount, and then it matures at par. If you buy a distress, Muny bond for like you put an eight thousand dollars, and you sell it later for ten thousand dollars as a capital gain. You'll be taxed on that. So, there are some times when you would pay taxes on media. Now, Alex is asking what if it's an IRA? Do I have to worry about paying tax interest. If it comes from another state and the answer is no, you won't have to worry about that. The only thing I would say is. Generally speaking immune bond already has built in tax advantages, so you wouldn't keep it in an IRA, unless there's the example of the stuff I was saying previously like for. It's one of those exceptions when him UNIBOND would result in taxes than you might WanNa keep it an IRA, but generally speaking. If you're going to buy Muny Bond, keep it out of an IRA. Next question comes from Boone. I just did my first. Roth conversion and looked at that old account for the first time in. There was the expected dividend producing fund I remembered, but there was a stock chesapeake energy that I had completely forgotten about since I purchased the stock in two thousand, six fifteen. It's down way down like eight point five percent off the purchase price. What should I do with it now? It's in a tax deferred accounts so I. Don't think the loss is realized until I. Start to pull money out of the account and that might not. Not Be for fifteen years current value of all my shares will be about one percent of the value of the account after the conversion. Do I sell in the very little value? I had left and depend on E. Trade to keep up with lost for me or should I hold on based on the slim chance. The stock will be worth more in the next ten years. Oil Stocks do act unusually on occasion, only oil stocks. Stock everything else makes that usually. Chesapeake has been really. Interesting Story to follow and frankly. I don't I. Don't know that I would look at it today. As a business that I'd WANNA own so typically if I. You know I think it was yet idea. Didn't sound like a position are actively building united investment didn't work out. I mean that that happens to all of us. We don't get them all right. We have a philosophy here at the full. A lot of do we like to? Water flowers and pull the weeds, and that's just a nice way of saying. Add to our winners in to get rid of losers in. This I think is more than likely slated to continue being a loser I mean. Chesapeake has lost a lot of value. In it does sound like based on when you purchased this, these is absolutely busted I mean. There there are all sorts of reasons to sell one of them is if you thesis busted and the reason why you invest in the company is is no longer the case, and I would he probably is the case with Chesapeake so to me like you know, you could sit there and let it go, but but what's the goal trying to get back to even, or are you trying to get back a couple of bucks for me a lot of times? I'll I'll take a little opportunity here and there to just go ahead and pull those weeds sell it. Be Done with it. In even though it's just unique out a little bit value there, you can still take that money and do something more productive with it. So. Yeah T to me. I can't tell you to buy or sell obviously, but I can certainly understand. Selling in this case, but I you know. As as oil and natural gas energy can can turn around. This is going to be one that has a lot of headwinds in in. You might be waiting a very long time to to get any of this money back. I point out here that I it seems that maybe boone has a slight misunderstanding of how taxes in aries work because he talked about realizing the loss when he takes the money out and trade keeping track of the loss for him, it sounds to me that he thinks that he can write the loss off whence he takes the money out. That may not be the case, but just to be clear. One of the great benefits of an IRA is you don't pay taxes on the gains, interest and dividends from year to year. But. One of the drawbacks is. You can't take a capital loss on that as well so there's really no no way to benefit on your tax return from this loss. Next question comes from Benjamin. You recommend seeing a fee. Only financial adviser for check in every so often I know there is the Garrett planning network and others to help find an advisor. But what questions do you ask? And what answers do you listen for when trying to find one that is worth his or her one hundred fifty to two hundred fifty per hour. So I would say start first with asking yourself some questions. What are you looking for? You could go for the whole launch. Lada where someone is managing your money analyzing retirement plan helping new save and a five twenty nine. Maybe even doing your taxes with some financial planners do help with the state planning, or are you looking for something more targeted? You just want advice about am I saving enough for retirement, or are you close to retirement? You're like I just WanNa make sure that I'm doing right when terms like choosing my Medicare plan and claiming social security at the right time, so first of all just be very clear of what you're looking for. Then if it involves investments in any way, you WanNa, make sure that you find someone who is at least in the general same area philosophically and I say this, because many financial planners are hardcore index. And if you come to them as a motley fool, listener member with a lot of individual stocks. They may say okay. I'll give you some general asset allocation guidance, or they'll say I don't care if you like to pick. Stocks are not my advises, sell the stocks and go to index funds, so you want to make sure that if you're gonNA, ask for any sort of investment. Advice that you wanna find someone who's someone somewhat at least aligned for what you're looking for. Once, you've got that then. Just asked some of the typical stuff. You might expect so credentials certified financial planner. Are they a CPA either their personal financial specialist. How long they've been in the business. There are lots of people who. have not been in the business very long. Even though they're not young people, a lot of people choose financial planning as a second career, which I think is great, but just because someone may be look like they're in their forties or fifties. Sixties doesn't mean they've been in the business that long, and you WANNA. See if they've worked with someone like you right so if you have. Maybe. You have a large amount of wealth large income huge portfolio. You WanNa make sure that they have experienced with dealing with those issues, but on the flip side to if if you have, are you know middle income, decent size portfolio, but nothing too complicated. You don't WanNa. Go to someone who's used to dealing with someone who's wealthier partially because those people charge a lot more. You want to find someone who's kind of a little more lined up with what you're doing. Then make appointments with three folks. All of them will do get do free. Get acquainted means, and you're just looking for someone who you feel comfortable with. Since, you mentioned Garrett Big Fan of the Gary Planning Network and other is is not for the National Association of Personal Financial Advisers. But Garrett on their website has a how to choose an adviser section. Just Google attitude visor Garrett Planet Network has a great chapter from a dummies book that they wrote about how to choose adviser, and they have a good questionnaire that you can print out in US asking lots of good questions of financial planner. It's tough. Choosing a financial planner like my mom just went through that Bro! Is You know and she didn't really have a lot of options in Boise Idaho. Maybe two and one of them, she I never called her back, and never got back her, and the other one was just so busy just so busy, and just she just never. It's it can be rough. Finding a financial planner can be I. Think what we'll see is one of the consequences of this. Of the coronavirus pandemic. Just, like we are all used to working from home, many financial advisors and financial planners an now working from home. So in what they're doing is they're becoming licensed in more states. So, if you are more comfortable, working with someone over zoom remotely I think you don't have to stick with someone in your area. You can go beyond your locations, but you know some people don't feel comfortable that if if they're going to have someone managing their life savings, they want to be able to meet them in person. That's just a personal choice. All right next question comes from twitter. Is that right from sully what I hear? Okay? I just listened to the episode mentioning Your Weakness Two. Shopping carts and Tj, Maxx that me or you Jason. Accused me. Thoughts on the stock. If I had a war on Amazon, basket would be Costco TJ maxx Home Depot tractor supply. What would be your basket against online retail? That's funny. Well okay, listen I wouldn't have basket against online retail, because online retails where it's at. The whole idea. The whole idea behind the basket approaches to find a long term trend that you feel like the world is headed toward and so the war on cash basket, for example that was always one about people using cash war, traffic payments now with that said I get the spirit of the question some going to answer it because I do like some of these ideas. And I I would definitely include Costco in their in Home Depot's well. Home Depot gets a lot of my money. Doesn't, but they have a very loyal fan base of customers that just are happy to renew year in year out. So I love those membership models there, so costco and a Home Depot for sure you know I'm going to give a little shout at my wife Robin I. Know that she would approve of my adding target to the mixer. She hasn't been raving about targets APP and ordering on the APP the able to go to the store. Just pick it up right there I've talked with Ron Gross on more than one occasion about target and how this really has. Become a twenty first century resale right they're doing. They're doing everything online and in physical stores. What they call Alma Channel and then my fourth and I'm GONNA. Take this. You probably aren't expecting this when Alison. I'm GonNa Shock and all you. I'm ready. I'm ready Alta. We're going. Make up my I know my daughter's love. It ugly ugly Mug like this. What do I know about makeup? Tell you what. Get! A House with two daughters and a wife. That's what I know about make. There's a lot of it in an Ulta is a really really good business. They actually have a very nice diversified revenue stream. They've got the salon a`dynamic of the business which encourages people to go there they do have an online business. They have an augmented reality function there at where you can actually like. Try things on makeup to see how it looks. Mary Dillon just a phenomenal other adults of that's my fourth, their Ulta but they I appreciate the spirit of the question I like the idea I'm not saying this is the basket. I'm not tracking this basket in a not a not backing this basket, but in the spirit of the question if I had to develop. A basket, such as this one I think it'd go with those four. Yeah, I mean I guess you just have to think about what retail out there is something that you would still physically go to. Because the actual retail experience is being in the space is the experience and what you're there for? And I know I mean before Corona virus we I would go to target and just just couldn't believe how much money I had spent from walking through a few of the aisles. TJ Max is just a phenomenal business I mean what they've done through the years. Is really capitalized on the nature of the business, the advantage they have in that treasure hunt kind of nature like you go to TJ Max, maybe not necessarily looking for something, and then you end up finding a lot of things, and it can be a little bit lumping at times, but but generally speaking like management's a very good job of running that business, and they know how to exploit the advantage of experience. I think they're online game. Though I think they could probably get something going with online, and they just have not have not yet and so I. Haven't since Corona Virus for example. I haven't spent a single dollar there, but I continue to still shop at. Home Depot I. Think Yeah! We still shopping at home depot because we're doing. You know you gotta buy lumber somewhere. And I know my grandparents out in my my inlaws out in rural Virginia. They love tractor supply store, but that's not. That's not in where we live, but. Still New deck at the house there allison. I mean you, can you see? A big exposed beam behind me and some drywall work that needs to happen. Have lots of drywall work that needs to happen now though. Yeah Anyway get to that. All right next question comes from Matthew. I got married to my amazing wife nine days ago in a small Kobe nineteen wedding in our front yard after we postponed it from its original date in April all. It was definitely different, but still very special. My question is in relation to this wonderful event. My salary has been at a level that has allowed me to fund a roth. Ira I love the optionality of it, but after marrying my bad ass, wife are combined. Salaries are now over the limit that would allow me to fund the Roth. IRA does this affect occur immediately? Do I need to now open up a traditional. IRA and begin funding it or do I have until the end of the year. Matthew wants a Roth Bachelor party one last. Well Matthew I have bad news. When it comes to most things in taxes, your status and your age and things like that depends on where you are on the last day of the year, said if you're married on the last day of the year, you were considered married for the whole year. So that means if you contributed started contributing to a Roth IRA for twenty twenty. You need to call up your brokerage. Firm and re characterize that as a traditional. Now don't have any other traditional IRA, as it's very easy to do the back door, Ross which we've talked about before you can just google it or even when you call the brokerage, just say I want to do the backdoor. Roth and they'll tell you what to do. If, you have other traditional IRA as you can still do. It just becomes more complicated and you'll probably pay more taxes. So you, but you may not be totally out of luck and I should say that's only if you have a traditional IRA doesn't matter if your wife has traditional areas. One exception by the way of of what I just said. In terms of tax status and last day of the year is distributions from retirement accounts before it's age fifty nine and a half, you actually have to be age fifty nine and a half to avoid that ten percent early distribution penalty, unless some of the many exceptions that are out there exist. Right next question comes from Warren Warren Buffett. Maybe I don't know that's why I was thinking. He's asking about coq, so maybe maybe. Once James Opinion on coke. By? Or hold? Wants to now. I'd give buffet night give. Kiesel Warren of the same advice and I would say. For some I'm not buying it. Not Buying it I'm not holding it if I own it. I guess that means sell it. Even Atlanta Georgia person like you i. feel like it's almost sacrilege. I am pretty close to probably not being ever even invited back. But the facts are the facts. Okay, I mean you do have to look at the stock itself has been ain't bad stockton for the last five years. I mean I do understand why when you look at it what they do, I mean they have. Four hundred master brands, and less than fifty percent of them are the big global brands that are actually responsible for almost all of their revenue when I say almost only ninety eight percent, so it's a business. It's very reliant on on. You know a small portfolio of really successful grants. The problem is now. We've always talked about cocoa beans such a great distribution story and that's true. They've got a distribution network. It's just phenomenal, but the problem is now. They're what they're distributing is is being seen as not so good for you in so you're seeing them. Have it into to essentially pivot away from what you know brought them all of the success for all these years. Years in soda and that that's not going to change I. Mean you're always GonNa have people to drink soda? People are not to drinking as much soda going forward in the numbers of just kind of the kind of shown that through that through the quarters in the years of Coca, Cola and Pepsi Pepsi. Has the salty snacks division, which I've always been very. Impressed by I, mean I love a good Cheeto, and so I mean anytime you can throw a bag of those cheetos in my Patriot Amok GonNa, turn it their coq. Interrupting, but I think this is also very important point. You tried the Jalapeno White Cheddar crunchy cheetos. The White Shit or so. I've tried to Jalapeno ones but I've not seen the white Cheddar White Cheddar Jalapeno crunchy cheetos. Don't get the puffy. The poofy ones are not as good, but the crunchy white Cheddar Jalapeno Cheetahs. them by them. They're amazing. I have to back. Pain you. I'll get those next time. I promise I, mean Eh. One. crunchy wants the puffy ones, so that people won't you're not? You're not seeing poopie. Who using poofy Joe Copy? We'll be Coca doesn't have that dynamic of their business. They don't have that dynamic to their business, and they've suffered from that Pepsi's Pepsi's outperform coca-cola over the last several years. It's not safe. Pepsi or coke get it back. I'm sure they probably can. But what I am saying is I think there are a lot of better ideas out there, and so I wouldn't be putting new money into Coca Cola and frankly if I did own it. I probably would look at selling it and you know if you've got a beverage company, maybe own starbucks. It seems like the science coming out in support of coffee, right? It's coming and telling you that these sodas. They're gonNA. Make you fat. Coffee, it could extend your life. It could help you live longer. SMART Mexican looking this a starbucks as well is. That sounds like study from the copy roasters of America. Do! Something that Chris Hill sent me the other day. that. We sleep at night. I'm glad I've been drinking coffee as long as I have God knows what I would look like otherwise. You're a good looking man. Rick. good-looking next question comes from. A. I'm trying to save money for my kid's College. Fund while the five nine is a great option. I'm limited to investing in mutual funds, which means at best I'm going to get what the market gets assuming I do some sort of low cost index fund and I be a capital F. Fool investor have been doing much better than the market in the last three years of being a member of. Of Stock Advisor Enroll breakers, even during this pandemic mess by listening to every full podcast and following David and Tom's and yours and every one else's in the full universe. My portfolio of about one hundred stocks is up here today. Thirty percent to the market's down five percent as of day as of today weighed down by three sluggish five to nine plants that are also down five percent each. I feel like throwing away money by using the five to nine, and not being allowed to select my own great companies in which to invest. What's more, my understanding is that the five to nine does not count as an asset for the kid when applying for student aid, but the coverdale does. So I come to you with a simple question. Can I have my cake and eat it, too? What if I wanted to use the coverdell to buy individual stocks? Until the child is nearing college? At which point I then converted to a five to nine. This allows me to get better returns and avoid it being an asset for financial aid and get the favorable tax benefit. So, chose this question, because first of all Dune does a good job explaining the benefits of the coverdell over the five twenty nine, you can buy individual stocks. You can buy and sell them all day long. We recommend that, but you can. Whereas with the five twenty nine, you can only make two changes to the investments a year, and it's all mutual funds. So. That's you did a good job of explaining that. I will point out with the coverdell. It's gotta low contribution limit of only two thousand dollars a year, so for some people save more for college, but they can max out to cover it out, but then put the rest in a five twenty nine. One thing that doomed does not have quite right. Is The financial aid treatment the financial aid treatment? Coverdale's and five twenty nine is identical. They're treated as assets of the parent, not the kid that is favourable from a financial aid perspective. It's not negligible doesn't mean it doesn't have any effect on financial aid, but it's better than an asset that is owned. By the kid. He can. Transfer money from the Coverdell to the five twenty nine. If for some reason, he decides to do that, but you can't transfer it. The other way around so were convinced to try out the covered. You have money in a five twenty nine. You can't move it from the five twenty nine. To the coverdale. What other interesting thing that he pointed out is that he is doing very well with his investments, and he owns about one hundred stocks. We get this question a lot. Either on the show, or on the full live that we run every day for members of full services, and that is how many stocks should I own, and if I owned too many are not just owning index fund watering down my returns, but here's an example if someone owns a one hundred stocks is still crushing the market. Idol last question comes from Cameron thoughts on the valuation of Stone Co in light of the corona virus for a fragile country like Brazil. This could be the tipping point after so many other headwinds. But how does that affect stone? coz Business Jason I. Don't even know what Stone Co is. What is still business? Yes, don't Coz a payments company that's focused on Latin American markets in Brazil and particular in so I guess it could be. Draw you can draw a parallel to to a with square through pay pal at, but generally speaking I mean it's payments. Company focused on Latin America. Primarily Brazil. Is the big money making market kind of like Marco Libra, they're. In I, I, it's a it's. A NEAT opportunity, gained a lot of headline recently, when and it was, it was seen that Berkshire hathaway. Warren Buffett's company Berkshire hathaway taken a five percent position in the company, which is pretty considerable i. Think in the near term. You have to acknowledge the fact that. They're gonNA, be some real headwinds in in Brazil particularly because of the pandemic I mean. The flip side of that is role in same boat kind of in that regard. The entire world is dealing with it, so it's not specifically you know it's. It's not particular to one economy or one country some. To get hit harder than others I, do feel like Brazil. Be at a place where they can recover from this given You know some of the other businesses in the area. I mean that that that I think is. Who knows ultimately how? That's GONNA shake, but generally speaking. I think the move away from cash towards cashless. Transactions in and financial software that's not stopping if anything, this hastens that which which is what I think, Cameron's talking about there and for a company like stone. Co, neither are other companies in the space pags bureau in roquetas libra to but you know moving money around is a big big market opportunity, and there's nothing that says they won't be able to expand well beyond the Latin American markets, too, so I I'd say cautiously optimistic I mean I

IRA Jason Moser Google Chris Hill Brian Feroldi Canada Starbucks Warren Warren Buffett Twitter Toronto Alison United States Muny Bond Brazil Alex
EVO 2020 was cancelled

Gaming Ride Home

07:17 min | 1 year ago

EVO 2020 was cancelled

"Yvo Twenty twenty has been canceled due to various sexual abuse allegations. Yvo Is the biggest annual fighting game tournament in the world, and even with the covid nineteen issues plaguing everyone on the planet. The tournament was soldiering on with plans to make it fully online. Earlier this week, however that all fell apart, and in order to learn more about it, I called on Imran Khan to explain everything Imron. Come into the gaming ride home show again for having me Yvo was canceled. And I just want you to give me the full story. What happened? Why was it canceled? Everything start from the beginning, so ego is the biggest fighting tournament in America Kinda the biggest in the world. There's like some discussion about that at this point, but ego is basically where fighting games have been aspiring to for the last twenty thirty years and listening started in the ninety S. This year, obviously because of covid kit have their usual Mandalay Bay Las Vegas big gathering of fighting game players. So this year they ended up canceling I place. Eve Online Eve online was a different thing where the. Mainly, got games together with like Netco like mortal Kombat eleven and them fighting her indie game that was originally based on my little pony, but basically it was A. It has to evolve brand that could stay around despite not being the big mass gathering tournament that they expect over the last couple of weeks. There's been a bigger. industry-wide movement to out sexual predators in gaming and the gaming industry, and some companies have been hit harder than that are with that bubis off for example, but for the most part it's. It's not a huge thing within the FTC. Because the FTC's always kind of had a reputation of like. Being a bit more open with their sexual harassment and it's always like. It's never been to a level of. A mass critical mass. Joey quilter this past week yesterday in for yesterday in fact was outed by a player. Named He's just does mikey. He goes online and is after the tag is crack. Peron but George Taylor. Who is the head of the current? President Vivo who founded it with Tommy Tony Kanaan. was outed for experiences when he was. Close, to twenty, where they were southern golf land, which is an amusement park in l. a.. That mikey accused him of basically. Paying money to young kids to take their shirts. Germany polls mikey related experience where he said quarter. Paid him twenty dollars to see his genitals inside a restroom and bought him pornography so. It's IT'S A. It's a larger thing that when you look at it from the perspective of not a child who just thinks they're having fun. It's real creepy, but what is conditions came out. Other people's Front, also coming out of the woodwork, saying like more finding old chaser people were talking about doing these things, but not naming names, and now that it's out. The floodgates are broken out. Yvonne immediately went. No, WE'RE GONNA put on administrative leave and check this out, so I mentioned Tom. Tony Kennedy before their more famous like they are obviously co-founders of ego, but there are more famous right now for being developers of Product L. at riot games so. They had to step in for this and go okay. We're looking at this right now. We're investigating and seeing what happens. It did not take very long before nether realm. I believe the first one like say. Are Involved with ego involvement in that sense means we don't WanNA game there. We're not going to earn any money towards prize pools. We're not doing any advertising which is fairly big deal. Arguably moral combat was like the lead game for that tournament. Right for the online tournament. Yes, Merle come at usually has a hard time with like the in person tournament. Fighting community hasn't really take to that game too well, but as an online net code game like for example, smash brothers was canceled for Eve online because the net code. Isn't that good, so this is more time to shine. The actual like really arguably was streetfighter as it is every year. This year. Are Not meeting her, but a little bit. After another canceled COP CANCELED IN ONCE CAPCOM cancels gets away from ego. Then that's that's the ballgame lets. Everything goes away soon after main sex developers of them biting heard who this is their big chance to become A. Kind of a household name and if I didn't need community, they cancelled. Bay Namco canceled and ran into that ego are the canons came out with a message from as ego saying? Hey, we were cutting for joy color. He is not president anymore. In the future, he will have zero involvement with the organization this not he's going to not be on. He's going to be on the board, or he'll be the FCC or he'll still kind of tournaments. They're cutting it off completely. Shortly after that they also that announced, we can't under these circumstances and this change in organization also do evil online in a couple of weeks in August. A month or in August? I. Know that screws over a lot of people, but. It seems like honestly the best. Call right now of. You'RE GONNA have to go through with work. That joy has done or you're going to have to. Try It's from scratch. Cobble together in event that takes at least a year to actually set up and try to get together in a couple of weeks. Yeah, I mean they just they basically. Got Rid of the boss in the most public way, possible right I mean it's it's you can't just like recover from that in a matter of weeks. Really Yeah, it's. It is one of those things of a lot of this is. Probably high time for the funding community insert reckoning with a lot of these things, because it's an issue for a number of years, it was I. I don't know if you recall but a about eight years ago, there was a street fight across capcom across Tekken. Show online, and it ended up ending as a result of some sexual harassment claims, and those a big divide in the community about like whether sexual harassment was a just a part of the culture or not and. Stuff like this doesn't help that argument. No I mean I like you, said earlier I mean like. Feels like the right call to elevate it, and as disappointing as it is for Yvo to be cancelled like it's a big flag for like we need to address. This is if we're going to cancel this event because we need to look at ourselves internally and I think I. Mean Hope the hope is that they come out better on the other side. I mean it seems like this is one of those things where. I. Hesitate to say Covid kind of save them but. If. This were an actual in person things still at Mandalay Bay then they wouldn't be able to cancer that quickly an online tournament. Shuttered a lot more easily. The bigger question now is what happens next year.

Harassment Yvo Twenty Twenty YVO Mikey President Trump FTC Mandalay Bay Las Vegas Imran Khan Mandalay Bay America Joey Quilter Riot Games Netco Namco Germany Tony Kennedy Tommy Tony Kanaan. Yvonne
How to Dream BIG

The Daily Boost

04:36 min | 1 year ago

How to Dream BIG

"So dreaming big I'm a big time. Dreamer I have a lot of friends who are big time dreamers. I'm realistic dreamer but I. Just believe that. If you shoot for the stars, you end up getting a lot right even if you don't get to the store you want to go to. You'RE GONNA get a lot more? If you shoot for the stars then if you don't then if you play small, you don't fly small. You're board place mall. You're born. Play big. Let me. Ask You a question. Do you still dream? About what you're going to be when you grow up. It's funny as I've gotten older I've never stopped that I never have. I get more excited, the older I get, and I find myself years ago when I was a younger guy when I was in my twenties and stuff I would. I would talk to people in their seventies and eighties, and they would say I still feel like I'm eighteen. And I never got it, but as I got older decade after decade after decade. I get it now. But one thing I've also noticed a lot of people don't have the dreams that they used to have. They're afraid to have them. They've forgotten how to dream. I still do that I still wonder what's GonNa be when Scott grows up and I'll let you figure it out, but I'm having a good time doing what I'm doing right now. Those visions. Those type officials keep hopping around in your head. Think about it for just a minute. Do they miss a reason? They're in there. As I've said many times before. If these ideas pop into your head, you got a couple of choices you can go. Do something about it sometimes scary. You cannot do something about it sometimes scary, or you can sit there on the fence getting spinners in your ass worrying about the whole time, drive yourself crazy for the next ten fifteen twenty thirty years. I highly suggest you don't do that. I want you to take those ideas on your head. Look at them and acknowledge him as a yeah. This is Kinda cool. So. They're popping around your head I. Want You to? Think about this. One is your big awesome motivating mission. What's your big awesome motivating i? Call Them Damn too big awesome motivating mission. I have goals like that as well. What's driving you? Where do you WanNa, go think about it inside and I will tell you this. In with ninety nine I really truly is ninety nine percent. I'll get people on the phone with coaching calls. I talked to people on the phone a lot all week long. I'm talking to people on the phone all over the world. And I will tell you. Uh Question. I'll say so. What's in your head? What's going on what really want to do? What are your dreams? Which your big awesome motivating mission and the global? No. I so I know you don't know, but if you did, what would it be? And then they go POW for the next ten minutes. They told me exactly what it is, and then if they forget it gone and I said, did you hear what you just said? Did you hear all that stuff? That just came out of your mouth. Yeah. We're there come from. the, smile on their face, peers I can hear it on the phone or seat on the call. So you have asked that question these visions in your hand. These things you want to do when you grow up what's driving you? What's at big awesome motivating mission? Mine is to do what I do. The Best I could possibly do knowing full well that if I do it really really well. Other people get all excited they Scott I wanNA I. Want what you've got going on there I won't come. Hang on to you a little bit. I wouldn't suggest it because I move fast is going to be unpredictable. I can be a radic. Sometimes I like to sleep in late on Saturday stuff like that. You probably wouldn't like all that stuff, but. What drives you Bam. What Dreams Excite you? Give you a feeling a happiness. I know that Scott. I can't do it I have this idea. Somebody really excites me I. Just be so happy doing that, but I can't do it. Why not? Why not because it scares me? Bam sure it does anything bigger than you. You never done before. It's going to scare you. What excites you though? Scares excites at the same time. Have you ever noticed how close to feelings are. Somebody screaming Oh my God. They're screaming. Let me say here. I come to see the day. Underdog is here. You go there, and you find out somebody's laughing hysterically himself. I thought you were dying. Laughing Fund Yukos cracking up. He cracks me up when he says that stuff. What's cares what excites you? It's kind of the same in that. Oh my God think about that for a second. Get excited your goal and yet it feels like you're fearful Bam. What makes you smile? When you think about doing it. It's that simple. Makes, you smile, you say. If I could get myself to Bam. I know it's in their. My question is. Do you have the nerve to? Admit, what's in there? Take a few minutes and figure out which Bam is and stand up. Take a SIP repeat Yvonne going to get what you want. Because I'M GONNA. Come over to your house and Meka. That's the case. Okay, I am.

Scott BAM Yvonne
Travel to Bosnia

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

04:51 min | 1 year ago

Travel to Bosnia

"Welcome to the amateur traveler I'm your host Chris Christensen? Let's talk about Bosnia. I like to welcome to the show. Canaan Charter, which who is coming from Bosnia and his coming to us from highlander adventures dot, be and has come to talk to us about Bosnia Herzegovina. Canaan welcome to the show. Thank you very much happy to be here excellent and for people who can't find Bosnia and Herzegovina on a map. Where are we talking about? Well. Everyone knows how to find Italy. It's a big shoe ships country. You have a boot-shaped country, so just go to the right side across the Atlantic Sea and we are right there. Well and your neighbor of Croatia. Bosnia you know goes around like little crescent moon. knoll on the West and south, and then these we have Serbia and southeast Montenegro. I to address. You're interested in making sure that people understand that. If they remember news about Bosnia, they may be remembering news from twenty thirty years ago when Bosnia was going through. A, war that's done, and that's been done now for quite a long time there there are people who are out in the working world who don't remember that and it's a wonderful place to go I. Want to say that I was anxious to do this show because we haven't done a show on Bosnia for a long time. And since then I have been to the country and loved it. So why should someone go to Bosnia Herzegovina? Well, there is a lot of reasons depending what you're interested in now. Bosnia is very complex country, but extremely small size of Pennsylvania, but inside. You have so much for the adventure seekers. There are so many adventure opportunities from Whitewater. Rafting canyoning to paragliding hiking is spectacular, and then if you're into history, we say that we have much more history than we can handle. Different Than Empires were here. We like to say where the crossroads or that where the meeting between the East and the West. Culturally very complex country, and also religiously we have Muslims, we have the Orthodox Christians, and we have Catholics with three big groups. Of course there's the Jewish community here which has been here since they were thrown out of Spain after Kista, so for five hundred years, all of these make this crazy, crazy and beautiful mix that very interesting for foreigners to see because inside I will for example and. And in many other cities in Bosnia, you can pined mosque Docs Church Catholic, Church and a synagogue literally in two hundred meter radius, and it's been like that for five hundred years while inside I will because that's how will the city is? And all of a Bosnia and we're very proud of that architecturally very different from anything else you can find in Europe you're GonNa, find this mix of. Of European styles as well as the optimum styles and a lot of course, local Bosnian styles in all of that mixed together will like to say that we are a Bosnian pots. That's one dish that we have. It's cooked in a big pot with a lot of things, mixed sight, and that's Bosnia a lot of things mixed, and it works perfectly. An Indian taste is fantastic why you should. Should visit Bosnian well. Whatever you choose. You're GONNA love it. If you're into history too much of it, you're into nature. It's absolutely stunning. It's fantastic, magic Pennsylvania, and then put inside the Rockies Grand Canyon Inca trail at a lot of other things as well a bit of New Zealand as well. We just like seaside. We have twenty four kilometers of seaside, so that's one thing with them have. And then, of course, for actually learning history or getting certain messages, let's say about life about history. How people live together or how they don't like each other, because while we had a lot of wars, let's especially in the last two hundred years. There's a lot of lessons that you can learn in Boston. Let's say war tourism doctors is now very big part of tourism in in Bosnia so if you want to learn about that, we are definitely to come to see what happens. If you don't defeat fascism, like most of Europe defeated off the Second World War and it actually shows how life can be both good and the bat also if you want to visit a place. which is completely different than rest of the Europe and very relaxed very laid back with fantastic food, most at a lot of reasons I think.

Bosnia Herzegovina Europe Chris Christensen Canaan Charter Pennsylvania Croatia Herzegovina Mosque Docs Church Catholic Serbia Atlantic Sea Kista Southeast Montenegro Spain Italy Whitewater Boston Rockies Grand Canyon Inca New Zealand
"twenty thirty years" Discussed on The Meb Faber Show

The Meb Faber Show

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"twenty thirty years" Discussed on The Meb Faber Show

"Twenty thirty years and watch us grow the business, but big advantage to investors. It's a big advantage to us in terms of costs, and it just made sense. And now we're really early to the party one of the first to do this. And we have a lot of excitement. I must have had more than over doesn't business. Come to me, two billion dollar businesses that want to raise money doing this because of paying fees institutions, which will go and Sachs, and Morgan Stanley is a great companies brilliant. But at the end a lot that is generated just by being a middleman, right? Hey, we know a lot of people who are rich you're gonna offering. Okay here. You guys can meet pay me. Six percent. Even give me six percent shares. Outstanding whatever the deal is you've oid a lot of that. So was seeing record amount of STO's launch last quarter. It is nerve wracking because it's new to the market, which makes means what men means I can look like an idiot or genius. I don't know which. But it's something that would probably because we really raise money were excited. Now, our companies really growing our listeners growing in a good position. It's cool in terms of doing something original. And now the biggest thing going is acquitted. We wanna make sure t zero is going to wash they already launched a platform. Another company called open finance these are security compliant companies secure exchanges that we're going to be launching on. And that's going to increase as more companies come out, you're gonna see more and more volume and liquidity increase, and that's one of the risks is liquidity part. And right now, we see is probably gonna have pretty good liquid. If we get on these exchanges which when gauche eating with them right now. All right. Lot of questions in, you know, this is interesting personally for me as well because we did a private placement of few years ago. I think the only awesome is compete that I've ever known that if done a crowd fund raise again, also credited only where we raise about three million bucks. But did it through just kind of our audience also voided the banks because didn't want to charge people. For an extra five eight percent fee. Ten percent and some banks or carry which is what most of the online platforms will charge. But the hearing a lot of what you talk about. Today is interesting particularly liquidity part because talk to me little bit about what that probably means in reality. Is it kinda like these private brokerages like we've had equities in on and chairs post that do kind of late stage private for like Uber or lift before when public where they try to match up. How would the trading actually work? So let's say I invest in two years from now, Mike, all right? My investments doubled tripled gone down by half. Whatever it is. I want to be able to sell some what does that actually mean for those listening? It's not as easy obviously going on trade and just clicking sell. What does the market look like for the sort of structure? That's the goal. And for me. I wanted to make sure listen just like you. And you're going to your clients. I had a good film varies money. But it s just beginning for us. Right. My name's on the door. Wanna make sure like the liquidity par? What happens after this? How he goes to the? The market. So a great question. The goal of these exchanges is they want to become the trades and make it easier. So one of the things with the ICO market where you have an address safe you go on coin base..

Sachs ICO Morgan Stanley Mike Twenty thirty years five eight percent two billion dollar Six percent Ten percent six percent two years
"twenty thirty years" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

06:50 min | 2 years ago

"twenty thirty years" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"That's our goal. But most of you're aware we've had a volatile tumultuous fourth quarter of two thousand eighteen most things were up going into the fourth quarter. And now, basically everything is down. But what are the five things that you can be doing to take advantage right now of this volatility? Here's the first probably most important thing you need to do take a deep breath, maybe two or three the worst thing you can do is over-react out of emotion and make huge financial decisions. Because of something you read heard are feeling right now. So take a few deep breaths as a parent to five children. I'm reading this book right now, it's called the whole brainchild. Some of you may have read it, it's a really popular book. But it's written in a non boring way, which is sort of interesting because it's talking about the neuroscience of your child, basically what's going on in our children. Brain's when they're frustrated when they're upset when they're acting out because over the last twenty thirty years, and even in just the last decade alone, we have made tremendous strides in brain research. So we know a lot more today than we ever knew about what's actually happening inside of our children's brains, and as a parent, or as a grandparent, I mean for those of you that remember raising kids are in the thick of it right now, you know, that there's nothing really worse than when you act as a parent out of emotion. You say something you shouldn't react in a way that isn't really consistent with your values, but your emotional it was reactionary and in this book, the whole brain child, the author actually outlines this friend of his and any prefaced it by saying, hey, this friend of mine, by the way, who I got permission to tell the story about like this is a really good, dad. The key loves his kids. He super involved like this is a really good, man. But he told the story of they were at the neighborhood park. And they're younger child was swinging. And he was pushing that child in the swing and the older child who's about six or seven years old kept kind of trying to go in front of the swing like running back and forth in front of the. Swinging and the parent the dad said, hey, don't do that. Like, you're gonna get hit. You're going to hurt somebody. You're gonna hurt yourself or your sibling like don't do that. And of course, about a minute later runs in front of it. Right. As he's pushing the younger child in the swing and the younger child basically collides with the six year old who's running in front. There's this big collision. They're both crying and out of reaction. He goes are you stupid? What are you doing? I already told you not to do that. And I mean, there's other parents they're at the park, and it was almost like right as he said it he realized like oh my word. What did I just say and his heart sank key felt terrible. He doesn't think his child stupid. He loves his child. He knows they're just a kid. But in that moment, he just so emotional reacted out of emotion. And generally when we do those things I know for myself as a pair, any of you her parents like you can think of your kind of reactionary moments that you've had as a apparent and like you're not proud of him. But you've probably had. Them because you're a human like it happens, and as humans were really emotional and one of the problems with that is money's really emotional. And so when we have markets that are correcting and potentially going into a bear market, and we have all this trade war, and all these different things that the media sensationalizing like it becomes really hard not to react and up and Bismarck. We've had a unique situation up in Bismarck. Basically, what will happen and you'll see if you've been getting in your mailbox happens in Arizona too. But especially North Dakota, what will happen is when the markets. Get really volatile you'll start getting invited. If you're kind of a boomer age person, and you're listening to this or maybe even a little older you start getting these invitations for a steak dinner like come to this steak dinner thing, and this steak dinner is not educational. It's not to actually help you. From a fiduciary do a good job with your money because we run a lot of educational events. And they're not designed to sell anything. They are actually designed to help you understand the tax strategies and different things like that. We're passionate. But no, these steak dinners are done by insurance agents. Their whole goal is to play on your fear in your emotions right now in the fourth quarter of the year. And basically have you lock in losses sell everything at the bottom and put all of it into some insurance vehicle generally a fixed annuity, and I'm not making any claims about that are fixed nudity is good or bad. They can have a place in a portfolio case. So I'm not saying that annuities are horrible. But here's the deal. You gotta be really careful. Remember today? I'm talking about what are the five things. We can be doing to take advantage of the volatile markets and just to recap. If you're just joining me number one is don't react out of emotion. Take a deep breath. The last thing that you want to do is lock in all of your losses and make an emotional decision to tie up your money for ten or fifteen years, you need to be extremely careful of the insurance agent in your town, slinging a bunch of insurance when the market drops because what will happen is they wait. They literally wait until the market drops, the then know that you're emotional and they start firing off invitation. As fast as they can. So if you're being pitched some change in your strategy, which is let's get everything in this vehicle right now because the markets are volatile. Hey, you know, what the markets are already down fifteen twenty percent quarter. You're telling me you're going to wait until they're down fifteen or twenty percent, then sell your stuff. And then go move it into something else. You want to make sure that any of those changes are being done within the context of an entirely full comprehensive plan by a fiduciary who can offer you every single strategy. That's out there who's not making their mortgage payments to sling a bunch of insurance for high commissions. I have seen this all over. But especially up in North Dakota. I've been seeing these invites coming out of the woodwork be very very on guard and cautious. If you're all of a sudden being pitched, this safe thing just know they're playing on my emotions, I'm probably more vulnerable and more scared than I realized and should I be locking in losses. Should I be locking in after the worst quarter in eight years is that? At the time to be selling at the end of the worst quarter in eight years. And so my thinking is this if you are in this mindset right now, where you're saying I am questioning what I'm doing John. Like, my stuff is down. I don't know if I have too much risk. I'm really not certain that I am doing the right thing. I don't have a visible comprehensive plan that I can lean on. And I want to know what I can be doing because there are some incredible opportunities right now that didn't exist this summer before this correction. I mean, we see this keystone in our clients as a massive opportunity. I love that the market's down right now, and you go John what's wrong with you your revenues down a ton because we're a fee only RIA that gets paid on the value. The accounts were managing you're saying, John. Do you have a screw loose? Why do you like that the markets are down because you're making way less money? The I am, but there's some really great opportunities that we haven't had available for really the last eight or nine years because the market's been going up, and if you'd like to know, what those are you want to know, how do I take advantage of this downmarket reassess.

Bismarck North Dakota fiduciary John Arizona eight years fifteen twenty percent twenty thirty years twenty percent fifteen years seven years nine years six year
"twenty thirty years" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"twenty thirty years" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"Off the shelf. You know? It's right there off the shelf and iphones. Save us. So this this really good I phones into smartphones. Will save us twenty thirty years. Save us from what? But you know, just twenty thirty years. Right off the shelf. Right there in Macy's on on Friday right there with the sales addresses right there. It's right on the shelf just pull the technology of we could pull this out is very simple, but for the capitalist pigs. And and Trump particularly vodka whether emails vodka hadn't been emailing the way, she emails, and we'd be cutting carbon emissions by at least thirty percent right off the shelf. Go ahead. The reason we don't do it is because we are still confused blind shrouded with. Hey anger. Racism. Mommy issues. Even when I ramble. In absolute incoherence. I can always throw that word racism out there. And then all of a sudden, I get applause. I love that line. I've been practicing this all day. We're still confused blind shrouded with a hate anger racism, mommy issues. Otherwise, we'd be pulling right off the shelf our carbon emissions technologies and be able to cut them by thirty percent. Save the planet. And have the most magnificent global society that anybody's ever seen. But for Trump. In the white folk out there. We'd really be an advanced society. This guy. Such a clown such an idiot and everybody nobody says it nobody's allowed to say. It. I said it. I'll be right back. Take a trip back with this week's rock almanac. It's going on rock and roll lovers. Sandy west here to take you on a trip back to this week in rock and roll history. This week in one thousand nine hundred seventy the Partridge family started a three week run at number one on the US singles chart with. I think I love you. The song was featured.

Trump Macy Sandy west US Partridge twenty thirty years thirty percent three week
"twenty thirty years" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

04:15 min | 3 years ago

"twenty thirty years" Discussed on Venture Stories

"Professors in helping to motivate the interest. If you can look back to a machine learning, not twenty thirty years ago, I would say that the class sizes in universities around these topics quite smaller you could think about from like from Berkeley were I graduated is about like thirty people and over the years as as those technologies made their way towards industry and you can see now in your Google apple face. Spoke. Amazon's are all leveraging some this work from past researchers unim- students. It's very well motivated that they're supporting the universities in the research endeavors. In sudden eighties class sizes are also just growing. They're growing at these Berkeley, two, three or four hundred students, and a lot of academics are interested in developing new projects for a machine learning here. But I would say that this space is still in its in its infancy in terms of its application for Blockchain's today. And that's where I think contributing back will help to motivate very similar developments in the academic world and help to get more students involved in congress, computer security in researching distributed systems in these very fun topics. But one part is just getting exposure for the students, and then you're the parties to have them adopted us this. You mentioned earlier when you into little bit about cash works. Switching from our Susie Starks shore. That is short. So he cashes a protocol that was developed many years ago that basically uses a coin blockchain to provide anonymous payments. There's a few properties that passionated roles one is it's it's decentralized, so it works when you're given any type of ledger. Save, for example, bitcoin ledger. The second point is that it's, it's privacy, preserving. So you know anyone in this network can basically post a payment and they can post for anybody else without revealing themselves, but a receiver or the amount that protecting with. Lastly, it's also very efficient as this is using z face in arts in the good things about it is that verifying transaction, this case would be just like about a a kilobytes in size, and it would take only a few seconds to verify currently those those proofs for those private transactions that you create take about a minute to produce. But there will be a network upgrade coming in the fall called sapling and what this will enable. Basically proves that would tape only merely seconds to produce totally. Should we get into some of the other privacy preserving protocols, or is there more you save up? You're not prefers short? Yes. So actually, I guess I didn't touch on a stark so to speak. So yes. So there is also this new area of research that is coming out called Stark's. These are basically knowledge, scalable, transparent, arguments, knowledge in in what that jumble is basically providing. You are specific properties. One is a universality, so this is them can work for any types of computations such as long as you can represent that computation in some algebraic form. Secondly, it provides a property of transparency. So in all of the messages that are sent by the verifier are considered a very, very simple slow. Your dependencies are around things like graphic hash functions, and these things are very public in nature and easily verifiable by basically anyone in this case on a network. Additionally, you get skilled. And so what this means is that the prove vers scales in his case quasi linearly the number of cycles also Advair fire skills are very nicely. In this case up Polly logarithmically for the more technically minded audience members. And I think the last most interesting property of these systems is basically post quantum security with that means is that the cryptographic credited that underlie the security of this system are either the existence of things like, you know, collision resistant hash functions or just common access to certain random functions. And this is a very nice feature for going forward as more or systems are developed to basically do quantum computations than you have this risk of things like discrete log attacks, having out rhythms that can basically factor notaries down to their primes. Basically, we were trying to prevent these types of attacks in in the system..

Berkeley Susie Starks Amazon Google Polly logarithmically Blockchain apple Stark twenty thirty years
"twenty thirty years" Discussed on  News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

02:53 min | 3 years ago

"twenty thirty years" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Twenty thirty years that we could be facing a tipping point where we were pushing? The, earth into an ever increasing warming and that's exactly what we're talking about now What. Are you seeing is a possibility? To that the sun is? Heating up and it doesn't have to heat up by much to create all kinds of problems. Here but the opposite is happening we're at a solar minimum there have been scientists that. Have, been having dinner bets with. Each other about, whether we're going to going to a monitor minimum if we go into a modern minimum, the sun could decrease in its brightness that's the energy that it releases by approximately one percent that doesn't sound like much but he would be a cooling and that so. We are not we cannot in this instance blame the sun for anything. That is happening on earth what about. The solar system, though isn't it heating up to I've heard people kick around those sentences and I don't know the data that it's based on I think three or four years ago that somebody was. Saying that Mars was heating up well I've Never seen any data that would suggest that so I don't know where that. Came, from It's. It's unbelievable the, the I think. The biggest problem is going to be the water source once that goes everybody's in trouble he makes that final great point or sad point that what are people going to do that lose the, land by water and they go under land and they lose territory who takes them in, where do we go and that the future of the planet could be like Mad Max increasing number of fights over the little bit of resources that some areas will have other places they will. Be walls built to keep people out who are starving to? Death and all of, this what can we do to prevent this kind of. A future, there will be riots. There will be all kinds of mayhem out of. Control I mean we saw what happened just With Hurricane Katrina government was not able to. Handle the load, right exactly and. They fires of twenty eighteen if this is just the beginning and it gets worse and worse can you imagine what summer would be like for the west and what is going to happen so, many houses burned and if next year it's incrementally more and then the year after you, would think that all of this like the writing is on the.

Hurricane Katrina Twenty thirty years one percent four years
"twenty thirty years" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"twenty thirty years" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"Outlive my money and twenty thirty years not the next decade worried about. It's twenty and twenty five years were worried about and there are. Ways that, you can still have growth potential you can still be in the equity market you can still have the chance to, outpace inflation, while still protecting some principle the, big. Foundations endowments institutions have been doing this for. Years it just wasn't available to you and I is the, retail little guy that's a great. Last five years and it's just not widely known, and again We're not we're, not pitching a product or a company it's a it's. A strategy that anyone can implement you. Just need to expand, your investment toolbox sure and understand that these, things are available and you don't Mike and that's. Very very well said in that I think the key there is that the conversations. Should be had, right with your adviser I mean especially when you're reaching as? You say when when you're reaching that stage that distribution stage right with respect to the investing life cycle right it's definitely now you bring it up very well Mike and, that you know these strategies have been around for a long. Long time from an institutional standpoint right from. A pension management standpoint etcetera etcetera just not really there for the individual investor. Or I'll say this not really there in a sophisticated ultra. Sophisticated manner for the individual investor right yeah and then I don't wanna. Get too technical here but when you are entering retirement again that. Distribution phase That is, where you're at your most risk, and, brisk. Is if you have bad luck you're.

twenty thirty years twenty five years five years Mike
"twenty thirty years" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"twenty thirty years" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"To outlive my money and twenty thirty years not the next decade worried. About it's twenty and twenty five years worried about and there are ways. That you, can still have growth potential you can still. Be in the equity markets you can still have the chance to, outpace inflation while still protecting some principle the big, foundations endowments, institutions have been doing this for, years. It just wasn't available, to you and I. Is the retail little guy that's a great the last five, years and it's just not widely. Known and again we're not pitching a product or, a company It's a strategy. That anyone can implement you just need. To expand your investment, toolbox sure and understand that these things are, available and you don't Mike and that's very very. Well said in that I think the key there is that the conversations should be. Had right with your adviser I mean especially when you're reaching as you say? When when you're reaching that stage that that distribution stage right with respect to the investing, life cycle right it's definitely now you bring it up very well Mike and. That you know these strategies have been around for a long. Long time from an institutional standpoint right from. Pension management standpoint etcetera etcetera just not really there for the individual investor or. I'll say this not really there in a sophisticated ultra sophisticated. Manner for the individual investor right and I don't wanna get too technical. Here but when you are entering retirement again that distribution face that is. Where you're, at your most risk and your risk is.

Mike twenty thirty years twenty five years
"twenty thirty years" Discussed on Forked Up: A Thug Kitchen Podcast

Forked Up: A Thug Kitchen Podcast

03:57 min | 3 years ago

"twenty thirty years" Discussed on Forked Up: A Thug Kitchen Podcast

"Because i think that argument compel will compel more people though yeah i mean look at the guy who's fighting the hog industry and north carolina's thirty five year he's not your quote unquote average tree hugger right he was you know republican people who've lived in it for twenty thirty years pissed like you're saying yeah that would once they come face to face with the reality he was a fisherman retired from the marine corps and he had a fishing business with his son and all of a sudden the fish were starting to float at the surface and billions of he said since the nineties and they showed a bunch of photographs of like the fish suddenly becoming deformed time yeah they and they they had to bulldoze off the beaches down there and it was gnarly what's causing this and he went and took the kind of apocalypse now vote up the up the river and found the tributary tributaries all the hog sewage filled with you know four hundred different types of microbes and one hundred different men made things we're all leaching into the watering killing these pink lagoons yeah and the way he tied that back to his marine corps service and how he had taken that oath to protect against foreign and domestic terrorists and how he was now seeing this as the domestic threat that he had an understood it was in the marine corps us looking never understood domestic threatment now i know yeah so i mean these are good and that that was that personally destruct me as a person but also as a filmmaker these are the stories that really when i went across kind of scouting and following in the footsteps of what the book did but also exploring another areas that's the stuff that really resonated for me he's really good people that are out there that are doing stuff to try and change this they're small percentage but i think everybody would agree with what they're doing i think to your point about him not necessarily being typical tree hugger like you would think like most people want to make good choices and they wanna make compassionate choices and i think your phone makes the argument that we can get there i mean i think jonathan points it out it's a fact in his book i think it's a could be wrong on the percentage but it's close to this it's ninety eight percent of us don't want animals to suffer for the for the you know the meat and dairy that we eat but look the system that we've put into place and so there's some way of having a dialogue that extends to people who aren't going to give up eating meat but like you know once you start to take a look at it you can make decisions based on what you know i hope the film at least does a little bit of that oh yeah i think that it doesn't in us hock about this when they're talking about the deform themselves and how the animals are endorsed because if people saw that from the road or people could get a closer look they would not buy that product yeah and it's just it's it's tough for people to disassociate the harm that's being done to the animals and what they're picking up at the grocery store for dinner i think frank the turkey farmer meet the strongest argument you know because you could tell he has this really close connection to the animals he's raising even though he does saw them for slaughter or your when the slaughter short came in he had to he went in and pulled one of the turkeys out he's like nano she needs to stay that he cares and i think his perspective in his thought process in the whole system will really resonate with the audience members who do still eat meat had you do you think that this will help people reconcile like where they want their morals and their eating habits yo and you want a guy like frank to be raising if you're going to get i mean he he does care about his animals he told the story he's right in a tornado alley so he gets tornado was coming look like this was it for his farm so he's like a well and so he.

north carolina ninety eight percent twenty thirty years thirty five year
"twenty thirty years" Discussed on 1150 AM KKNW

1150 AM KKNW

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"twenty thirty years" Discussed on 1150 AM KKNW

"Said look you gotta go because he had lost all support on the hill but if if this would have been in fanned continuously by a news organization you know nixon was just twenty thirty years too early for for that extra bit of support now the rules have changed the atmosphere is different the dynamics are different and how the congress is reacting is a really really striking didn't work for nixon he did but but he recognized what he needed but he didn't have you didn't have the ability yet the network i mean he gave commercials for nixon and he built an image for but he did for the forbush and for trump yes yeah well the i mean paul ryan i mean it's just it really is like these little tiptoes like you know that he came out and said he agrees with trae audi i mean it's just weren't such a ridiculous place where we were literally have a lunatic in the oval office who tweet some ridiculous conspiracy theory every other day that then you know at least republicans with some bit of sanity most of those are on the way out trig outy paul ryan have to say no that's not there's no spy gate but but that's not that's like the most they stand up to him right just when it's it's the most lunatic of conspirator air looking they're afraid of his base that live in their districts and their stay out and and he's got this this hold on on the base and the the the republican members of the house house especially are are paralyze.

nixon congress trump twenty thirty years
"twenty thirty years" Discussed on Super Station 101

Super Station 101

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"twenty thirty years" Discussed on Super Station 101

"You know we haven't built any oversight in his country like in twenty thirty years driver or or maybe longer but wasn't it is our shortly after world war two that we would try to save the all resources in this country where later war possibly you know at the time that thing with soviet union so we would import oil from other parts of the from the other parts of the globe correct on well that's what that's what the strategic oil reserves were were you know all about with their intended for it but some people have suggested over the years and again they went all the way back to the second bush that you know we should use these reserves to to influence the markets and it just doesn't work that way we don't want to drain those reserves there's not enough reserves does not not to make marginal difference if you're thinking about the what is the strategic reserve is for you know in case of national emergency for a nother lord skill war world war do for the military to operate on that's not really for civilian use but you always hear them saying hey we're gonna release figures reserve this it's just like a drop in opinion the ocean i agree i agree anyway great job guys is one i thought y'all letter thanks very much a lot of folks don't even the interstate system the interstate systems designed for the military's use vote the internet all working with in spite of course contributions you'd be surprised how many things that are actually put out in this nation from a market perspective that are designed for the security of this country and so you know the the early days of the internet the arpanet you know was to allow forces in the field to communicate the event there was a nuclear war same thing on the interstate system to move troops around that's why it's actually federal law that any interstate every fifth mile has to.

soviet union bush twenty thirty years
"twenty thirty years" Discussed on The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"twenty thirty years" Discussed on The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

"Level you know twenty thirty years down the line and i mean i think the penny is dropping with a lot of uh i think even people in in the financial times oped pieces from the mall the more you know pragmatic ones would realize that actually the state is coming back in and it kind of has to come back and if you're gonna see it cannot deliver long to an infrastructure renewal i mean if you look at the nuclear ing i mean you said you said you said britain we'll where more in favour of nuclear energy i'm not i'm not sure we obviously as apoe as as a sort of a nut the iranian she's plays much they spoke about taking energy from nuclear deal annual they would be mba but even that you had a massive underwriting by the state of the whole project to make it happen you know i think what we need to sit start saying that there is actually w we know the stages picking up the tab hall oil it's not the state the public is picking up the tab for a lot of these uh privatize services anyway um you know i'm actually there was some really good credible arguments that you can do this is much cheaper in the public sector um and that's what and that's why i'm not and that's nothing it's driving a lot of their the agreement especially in germany both in and perhaps more conservative rural areas has perhaps this is what is the more metropolitan areas is a realization by local politicians who probably have pragmatists rather than ideologues of any kind that they're actually um the things that they privatized in the nineties can deliver revenue that they can cross subsidize other cashstrapped public services i think other than some thing about jiminy you know they they've had a similar austerity politics at the national level but that means that there's a lot more pressure on look governments on their budgets on where local governments have i've actually still got the power to take things back into public control when it privatize franchise comes up for new they've done it because they realized well actually vases on uh revenues feeding shareholder dividends these private companies w we can bring that will bring a lot pick back and harrison beacons across subsidize cashstrapped public services or and she told about ways when germany's politics struck to different from persson's and we've also you chimi.

persson britain germany twenty thirty years
"twenty thirty years" Discussed on 560 KLZ The Source

560 KLZ The Source

02:40 min | 3 years ago

"twenty thirty years" Discussed on 560 KLZ The Source

"For a law hong time even twenty thirty years and then you start noticing uh that you have some water retention in the legs a demon and it looks like it's a mystery well it's really not a mystery the issue is is very old uh scarred trauma the appease iata me and now there are many other types of traumas that can occur that may affect the low back and then affect kidney his well so what do we do to really give ourselves great health for the kidney because it's so important to our energy and our power through the day so number one you can jump on one of our really great devices and this is really important for the skin to is it buys called a highdrama nerve very inexpensive and it's handheld and it's a sensor that can tell us how we're doing moisture wise within the various layers of the skin so you can make sure that you're drinking enough water every day for your body needs and this becomes a a much more of a problem in very hot climates than it would be in colder climates you can of course supplement dha in the looking at american food uh and having done this for many many years and having tested thousands of people i would say that everyone should supplement dha of the dochas the hickson orrick acid and that gives you two options one a vegetarian option we call it dha two hundred which is a two hundred milligrams of omega3 fatty acid uh from micro algae's so it's the cleanest leastlikely to deliver in the kind of a toxin hear you could take maybe three if you've been divisional longtime maybe you'll take five for a few months and then cut back to three and our latest edition epa dha which is from a fish oil without any molecular distillation or any weird things remaining we've been able to clean this oil and so if you are not a vegan you might consider this is a good option a teaspoon today is what we would recommend and this guy is not only critical for great kidney health and just about everyone we do energetic has the non shows a.

water retention hickson orrick twenty thirty years
"twenty thirty years" Discussed on WLOB

WLOB

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"twenty thirty years" Discussed on WLOB

"The table what they offer if they offered nothing more than excessive labour overhead then there will be more than a few places where companies will be happy to say you can strike till hell freezes over yeah ththat's absolutely right and it will be a great adventure to see how we play it if not the way they've been doing it at a european union for example the vision of the future ten twenty thirty years from now is one in which most people will not be working we already have one in five families working age and the united state for nobody works at all and the idea is the government instead of giving you a welfare check is going to give you a guaranteed wage of say thirteen thousand a year you get together with a few friends you have enough to maintain a reasonable household without lifting a finger how well they pay for that very simple in the european union are going to clear the robot's who are actually doing the work to be electron a person's and as soon as they do that the robot's can be taxed the robots or have any the robots don't have any assets they don't have any incomes what is it that you'll be taxing no they ever a play have productivity they have the head productivity yes they do so they'll be taxing the company's of course of course and i mean this is one of the great art forms the democrats who perfected here that they don't do to nearly the same degree in europe i mean even with the tax cut of republicans now 21percent corporate taxes in europe in in the eu countries of europe the average business taxes eighteen point eight percent so we'll still be above the we are a pnn average now uh would you have favored cutting the ah the raid more i know donald trump of course was talking of various types of fifteen percent of the twenty percent they settled on twenty one to pay for a few other things that it is in the the the multitude of provision in this tax bill are are you satisfied with twenty one or lower you can get it the.

ththat european union europe donald trump ten twenty thirty years fifteen percent twenty percent eight percent 21percent
"twenty thirty years" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:51 min | 3 years ago

"twenty thirty years" Discussed on KQED Radio

"An investigative journalist and that journalist naturally found the railway bus a man who ultimately confessed to this rate a man was thought to have committed fifty rapes in that area and when this information was given to the judge the judge said tight free thai this was so bitter and so he decided to file a lawsuit against the police and others whom he felt were responsible for his suffering and and that's when i really started working on this case trying to figure out how did that victim go from that ones the closest to i'm absolutely positive that's the guy i was asked to work on titus his case because i'm a psychological scientists i study memory i've studied memory for decades and if if i meet somebody on an aeroplane we ask each other what do you do what are you doing i say a study memory they usually wanna tell me how they have trouble remembering names or they've got a a relative who's got out some research some kind of memory a problem but but i have to tell them i don't study when people forget i study the opposite when they remember thing that didn't happen or remember things that were different from the way they really were i study false memories in one project in the united states information has been gathered on three hundred innocent people three hundred defend the to working victims of crimes they didn't do they spent ten twenty thirty years in prison for these crimes and now dna testing has proven that they are actually in assent and when those cases have been analyzed threequarters of them are due to a faulty memory foam anti eyewitness memory well why lights the jurors who convicted those innocent people and the jurors who convicted titus many people believe that that memory works like a recording device you just record the information then you call it up when play it back when you want to answer questions our identify images but decades of work in psychology has shown that this just isn't true our memories are constructive their reconstructive memory works a little bit more like a wicket pedia page you can go in there and change it but so can other people it's it's an amazing story and and i know that you you do a lot of this kind work at as a legal expert but you also do run these kinds of experiments in.

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"twenty thirty years" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:46 min | 4 years ago

"twenty thirty years" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"House maybe there's always somebody who think you're you're a little off berger a little different now you do get anybody any anybody nobody would always say that no they haven't found anybody at end date they say they have talked to numerous people they're continuing to try here but they are asking for for any information that that anybody might have whoever came in contact with it guide had a memorable experience right if you're a thing that big he truly does not know a motive because i'm i'm speaking personally here and he could not not talking about the but what the investigators are working on at this moment because we can't look look at this case and and pay that we have a motive but there is nothing that point in the direction of what led him to to carry out if attacked yeah i i even read online did season fbi i veterans you know guys have been on for twenty thirty years and they go down the checklist of everything that they know about guys who snap like this and he doesn't check off any of them now now as social media profile nothing ag is completely wrong by no religious or political beef that we know about but it is important because there have been lots of room a lot of talk show banter about terrorism and that that indian the thought that that that could he'll be there the fbi uh poli they all say they have found no evidence that there is any connection to the international correctly up the guy thing even to terrorism in general uh you could debate if they through terrorism or not but in the traditional fence up care rhythm they find nothing there that there had been i know i'm getting tweeted constantly from people who claimed that uh that they think this with it because i and that they're going to uncover that it because it goes back to the philippines well that prove girlfriend was from it i went home there and that's why the money went to the philippines it was going to hurt i go if.

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"twenty thirty years" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

KMET 1490-AM

02:17 min | 4 years ago

"twenty thirty years" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

"And he has it on your upset make it a law right okay the reason he took six months to do it is because these given congress time to act in hopefully they'll go ahead and work something out uh let's see and they're all talk or if they use it as an election weapon but i think the democrats will i like they're all talk i think we've seen witnessed beyond a shadow of doubt this congress is nothing but talk i hope they put her all wession there's no action anywhere you can point to word congress has taken action president trump has taken actions where he can and tried to force congress in two action their inability falls back on the congressional leadership weather's the house or the senate take paul ryan is a failed majority leader mitch mcconnell is almost i on him say almost he is a joke of a leader that's my humble yeah he's wanting to drain the swamp he is the swamp but i hope they put e verify nowhere a lawyer that are somebody at no cost can go online and verify dimension some of these people that are daca recipients or wouldbe where have they been for some of better for twenty thirty years our application sovereign lifethird really wisdom they don't do it because edel have two exactly there's accountability so what trump did with that one move was he made congress accountable and he made these young people accountable he wanted to say to them we have a rule of law we have an immigration law and by the way what obama did was he created a class of people in the us that are special and above the rest of us are you okay what that are you okay they your own children worse pushed aside and some one that was yes they were brought here turn not the will of their own but basically they have more rights than your own kids they're getting in state tuition they're getting a lot of goodies and free piece and i think americans have to really think this over in say isn't it time we got back to the rule of law and running on the risk of people saying that you're a racist why is it okay for dhaka to be here and we're not supposed to say anything about that but.

congress trump the house paul ryan mitch mcconnell edel immigration law obama us dhaka president senate majority leader twenty thirty years six months
"twenty thirty years" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:57 min | 4 years ago

"twenty thirty years" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"That the robbers would not be imprisoned for a robbery with twenty thirty years to come to an end in this case they needed help they need logistical help they needed the support in other ways so what you'd sort of a baby lay out what their ideal was the idea that they pitch did these mob guys whose support they requested yes we are basically what the court but the robbers also easy getaway car stolen car that would be provided by a uh a family and a getaway car would also have to be disposed so the market family provided all the owner operator at a record yard a section of the city who were would what could build a vehicle so that that it will be go evidence events of one witness may have noticed the robbery of going away from the hotel the limousine that people up with to water uh what they all good oh god that they had walked a few blocks away from the hotel so what other we require and good family provided the stolen getaway vehicle including deliver gene that could be robbers pulled up to go out with and by the way too will read so they live with a befitting vehicle for the robbers savable uh pulled up to the hotel editor also left until after the robbery so the plan is as they describe it to this lucchessi under boss who you can tell us a.

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