35 Burst results for "twenty minute"

My Best Programming Tips with Jason Swett

Ruby on Rails Podcast

08:19 min | 4 d ago

My Best Programming Tips with Jason Swett

"I think it's easy to fall into the trap of wasting time by just like. Chasing this rabbit, chasing this rabbit, and if you step back and say if somebody came and looked over your shoulder and asked like hey. Are you actually trying to do right now? A lot of times. If you don't have an answer to that question, then it's like, what are you even doing so like? Anytime. You're coding and you're feeling like lost like you're just flailing around it can be hopeful to step back and say hang on a second. What am I actually trying to do right now and I catch myself doing this when I'm just like messing around and not getting anywhere I'm like hang on what's my goal again, and often the problem is that I don't have a clear goal and so just saying what it is that I'm trying to accomplish is so so helpful even going to the extent of writing down. Can Be really helpful because then it forces you to really be clear. See I read this one in terms of a group contacts or a context where I'm given a ticket that might be fairly vague and so when I look at the taking I, don't know what I need to do here and so I have all these clarifying questions that I need to do and when I try to do is once I can get those into a more technical format I liked to rewrite the ticket with the product managers you know. Acceptance on that so that way I can clearly articulate that goal. Yeah. That's interesting. If I saw a story that was too vague I would look at the story and say, this story is not what a call shovel ready. So shovel ready just means that it's Ready to begin work on it. And throughout my career I've I've had a lot of instances of the of the challenge where I get a story and it's not shovel ready. And I think a that's kind of the role of a scrum master. If you're working in agile methodology to go through the stories before they get to the point of being assigned to developers and making sure that they are sufficiently crisply defined to actually be worked on one of my tests that I that I do on stories when I when I look at him as I asked if we. gave this to an external qa person would that Qa person be able to read what's in the story and know what manual tests to be able to perform perform to know that this story is done and if that's not possible, then it's very likely that the story needs to be made more crisp, including a very clearly laid out definition of what it means to be done with that story. That's great. So moving onto the next tip, keep everything working all the time, and this is one that I have definitely failed to do before we have had to do a massive ru factoring and I realized halfway through that the behavior of my code has changed tests or failing I'm not sure which part of the code I've changed has caused this issue and I ended up having to kill the branch start all over again. So what's your tips around that? Yeah, that's painful. I've definitely had that experience myself a lot of times in the past, and that's why this is one of the one of the top tips in the sequence because in in my career, this one, his burned me a lot of the time. So there's not much to say about this other than like keep everything working all the time, which means like make a small change and then test everything. It is really helpful in these cases if you have good test coverage on your entire application, because what I will do is make a small change a very small commit maybe it's even just a one line commit. And then I'll push my commit up to Ci and I'll let the tests run on the whole application. I don't necessarily always wait for the whole entire test suite to run before I, continue my work because with my application right now, my test take like twenty minutes to run and I'm, not gonNA. Just sit and wait for twenty minutes while that's happening but I'll make a small change push up to see I make a small change push up to ci there's a little delay but that way at least if things start breaking, I know the exact small change that made things breaking so I can So I can know what the culprit is and then also in addition to the CI thing because that's a little bit peripheral. I will make a small change go into my browser and manually test. I'll make a small change and then run the test case that tests that exercises that line of code, and if that passes, I'll run the test that the whole test file that tests that whole class and stuff like that. Because yet, if you if you work for like hours or days and let things stop working, it's so much harder to go from not working to back to working than it is to keep everything working all the time I completely agree and this actually touches upon the next one. So the other day I googled the concept of atomic commits and you might know this but you are the number one result on Google search exciting. So Jason, could you explain what an atomic commit is? Yeah it's a commit VAT is only one thing. So. This is interesting I I, find myself wanting to read my own blog post so that I can answer this question more more intelligently I'll explain how I do my own commits. I don't usually do more than a few minutes at a time worth of coding I don't usually do more than. A few lines well, maybe like five to fifty lines is the average size of of my comments and I try to stay more toward the like ten or twenty lines into the spectrum per commit not that lines is like a hard metric that I adhere to. That's just how it happens to work out. and when I'm when I'm coding in front of people like when I'm teaching a class or something like that, the students are often surprised by how frequently I commit like sometimes, I'll just change one character and they'll commit and the they'll be like isn't that like so much overhead compared to the amount of work you did. But. No. What I'm doing is I'm keeping my commits atomic because like for example, if I change a piece of configuration in my application. And then I work on this unrelated feature and I spent like. Twenty minutes, and then I commit that thing I commit the feature change along with that unrelated configuration change. then. What if that configuration change causes a problem? Later, I might be doing my debugging research and discover that this commit introduced problem. But to me looks like this is this feature that I added. But really it's this configuration change that's buried way in it. That's really not obvious and that's unrelated to all the other code I changed. So makes that debugging lot harder. So when I commend I'm not necessarily always committing for the sake of the change that I made I'm committing for the sake of whatever changes I'M GONNA make. I want to keep this small change separate from whatever change comes after that so that each commit is only one thing. So again, that makes the debugging easier, and if you ever need to roll something back I had to do this just the other day where I made a change that my boss asked me to do. But then the next day my boss said actually can you put it back to the way? It was before because my tom because my commit was Atomic. All I had to do was revert one single commit and it was super easy to roll back.

CI Google TOM Jason
20 Minutes About Metabolic Fitness

20 Minute Fitness

04:09 min | 4 d ago

20 Minutes About Metabolic Fitness

"Everyone it's Martin from twenty minutes fitness. I'm here in San Francisco and I'm connected to levels founder Josh, Clementi Josh. Why don't you to be yourself? Martin's great to be on the show I mean on I'm josh, founder of levels and John Interested in bringing metabolic fitness to the mainstream rates, and so what does everyday mean? What is Metabolic Chiasso metabolism? Easy Way to think about metabolism is the set of cellular mechanisms that create energy from our food and environment that. So this is how we power the processes in our body ourselves bringing fuel and they turn it into energy and so metabolic fitness or metabolic health is when those systems are. Operating properly and you have often energy weight balanced performance without excess byproducts and so the way that that we're doing this is using continuous glucose monitoring hardware software analytics to close the loop between actions you take every single day in your daily life and the reactions, your body experiences in particular, the blood sugar response, your body experiences, and so this is this is the level, is that closing loops between action reactions the way that behavior change becomes eating, easy and obvious I, and so we're the first metabolic fitness company greenest market, and how do you define an excess byproduct like at what point you have too much nutrition what is it exactly? So, the some of the easy ways to think about this art glucose itself. So this is a it's sugar essentially, this is a molecule that is the primary energy molecule in the human body so that metabolism functionality that we talked about is driven primarily off of glucose sugar and fat, and so when you're consuming sugar, it releases into the bloodstream and You know this is actually just tipping carbohydrates while they sugars that interest the bloodstream, and so this triggers a cascade of processes, hormonal processes, and those tell your body, how to op sort of appropriate that Lucas, into the cells for for their useless contrived things like weight gain can. Be for muscle expenditure for energy using mechanical loads on a commute for cognitive function in the brain. But those laws get too high. You actually have an inflammatory situation because Lucas is a very reactive molecule it produces what are called free radicals, inflammatory cytokines. I'll sixteen alpha you know these different molecule byproducts of glucose reactions that actually are very inflammatory and can cause breakdown of tissues and skin glaciation, which is right leads to Browning of the skin and wrinkles. All these byproducts that ultimately are are not good for us. So there's a fine balance and glucose is meant to be kept in tight control and that's what we mean by byproducts. Normally unless you have diabetes, you should not have resistance to insulin release right so how does that really matter van for you know everyday use that a non diabetic being that we have been since glucose is the primary energy source for for the modern person we've studied the Post Disease State of Glucose for for many decades. So this is called diabetes typically type two diabetes which a lifestyle driven illness that sets in your body can no longer respond to insulin you can't use glucose in. Your bloodstream effectively, it gets really high toxic levels. So we studied that quite a bit but the thing is that all of us across the metabolic spectrum from healthy to to less healthy are all using net glucose and so there is an optimization function here where because these mechanisms are linear you know it's not it's not like a a threshold where you cross over it, and then suddenly you're unhealthy that's kind of how start thought about a me to think about this metabolic fitness meaning the choices. We make require focus effort and repetition to achieve optimization. So it doesn't matter where you fall on the spectrum metabolic health de Choices you're making today are affecting your hormonal cascade causing qualitative experiences in causing quantifiable to potentially detrimental effects like weight gain, where's performance exercise cognitive decline sort of all of the things that we struggle with our day-to-day are affected by the choices we're making that we don't really connect because we don't have that close loop system. So now by by showing that the person who. Doesn't have diagnose metabolic dysfunction. You can optimize your choices daily see the data in real time, make better ones, and then achieved this sort of metabolic control where instead of having these this roller coaster of spikes and crashes in energy issues, and again wait gained the rollercoaster. We all ride day today that we kind of use our emotions feel way through. You cannot have data and you can use that to achieve this the state of balanced control and you know lower flatter smoother continual on metabolic control.

Clementi Josh Lucas Martin Founder Diabetes San Francisco John
Dunkirk Awards

Filmspotting

06:36 min | Last week

Dunkirk Awards

"Welcome to film spotting, we will get to our Nolan Review Awards. Later in the show, we might have an for those awards picked out by. Then we might not. We will share our awards for favourite supporting performance and lead performance from this retrospective of the work of Christopher Nolan will also share our picks for best Nolan moment in the overall best moment or seen after we have revisited all ten of Nolan's films and that will culminate with our Christopher Nolan rankings. The definitive Christopher ranking for each of us one to ten will there be some shifting Adam Gimme a tease. Shifts definitely from the last time, I posted a Nolan ranking on letterbox. There's been some movement Yep me too one I think you'll like I don't know if you'll like it enough, but you will like it I though the World War Two movie from Christopher Nolan that we didn't know we needed dunkirk. The enemy tanks stop. Why? Why waste precious tanks when they can pick from the. Barrel. Their full hundred thousand men only speech. Your position. Josh, coming into this rewatch was that done kirk is Christopher, Nolan's best film and there's at least one longtime listener and regular commentator who agrees with you that we are culminating this overview triumphantly with the filmmakers greatest achievement Adam Grossman in Vancouver says like many of us. I've completed my Christopher Nolan Review. Biggest takeaway hoover is a really hard were dispel. Well, second takeaway. I've decided dunkirk is Nolan's career highpoint while my heart loves interstellar the most good on you Adam and I. Hugely Admire. and. The Dark Knight for what they meant to Action Cinema and Superhero movies respectively dunkirk is his masterpiece got laid down for you tenant. I just don't know how anyone could argue that the legend of dunkirk could be told any better the setup and the first eight minutes alone from the falling paper from the sky to the distress. Cry of where's the bloody air force is a wonder of a short film. In itself, the lack of dialogue works perfectly for what this movie wants to achieve with. Hans. Zimmer's relentless scored doing all the audio work that's necessary among all the chaos. There are frequent moments of grace. Kenneth. Branagh face as Commander Bolton as the cavalry arrives in the form of the civilian vessels the empathy as Peter Tells Killian Murphy's PTSD soldier. The young George will be okay and no moment more than the shot. Be Okay and no more than a shot of Tom Hardy's planes silently gliding over the beaches of dunkirk knowing his job has been done. dunkirk is also uniquely Christopher Nolan Movie One where his signature use of time has never melded together better and more cohesively than it does in the final twenty minutes of this film while Dunkirk will understandably never be a wholly enjoyable or easy rewatch. It's one that gets richer and richer with repeat viewing. Now, Adam Mention Nolan signature use of time, and that is one aspect of dunkirk among others that certainly connects to his entire body of work. But there are other aspects that Mark Dunkirk is unique. It is only film that is based on historical events, which means it is inherently rooted in the past and yet I'd argue it is only film that truly feels present tense meeting there are no. Dead parents or wives or forsaken children or other tragic events haunting the air's barrier played by Tom. Hardy the Moles Army private Tommy fiene whitehead or for the most part the sees Mr Dawson played by Mark Rylance like all Nolan protagonist there's plenty of personal sacrifices on display but no guilt no sense of futility about toning past actions just the seemingly futile need to survive the current event that they. Are Tragically experiencing here's something else that argues unique about dunkirk as we every other commentator on Dolan's work is discussed in some form or fashion for all those dead parents and wives and foresaken children. There's nothing so emotional or borderline sentimental in any of his previous films as the climax of inception and yes, mileage may vary there which led to interstellar and not only mcconaghy's crushing breakdown watching twenty three. Years Worth of miss video messages from his family but the verbalize message love is the one thing we're capable of proceeding that transcends dimensions of time and space. Maybe we should trust that even if we can't understand it, it's hard to imagine any character in previous Christopher Nolan movies saying something like that which led to Dunkirk am I crazy josh this is his most blatantly sentimental and even heart film. And if so is that what establishes Dunkirk as his best its balance of coldness the sober portrayal of the hell of war of life in the misguided choices, some men will make when facing death with warmth. In the compassionate inspiring choices some men will make to maintain a way of life. So a lot of subtleties in that question and you're onto something so you're not crazy I think I would distinguish. The word blatantly, I. Don't think this is blatantly emotional or moving, but I do think you're onto something in the fact that it is maybe his most heartwarming in where it ends up and let me kind of try to parse those. You're right as long as the Nolan Canon has convulsing McConnell. Interstellar is going to be his most blatantly emotional I mean you can't have a scene like that without registering that on it surface. That's his most emotional movie. But I will also say that I find Dunkirk to be his most emotionally affecting movie maybe even more. So than inception, which we about how I did find that very moving especially in the character of Mal. So yet dunkirk is really a unique thing even as it's working within the strands and trends that we have been tracing in Nolan's other films, I. Think the heartwarming aspect is probably a part of that. You've nailed it there in that it brings us to a place that. Is One of Constellation and I think it's earned because I think up until that point we have just been suffering alongside all of these other characters in so many ways and we've also been recognizing as the movie does that this is You know a an account of a military failure, a huge defeat and so for the movie to kind of offer, some sort of solace at the end of that I think is. In proportion and well

Christopher Nolan Dunkirk Mark Dunkirk Adam Grossman Nolan Canon Tom Hardy Josh Hoover Action Cinema Zimmer Hans Kenneth George Moles Army Tommy Fiene Whitehead Vancouver Branagh Dolan Kirk
20 Minutes With The Founder of Hyperice

20 Minute Fitness

07:13 min | Last week

20 Minutes With The Founder of Hyperice

"Any athlete understands recovery is essential an arguably just as important as the workload itself to achieve peak performance in recent years even among amateur athletes, we've seen a growth and acceptance to what's the necessity of taking the time to really focus on recovery. But what has actually entail for one year muscles require time rest and particularly plenty of sleet repair and grow, but taking the time for active recovery such as stretching. And Foam Rolling Yoga also play a large role in keeping the blood flowing and helping rebuild from intense physical activity. You're listening to twenty minutes fitness and I'm your host Martin caster twenty minutes fit is partly powered by shape scaled up and three d body scan that visualizes your body composition photo realistic three in recent years technology has rudy started to supercharge the fear of active recovery there methods such as icing cryotherapy. Percussion therapy also commonly referred to as massage guns, compression therapy. All the way to infrared sauna have been long used by various. Bro Athletes for recovery for today's show, we've invited highs founder and CEO. Anthony, cats hi FIS has been one of the leaders in the field is known for its iconic products such as the hype vote massage gone the Viper vibrating foam roller as well as the compression sleeves their products have. been used early on by NBA stop there such as Lebron James and the late Kobe. Bryant and today there aren't they use by pros and all the major us. Leaks the English premier league as well as Olympic athletes. We chat more about how he first got started with icebox neoprene and also take a deeper dive into the science and also some of the best practices behind some of these recovery methods and devices. Hi Anthony I'm excited to have you on the show today. Can you tell us a little bit more about yourself to kick things off? Yeah. So my name's anthony cats on founder pipe price. I founded the company about ten years ago it started out really just as an arm project like I was before this I worked in education was a high school teacher I was married to professional. Athletes and I was still really active and I still play sports and was sort of looking for ways to improve my body and sort of slow the aging process and I started my by started kinda get more soar after do things and you kind of start to see like the wear and tear you know grown up in the in the Dark Ages fitness in the ninety S. People used to basically do bodybuilding it wasn't very functional and that control my body in in. So I start looking at like, what would it winter pro athletes doing? You know because obviously they put the biggest premium on. Their bodies and sort of the new kind of things if there was anything new that they were doing that I can adopt and when I did sort of the research on, it was funny like the word recovery didn't really even a quiet sports like that. We use it now and there's a category now but they're back then. You know recovery meant like alcohol recovery or something you know. It didn't mean the same and so the industry was really dominated by like sort of these like medical device companies that would make products that would live in athletic training room for in professional sports and mostly what guys were doing for like you know just. To recover faster faster was was ice was ice tubs. Getting, getting a cold tubs and then, and then they were icing their joints and then if you getting a massage in athletes paper massage and stuff, and that was kind of that was kind of what the recovery will look like in two, thousand ten and so I figured okay well, you know if you can't really market a cold tub but athletes are icing their joints every day and they were doing it with plastic bags and ace route or Fight in every single day. Yeah. It's really wasteful and just like you know it's just not really convenient leaks in you know Dallas is kind of what they were doing. So it Kinda struck me and around this time two, thousand ten. So beats by DRE was relatively new. You know they debuted at the two thousand, eight Olympics and the Osa basketball guys were wearing them kind of adopted this idea that you if someone wearing something right and you know if I could make something that was good enough for like pro athletes to wear that people would see it on them and because it's on their body because it would be like wearing potentially like wearing them, you know on the sidelines or Photos, in your starting, it was Kinda before instagram. So it wasn't really the access to like the behind the scenes of what these guys do is not really the same level of now because I feel now we have a much better window into what what sort of the athletes are famous people do in their you know when the camera's not on. This kind of struck me. If there was a documentary called the last dance about Michael Jordan and it was showing how different famous then where he was the most famous person in the world and he'd get off the team bus and they would just be like a thousand people waiting at the hotel just like watch him walk in the door and we don't need to do that anymore because now everyone has we see what people do in the cameras. And we have twitter, right? Yeah and so people and and then there's way more content right? So there's just way more content of like, okay. What is sort of what is an athlete? Do? They're not court in got used to be pretty mysterious people in an intriguing so I figured that if I could make an icing product because athletes have to is every day people see maybe what sort of kind of catch on A in obviously not a school would beat because it's music that's universal but I still felt like young athletes might adopt it. So I had the idea to make like a really cool looking is compression device, and so I started researching therapy. The. Compression was import element of it and I had. A friend of mine who's a college basketball coach was regularly working out with Kobe Bryant and in Kobe was known as the biggest like that. He he is more than anybody and there was articles well-documented about how he really took care of his body. So I thought if I could make a prototype and I could show it to him and maybe you know maybe get into weirder sort of my thinking and I showed it to them I. so I literally was cutting up wetsuits and going into like wetsuit factory's GonNa live in a beach community southern California. So like there's some of the old Lexi factories that are still around back then so I was kinda compression sleeves and then taking ice bags from like you know from like rite aid or whatever, and and and just kind of like putting them together these compression sleeves. Trying to make something and you know he was really receptive to the idea that there could be a product that would make more efficient and it would actually look not just be so wasteful. So I a couple times in he kind of gave me some really good criticism that was constructive and what I realized like this can't be an art project like this is not how businesses have to like if I'm. GonNa do what I gotta do it. Right. So I gotta go get like. So I was calling manufacturing companies and it was during the recession and people weren't really interested in talking about no experience at all and just sort of this but one company believed like, okay. I kind of had proved that I was like interacting with Koby in the disciplinary doing for him and they kind of just took a flyer on. Maybe we'll try helping sort of developed sort of come the extra separable and so took about a year I. Got I, finally convinced him to do it. We took about a year to kind of develop the product properly I had the idea to put an air release valve at is bag because when ice melts, it creates like air pocket in compression doesn't work because it blocks a compression. So if You have a button that releases the air. The compression always makes contact with the ice and then you get your eyes compression therapy and that's that's the whole idea behind it was that I would watch guys ice and then I would see these like there's a big air bubbles forum. It's like because the heat from your body is exchanging with the ice and then that creates natural gas, which is A. Form of like air and

Kobe Bryant Anthony Founder And Ceo Martin NBA Rudy Lebron James Michael Jordan Twitter California Basketball Olympics Koby School Teacher Dallas DRE Founder
Make a will for free with Freewill

Talking Tech

04:20 min | 2 weeks ago

Make a will for free with Freewill

"A lot of US never get around to creating a will to make it easier. The APP free will would like to invite you to use their free online tools. co-founder Jenny Chia sprawling is here to tell us about it hi Jenny. So free will is a website that anyone can make a free state plan on, so that includes a will help care directive and a power of attorney. It's really easy process. You just go to www dot, free dot com, and you answer a series of questions very similar to when attorney might ask you in person, and our software takes those answers and populates a form a legal document that you can then print inside with witnesses and your gotten so on average it takes users about twenty minutes to get a completely free estate plan set up. Already your called free will so this is a totally one hundred percent free will. That's right. It's only possible through the support of nonprofits, so we get one hundred percent of revenue from nonprofits that WanNa make it easy for people to not only set up their estate plans, but also potentially, but you're not required to leave money for charities. Okay because I know people spend a lot of money to lawyers to get will's made. That's right and we think it should be very different access to lies a huge problem in the United States today instead, so we see that you know underrepresented communities have half the rate of will writing than majority communities, and that ends up being a huge barrier to wealth transfer from generation to generation. Some people just never get around to it, aretha. Franklin died without a will. Acting, right and princess well. Wow crazy. So, how long has the been out? It's been out for about three years, and we're actually experiencing a huge spike in demand right now since Kovic started booth, because people are actually able to or think about mortality for the first time, and having really important conversations with their family about what their hopes and dreams are if they were to pass away. How long does it take to create a will on the APP? On average less than twenty minutes. Okay what what motivated to start the at. I the big motivation. Is that you know we talked to a lot of people about their charitable giving and realized a lot of people don't have the ability to gave large amounts of money while. They're saving for their mortgage. Their kids educations things like that, but when they pass away, they might own a home and be willing to share a kind of five or ten percent of that with charity, and it turns out. This kind of charitable giving is actually the largest type of giving. On average in a person's life, so we started free well with the promise of making Book Estate Planning on charitable, giving in not really easy, and we've now raised over one point five billion dollars in commitments attorneys. Host on the charities that have gotten money from you guys. United way of heart. Association's Saint Jude's. People donate to all sorts of causes whether it's the universities that they went to the hospital. They had their children ought. It's just astounding the generosity during this time of course I'm talking to you on video. Video Window here on skype and you look really really young so you in your twenty s. I actually just turned thirty last week, congratulations. You seem very young to be concerned. About will's. Yes, so. You know it's important to write a will even early in life, a lot of people don't realize that one of the biggest purposes of putting a will place is to set up a guardian for your children. To setup protection for your pets and caretakers. If you have those to pass on your digital assets, such as your facebook or instagram account, so this isn't just something that baby boomers who had a house. They want to give away. should be concerned about, but really all people including people. My Age should have advice Jenny. Spalding from free will go to free will dot com. Go to the APP store, I assume the the IRS Google APP stores to download the APP. Just when www dot, free dot com,

Jenny Chia Attorney United States Co-Founder Facebook Spalding Kovic Franklin Google Skype IRS Instagram
Have Man United Improved Under Solskjaer?

ESPN FC

05:33 min | 3 weeks ago

Have Man United Improved Under Solskjaer?

"Craig and frank with US Craig. What happens to you and I said? Well first and foremost. Why it can play in the chat league, because the Court of Arbitration for sport overwhelmed ruling. Now you go! We went into the intricacies and say. Think well I don't think anybody's really interested in the factors that can play. So, annual. Mean Franken segments. I'm no bottle. Convenient if you like no right I. I thought. Were good for the point. You know we know. Got The call. But he started so sloppily and I was. I was really impressed. Foster fifteen twenty minutes walk. Ralph has say that with what he's working with with the budget with the place called the way the press. They really pasta, and they were good for the lead. Listen to to Sucker Punch of two or three minutes reunited with some quality. We saw Paul Pogba Leon needing a kick up these box me sleeping possession a couple of times I've got caught for one of the goals. I thought I thought they kept plugging up to know a strong that the star. The strong finish all be inactive down. To ten men with the head injury to two young Williams wasn't ideal, but it couldn't defend the call now. And so therefore, we were not deserving island thing of taking all three points at home this. Is Craig mentioned once. You've got those two goals united. Franco well that's done and dusted united going to go on and win this game. Yeah True I. Think it was the end of the story and. Was quite unfortunately for Saas on, because seeing the the hard work, they made no and the they went through to maybe try to get at least. Withdraw off time. They were two, two, two, two, one at halftime and I think when mentioned decided to finally play the should that they were better than the saints for the second half same problem. Still Sloppy and at the end of the day you know. You always have the risks to to see the. Getting goal, and then seeing you getting outside the stadium withdraw and these up very unfortunately, because we didn't got injured the play ten against eleven the last. Let's say seven eight minutes and kick, but you have to be strong. You have to your more experience. You WanNA reach the chimpanzee next season. You shouldn't consider goal on the corner. Kick if you want to if you want. Everybody thinks that's going to deserve to be in the chimpanzee. That's really two points relaxed stupidly from from Manchester United at the of the game. Done seems to be a law. People recently have gone tidal wave of all souls Lavin. And whilst they have. IMPROVED THERE'S NO DOUBT ABOUT The Bar was extremely low. There's an argument to be, said the F. as hotter manager, they might have already knew Detroit for and be in possession of trying to chase teams down. Let let me just give you some facts off. The back of the the lockdown. Enough talked this. They've only had one team. That's not in the bottom half of the league, and that Sheffield United today interest and start from. Leslie the Skykomish who's on the feed calms tonight with Jim Bergman. He said we must remember. Prior to this game. Points return and Premier League history on Chop without the fifty four points behind Liverpool. Last year, they finished two points behind the league champions. Manchester City some point out to me Ho this is a superb progression under only gonNa Solska, and as I said, some of the footballs been better, but we must, we must remember the V. could have been in the top four nil dawn with that scored hide behind the manager in charge, not setting fair four points behind Liverpool and scrambling around to get results against teams in the bottom half. The League that that's that's not opinion. That's fact you've got Kim credit for what he's done over the last few months early, Craig. But in a league season is over a few months that don't don't think the twitter crowed. A league season he's been in there. Before Christmas the year before you had the January transfer window at the summer transfer window. His second year in the job. We're talking about a full season. They are fifty four points of the league leaders. That's more than they. We're off Manchester City when the championship last season and I repeat the second points return and their premier league history to this before the game tonight. Tell me why it's a reason to be separate cited above Manchester. United I would be concerned that with him at the helm right with the hail golsby be able to negate the amount of points next seasonal decision after that. That does worry I would have United Fund not coming up here. All this is the greatest thing ever look at the results forgetting looking league table. Look at five bucks look at previous seasons. This is the worst they've been. In the last Chris Seasons in terms of the gap, even before source was the job marina wasn't that far behind on goal wasn't as far behind. That's factual.

Craig League Manchester City Jim Bergman Liverpool Manchester United Court Of Arbitration Manchester Paul Pogba Leon Ralph United Fund Franken Twitter Detroit Chris Seasons Sheffield United Franco Williams
From Rabbit to Crab to the Lab

Sounds of Science

06:23 min | Last month

From Rabbit to Crab to the Lab

"Today. I'm joined by foster. Jordan, the CSV of Charles Rivers Endotoxin, Europe foster has spent most of his career, working with and around South Carolina's horseshoe crabs, strange creatures, whose blood keeps US safe. He joined to discuss how his career parallels. The changing attitudes towards horseshoe crabs as well as the future of endotoxin, testing and recombinant technology. Welcome foster. Thank you join the conversation. So, let's begin with you. Can you tell me about your early experiences fishing for her? She grabs sure it was funny, you said. My. Most of my career actually I kid people because it's only job. I've ever had Your career then. I don't even I don't even have a resume so. The way I got involved with this was my. My father was an investor in a small company called in safe back in the mid eighties when I was an undergraduate student at Wofford College. And I heard him talking about it. I was studying organic chemistry, and he had partnered with the person who had originally used the test for pharmaceutical application. His name was Dr Cooper Dr James Cooper. He used it at John, Hopkins. University, he was a a radio nuclear pharmacist who is making nuclear medicines and the test at the time for bacteria. Linda toxins was called a rabbit powergen test. You took a New Zealand. Zealand White Rabbit and you deluded your product that you were testing for contamination and sailing, and he's ten meals into the ear of the rabbit. You Monitor the ravitch temperature for three hours, if the favor spike more than three degrees that was considered a failed test, and that rejected the product, but you know these new nuclear medicines. Had you know half lives of their nucleotides pads of of only twenty minutes so the? The test was was ineffective for this. These rabbit tests just sounds so inefficient. How did we get from there to using what we use today? Yeah, so be. It was really I. Forget the time it was wasn't really about replacing. The rabbit test is about five minutes Dr Cooper needed for these nuclear medicines, and and and when he did it, and he made these first crew preps, and they were, and he published that. That in nineteen, seventy two. He was actually he was actually on a grant from NIH so it wasn't something that was patentable. it was public knowledge at the time public information because it was a h grant that funded the research when he published that in nineteen seventy two I. Don't think he really thought anything of it and as the FDA solve the the value of this test replacing the the rather. Test. They also realize it would be the first time that a an animal model, but whatever be replaced with a regulated in vitro tests, so they decided to reunite the test itself, and what's interesting is even today where the only quality control tests that's actually regulated by FDA and we have the same license. Our licenses eleven ninety seven. We have the same licenses of. Of biologics manufacturer vaccine manufactured right, and we're inspected by the twice a year. All our products has to be submitted and approved by FDA. So we're extremely regulated in the space, which is also important when you think about new technologies, and how will a new technology be developed when we're so highly regulated and controlled and the amount of testing? That was necessary to just. Show equivalency to the rabbit, but long story short as the evolution into safe. When I ended up in graduate school, I ended up going to a into safe working for Dr Cooper. We were very small. I was just four of us in the lab. And you know obviously one of the main things we needed. Was Horseshoe crabs. Charleston was known for having horseshoe crabs, but two things about Charleston one is the population or or South, Carolina population is very strong in addition to the the the largest physical more shoe crab. There is the. Female one time that from tail, the whole link. The female was basically a meter. Long thing so very long right? YEP, so so they're big, so you don't have to handle nearly as many to get the quantity of blood we needed, but back in those days the crabs were were a nuisance. They were considered pass. they tore the fishermen's nets ups, especially the fishermen, and when they were bottom, dragging which was warhorse, pass laced for ill and cough. That was a byproduct that they just didn't want to deal with many times. They would just throw them up on the bank. Let and die compost them. Grind them as fertilizer the only other commercial applications for them at the time was to be used as bait, but again thinking about just the pure amount of work, and it just wasn't worth the fisherman's time to do it so again, not very well like creature that. So going back. You said you've. been working in the industry, your entire life and that is very unique, so can you? Tell me about working for for your dad and doing the early fishing long story short so when I when I left Graduate School I was given opportunity the company wasn't doing really well at the time, although the tested then mandated by the FDA to replace the rabbit, it was still a difficult competitive situation so again for us. It was tough. That's why they wanted me to come. I was one of the first ones to get you know three or four o'clock in the morning and go gathered the horseshoe crabs. From April fifteen to end of June. We bleed only when they coming up at high tides, and mainly they come up at high types after dark. Full Moon and a hot crabs. You're going to be there, okay. The southlands in thousands in early days we couldn't handle all the crabs that were coming up, so it'd be kind of surreal I can imagine a beach full of crabs. It is and we you know. We had very selective fishermen that we work with because again. They a lot of them just didn't see the value of them. It took us a long time to get the get the attention of the commercial industry. Get them to realize the value of the crab. Eventually we did I would actually drive to the docks during shrimping season If they caught him as byproducts I would just leave our car business card and say hey, call us if you catch any byproduct I'll come, pick them

Dr Cooper Dr James Cooper FDA Graduate School Europe South Carolina United States Wofford College Charleston New Zealand Jordan Linda NIH Carolina John Hopkins
From Rabbit to Crab to the Lab

Sounds of Science

04:52 min | Last month

From Rabbit to Crab to the Lab

"Today. I'm joined by foster. Jordan, the CSV of Charles Rivers Endotoxin, Europe foster has spent most of his career, working with and around South Carolina's horseshoe crabs, strange creatures, whose blood keeps US safe. He joined to discuss how his career parallels. The changing attitudes towards horseshoe crabs as well as the future of endotoxin, testing and recombinant technology. Welcome foster. Thank you join the conversation. So, let's begin with you. Can you tell me about your early experiences fishing for her? She grabs sure it was funny, you said. My. Most of my career actually I kid people because it's only job. I've ever had Your career then. I don't even I don't even have a resume so. The way I got involved with this was my. My father was an investor in a small company called in safe back in the mid eighties when I was an undergraduate student at Wofford College. And I heard him talking about it. I was studying organic chemistry, and he had partnered with the person who had originally used the test for pharmaceutical application. His name was Dr Cooper Dr James Cooper. He used it at John, Hopkins. University, he was a a radio nuclear pharmacist who is making nuclear medicines and the test at the time for bacteria. Linda toxins was called a rabbit powergen test. You took a New Zealand. Zealand White Rabbit and you deluded your product that you were testing for contamination and sailing, and he's ten meals into the ear of the rabbit. You Monitor the ravitch temperature for three hours, if the favor spike more than three degrees that was considered a failed test, and that rejected the product, but you know these new nuclear medicines. Had you know half lives of their nucleotides pads of of only twenty minutes so the? The test was was ineffective for this. These rabbit tests just sounds so inefficient. How did we get from there to using what we use today? Yeah, so be. It was really I. Forget the time it was wasn't really about replacing. The rabbit test is about five minutes Dr Cooper needed for these nuclear medicines, and and and when he did it, and he made these first crew preps, and they were, and he published that. That in nineteen, seventy two. He was actually he was actually on a grant from NIH so it wasn't something that was patentable. it was public knowledge at the time public information because it was a h grant that funded the research when he published that in nineteen seventy two I. Don't think he really thought anything of it and as the FDA solve the the value of this test replacing the the rather. Test. They also realize it would be the first time that a an animal model, but whatever be replaced with a regulated in vitro tests, so they decided to reunite the test itself, and what's interesting is even today where the only quality control tests that's actually regulated by FDA and we have the same license. Our licenses eleven ninety seven. We have the same licenses of. Of biologics manufacturer vaccine manufactured right, and we're inspected by the twice a year. All our products has to be submitted and approved by FDA. So we're extremely regulated in the space, which is also important when you think about new technologies, and how will a new technology be developed when we're so highly regulated and controlled and the amount of testing? That was necessary to just. Show equivalency to the rabbit, but long story short as the evolution into safe. When I ended up in graduate school, I ended up going to a into safe working for Dr Cooper. We were very small. I was just four of us in the lab. And you know obviously one of the main things we needed. Was Horseshoe crabs. Charleston was known for having horseshoe crabs, but two things about Charleston one is the population or or South, Carolina population is very strong in addition to the the the largest physical more shoe crab. There is the. Female one time that from tail, the whole link. The female was basically a meter. Long thing so very long right? YEP, so so they're big, so you don't have to handle nearly as many to get the quantity of blood we needed, but back in those days the crabs were were a nuisance. They were considered pass. they tore the fishermen's nets ups, especially the fishermen, and when they were bottom, dragging which was warhorse, pass laced for ill and cough. That was a byproduct that they just didn't want to deal with many times. They would just throw them up on the bank. Let and die compost them. Grind them as fertilizer the only other commercial applications for them at the time was to be used as bait, but again thinking about just the pure amount of work, and it just wasn't worth the fisherman's time to do it so again, not very well like creature

Dr Cooper Dr James Cooper Jordan FDA United States South Carolina Europe Wofford College New Zealand Charleston Linda Hopkins Carolina NIH John
Highlights: Man City 4-0 Liverpool

ESPN FC

04:50 min | Last month

Highlights: Man City 4-0 Liverpool

"City's four nil demolition of Livable Craig. Burley Steve Nicol and DOT WITH ME Steve Big deal. Know. Alyssa not disappoint, and it's as deflate and. But it's no big deal and really should we be surprised? You know Liverpool war on heightened. Anyway, and we're playing against a great team. And they just outplayed, but you know what. After the next game when they weren't well before Gotten Craig I saw you on twitter, talking about how this is taking the shine of slightly the title. Yeah Yeah was trying. Trying to encourage those edits that will suggest that not go away. Hide under a rock. Liverpool for fifteen twenty minutes. Were the Liverpool. That will come to admire, but then I just thank God. For you know war subconsciously. Doesn't really Martin and the. It doesn't for them and and some sense from a professional standpoint, the steam engine you don't. You don't ever want to have that happen as a player. In the League wrapped up nearly as you have then subconsciously unless. Pledge Not can say they've been celebrating. And some wager in this lockdown social destin's and still managed to enjoy this, and so the preparation has been affected is on top of that. You know we know set here agreed site. We know we'll set. These problems are done set. These problems have been the catastrophic mistakes have made defensively. They can open up any team. You're never meant that neither team that for seven days as we celebrate within the League you agree in. Yeah absolutely I there was a god Ivana formed by the Manchester City plans level, and quite rightly, too, but that was all. They began to give them tonight. I think they wanted to just make a point to live appropriate is little point and admire reflection. Watching that was it felt unreal. It felt like a friendly. It didn't have the intensity really of Manchester. Manchester Society Liverpool game as we understand it, it'd be end. It didn't really matter being Liverpool picture full strength team They wouldn't have wanted anything like that to happen, but it did and all. I can say really. Is that Liverpool? Party might have been a heck of a lot better than we all saw. Because the defendant in particular had double vision. Steve. What's that income? which is clarify that you're not broadcasting this show from inside the show or Cuba? benching cuts from living. Off. Of criticism of the date goal. If Mrs Dark appears from behind those curtains. I promise you. Stephen. Stevie. Stevie USB the situation before where you want. And having to go through the motions he must be. Yeah the one that comes to was way by two three Liverpool dropped the title up. We're like four games to go. And of course I'm I've just joined the team and I'm trying to get and so I'm I'm all on edge I'm I'm I'm coaching trated and that same team that completely dominated dot year. Finished the season with with like. Three defeats a two defeats, two draws, and then score any goals and. Just was was a shell of what had been previously, and these were these were experienced center national players who had been through the ringer renew. It was all about. And it didn't. Didn't really have that much. There was no wedge. There was no edge with the coaching staff and so. Particularly me I shouldn't have been surprised. It Didn't really matter in the end, but I'm intrigued to get your thoughts on the penalty Steve Did. You think it was the right decision. Listen I can see why the referee gave it because. Y-. Gomez on was across the front, and how to hold of of of Sterling, no question. The problem I have is that and the same tussle they were having sterling had half of Gomez Short, and he's left hand holding them all. So that's the only thing that annoys me I can see why it was given. A little dive, either by the way I don't see how you can die when somebody's holding onto your belly button. But I can see why it was governed. And as you said previously, the truth is the titles wrapped up. So why get bent over of boater? Didn't

Liverpool Steve Nicol Stevie Manchester Gomez Twitter Alyssa Manchester Society Destin Stephen Martin Mrs Dark Ivana
Cresta: Speech ML for Calls with Zayd Enam

Software Engineering Daily

04:41 min | Last month

Cresta: Speech ML for Calls with Zayd Enam

"Welcome back to the show. Thanks Jeffrey it's awesome be back. The last time we spoke you were doing research at Stanford. Tell me about your research and what you came away with from that research. Yeah I was focused on. How do we build machine learning to prove office productivity? So, how can we build tools that help help? People be more effective in the office. And that was that was the predominant thing, instead lot of user studies and built tools and software for different types office work. You eventually came upon this idea of Kresta which is built to incorporate a I into educating customer service workers call. Center, workers, sales, people. Help me. Understand the problem with the call center. The Contacts Center workflow that you identified. Yeah absolutely answer the problem. There is the problem that we see you problem that you see across many different workforce's, and basically the the question is. How do you make everyone as good as your best person? So at any kind of sales team, any kind of these kinds of contact center environments, you have folks that really good and other folks that are new, and maybe looking to sort of gain more experience. So how do you take the expertise of the best people and help everyone performance, level the best person, and so that's one key challenge that's. That's in this space in the second is folks are still spending tons of time tons tons of time doing tedious repetitive things, doing things like filling out forms and salesforce, rather crm's and doing order clicking these kinds of things, and so how can you help automate an abstract way, the repetitive and tedious bits of their work, and so really the two major problems the space. Like how do you help? People be fast at the really tedious bits the work in. How do you help them? Be Good at the bits of the work that really unique. That are really unique and creative to the type of work that they do. That sounds like a really broad domain. What specific subset of that broad domain? Can you focus on develop a product in. Yeah absolutely, so it's very brought domain and it's a very very. Big Idea and so really focused hyper focused on the use case that we have is, we started with basically inbound sales chat, so you have these large sort of sales conversations that occurred over chat, and you have teams of one hundred people to two hundred people for large companies that are selling. telcos or companies that own retail products. And the challenges you have on those teams is that you have some people that will take a conversation in converted three x of somebody else, and what are the doing on conversation? That makes them so much better. And so what we're able to do is go in and look at conversations for the top performers over the last year collect one hundred thousand two million conversations that happened over the last year in identify which conversations led to successful outcomes, so you have and able to identify that this conversation led to the successful outcome and able to identify. What are the behaviors that the person did on the conversation? And then real time able to prompt people, so here's here's what the best person would upset at this point the. With does that gives them the right thing to say at the right point in time, and it really helps them have a better conversation with the customer and really focused conversation better conversation with the customer that leads to better revenue, better conversion, oddly merely better conversation. See Start by identifying the people who are doing something right who are actually having success. Maybe have some KPI. Is that what you're saying? Yeah, so we look at sales outcome for each conversation. Did the conversation result in a sale or did not result in sale? And then that becomes a training signal for us. And once you have that training signal then I guess you need to have this backlog, or you need to have a bunch of data associated with the what might have led to that outcome. Exactly so basically we start in the space of companies that do sales within these twenty minute or thirty minute conversations where the whole sort of conversation is the transaction, so think about if you're sort of reaching out to a retail company and you're looking to buy a kitchen sink, or you're looking to buy a new phone plan, or you're looking to buy sort of accounting software. The context of the conversation contains everything everything about what you're looking to buy. Within that conversation in the rebuilt to prompt prompt salesperson and the support person on what's the best thing to say at each point in the conversation?

Jeffrey It Stanford Contacts Center
Cresta: Speech ML for Calls with Zayd Enam

Software Engineering Daily

04:41 min | Last month

Cresta: Speech ML for Calls with Zayd Enam

"Welcome back to the show. Thanks Jeffrey. It's awesome be back. The last time we spoke you were doing research at Stanford. Tell me about your research and what you came away with from that research. Yeah I was focused on. How do we build machine learning to prove office productivity? So. How can we build tools that help help? People be more effective in the office. And that was that was the predominant thing instead of user studies and built tools and software for different types office work. You eventually came upon this idea of Kresta, which is built to incorporate a I into educating customer service workers call. Center workers sales people. Help me. Understand the problem with the call center. The Contacts Center workflow that you identified. Yeah absolutely answer the problem. There is the problem that we see you problem that you see across many different workforce's, and basically the the question is. How do you make everyone as good as your best person? So at any kind of sales team, any kind of these kinds of contact center environments, you have folks that really good and other folks that are new, and maybe looking to sort of gain more experience. So how do you take the expertise of the best people and help everyone performance, level the best person, and so that's one key challenge that's. That's in this space in the second is. Folks are still spending tons of time tons tons of time doing tedious repetitive things, doing things like filling out forms and salesforce, rather crm's and doing order clicking these kinds of things, and so how can you help automate an abstract way, the repetitive and tedious bits of their work, and so really the two major problems the space. Like how do you help? People be fast at the really tedious bits the work in. How do you help them? Be Good at the bits of the work that really unique. That are really unique and creative to the type of work that they do. That sounds like a really broad domain. What specific subset of that broad domain? Can you focus on develop a product in? Yeah absolutely, so it's very brought domain, and it's a very very sort of big idea, and so really focused hyper focused on the use case that we have is. We started with basically inbound sales chat, so you have these large sort of sales conversations that occurred over chat, and you have teams of one hundred people to two hundred people for large companies that are selling. telcos or companies that on retail products. And the challenges you have on those teams is that you have some people that will take a conversation in converted three x of somebody else, and what are the doing on conversation? That makes them so much better. And, so what we're able to do is go in and look at conversations for the top performers over the last year collect one hundred thousand two million conversations that happened over the last year in identify which conversations led to successful outcomes, so you have come and able to identify that this conversation led to the successful outcome and able to identify. What are the behaviors that the person did on the conversation? And then real time able to prompt people, so here's here's what the best person would upset. At this point in the conversation with does that gives them the right thing to say at the right point in time, and it really helps them have a better conversation with the customer and really focused conversation better conversation with the customer that leads to better revenue, better conversion, oddly merely better conversation. See Start by identifying the people who are doing something right, who are actually having success. Maybe have some KPI. Is that what you're saying? Yeah, so we look at sales outcome each conversation did the conversation result in a sale or did not result in sale. And then that becomes a training signal for us. And once you have that training signal then I guess you need to have this backlog or you need to have a bunch of data associated with the what might have led to that outcome. Exactly so basically we start in the space of companies that do sales within these twenty minute or thirty minute conversations where the whole sort of conversation is the transaction, so think about if you're sort of reaching out to a retail company and you're looking to buy a kitchen sink, or you're looking to buy a new phone plan, or you're looking to buy sort of accounting software. The context of the conversation contains everything everything about what you're looking to buy. Within that conversation, and in the rebuilt to prompt prompt salesperson and the support person on what's the best thing to say at each point in the conversation?

Stanford Jeffrey Kresta Contacts Center
The Iconic Astrovan Has Been Replaced

Innovation Now

01:04 min | 2 months ago

The Iconic Astrovan Has Been Replaced

"Astronauts Benkin Hurley spent the morning before launch in the astronaut crew quarters at Kennedy Space Center. They sat down to a preflight meal five hours before launch after receiving a weather briefing, the crew began suiting up. The pair was then transported to launch complex thirty nine day, but instead of the traditional Astro van, which had taken astronauts to the pad for more than three decades, these astronauts made the nine mile trip in a pair of Tesla's provided by SPACEX the customized electric cars. Cars sported. Falcon, Wing Rear Doors, and the flat floors gave the astronauts plenty of Legroom, an enormous battery pack provided ample power for the twenty minute drive, the drive marked the first time astronauts had taken a car instead of a converted motorhome to the launch pad, and the launch of the crew dragon on space XS Falcon nine rocket marked the first successful flight of NASA, Commercial Crew Program and the beginning of a new era in American spaceflight for innovation. Now I'm Jennifer pulley

Commercial Crew Program Kennedy Space Center Benkin Hurley Jennifer Pulley Astro Van Tesla Nasa
UK's Queen Elizabeth joins first public video conference call to mark carers week

WBZ Midday News

00:43 sec | 2 months ago

UK's Queen Elizabeth joins first public video conference call to mark carers week

"A team quite Elizabeth the second stake in part in her first public video conference call correspondent Syria shock at least says the queen spoke to for health aids so called carers about the challenges they face looking after people close to them during the corona virus pandemic as part of Paris week in the UK the ninety four year old monarch showed once again that she's adept at meeting the challenges posed by new technologies the queen said it was interesting listening to all the carrots tales and stories and she's impressed but what they have achieved already the queen husband isolating with her ninety nine year old husband prince Philip I went to a concert over the past three months was on the call for around twenty minutes during the call she heard about the isolation and difficulties carriers have been facing through the

UK Elizabeth Syria Paris Prince Philip I
Black Trans Lives Matter

Nancy

06:39 min | 2 months ago

Black Trans Lives Matter

"Have you gone to? Protests? Recently if you have. What have you seen I have not gone this year for a couple of reasons covid. I personally am very uncomfortable. Going out in the midst of the crisis. I don't WanNa. Be Quite honestly black and sick and Trans in a hospital with Kobe. I? Just don't want to put myself in that position. That's not wise. It's not a wise thing to do given the hostility of our medical system to transpeople given the hostility of our medical system to black people. It's just not a good trick. And for that same reason, being black and trends, and by chance woman. I don't want to have an experience with the cars for will state. That is to say that I don't want to have. Anything to do with. The the cars roll system because of its harsh, disproportionate and unfair and dehumanizing treatment of Trans People. I think thirdly you know there's a real question that I've been wrestling with that I wrote about recently. in a much larger sense of whether or not Black Trans Women in particular should show up. In this moment, shouting black lives matter when in so many ways we understand that within the black community. Our lives are treated as if they don't matter. And as if they're undisposable. And there are so many ways in which the grief and the frustration and the sheer rage that people feel. which people feeling now around the death of George Foy which are totally fair know. I felt last year when there was a string of murders of Black Trans Women, last June and into July in particular, they started in May. and it was a really dark painful time, and I remember going to protest at that time for those women who died and were murdered and wondering where everybody else was. And, so I kind of feel that everybody else gets shop in this moment, right that there really valid reasons why, as a by transforming I am not out on the street and is very valid. There's so many other people that are showing up in this moment which I wholeheartedly support. Yeah, when and part of what you wrote about in that piece that you're referencing is This video that emerged of the Trans woman named IANNA DR being attacked convenience store by a group of black men I guess the first question is were? Where were you when you first saw the video? And what was your reaction was at home. I was at home and I. Think i. read the description of what happened. And then I saw maybe five or seven I didn't see very much of it because. It's really hard to watch what I saw shocks me, and then I learned a little bit more on just through some things on my feet that it was in Minneapolis. And that really struck me. Write that on the first day of pride. Month was the day that she was beaten. Minneapolis Saint Paul. Where those very same people are out in the streets, have been out in the streets or are supportive of people on the streets, demanding black lives matter demanding that they be seen as human beings. could engage in amassed humanization of someone else. Who is back at the time without a second thought was. Deeply, enraging to me. Deeply, fattening and terribly shocking. And when I decided that I wanted to write something about it. I went online and I actually found the entire. There's an entire twenty minute clip of the entire. Affair as it were, and there was a carnival like fear before they decided to beat her up, they actually had cornered her essentially in the convenience store, and like literally a carnival atmosphere, both inside the convenience store in the parking lot after they were done taunting her for twenty minutes and like. There was something about it and that moment where she was not treated as a human being. And that really got to me. You wrote in your piece that. Recounting xactly, what happened to Yana in the video is important. And allow discussion about how much should describe violent incidents like these where it can be triggering for people. So. I guess my question is. Why do you think it's important to really talk about what happened in detail? I think the part of the video that often gets displayed is the last part of. The beating rights of the beating actually starts in the back of the store, and then they can move in a semi circle to the front, and that front part where she's bent over and people are are on her is what's been getting played online, but the entire thing that leads up to that I think underscores the depravity of the entire event, and that depravity is really important to understand because it underscores the way in which. Black Trans. People are seen. and. We collectively as people right as humans have to reckon with that depravity. We have to see it. We have to acknowledge it, and we had to ask really hard questions of ourselves about how and why and we can't prioritize the death of black men, and at the same time ignore an even encourage the death of black. Trans Women and somehow believe that we're going to build a just society for everyone yeah. I. Mean You know we're? We're in this sort of extraordinary moment. Where more people than ever are open to the conversation about police brutality against black people and also just general inequality that exists for black people in this country What do you think the barriers are to making sure that violence against Trans Women of Color is included in that conversation. Yeah, I think the barrier is people saying human beings rather than freaks or objects of entertainment or

Black Trans Women Trans People Trans Women Minneapolis Wanna George Foy Kobe Xactly
Queen Elizabeth takes part in first public video call

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 2 months ago

Queen Elizabeth takes part in first public video call

"Queen Elizabeth the second has taken part in her first public video conference call to chat to four carriers about the challenges they face looking up to people close them during the corona virus pandemic as part of Paris week in the UK the ninety four year old monarch showed once again that she's adept at meeting the challenges posed by new technologies the queen said it was interesting listening to all the carrots tales and stories and she's impressed but what they have achieved already the queen husband isolating with her ninety nine year old husband prince Philip I once accosted over the past three months was on the call for around twenty minutes during the call she heard about the isolation and difficulties carriers have been facing through the pandemic there is shockingly London

Queen Elizabeth UK London Paris Prince Philip I
Problems reported at polling sites as Georgia holds primary

All Things Considered

01:47 min | 2 months ago

Problems reported at polling sites as Georgia holds primary

"Well the states are record absent T. turn out long lines and problems with new voting machines plagues those voters who did show up to the polls as Georgia public broadcasting's Stephen Fowler reports the meltdown comes ahead of what's expected to be a competitive election in Georgia this fall before the first vote is cast elections officials warned of longer lines fewer polling sites and likely problems with the new voting system so Anita Walker showed up to vote at Sandown recreation center in south Fulton County twenty minutes before the polls opened listed here for an extreme ly long time before we even knew anything and then we have to continue to wait for them to come back up so it was it was very chaotic this morning all of the voting machines were down for hours and she did not cast a ballot until ten forty five across the state similar stories played out some counties a liver voting machines to the wrong location others had issues with elderly poll workers dropping out still others were consolidated into massive precincts overwhelmed with people coming to vote in person eighty year old and need a herd was frustrated none of the voting machines that heard the cab county polling place were working and poll workers ran out of backup paper ballots after just twenty voters America has gotten to the point that we are now taking the liberties of people even voting from them how can we do this gave sterling with the secretary of state's office says the problems are limited to a few counties and argued many of the reported issues can be fixed by more training the vast majority of counties metro suburban urban are all doing fine with the system and they're into getting through it Georgia is considered a battleground for this November's election and has two U. S. Senate races that will keep turnout and attention to voting

Stephen Fowler Georgia Anita Walker Sandown Recreation Center Fulton County America Senate
Twitch streamers see 'sudden influx' of copyright takedown requests for old clips

SGGQA Podcast – SomeGadgetGuy

07:05 min | 2 months ago

Twitch streamers see 'sudden influx' of copyright takedown requests for old clips

"Well now we have the full force power. The distribution engine known as the Internet and stuff is getting really messy again so a whole rash of DMC. A takedown requests were sent out to twitch streamers off of clips in their archives. this is coming directly from the twitch support twitter twitter feed. This do this week. We've had a sudden influx DMC takedown requests for clips with background music from twenty seventeen to twenty, one, thousand, nine, hundred, if unsure, about rights to audio and pass streams, we advisory moving those clips we know many of you have large archives and we're working to make this easier. This is the first time we have received mass DMC clip. CLIP CLAIMS AGAINST CLIPS? We understand this has been stressful for affected. Creators are working on solutions including examining how we can give you more control over your clips. We adhere to the DMCA which requires that we take action on content in streamer accounts upon notice from rights holders as happened this week. Our guidelines for music have not changed, so please reference them here. This is. This is an impossible situation Again saying commentary and critique you'll you go to a youtube video and we're GONNA be talking about this scary movie, and at the beginning of that youtube video they flash while ago section five Oh to fair use blah, blah, blah, commentary increase critique. Claiming Fair use is not an affirmative defense. You can't fair use and then use someone else's intellectual property. Commentary and critique is your reactive defense. If a rights holder decides to take you to court. And then you pay for a lawyer to go before a judge against a multi. Billion Dollar Corporation to defend your right to use their intellectual property. cannot a for a firm that defense before you see a judge, you can only react to a to a claim using that as your legal protection, which I don't know about you, but I don't have the money to hire lawyers to go up against Disney. No like this is not something I can really do now. Many corporations take very soft touch approach, but in this age of creating content for Youtube, and for twitch, and for any other platform out there. It is. Wildly difficult. To work out the legal responsibilities. Youtube doesn't. They, give everything over to the rights holders, and they allow the rights holders to decide. Was this a violation, or was this fair use, or can they use your content and the rights go? We'll sure, but we're GONNA. Take all their monetization. That's not really fair. Use I mean again. If you make a documentary, you don't have to clear clips in a documentary so long as you're holding to actual commentary on the media that you're using the intellectual property that you're using. I take a very conservative. View on fair use like a reaction video to me is not fair use. A movie review, which just spoils the plot is not fair. Use a you. You know what I'm talking. Those movie reviews where it's like a twenty minute video, and all they do is talk about the plot, and that the very end they go well. I thought. This movie was great. You know like if the whole point of your review is to. For your own benefit, supplant someone from going to see that movie and monetize that movie then I don't believe your fair use. I don't believe that's critique, I don't believe that's i. that's barely commentary on a piece of copyrighted intellectual property. So. This is gonNA. Get Messier from my few game streams. Were were the ones okay so i. don't have a ton of games. Strings on twitch. Keep those clips whenever I've done a game stream. It's usually just like. I've got an hour to game and I felt like opening up a chat window, so we can all hang out it. It's almost never like. Anything amazing happens. That's worth me saving but I did. Keep my clips from alien blackout. And all of those both on Youtube and on twitch got removed. Got takedown notices a twentieth century Fox, the Soundtrack to alien is in that game, and if I'm sharing a stream or a part of a stream from that game, that clip is going to have a content ide- flag and I'm GONNA get a takedown requests so you. I'm pulling I pulled those clips. You, you can't see my my alien stream not again. I don't know that you'd want new just playing an android game for an hour. But they're gone. You know so increasingly. That's going to be. I think part of the situation or the problem, the actual live stream on twitch i. don't see where that's necessarily going to be affected and twitches such a platform for that in that moment real time interaction with their community I don't feel that these. These take down. Requests are going to be focused on that activity, but that still a legal grey area where I feel at some point, if these companies are getting more litigious and more aggressive about platform, like twitch that we're going to have to start examining how this stuff is monetize. How'd you stream even in real time? Someone might see this. Person's going to be streaming. This game in this game uses as a soundtrack from this from this musician and that musician might be able to in real time. Say NOPE, you don't have permission to use my music in the stream because you're not talking about my music, you're talking about the. And that's different. And who has an angry angry? Joe Was for one of the Star Wars sequels he had a video. With the. A complaint on it, and you go and watch his reaction. He's playing the full audio of a trailer and that trailer has John Williams music on it and he's not commenting on the music. Well You're playing the music. You are no longer. Safely operating under commentary and critique by playing John Williams score, and not critiquing or commenting on John Williams score. That's that's not fair. Use so rightfully you're. You should be as you DMC a notice. That's that's what's so. Sticky that's what's so difficult about about how this stuff is handled and why we need sweeping reform. Of Copyright Law in the United States, but that's probably not going to happen is probably not going to happen in my lifetime.

Youtube John Williams Twitter Dmca United States Dollar Corporation Disney Messier JOE
Tropical Storm Cristobal makes landfall in Louisiana

The Frankie Boyer Show

00:42 sec | 2 months ago

Tropical Storm Cristobal makes landfall in Louisiana

"Tropical storm Cristobal has made landfall along the coast of southeast Louisiana the center of the storm landed between the mouth of the Mississippi and Graham dial as the eastern side of crystal ball swept over Florida on Saturday night a tornado turned in Sumter county Florida about twenty minutes later second tornado followed and destroyed a barn another tornado hit near downtown Orlando two brothers were killed after they were caught in an undertow and swept away off the coast of Louisiana the young boys or swimming at a beach in grand Isle when they were caught and swept away ahead of the storm Louisiana governor John bel Edwards requested president trump declared a pre landfall emergency for the

Louisiana Mississippi Florida Grand Isle John Bel Edwards Donald Trump Sumter County Florida Orlando President Trump
"twenty minute" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

The Twenty Minute VC

02:20 min | 1 year ago

"twenty minute" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

"Find or alive entrepreneurs especially building products in new industries, but as much as you can find calms really valuable, then then you need to really make some judgment of what you think patterns of repeat purchase behavior might be an L. Hope you understand your LTV which will inform your back. So we have a lot probably fearful episode. Well, I mean, I think that's a suggestion for round two. He says, but I I want to steal from one of your tweets. Now, I told you I was a big fan. Boy, if you had to make a career decision, you would you cool for advice? I would come I grandfather. So my Grandpa's name urban Morris. She started bourbons, which is a department story grew to five hundred. Stores and to me he's Alton entrepreneur. So in what I just trust there by she's the most straightforward, honest person the net and just gives me a really practical report buys page products. That accompany the right way. I think it's about knowing your audience that you're pitching a blockchain set up. He probably shouldn't be cold. Emailing. Investors focuses on green tech pitches. His way outside Meyer, though, this and pitching is really at sales Cam. So as an entrepreneur, you really need to target the right investors in so up tonight. C entrepreneurs forget this. They just take us frame approach for their. They don't really consider who they're pitching to. And then I wanna finish where you'll nice recent publicly announced investment. I'm why did you say, yes, Jeff? Yes. So radar relay was announced recently a decentralized exchange they've done over one hundred fifty million dollars in transaction volume. During their beta lady us, one hundred fifty countries and more importantly, Ellen Curtis whose CEO's brilliant product line, and it really taken a product for his approach to building the exchange, which is pretty rare in the crypto world. And so So as. I was really happy to back on just based on the fact that he loves products his idea. Jeff next time, I'm going to be out in LA. Are we going to do this in a hot tub? Overlooking the Mahita, and it's going to be a very special around two is not a deal. Talking to me. That's what I love to do. So. Yeah, let's check it happen. I mean, what can I say with that? I just cannot wait around too. And if you'd like to see more from Jeff which clearly is a must then you can find him on Twitter at J M j Mike was I'd love see behind the scenes here. The twenty minute BBC you can do that on Instagram at H dubbing 's nineteen Ninety-six with TB's. It'd be great see that. But before we leave each day I wanted to little bit about hymns the knee wellness brand for men. So I'm gonna join interesting analogy stick with me half..

Jeff Morris BBC Ellen Curtis Meyer CEO LA Mahita Mike one hundred fifty million doll twenty minute
"twenty minute" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

The Twenty Minute VC

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"twenty minute" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

"Now, I'm thrilled to handover to fill in co founder and CEO at all turtles. You have now arrived at your destination. So it's such a pleasure to top you gonna show stay for Bryce special round two. So thank you so much for taking the time out to join. This very dull at British shots once more thinks area. Great to talk to you again, I'm excited, but I want to still stay in for those that maybe didn't get a chance to listens around one. Tell me Phil. How did you make your first foray into startups? And now come to found old hustles today. Wow. Well, I think I started my first company when I was in highschool and finding it difficult to hold on job ever since for about twenty five years or so so made in for serious startup in ninety seven and sold a twenty minutes before the first dot com crash and then pull the team together for a second one and then moved over to Evernote co founder and CEO of Evernote for nine years. And then after that and decided I was done with being a CEO and thought I wanted to be VC for the rest of my life. And so it was lucky enough to get a job as managing director general catalyst where I stayed for two years before deciding that investing was actually initially feel like a real job. So needed to go and do it again. And then started all turtles. I mean that is such brilliant on sixteen description of a phenomenal career to subsequent questions to us. You mentioned selling before the crash sack. I'm always having on a C never lived in one three one in a working career. I'm always really intrigued. How did seeing the crash and seeing the boom and bust cycle firsthand. How did that affect how you operate and think about scaling companies kind of made me realize that I didn't really care that much about what what state the market presented any given time. I always kind of sort of suspected it. And it's just reinforced it kind of going through the crash of two thousand and then again, the the crash in two thousand seven two thousand eight kind of always having companies at that time looking either raising money or operating stuff just going to confirm my suspicions that don't really care about what the rest of the market is doing right now you have to be generally aware of it to not make any stupid mistakes. But for the most part a good idea one years. It's still a good idea of where the market is up or down, the sure and the other woman that I have to tell on from the bio that is. Four aims VC with g obviously a phenomenal firm. How did switching signs of the table. Change your praising mentality and constructive really towards building turtles today. It was really very influential. I got a chance to work with some really talented, people got a lot of mentorship. A lot of advice. Probably the most important thing was just the broader pattern matching up until that point. I been in three companies, and maybe advised they're going to talk to a couple of dozen more and been in a few dozens of board meetings in my life. Then in two years at Cadillac and got to see hundreds of companies, hundreds of more dynamics, and so the pattern recognition just became much better. So it's really useful to kind of layer on that the more abstract macro sense of what was going on to actual experience operating. And it was great just seeing all of the mistakes that I had made repeated in so many other founders and CEO's that I talked to it became very clear most as reflection back on what I was doing wrong when I kind of saw other people doing it. So I think that my two year inadvertent vacation in. Venture capital. I think is probably made me a better CEO, then many actual time operating company. I mean, how can I jump on that and tease what were the big mistakes e sore and all this the definitely had yourself. He think can kind of pry versions of fill..

CEO co founder Bryce Evernote Phil managing director Cadillac two years twenty five years twenty minutes nine years one years two year
"twenty minute" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

The Twenty Minute VC

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"twenty minute" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

"This is the twenty minute with me. Harry Stubbings at age Stubbings nineteen. Ninety-six with two on Instagram but straightens day because I think this is simply one of the best shows we've ever done. It was such a joy for me. Do the twenty minutes went out of the window to be quite honest. And so with that, I'm so thrilled to welcome fin bonds partner first round capsule, one of the most prestigious unsuccessful early stage funds of the last decade with a portfolio including the lice of Uber square Worby Parker hotel tonight, goats, patient ping atrium and many, many more incredible companies as thin. In his own words. He learned the business of startups helping grow and one from fifteen million dollars to two hundred and twenty five million dollars in revenue as creative director for footwear and started his own fitness video game company producing yourself fitness, the first game of its kind for XBox PlayStation two. While he also built partnerships with the likes of Proctor and gamble, and McDonald's and Finarsih writes the most fantastic blog sneaker had VC. That really is a must read for me always. And I do say he signed to finish partners, Josh Koppelman Bill trend should roll pays, hey. Born for the fantastic questions provided stay. I really do appreciate that. But before we welcome into the whole seats day, we mentioned some incredible companies in the of that, and I want to spend a minute talk Bracks the first corporate card for startups Sprague's found his enery Kim Pedro Bill to payments, business in Brazil, but found themselves rejected for a corporate call it when they're in Wycombe beta. They decided to build Brax with instant online sign up, no founded liability required, unlimited ten to twenty times higher than standing cod's pretty incredible. I know. And you can sign up for Bryce today and get fees waived by entering the codes..

Harry Stubbings Stubbings partner Uber square Worby Parker hotel Kim Pedro Bill Josh Koppelman Brax Bryce Proctor Bracks Finarsih director McDonald Sprague Brazil Wycombe twenty five million dollars fifteen million dollars twenty minutes twenty minute
"twenty minute" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

The Twenty Minute VC

03:25 min | 2 years ago

"twenty minute" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

"Them. How do you think about decentralized teams from ineffectiveness in a massive perspective? Yeah, I generally think decentralized teams won't work. I think in the very, very early days of any platform they can work and it's because there is not that much competition and a lot of we need to build out his infrastructure and you have a small number of engineers they can communicate with each other to get those things done over time. What happens is you get more and more sophisticated operators, you have a more and more complex projects that require more and more integration and communication. And so I think you see a recentralization of teams, and so there's no substitute for fifteen or twenty or thirty people physically being in same space. Face all the time. If I sort of play that forward a little bit, even more, I think potentially contrarian view here. Even more is that I think this will actually recentralize back in Silicon Valley. And the reason is that at a certain scale, what's it going from three people to twenty five people, two hundred people to five hundred people. Once you start hitting real global scale on these things, how you go about building accompanying how you go about building an organization. Let's say organization because some of these things may not even be companies how you thinking about building organizations that are affected and can scale and have global impact is tribal knowledge and tribal knowledge really sits in the heads of the people who've done it before and the vast majority of those people are in Silicon Valley. And so I don't think it's an accident that if you look back at the last thirty years, you know with PC's software internet one, oh, social share economy, transportation as a service. And now self-driving that all of those ways have their epicenter in Silicon Valley. Of course, there are some some notable exceptions like Amazon, but buying large that centralization as happened repeatedly in Silicon Valley. And I think it's because this tribal knowledge of how you build organizations that can scale. Isn't the heads of a lot of people here. So what I would expect will happen is actually over time crypto companies will actually recentralize in large part to Silicon Valley. In terms of practicalities, obviously, a lot of these, the decentralization, engineering wise is g to coast and just an inability to scale at coast numbers wise. How do you think about the practical side of affordably scaling engineering teams and how that kind of loosen other mulcahy's? Yeah, it's, it's a great question. I think in general, the bay area is much more expensive than most of the rest of the world, but your best engineers are ordering magnitude more effective than your average engineer. And so very small number of people who can start these things off and then build teams around them. We'll still agree that value. I think a lot of those juniors are still here, and so as long as you can get five to ten of those really, really good people in one place, even if you have to pay them twenty five percent or fifty percent more. Let's say often it's worth the cost. And so I think that pattern will play out until the cost of having those engineers is commensurate with the value that they create. And so if engine in the bay area cost literally five to ten x more than they do in Berlin. Let's say, I think you'll continue to see that happen. Hopefully doesn't get to that. Hopefully we're able to address these issues, but I think we actually have some runway to go put another way. I think there are these network effects in Silicon Valley that will keep people here will make them significantly more effective and network affects take long longtime to degrade. You look at companies like EBay or pay pal. I mean, they actually just get stronger and stronger over time, but it's pretty amazing to look at home net with sex work, and they're real network affects in Silicon Valley that will keep pulling people in that doesn't mean it lasts forever, but I think we're not eating reclose actually, this thing collapsing, I mean, I'm having so much on. I'm just like a twenty minute VC with absolute slight. This terrible main clearly, but I do have into the far around. So as I say statement, and then you give me your immediate, how does that sound? Okay..

Silicon Valley mulcahy Amazon engineer Berlin twenty five percent fifty percent twenty minute thirty years
"twenty minute" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

The Twenty Minute VC

03:46 min | 2 years ago

"twenty minute" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

"Buy gross and finding brands and entrepreneurs, and businesses, and teams that are doing exciting things that may make sense within a large organization. And then you know, I think deserted kind of happened, but I think that the final views. View of any business. That's a product business is going to be that it is a retail brand or a retail business that it is technically not a tech business that happens to sell product, and you may be able to use data to be more thoughtful about your decision making processes. You may have a better read on reoccurring revenue because it got a real sense of who that consumer is. And as a result of that, these companies may trade at higher multiples than legacy retail companies do, but they probably won't trade tech multiple. So probably trade somewhere in between. And I think we're probably eighty percent of the way there in terms of people learning that and realizing that. And I think once that happens, we lose a little bit of the froth and we can sort of get back to simply building grade exciting meaningful businesses and brands for the next ten twenty thirty fifty one hundred years. I have to say they absolutely this, which may me route the day. I who the twenty minute VC, but I do want to move into the final. Element being the quickfire rounds. So I say she'll statement and then you give me your media policy see seconds, pel one all you strapped in? Yes, I'm strapped in ready. So the favourite Bookham whining to kill Mockingbird. It's obviously a classic American tale of growing up in his of the beautiful story. But I think the reason why I love that book in particular is because just about everybody's read it just about everybody remembers when they read it and just about everybody has read it again. And so it's it's an interesting story that I think everybody has multiple attachments to throughout their lights, and it's a fascinating way of sort of learning about someone what they think and who they are. Alleys, Townsend says from light speed that we're seeing the replant foaming of retail. Well, she would take him this in the future of retail specifically. I mean, we're definitely seeing a world that's dominated by Amazon. I think that's for sure, or definitely seen a consumer funnel of ice start on Amazon for just. Every purchase that I make, and I don't think that's going to change. So that either means that we need to build needing full businesses that stand apart from that, or we need to build businesses that are leveraging and growing off Amazon and the right kind of way and Cobley combination of both of them. So I think if replant forming means a world that is dominated by Amazon, but where there is still opportunities for brands and businesses to grow off their own channels off physical channels off online channels off other third party wholesale in partnership channels. If that's a read platforming of legacy industry than, yeah, I do think we're probably going through one. You mentioned diamonds in that custom green settlements show. Amazon does motivate the milk than destroy it. Would you agree with that? Yeah, I think so. For me, what's most interesting about Amazon is how efficient it's made us. I would say there are a lot of products that I buy from my home on repeat that. I have no problem buying on Amazon. John, and I think in a way it gives you greater ability of time. I go on Amazon and buy a toothbrush and the toothpaste, and all the household items that I may need that I don't have a huge emotional attachment to, although there, I'm sure lots of people but have an emotional attachment, their toothbrushes well, and that availability of time gives me an opportunity to visit the glossy showroom. That gives me an opportunity to bend a little bit more time on holiday. It.

Amazon John Townsend Cobley ten twenty thirty fifty one hu eighty percent twenty minute milk
"twenty minute" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

The Twenty Minute VC

03:15 min | 2 years ago

"twenty minute" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

"But since I left, I've just increasingly taking bold risks and I've had a lot of mega face plants and the resiliency that you develop the skin sort of wartime mentality that drives has made me interested in taking bigger and bigger risks and bolder and bolder beds. One of my favorite. How do you deal with the fine moments for me, I lean on, you know, my wife was li- like therapists support. I think it's hard. It's not. It never gets easier highs. Heiser high. The lows are low, but I've had some really big tough ones like Doppler labs, not working out company, which we raise a lot of money. We developed really incredible IP and product. We were super proud of, you know, we thought that that thing was going to be one of the biggest companies in and we had acquirer interest levels that, you know, I never thought I would see in any my companies and it didn't work out in the end. And so really, I think what made me able to go through that experience was that I had had enough experiences like it before or even small failures in current society. There's so much pressure be successful in school and go to college and get the job and then get the right promotion. I think it's interesting about this industry is you almost have to have failures and face plans to to be successful. It's almost a prerequisite something to be celebrated and Lonzo well-executed failure, and you learn from it and. If you have the right investors who are understanding and combat on your next one, you know, I see it as progress instead of cows with so many facets of you'll career. I'm kind of activities. What would you let your legacy to be? I don't really think too much about my legacy. I think about it as I'm very internally motivated. I wanna leave it all on the field. And when I die, I want to say that I came close to reaching and cheating my potential for impact on the world and interesting which were rooting work and interesting, rich awarding social and family lives as I can. I think legacy that's dangerous thing to to get obsessed with. That's probably why I'll never be Jeff Bezos or someone someone like that. You know, Bill Gates who's literally cured a few diseases, you know, with his wife on their own. I'm not as driven by that as I am sort of the personal challenges. I've got some towns like to make sure that I, I leave it all on the field now enough that, but I wanna finish on the next five years for you on the siting roadmap have with cross poss. Yeah, I'm having the time of my life scaling this business. Get to wake up every morning, thinking about how to motivate people to become healthier and happier more inspired version of themselves and spend. As much if not more of your time of your, you're conscious hours in my working than you do even with your own family. In those two things are probably would determine whether you're happy or not in your life. And so I just feel really lucky that I've kind of stumbled into meeting pile getting involved in this company and then being chance to lead it, and I'm really having the time life. So I'm hopeful that this is my last job and then I can do it for a really long time and turn it into an economic engine that will just allow me to continue to place more interesting bets on making people healthier and happier, and hopefully make a little bit of money on the side, continued angel invest and help other entrepreneurs. Well, I mean, I have to keep because you'll the reason I go to Pelosi's mice phoning, so she signed he about, but as I said, I've had so many great things from Charlie, so for so long. So it really has been such a pleasure having you on stay fresh to thanks. And I have set really well such a huge pleasure top for it. So I'm gonna show such a big mar of his incredible career and you can find him on Twitter at for honesty, line coins, we'd love see you, hey, behind the scenes, the twenty minute BBC..

Pelosi Charlie Jeff Bezos Bill Gates Doppler labs Twitter twenty minute five years
"twenty minute" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

The Twenty Minute VC

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"twenty minute" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

"I do just want to abbott don really as one of those truly special people in the co system he's been so kind and supportive to me and i really cannot find him enough of that and if you'd like to see more from don which you really must you can find him on twitter at de shine nasty shine 'em likewise we'd love to see behind the scenes here at the twenty minute vc you can find on instagram at age stabbings nineteen ninetysix with two bs it'd be great cu that but before we leave each day brown's announced owning too small ways of creating video and digital content to fit new distribution channels looking for false turnarounds while maintaining or improving the quality of the video platform addresses directly it's now simple for brands agencies to connect with the very best creatives for that project smith medium is already working with some of the biggest forward thinking companies to save time i'm cost by in comparison of the global network curated creative talent with a global network that wellplaced to continue to sponsor take on the world's coltan damant produces a mockus making for the best creative lives can get the shortlist of idioms account manages in hours tailored to that project needs needs to submit a brief today we'll check out in the of video dot com home to some of the biggest names in the industry and support for the twenty minute vc also comes from one the capsule the easiest way to invest in largescale solar energy projects across the us with one you can earn up to seven and a half percent annually while helping to finance renewable energy projects and you can get stuff at one the capsule joel come forward slash twenty minute vc all in lashes one the casual where impacted investing meets capitalism as i appreciate what your support and i can't wait to bring you friday's episode with adrian found on c at forward.

us brown joel adrian twenty minute
"twenty minute" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

The Twenty Minute VC

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"twenty minute" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

"Paul to the twenty minute bc this week and it's founders friday with me harry stabbings and you can find me on instagram at h dubbing is nineteen ninetysix with tb's i would love to see that where you can ask questions for future guess even suggest future guests for the show but to the showed stay and we welcome in incredible serial entrepreneur in the form of system book founder and ceo at honor the startup that provides care your family will love to date seth has raised over sixty million dollars in funding with on from the lights of thrive capsule andriessen horrors homebrew on abc just to name a few i'm proud to honor seth was the co founder and ceo of me bo a web communications platform bind by the likes of sequoia khosla and true ventures and me by reach fifty million dollars in revenue and close to hof of the us internet population before being quite by google for one hundred million dollars in two thousand and twelve google says served as a product derived on the google plus platform google axe and cecil so an incredible angel investor with a book furlan including the likes of fit bit and gusto to name a few i do say huge heat to schamlen mar zone for the injured set today without which is absolutely would not have been possible we really do appreciate that shan but before episodes day brown's announce hunting too small ways of creating video and digital content to fit new distribution channels looking for foster turnarounds while maintaining or improving the quality the medium platform addresses donte irately now simple for brands agencies to connect with the very best creatives for that projects medium is already working with some of the biggest forward thinking companies to save time and cost by an iron comparison of the global network security creative talent with the global network that well placed to continue to expand take on the welds content amount produces a mockus looking for the best creatives can get the shortlist from videos account manages in hours tailored to that project needs and we need to submit a brief today we'll check out the platform my video dot com home to some of the biggest names in the industry and support for the twenty minute vc also comes from one the capsule the easiest way to invest in largescale solar energy.

Paul founder and ceo seth abc co founder sequoia khosla google ceo cecil brown donte irately twenty minute one hundred million dollars fifty million dollars sixty million dollars
"twenty minute" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

The Twenty Minute VC

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"twenty minute" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

"And i won't say again a huge sign huge boris giving states come on the show more exciting times ahead for him and angela with version one with the new investing thesis and you can find out more on twitter by following bars at beaver likewise we'd love see you behind the scenes here the twenty minute vc you can find me on instagram at h dubbing 's nineteen ninetysix it'd be great cu that but before we leave each day brands announced owning too small ways of creating video and digital content to fit new distribution channels looking for false turnarounds while maintaining or improving the quality the moon videon platform addresses dante rightly now simple for brands and agencies to connect with the very best creatives for that projects medium is already working with some of the biggest forward thinking companies to save time i'm cost in comparison of the global network security to creative talent with a global network that wellplaced to continue to sponsor take on the world's coltan damone produces a mockus looking for the best creatives can get the shortlist of idioms account manages in alice tailored to that project needs we need to submit a brief today we'll check out the platform of idiom dot com home to some of the biggest names in the industry and support for the twenty minute vc also comes from one to capsule the easiest way to invest in laws scale solar energy projects across the us with one you can earn up to seven and a half percent annually while helping to finance renewable energy projects and you can get started at one the capsule dot com for slash twenty minute vc all in lapses one the capsule where imprint investing meets capitalism as always we sir appreciate your support and kennel wait to bring you found us friday.

angela twitter dante us twenty minute
"twenty minute" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

The Twenty Minute VC

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"twenty minute" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

"I'm not quite sure why i always thought with this is the twenty minute nbc highly if he clicks on the show you knew that this was what you would clicking but regardless welcome to the twenty minute vc with me harry stabbings and you can see more for me and behind the scenes on instagram at h dubbing nine hundred ninety six with two and speaking of instagram so many of you have message me that saying you'd like to cover more crypto so naturally i listen to you and i'm thrilled to crypto focus show stay with a friend and second time into the show in the form of boris verts founding partner had version one one of north america's leading early stage funds with a portfolio including the lice of previous guests coin based angel list schipol top hat polly chain capsule and many more incredible companies also boris boris was the c o a books where he led a team of seventy people until the acquisition in two thousand eight by amazon in addition to this force zoo so aboard partner with andreessen horowitz and it's the lead independent director at ethan capsule a toronto based technology company aiming to become the central hub for the theory of ecosystem mmhmm but before episodes day browns and now turning to small ways of creating video and digital content to fit new distribution channels looking for foster turnarounds while maintaining or improving the quality the moon videon platform addresses not directly it's now simple for brands and agencies to connect with the very best creatives for that projects medium is already working with some of the biggest forward thinking companies to save time and cost by an iron comparison of the global network security creative talent with the global network that wellplaced to continue to sponsor take on the world's coltan demont produces a mockus looking for the best creatives can get shortlist from videogames account managers in alice tailored to that project needs and we need to submit a brief today we'll check out the platform meridian dot com home to some of the biggest names in the industry and support for the twenty minute vc also comes from one capsule the easiest way to invest in largescale solar energy projects across the us with one you can earn up to seven and a half percent annually while helping to finance renewable energy projects and you can get stops at one the capsule dot com.

nbc instagram north america partner andreessen horowitz lead independent director browns us founding partner boris boris amazon toronto twenty minute
"twenty minute" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

The Twenty Minute VC

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"twenty minute" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

"Thanks i really love talking to you i have to say it was so special top jerry on the show you that and as i said reaction wheel in that it's one of the best blogs on the venture capital industry jerry one of the deepest thing is that i've advocaat across he's been incredibly kind and helpful to me and i so appreciate his friendship so thank you so much for that jerry but before we leave each day bronze announce hunting small ways of creating video and digital content to fit new distribution channels looking for false tun around while maintaining or improving the quality the medium platform addresses dante rightly his now simple for brands agencies to connect with the very best creatives for that projects medium is already working with some of the biggest ford thinking companies to save time i'm coast plan are in comparison of the global network curates creative talent with a global network that well placed to continue to sponsor take on the world's coltan damone produces a most is looking for the best creatives can get a shortlist from victims account manages alice tailored to that projects needs and we need to submit a brief today we'll check out in the platform dot com home to some of the biggest names in the industry and support for the twenty minute vc also comes from one to capsule the easiest way to invest in laws scale solar energy projects across the us with one you can earn up to seven and a half percent annually while helping to finance renewable energy projects and you can get stops at one the capsule dot com forward slash twenty minute vc in lashes one the capsule where impact investing meets capitalism as always i so appreciate oriole support and i cannot wait to bring you an incredible episode on friday with jesse janet at leumi.

jerry ford us jesse janet leumi dante twenty minute
"twenty minute" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

The Twenty Minute VC

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"twenty minute" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

"Welcome back to another week in the world of the twenty minutes with me harry stubbings not love see you on instagram at h dubbing nine hundred ninety six for all things behind the scenes from us and a place where you can submit questions and guests for future episodes i'd love to see that but to the show today and i know we always do a very formal introduction but not today today's guest is not only a good friend but also in my is one of the industry's deepest thinkers on the tree mechanics of investing and managing a successful portfolio his writing on reaction wheel dot com has and continues to teach me with every piece and you really must check that out so i'm very thrilled to welcome jerry neiman into the whole seats day now jerry is one of new york's leading angel investors with a portfolio including the license the trade desk which appeared in two thousand sixteen data dog and flurry which was acquired by your who just to name a few to angel investor jerry was managing dr archer senator investments and before jerry built the first open market for the pricing and exchange of real time consuming data in the form of route marcus jerry's have been the managing director at omni combs vanish capsule division where he enjoyed an incredible five ipo's from the portfolio i do say huge thank you to my partner in front fred desktop for the insurance jerry stay i really do so appreciate that fred but before episodes day brown's announce hunting too small ways of creating video and digital content to fit new distribution channels looking for foster turnarounds while maintaining or improving the quality moon videon platform addresses not directly it's now simple for brands and agencies to connect with the very best creatives for that projects medium is already working with some of the biggest forward thinking companies to save time and cost by an iron comparison of the global network curated creative talent with a global network that wellplaced to continue to sponsor take on the world's content demont produces a mockus looking for the best creatives can get the shortlist from videos account managers in ours tailored to that project needs and we need to submit a brief today we'll check out the platform my video dot com home to some of the biggest names in the industry and support for the.

jerry neiman new york marcus jerry managing director omni combs partner dr archer senator fred brown twenty minutes
"twenty minute" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

The Twenty Minute VC

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"twenty minute" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

"My pleasure thank you so much for having me on show what an incredible guests have on the show and what can i say i'm sold on the very exciting times ahead for the opportunities in the midwest and if you'd like to see more from chris you can follow him on twitter at chris olsen not really is a must likewise we'd love see behind the scenes here at the twenty minute bbc you can find more from us on instagram at eight stubbings nineteen ninetysix it'd be great cu that but before we leave each day on use phones the ring i made a splash when they were on shark tank a few years ago the concept genius if someone rings you a dual belt and you won't home to come to the door you can respond to the person using just your smartphone adding a level of both security on convenience today over million people using the ring video doorbell to help protect homes and now bring has a great new product coup brin floodlight cam just like rings amazing doorbell front light cameras emotion on today to camera in front alight with hd video and two way audio unless you know the moment anyone steps onto your property and you can see i'm speed to vincent's even set off a built in a long right from your phone so to me spending my life in this gd i have my ring at home and you can instruct deliveries check security and just feel much more comfortable for me from the studio simply put with ring you're always home and now is a listener you can save up to one hundred and fifty dollars off a ring security kids when you go to ring dot com slash twenty thousand ring dot com slash to'serve e c and speaking of providing security and comfort that's what happens when you work with a firm like kuni kuti is a global law on builds around supporting startups on the.

midwest twitter chris olsen vincent kuni kuti fifty dollars twenty minute
"twenty minute" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

The Twenty Minute VC

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"twenty minute" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

"Wonderful thank you so much harry well if you're as slices i am for the future for five then you can see more from al on twitter by following him on at zone saudi zahi with love see behind the scenes the twenty minute bbc you can find this on instagram at h dubbing nineteen ninetysix with two bs it'd be great seed that but before we leave each day on use the ring i made a splash when they were on shark tank a few years ago the concept genius if someone rings you a dual belt and you won't home don't wanna come to the door you can respond to the person using just your smartphone adding a level of both security on convenience today over million people using the ring video doorbell to help protect homes amount bring has a great new product co brin floodlight cam just like rings amazing doorbell from light cameras emotion activated camera in front alight with hd video and two way audio unless you know the moment anyone steps onto you appropriate and you can see i'm speaking to vincent's even set off a built in a long right from your phone so for me spending my life in this judy i have my ring at home and you can deliveries check security and just feel much more comfortable for me from the studio simply put with ring always at home and now is a listener you can save up to one hundred and fifty dollars off a ring security kids when you go to ring dot com slash twenty thousand ring dot com slash to'serve e c and speaking of providing security and comfort that's what happens when he what with the phone like kuni kuti is global north on builds around supporting startups on the venture capital funds the fund them now we've spoken before about that foaming the first venture fund in silicon vanni and forming movies funds than any other law firm in the world who also represents more than six thousand high grades startups across the globe through the full company life cycle that the number one fund for visa but axis both emanate.

kuni kuti silicon vanni harry vincent fifty dollars twenty minute
"twenty minute" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

The Twenty Minute VC

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"twenty minute" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

"The last publicly announced investment i got the founder to say yes to me was a company called bland that does software for consumer application like mortgage applications have ever met on nima eugene aaron the cofounders you'd understand how specialty were and and really was easy say yet to them and the struggle is gained them to say yes to me jerry allies that i had so many people recommending you for the show i'm so thrilled that we goes to say thank you so much for joining me stay hey thanks for having me this was a lot of fun what a fantastic guests and i want to say hugh like jerry if that he's done for me in the show and if you'd like to see more from him you can follow him on twitter on jerry shannon as i said at the beginning he must check out his latest piece on risk you can find that on the website the twenty minute vc don't come likewise we'd love see behind the scenes on instagram at h dubbing nineteen ninetysix but before we leave each day on useful to ring i made a splash when they were on shots and a few years ago the concept genius if someone rings you a doorbell and you won't home don't want to come to the dual you can respond to the person using just your smartphone adding a level of both security on convenience today over million people using the ring video doorbell to help protect homes amount bring has a great new product co bring floodlight cam just like rings amazing doorbell fraud light cameras emotion activated camera and fertilize with hd video and two way audio that lets you know the moment anyone steps onto your property and you can see on speed to even set off a built in home right from your phone so for me spending my life in this gd i have my.

founder twitter jerry shannon hugh fraud twenty minute
"twenty minute" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

The Twenty Minute VC

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"twenty minute" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

"We all back home in twenty minutes with me harry stabbings you can see more from us behind the scenes on instagram at h stabbings nineteen ninetysix stabbings with cheese where we will also be posting the upcoming guests for the show and you can submit your questions ahead of time and be named on the show and we really would love to see that but to the show stay on an episode which really reminds me just what an honor and a privilege it is to do the show so i'm very thrilled to welcome jerry chen partner gray lock one of the world's most successful vc funds with prior investments in check this out facebook instagram linden airbnb dropbox app dynamics the list really does go on of incredible companies as to jerry jerry invest and entrepreneurs building new enterprise sas applications and in all aspects of ai and cloud infrastructure jerry carney sits on the board of docker kato network gladly rumbek spoke and blend and prior to joining gray lock jerry was vice president of cloud and application services at vm wet while he was part of the executive team scaled the company from two hundred and fifty to over fifteen thousand employees and five billion dollars in revenue if you haven't already you must check how jerry's recent rising on risk the game of strategic investment it really is a fantastic piece and you can find the links on the twenty minute v c dot com but before we dive into the show stay on new sponsor sponsoring i made a splash when they were on shark tank a few years ago the concept genius if someone ruins your doorbell and you want home or don't want to come to the door you can respond to the person using just your smartphone adding a level of both security on convenience today over million people using the ring video doorbell to help protect their homes and mouring has a great new product cool bring floodlight cam just like rings amazing doorbell front light cameras a motion activated camera and fertilize with hd video and two way audio that lets you know the moment anyone steps onto your property and you can see i'm speed to vinson's even set off a built in a.

partner jerry carney vice president vinson jerry chen gray facebook airbnb jerry jerry docker kato executive mouring five billion dollars twenty minutes twenty minute
"twenty minute" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

The Twenty Minute VC

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"twenty minute" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

"The investors inch introduced to the companies to the coupe deaf teams i'm intrigued how do you like to rebuild the relationship what design process in florida like to you in an ideal world so i think there's a high level where i loved to spend time in talk to the venture capital community not necessarily to go and be like what part of your portfolio can i buy up of more just because what i saw it in recent is that you really are seeing the pulse inflow of what is coming in what the trends are and so for me it's absolutely invaluable to have like a good back and forth relationship with pc's on what are they seeing what's interesting what's real what's not real and i think that that is the first level of value and i'd like to think that i can give the point of view of a large corporate end sort of what we're seeing in the marketplace in what we think is going to make it up to our size and i think that there's a great back and forth there because i think that when you create that dialog and they understand what we're doing what we're looking for and i understand the trends they're seeing that's when you can actually come up in synthesize an idea that eventually could turn into an acquisition and it's much better than sort of here's my portfolio and here's the two that irrelevant your space and here's whether you could buy them or not and i think most bc's no that to most of my interactions aren't like that on venture capital side and so i think that's the first layer of how do you have a good interaction between corporate development nbc's jim so one of the twelve hundred gp's has recommended squad by the twenty minute vc it's exciting time say and we're going to progress through pipe grime said that it's a grueling process i'd love to hear your thoughts on this is a farah sas ment of the process wants to talk he's helping identified how would you respond to them how do you think about the process.

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