21 Burst results for "twenty million years"

The Now-extinct Castoroides Was a Bear-sized Beaver

BrainStuff

03:47 min | 6 months ago

The Now-extinct Castoroides Was a Bear-sized Beaver

"Brain stuff Lauren Vogel. Bam here. mammoths, mastodons and Sabertooth hats weren't the only giants roaming ancient America. The Pleistocene was a global epoch kicked off two point six, million years ago. It lasted right up. Until Earth's most recent ice age ended about eleven thousand, seven, hundred years before the present day. When you live in a cold environment, being big has its advantages. Large animals tend to conserve body heat more easily than smaller ones. This is one of the major reasons why colossal mammals were so widespread during the frigid pleistocene. CASTA Roy was very much a product of its time. The largest rodent in Pleistocene north. America, this very big beaver grew to more than seven feet long from tail to stout that's over two meters and could have weighed as much as two hundred and twenty pounds or a hundred kilos or more. Rivaling the American black bear in size casta royalties utterly dwarfed the Beavers that lived today modern Eurasian, and American beaver species clock in just around three feet long a bit less than a meter and way somewhere between twenty nine, seventy, seven pounds. That's about thirteen to thirty five kilos. Proportionately castaways had a narrower tail and shorter legs albeit with bigger hind feet than its extant relatives. We also know that it didn't eat the same foods. What he plans are a crucial part of every living beavers diet. The critters use chisel like incisors that's their front teeth to gnaw through bark and take down trees. But. Even though castaways incisors grew to be a whopping six inches or fifteen centimeters long the teeth had dollar edges by comparison. Dental differences would have made it a lot harder for Castro to eat tree bark and indeed it looks like this was not really on their menu. Using isotopic signatures and castaways teeth from Ohio and the Yukon a twenty nineteen study found that the giant beaver mostly eight softer aquatic plants. The findings say a lot about the Rodin's ecological niche and why it might have died out. For starters, castaways probably didn't build dams. Unusual. About that the earliest known beavers appeared during the easing. A which lasted between about fifty, six, thirty, four, million years ago. New evidence suggests that the wood harvesting specialists came along much later perhaps around twenty million years ago. In all likelihood, these bark fanciers used would as a food source before any of them started constructing dams. Since as fed on aquatic plants, its survival would have depended on wetland habitats. The animal was highly successful for a time cast Roy these fossils representing at least two distinct species have been documented in the Great Plains the Great Lakes, the American South Alaska and numerous Canadian provinces. Unfortunately for the mega sized beaver north. America. became warmer and drier after the last ice age ended wetlands grew scarcer as a result. Today's beavers used their logging skills to reshape the land around them so that it meets their needs with some well placed would in the nearest stream, a determined beaver engineer brand-new Pons. Yet if Castro Reuters didn't harvest would or build dams, it couldn't followed suit. So theoretically decline in natural wetlands left the giant beaver more susceptible to extinction. Last of these creatures perished around ten thousand years ago.

Casta Roy America Lauren Vogel Sabertooth Castro Reuters Great Lakes Castro Ohio Engineer Pons Yukon South Alaska Great Plains
The Evolutionary History Of Penguins Is Far From Black And White

Environment: NPR

02:23 min | 8 months ago

The Evolutionary History Of Penguins Is Far From Black And White

"The image of a penguin might bring to mind an endless march across windswept ice. The reality of penguins is a bit different says Grant Ballard of point blue conservation science was actually see species of Pangolin. Really, love, it's only two species. Many others live in warmer waters. So we're could conceivably dealing with something like minus seven degrees or even colder than out. Then, show, but lobby goes mainland has encountered temperatures that are up around one hundred degrees Fahrenheit. So how'd it penguins evolve with such different lifestyles and new study and the proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences has some answers we've been able to resolve. Several. Longstanding questions about penguin evolution in particular way penguins originated. Hurry Bowie of UC Berkeley as an author on that study. He says there's been a long debate about where the first penguins evolved was it Antarctica or farther north in New Zealand as others have suggested, well armed with genetic evidence from a species of modern day penguins his team has an answer which turned out to be along the coast of Australia and New Zealand the nearby islands of the South Pacific. They say that happened around twenty two million years ago from there, the penguin served on a circular current at the bottom of the world there is a clockwise current. And so they use this current colonized like. The region Juliana of the Catholic. University. Of Chile is a CO author. She says, eleven million years ago that current revved up and penguins used it to slingshot themselves throughout the Southern Hemisphere. That's right. slingshot. The researchers also observed genetic adaptations. Some penguins picked up along the way like the ability to drink seawater also changes in how some species use oxygen allowing them to dive deep that doesn't mean. Penguins will be quick to adapt to modern day climate change. Here's Valley. Again, this adaptation to being able to occurring freezing cold waters in tropical waters occurred over a period of twenty million years, and this doesn't mean that penguins are going to be able to keep up with oceans warming today. If there is one thing, the paper makes clear. It's that the evolution of penguins for from black and

Penguins National Academy Of Sciences Bowie Grant Ballard Pangolin Chile New Zealand Southern Hemisphere Berkeley South Pacific Australia
"twenty million years" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

10:09 min | 1 year ago

"twenty million years" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"You know he missed spring training and so you expect them to be a little rusty buddies bags on the ball very well and now you can get your hands full when he's come in the games locally we don't have to see him I Sean Addison with the start for the giants and who are the guys that he's going to have to keep reading about this comes lined up because that kept some pretty good boppers of Atlanta well they do and their balance you know with the lefties and righties arguments for review these all form but bios of me with he's got is doing a lot of the damage form and and really Rizzo of me down the line together a kid playing second Garcia's switch hitter who they brought up and he's swinging the bat well and get a lot of extra base hits and of course Chris Brian who is one of the top sluggers in the game he's dangerous so they they have a lot of pop and they they do damage and they're playing very well since all star break so they're on a good roll too so it's gonna be a fun series all right so the giants and the cubs it started a three game series giants baseball on the radio next good deal and his inconsistent discipline when it comes to players winning a fall the NFL com the policy well I start here the Seahawks were surprised by the news especially in light of what out what sorry Carol and don't you want to try to gather the case of John reed and they are all three cases you know there was some evidence brawler going there also was no conviction and be all involved in that situation so yeah it's got to give me would say is charity kill places go vision for a June it's going to be one of the most you'd be firmly James Nali you know I I have gone to all one word yet on read what I would tell you on at all if they do the record keeping their what their and do you know what I want to try it out you did sell back out of the investigation business and you know I I know that there is an a plus on the part of some older versions of my profile or is it bad July law enforcement take the lead on some of these things to worry yeah they did are you a right I'm sorry but that was part of it and then going out for a bit I think is you know trying to foster better relations with the players that the CBA negotiations you know I had so I rebels there's played in they'll decision but always drawn resort in the face of it I can read for people may not understand is a key component at Seahawks defense are front it's a contract year for read it and it to your point of every little bit more on this bird when you have a skill guy for team it's supposed to be contending for a Superbowl whose kid the big biggest playmaker from the league's MVP verses a big hog Molly in a defensive lineman how much truly does that factory in in in in in any individual's mind when it comes to making a subject of Lawrence objective decision all right sure what although would be zero right right you're now that these are there there like I was the one that always to be which is in all of us share an even process right well again that you should be able to take the name off the guy's Jersey and take the number off his chest and make up you know just on objective decision based on the fact yeah but I I'd say based on the loose in the NFL react at fair to be skeptical about that and you know I would or use it where everything was handled two thousand fourteen I don't think right longer govern them there I think you know basically is what Florida when was blowing in any given day and I remember the was handled I remember a lot of you'll be all set there was only two games even before we saw the video and the NFL trying to explain it away and then it became something else entirely widen the video service despite the fact that the NFL had all the facts all along and so you know all right I I did your feet are ideal world we're saving your ceremonial bells trying to be even handed from case to case but we share a room and old cases different based on public perception and public reaction across the board over the last five or six years and so I don't think it would be a reach just say the profile of each individual player what plan and clearly you know that's all part of a regional is a completely different level than John reed sorry to very good players all right he is our brother in the document to be dot com senior writer with Freddie company if it's Simmons on Freddie effort Simmons and ESPN radio outside the last week or so it's been a relatively quiet all season for the National Football League I'm sure the owners and the players okay we want to get together get this new contract hashed out of these wet and discussions about that but you're also going to have certain storylines a noble crept up today Odell Beckham junior saying the giants disrespected him and all of the foolishness we heard about what he had to say about his exit from New York now he's a Cleveland brown what do you think over all the giants did a lot to stick up for him when he was when he was there and that's for sure about that and you know I I agree Hey you know you have a handy man and and Jerry recent that mac is going down now or whatever and what those guys they they're all bad too but the hotel back almost a part of all Downton charge that Schirmer Dave Gelman go I I just tell you got a good job they don't realize from day one to try to make that work and you know I'll talk you like texting him right away to stop the job that job and yeah I don't know giants organization trying to do right by Odell Beckham step by step by step over the course of his career and I hear that that's right up to the head in and giving them a chance to go play for you in that that that I think most of us believe could be a contender it's one nineteen and so on I'm all for players being on you know I've never dealt where does speak your mind because one the bit of German troops out flyers I just sort of feel bad for the the people on the other end of it the giants have a handle a lot of things the right way over the course last five or six years and that's why there's been more turnover that organization last ability over the last decade there has been any time a lot twenty or thirty years but you know I I really do feel like you have to promote human standpoint right by Odell Beckham on a lot of different levels and so are you sort of unfortunate to see throw some good people under the box here the new year on the road starting tomorrow bird take a look at some of the bigger stories out those out there especially when it comes to hold outs Melvin Gordon with the Chargers I know Tom to Lesko wants to Pam darn good money I don't think you're gonna pay and maybe that the general manager of the Chargers Ali is gonna play and break the bank money Ezekiel Elliott go through some of those potential hold outs and what you expect to see so I'd been going all out and I also you know my my belief here is that all development charger okay all the line and that that's their history they got one of the toughest because project negotiators nobody United required I just you know I I think they've got a pretty solid idea of what value apple each fired and god this blight I really don't see them back in now especially the really talented roster guys I made some big names to ever have to take care of down the line guys like Joey Bosa Mike Williams you all a few years down the line drawing James because you care felt rivers Joe he's going into a contract year so I I did the charges all the live there I think it's very slow very seriously consider hold on if I were him I would hold out and I and I just think you know it board Melvin Gordon told me how you know it for that matter either I think about position we have any sort of leverage you got to use it because it can be waiting I mean all you gotta do is look at Todd Gurley the speed of light evidence of that and so I figured there's a decent chance the old Valerie part of it is because he knows he's behind it I thought that Prescott and and Adam are you alright a contract and alternately are America's bigger Gallagher I have to pay them I just think he's one of the very few will leave it at that position more so geyser changeable ya it is not you get all your help your record back what he is here the focal point of the offense and ultimately the order window right now we've got a lot of good young players coming up an office of line it's getting a little older a lot of things coming together a one sided they're gonna have to take care of them and then if you all get some you know like I did god do we have like a little less of a high profile Chris Jones is one that I think is interesting one is a very very good player for the chiefs they pay for it because over twenty million years ago the tar heel contract situation woman over the next few months and I think he is somebody in I wanted at this hour not show up this week and at some all are the values the better your choir there we've seen defense of salaries well over a lot of years and stuff eight three that I'm absolutely keeping our eye on and it'll be very interesting going forward and we do not even asking about Jim Harbaugh's comments about his Ohio State Buckeyes just did but I think we're good for another time it comes out I love it I love it because everything every all state Michigan rivalry is a big deal even something small like that thank you even something small bug I.

giants Sean Addison six years twenty million years thirty years
The History of Continental Drift

A Moment of Science

02:00 min | 1 year ago

The History of Continental Drift

"It was one of the earth momentous times continents collided volcano erupted ocean currents shifted species rent a muck twenty million years ago north and south america were arranged in nearly the same positions as they are today the big difference being they were separated by a deep open channel called the central american seaway there is no panama and no need for panama canal because there was clear sailing from atlantic to the pacific the fact that sears is a geologically active planet with shifting crustal plates during the time period between twenty three million years ago the pacific played collided with the caribbean played pushing magnets the surface to make islands in the sea and eventually creating a land bridge between the two continents the movement not only changed the land it disrupted ocean currents open the door to species migrations and probably altered the world's climate when the land bridge closed editorial waters could no longer mix atlantic became saltier in the pacific more dilute creating a gradient the moves water in a giant loop around the globe today worm atlantic water they used a pass through the gap move northward becoming the gulfstream stream scientists believe these changes created a warmer europe and contributed to our recent sick like ice ages the land bridge also open the way for species across from one conscience other dear horses raccoons bears and the camel ancestors of llamas moved south across the bridge at heaters porcupines possums and armadillos move north unfortunately many large south american species couldn't compete with the north american animals and became extinct changing

Panama Canal Sears Europe South America Twenty Three Million Years Twenty Million Years
"twenty million years" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

In Defense of Plants Podcast

03:38 min | 1 year ago

"twenty million years" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

"In this east west of I'd so it's more Mesic to the west and Moore's Eric to the east. It's in this rain shadow, Celso got these massive outcrops of granite. Like I was mentioning earlier and those create what we call spatially restricted microlight, so these are little pockets where let's say the Foxtail pines, which is Californian democ species can't get encroached by firs or hemlock. Right. Because they're sort of locked into this area by these big boulders, and the I can't get in there or fire can't get in there. So there's all these little subtle pieces to the puzzle that. When you kind look at it from the ground, not quite sure why this is all going on. But when you have this top level view, you know, we had a fire that, that ravaged through there, about five years ago, and that's what I started to realize these little pockets of, of the Foxtail pines, why they're there and why they've probably probably been there for thousands of years, as you know, the fire couldn't move through this landscape because there just isn't enough fuels and under story. So anyway, just fascinating stuff all across the clam at there's pockets like the miracle mile and I it's a never ending tree scavenger hunt for me. That's a pretty wild in it's really cool, because it kind of connects this big scale patterning of deep geological time deep climatic time in the history of glaciation on his candidate. But then also, these really fine scale ecological nuances to the landscape that do matter. Right. And that's when you thinking about why species are where they are how they're distributed in, in what diversity means from a on the ground perspective. You can't have one. Side or the other. It's really have these moments where will you get into a place like this, and you start to appreciate it, and try to understand it? And you really have that connecting thread that brings macro and migra scale ecological processes like right to the forefront. He definitely it's just so fun to, to piece things like that together, you know, the whole scale of the Klamath, the whole scale southern Appalachians, but then, like you're studying and the extreme southern Appalachians, like what's different about that smaller area than say the broader part of North Carolina and Virginia? And that's the same thing in the Klamath, like what's so special about this little pocket of the salmon mountains compared to the whole size of the Klamath in the Klamath mountains compare incised to say Virginia. I like to make that comparison. 'cause that's where I'm from, but it gives you an idea about the size of the Klamath, but then you dive into these little pockets, and it's different yet similar to those large scale patterns. It's like our freckly universe or speech. Exactly. So, yes. So then like within these patterns, you, we have sort of I consider exemplar conifers that really exhibit. What's going on in the Klamath mountains? What makes him so special and, and I think the poster child for that for me is the brewer's spruce. And this is our endemic conifer had only grows in the Klamath it has been around for a long time, you know, fossil records, put it back at least twenty million years, where it had a much broader range across the west. There's fossil records of it in Idaho, Nevada, you know so, so this is well documented, but what has happened in those twenty million years is the climate is shifted enough. So you can imagine twenty million years ago, the whole west was similar to the climate at the Klamath mountains now have that climate changed, and the footprint of that climate has shrunk into the Klamath, and this is cool and wet and we get a lot of rain here in the winter, some of these higher peaks will hold snow deepen. The summertime. They'll also get some rain storms whereas these are just thunderstorms, but it can be.

Klamath Foxtail pines Celso Virginia Moore Idaho Eric North Carolina Nevada twenty million years five years
How to Find Your House on Pangea

Curiosity Daily

01:50 min | 2 years ago

How to Find Your House on Pangea

"Remember, the good old days when all the continents were just one big mega continent. All right. Well, you probably don't remember those days because they were like a hundred seven. Five million years ago, but if you're still somehow nostalgic for those geographically simpler times back when you only had to remember the name Jia instead of seven different continents. Then we've got some good news. Thanks to a software engineer named Ian Webster. You can load up an ancient map of the earth. And find out where your house would have been you can find the interactive map on his website dinosaur pictures dot org, and you can use it to pinpoint a modern address in any of twenty six different geological areas. It's an out of the box way to connect yourself to the planet's history, you can set them up to twenty million years ago two hundred million years ago as far back as seven hundred fifty million years ago with lots of intervals between we check out our address here in Chicago. Because of course, we did. And the further back you go the closers to oh and the rest of North America drifts towards Africa around two hundred twenty million years ago. You'll find Florida wedged right in there between South America and Africa with the region that will eventually become Europe. In Asia hovering a little bit overhead, by the way. Did you know the Panja split into two sub super continents before it split into the seven continents? We know today the one in the north was called law regime which included North America Europe and Asia and the one in the south was called Gondwanaland which included Africa, South America, Australia and antibiotic they broken in their current configurations later on and that division is still going on today. In fact, Africa is splitting into two continents right now. But that's a story will get into next week. In the meantime, you can drop a pin on a map to see where you would have lived on the websites dinosaur pictures dot org.

Africa North America South America Asia Ian Webster JIA Software Engineer Europe Chicago Florida Australia Seven Hundred Fifty Million Ye Two Hundred Twenty Million Yea Two Hundred Million Years Twenty Million Years Five Million Years
"twenty million years" Discussed on Bad Science

Bad Science

04:25 min | 2 years ago

"twenty million years" Discussed on Bad Science

"You who knows? But yes. So like, it's the Meguid on was a real dinosaur, shark, basically. Yes. Extinct probably about twenty million years ago. God and was how big as compared forty feet, maybe. And that's everything we know about it is just based on its teeth. Okay. Okay. An standard great white is about twenty tw-. Okay. Okay. Those are the biggest sharks great white sharks. Toothy ones whale sharks right up to thirty feet long. But the plankton basking shark same thing. Okay. Got it. What about these sharks? The Waco is up with Mako. They maybe ten eleven feet. Okay. That's a big Mako though. Yeah. It's a really big make is there any validity to the shark brain being advanced like is it smarter than most things in the ocean. Is it compares to human brain? How does that work? So they have very large brains. Okay. So their brains are big relative to their body size, and they're bigger than some birds mammals. Okay. If you if you know, my dogs than you might go. Yeah. That makes sense. We did. I agree with that. Pretty much. But but the a lot of that brain is dedicated to interpreting sensory information, so for example, a huge part of their brain is dedicated to interpreting odor's in the water. So so, but the part of the brain responsible for deep thinking and writing worn piece is small so, you know, that's why their brain to body size is really large because they're very well adapted for sensing things in their environment. Okay. But you know, they're not they can learn very quickly. Okay. Like most animals can. And again, that's an advantage. Right. So the quicker you learned that eating a seal means, you get a huge, it's like eating confound big Macs. You know, that's a good thing to do biting a submarine is not a good thing to do. You lose teeth. You get no calories back. Yeah. So those are the sorts things that they learn very quickly from I would not put them in the highly intelligent category. Parrot in the movie was by far one of the more intelligent creatures in the movie. Okay. So not. Yeah. Yeah. This is a side note. But said that he only named it bird. I was like. Yeah. Deep relationship with this as Chinese risking his life right for the birds. Give it a name. Yeah. You have an insane. May maybe get one. Junior at least something so wait you're saying that that a lot of their brain is for interpreting signals odors. So the the blood thing is like a huge myth. That's probably in like every shark movie. So how far does it have to be? How quickly can sense it? There's a scene towards the end of this movie where she jumps in and she's like pretty far and almost immediately the shark. Doc. So how's it? Yeah. What's that that that isn't terribly accurate? So what you have to understand is imagine you have a drop of blood, and you put that into a pool of water, and you are able to watch it dispersive her time. So what you're able to do is count all those molecules as they spread out. And of course, what happens is if the currents going this way, then you get a concentration of that. And it disperses to the sides. And if you go up current, you can't detected it, all right? So, but the whole point is they can detect very few molecules in a very small amount of water. Okay. That's the sensitivity part. So their brain actually is very large. So that they can grab those few molecules and send a sigma the brain saying, I think I smell something that smells like blood. So that's the part that it becomes very hard to come up with a relatable explanation to the general public. Concentration right in the movie that was kind of BS, right? Doesn't happen magically like that. They would have to be a strong current going in that direction. Okay. So okay. So if you're bleeding, and you're in the ocean, and there's sharks nearby like how close you see what I'm asking. What is the concernable distance range? You know, it could be anywhere from one hundred yards. You know, if you're in the water for a long period of time, and you're bleeding for a long period of time. Yes. That could be a half mile or something like that. But you know, you think southern California we've got some of the most populated beaches in the world there little kids out there with skinned up knees..

California twenty million years one hundred yards ten eleven feet thirty feet forty feet
"twenty million years" Discussed on Science... sort of

Science... sort of

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"twenty million years" Discussed on Science... sort of

"They were cool before you, and you know, in these pictures of of sloths dropping down from trees swimming, through the water, doggy paddling. So it's clear that slots kind of pre adapted to moving through the water. And I think for phthalic sock knows the aquatic sloth from western South America. The remarkable thing is the commas been desert for at least twenty million years, if not maybe one hundred we don't know the Antic witty of that era desert environment. It's probably been some time. And whatever it is. It definitely includes the entirety of the evolutionary history of sock knows. So it's not like L sock nose drop down from the trees to the coastal house. Lost got up into the tree. That's a huge sloth mystery. We don't want this to become a. It's not a slot. That episode. Well for as much as any of the show, not just saw that you're wearing assault. Recognize we've never met. But. And the dude on the street corner with the sloth t-shirt. Oh, so Sarabhai was going. I talk about in the book this like slow. It was kind of wail hill wail hill is a site and northern Chile near the attic in the desert, and we were there for other reasons than just became apparent that this site had a lot of fossil whale skeletons. It's in the book, I described this kind of process realization on my part kind of an moment of like, wow, I have a much bigger task before me than I really realize what this twenty twenty eleven. Yeah. This is I had been to the site before. But it was in twenty eleven that they actually start doing excavations and removing part of the roadside to make room for the other lane of traffic northbound lane in doing American high PanAmerican highway, so why expanding the PanAmerican highway. And this wasn't enough wasn't wasn't big enough. Well, I mean, this is the year after the COPA mine disaster where thirty three miners were buried in. They rescued all thirty three. I remember that movie about it. When they realized they had a viable method for getting them out a bunch of tried to be the last one to stay down there because they wanted to be the world record holder for the longest time spent underground mazing store, there's a great PBS Nova show about it was released like a month after they rescued everybody. It's remarkable how quickly that studio turned it around. So this is maybe an hour up the road from that..

Sarabhai wail hill South America assault Chile twenty million years
"twenty million years" Discussed on Dear Hank and John

Dear Hank and John

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"twenty million years" Discussed on Dear Hank and John

"That point you're just like okay i guess we're friends right i met snoop backstage at a thing once and we took a picture together because i guess kids like my books or whatever and he was very nice and everyone i've talked to about snoop because i've sat next to his manager or people several times they they all speak highly of him bite he doesn't much better job of disguising himself than hoke and that's all so maybe i have set next us new it's very possible very possible i think it's some point we promise the people some mars news so i'm going to do that instead of like who's driven on a plane with before he goes can't wait for my new spin podcast people have shared a plane with so i yeah so the the news of mars is so there's a meteorite beautiful little meteorite in fact it's called black beauty that's what they call it the scientists because it's pretty little black meteorite that's from mars and this we have previous models of how mars formed and when mars i became sort of like like the crust formed and then rain fell to there's sort of this window between which like there was definitely liquid water on mars and then it stopped being there and then when it started being there is basically the moment when there was a crust so that is the window during which life could have happened and so knowing that those those dates is important and the models the mathematical models we have for how mars would have formed indicates that the crust formed pretty late later like later than this now this new evidence is showing us so instead of like hundred million years to before the the crust formed it would have been more like twenty million years according to an analysis of this meteorite which scientists did science to to sort of like say like okay this this rock is very old rock from the surface of mars and we can tell from i think the zircon crystals in it that this rock formed just twenty million years after the formation of the solar system rather than like a hundred or one hundred and fifty million years after the formation of the solar system which was our previous guests so that's pretty big news and it does it does it has a pretty big impact on how we're imagining the the sort of window of potential life on the surface of mars that's really interesting so is it possible that there was life on mars like long before there was life on earth well yeah yeah i mean that's sort of the hypothesis is out there that like if there was if there if we do find some evidence of former life on mars we will be able to tell whether that life has shares a common ancestry with us so was that life and if it doesn't it will actually be really hard to figure out if if it counts because all the things we have to test for life are all based on our chemistry but but you know like the the idea that life could have gone from earth to mars and like all the mars life just got knocked off of earth on a meteorite or that it came from mars to earth and we are in fact all descendants of martian microbes rate which would be really neat it'd be amazing if after all of these decades of work to get humans to mars it turns out that we were martians all along and if that is the case john question does that mean have already been to mars so we got there before twenty twenty eight if definitive proof is discovery that we are all martians at some point before twenty twenty eight or after twenty twenty eight we will either continue to keep the podcast named deer hanging john or we will change it back to john suthers chant but i mean i want proof i don't mean like climate change is real proof i mean proper proof those very clear that was a joke that was a joke for joke for hank and climate change is real and that was that was the.

twenty million years hundred million years fifty million years
"twenty million years" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"twenty million years" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"By the equator so they were let down in the kind of s to be type habitat with lots of bolts of rushing in deposits these sums and then over millennia as continental drift bolt the couldn't tropes barth is now they were compressed compressed in hot and and foam the millstone grits thoughts what we refer to douse after the last the gosse is retreated after the ice age that was open ifting events that foams from the mountain ranges round up and at the same time remember will lifted there was cracking on front doing as the ice retreated the elements able to exploit those crux and the fishes in the and start to road to the kind of nations we've got now and say it was all filmed by wind kind of icy lofts from the retreating office that's how it came to be where it is no three hundred twenty million years to get to where his doesn't very long destroy it does it in the blink of how many visitors do you get there around two hundred fifty thousand this year so it's quite a popular place today there's lots of people who come back year on year they came when they were child without grandparents and all that coming up with grandchildren and there's a lot of kind of puffing on down the generations and any chances of finding who did this and and bring him to take them into book for this it's fairly unlikely i think the best we can hope for is that someone who knows that they did it can kind of tell them how north on walls and not to do it again i would like to see that other people know that is not radio please don't come together but yeah because we didn't have we don't have any security cameras on that part of the site there's nothing we can do to definitely confirm who did it which is a shame really because it'd be nice to bring them to book this remind them took three twenty million years to get there appreciate speaking with you thank you thank you very much catherine barbara is a ranger at the brigham rocks national trust site in england we reached her in harrogate and you can see some photographs of that rock in the position it held for.

barth gosse catherine barbara brigham rocks england harrogate three hundred twenty million y three twenty million years
"twenty million years" Discussed on The Story Collider

The Story Collider

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"twenty million years" Discussed on The Story Collider

"Something has solid seeming as identity could be so influx over time and i was sort of learning the same lesson about entire worlds mounts would be pushed up and worn away and whole oceans would open and close over time i loved george harrison i love the song all things must pass and george took this insight to an extreme you know my hometown my partment and the theater in everywhere i've ever been in love would someday be at the bottom of the ocean or at the top of a mountain or you know in the middle of desert or hundreds of miles underground in the earth's mantle and someday it might be in a black hole you know everything is in flux and over time the only constant is change and i was told that the you know the only thing that can help heal the sorts of wounds that i experienced was the passage of time and and geology i was experiencing the passage of time at its most intense form and strangely it was sort of you know grasping with these ideas was one of the more comforting things that that i found in time and that might sound strange because you might think like considering your tiny place in the universe can make you feel very small and that might be sort of a scary exercising there's definitely something scary about the source of mass extinctions and things that i was researching that's why felt such dread when i was in west texas but i came in realize that that was only half the story and you know there's not everything the world didn't end after the worst mass extinction of all time it didn't end after any of the mass extinctions the other half the story is the recovery and that's just as interesting story as the disaster so twenty million years after the permian mass extinction first dinosaurs show up the first crocodile show up even the first mammal show up call roofs came back and what was lost was lost forever but what emerged from the wreckage these surviving pieces went on to build this incredible new beautiful amazing world that endured for hundreds of millions of years and similarly when my mom died at hit me.

george harrison west texas permian twenty million years
"twenty million years" Discussed on Science in Action

Science in Action

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"twenty million years" Discussed on Science in Action

"And there was an earthquake year earlier that's right there was a previous earthquake in september twenty sixteen which occurred about forty kilometers further south easy to decide to be carrier at all the rabija faults running through the area that were linked if people familiar with plate motions and the geography to the east of career you have the sea of japan which developed as a result of rift ing away from the eastern parts of asia about twenty million years ago and a set of faults casinos across south korea formed at that time one of these faults slipped in the earthquake in september twenty sixteen a gain of about magnitude five and a half this was crisis surprise but subsequently people have checked the historical records and discovered centuries ago the earlier earthquakes in roughly the same place so this is clean active foot zone protective probably quite a slow slip rate is it takes up some sweet the proportion of the plate motion between the eurasian plate on the ozanich plates in the pacific basin preps ball more work might have been done looking at these very obvious geological structures in in region but people have now started investigating them in detail and prehistoric earthquakes civil sabine undentified radiocarbon dated so it's well known that it is an active fault but not active in the way that one thinks of japan is and so on being active in the the interesting thing in your involvement in this project is the there is this geothermal experimental pilot plant going on but what what's that about.

japan asia south korea twenty million years forty kilometers
"twenty million years" Discussed on Aerial America

Aerial America

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"twenty million years" Discussed on Aerial America

"At the center of this state is unusual gathering place in the foothills of the chuckle mountains one that seems to breathe the air of oregon's pioneering spirit the appropriately named crooked river twists and turns through steep slopes to the towering spires of smith rock this castle of craggy peaks dates back to a catastrophic eruption nearly twenty million years ago potash lava and chunks of rock surged like an ancient oil gusher eventually cooling in place and over time weathering it a great stone pinnacles in some cultures places like this attract mystics get oregon it's a haven for adventurers welcome to one of the hottest spots for sport climbing in north america challenging the best in the world to find new routes up its most demanding surfaces the toughest one of all is the three hundred foot high pillar that looms above the valley it's cold monkey face for these hardcore sport climbers it isn't just about reaching the top it's about finding the toughest possible route up and down the peak scaling near vertical walls suspending from a single rope and repelling into the abyss the ultimate achievement to be the first to take on a newer harder route and earn the privilege of naming it in nineteen ninetytwo monkeyface became an international icon when french climber john baptiste trio made the first ascents up the overhanging east wall it instantly eclipsed even the toughest climbs north america he named the route just do it once climbers reach the top of smith rock many take a moment to savor the view of one of america's most remarkable landscapes.

oregon america john baptiste twenty million years three hundred foot
"twenty million years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"twenty million years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The mammalian lineage and so so they appeared about two hundred and twenty million years ago and so the book is sort of it's sort of a hundred million year history from sort of begins with fish cooling out of the water and so they're trying to live on the latte amphibians branch brancheau one way amend reptiles go one way and mammalian answers three guys another one hundred million yen stretch was with three hundred twenty billion years get two hundred twenty million years ago all these traits or the fundamentals of mammalian biology emerged from two hundred twenty million years onwards you've sort of mammals these little small furry animals living in the shadows of dinosaurs until sixty six million years ago when a meteor comes down and obliterates life as we know the dinosaurs dialysis it for the surviving buds but then the mammals with a flourish liam you had a term i don't have the the book in front of me but you had a term of art for for what the mammals did once the dinosaurs were were wiped out they they when the dinosaurs were around mammals were just they were basically from the grand scheme of things kind of hidden they kept a low profile but once that meteor hit and that layer of of a meteor dust relax description settles they explode like gangbusters yes exactly i think i said in a in a in the book is a competitor to a bunch of sort of amateur musicians jamming on the theme of mammalian whilst the titus also route and then what's the dinosaurs were gone i think i said it was like the instruments were handed over to john coltrane and felonious monk and just this this burst of creativity happened so when the dinosaurs were around no mammal no fossil of a mammal has ever been found bigger than say a badger a small dog amid suddenly wants the dinosaurs were gone there's this explosion of.

liam john coltrane two hundred twenty million yea three hundred twenty billion y sixty six million years hundred million year twenty million years
"twenty million years" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"twenty million years" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And id you have this wonderful delighting motion with which they move through the ocean after flapping their law the large finns now they found that um they have a our unique kind of walking motion they have these large fins of they swim with that they have tiny finns under them that the walk on the surface of the ocean with and um the same walking motion that they have won thin and other finn and then the other person is out remarkably similar to the we humans walk served dinner of the same mechanism for donor thinner with the muscle their nerves mike we have said that nope sales of that are in these gates are also in people um but this are existed of they think four hundred and twenty million years ago so up to sixty million years before the first ally form walked out of the ocean um to called maize meant uh let's move on lastly to some kerfuffle wolverine new dna emoji of all a things were talking about that the what tell us about that uh yes so the newest croth of emoji for this year include some good science ones um there's a petri dish a test tube and the dna doublehelix now researchers unball scientists oh so on twitter kept out of the dini was twisted the wrong we and um this is an easy design flaw to make but ultimately the right twist of the israeli what makes it unique and evil to function as the basic element of life on so their dna helix is up a ladder that's twisted right right so if you twist a jar um it if you tat bihute in a jar with your right hand in you twisted it any closing motion that's the wrong twist oh if you opened the jr laid any twisting motion towards eu that's in the right twist and while it's a it's a very simple design element it makes the difference between being the right key for life and the wrong while you've put a new twist on that story front near we won't for years we've had the news media of tv shows where they start with the globe turning they've always been turning it backwards south of the earth is been rotating in our revolving in the wrong direction so now have dna to match fat thank thank you very much.

finn twitter mike twenty million years sixty million years
"twenty million years" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

03:52 min | 3 years ago

"twenty million years" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"Com or any of our social media publish every show to facebook and google plus and become it there and we read it on the show we'll send you a mug and definitely follow us on twitter i'm at carl franklin he's at rich campbell send us a tweet you can earn free fake miles and i made it very free very fake extremely fake emphasis on the well okay let's bring charles would on here charles max would is the ceo producer and podcast host at deb chat dot tv he hosts several podcasts including java scrip jabber and ruby rogues he also has a course on finding a programming job and run several online developer conferences to help programmers level up their programming and soft skills welcomed on iraq's chuck hey thanks guys thanks for being here and you have been on the show before but i'm sure it was a panel discussion at deb teach in like vancouver a young twenty million years ago something like that yet yep yup and we've worked together recently with microsoft at build and connect and even ignite i think guys have yet your podcasters there to interview microsoft execs and things yeah it's funny i've actually reconnected with a few folks like donovan brown and you know some of the people that i've met at some of these events 'cause i do a segment for java scrip jabber called my java scrip story and since they were on javascript jabber it's kind of a where are they now when what are they doing and so i talked to donovan brown yesterday i've talked to several other people you know across microsoft that have been on the shows at these events and it's just been a ton of fun to okay what are you working on and you know house microsoft do in these days and it's tremendous the the it's fun to bring a bunch of podcasters together you know you think about yeah our job as podcasters are often the connector to it within a community off its offer developers working by themselves relatively few years and so the show is a bridge but being a podcasters remarkably isolating as well so it's really spectacular win the bunch of us as podcasters to sit down around a table and have a meal and talk podcasting right or anything else and because the guys that richard brought into a build and in all of these microsoft shows typically have podcast outside the realm of dot net we actually get to to hang out with you know links people java scrip people java people ruby people and it's great yen it's a lot of fun just to talk to people and kind of get the ideas around hey what do you do what you about who's your audience who were you reaching what you're trying to do for them and right hit it's all these ideas it's very similar in some ways to talking to programmers about what they do accept we're talking about actually putting media out that impacts people in a different way than open source does yes i think there's no substitute to having got had the experience of putting out a hundred podcast episodes to release he knows like you're over a line at that point where our conversation is now different how how you think about creating content and that routine generous process and you started the longtime ago ruby was not your first show was was related stuff it was it was about rails i was doing interviews and then i would intersperse it with oh this is what i'm working on and this is what i'm learning and that was almost ten years ago yeah and then our first panel discussion show on chat dot tv started about six and a half years ago with ruby rogues and the java scrip jabber turned six this next week i think awesome well to connect us back to.

facebook google twenty million years ten years
"twenty million years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"twenty million years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The months jealously guarded data so young and ambitious he turned to an independent catalogue of earthquakes around the edge of the pacific to get a measure of presentday plate motions this is the paper photographing north pacific at example of tectonics honest fear the biggest fear of goals initially skipped through here it seems to me that this map from a slightly distorted view of the pacific is the critical one what this map is is we chose the motion betray the pacific the north america of lawsuits the directions of motion from the earthquakes and then he got a bunch of earthquakes up of the north of the pacific around the aleutian around russia forest russia of those roughly pushing that japan that that quite clearly the pacific plate is moving directly to towards gneration the all these earthquakes shook the direction of motion between those two rights as the pacific pledges destroyed beneath character chapter and then japan why is that significant people hammed actually focused on the rigidity of the plates they focused on the process retracting all play boundaries right and this and what chastened dead was the first time anyone that actually said the right way to think about this is to look at the interior of plates is convinced of seafo spreading but they had got what jason i provided which was a rigorous description of how to actually think battle these motions mckenzie's paper was rushed into print by nature while morgan's dawdled on the more leisurely production line the aid to use journal off geophysical research but they were soon working together synthesizing that reproaches the p shaw go down to reconstructing the history of all the world's plates for the past one hundred twenty million years and john daly deciphered an even.

russia japan morgan mckenzie john daly one hundred twenty million yea
"twenty million years" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:36 min | 4 years ago

"twenty million years" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"That they can't make with each other and this could cause sudden woo hoo what will aim to have any incremental transitional qantas behind it and then there's a third one at called the founding colony and i think go who'd you out he also tried to come up with this to have hit the fence sort of evolution and away and the founding colony essay on the bottom of what is now the mandatory rainy and there's a small area where there is a species that gradually evolving incremental steps but then we're dad happen hit covered over after the ice age and and the water flows and kills up the mediterranean and so we do not borrowed those ochre meant who gaps uncc kill some submariner some clear hits it and it will say oh that's where that creature came from so there's that founding colony isolated grew that that went the classic pattern but we just haven't found it yet we know the results i know the creature did show up in other parts of the earth your the punctuated equilibrium were something suddenly no tremendous asian and then there's the cosmic rays i think it's every twenty million years we go through a part of our solar uh the the the galaxy whether son go through a phase and we get hit by a huge number of alpha particles which is care are ena apart okay we're great statement but did you have a question or what what that explain some of these very strange creature better up here out of nowhere and cannot be explained by slow transitional mutations which which we should be able to see an apostle record there you go okay david garrahy all three of those choices are correct and they all work in synchrony and there there's a fourth though oh he just came here right areas of their heads of four it wanted the beer right right right the thought of flee this is the model that i don't believe anyone else has built as far as what i've done where i've taken the multitude of credible scientific information and come up with a robot model of how dna can be exposed to centrally photon the path through other types of dna and the light will change the way that the dna structured so it will rearrange.

david garrahy twenty million years
"twenty million years" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:27 min | 4 years ago

"twenty million years" Discussed on WTVN

"Meant coup steps uncc so no some submariner some clearly hits it and we'll say oh that's where that creature came from so there's at a founding colony isolated grew that that went the classic pattern but we just haven't found it yet we know the results showed a creature did show up in other parts of the earth there's the punctuated equilibrium wear something suddenly no a tremendous innovation and then there's the cosmic rays i think it's every twenty million years we go through a part of the solar uh the the the galaxy whether son goes through a phase and we got hit by a huge number of alpha particles which is care are ena apart okay rick greats statement but did you have a question or what would that explain some of these very strange creatures that a hint up here outta nowhere and cannot be explained by slow transitional mutations which which we should be able to see an apostle record there you go okay david i'm he all three of those choices are correct and they all work in synchrony and there's a fourth though oh he teaches came here right heirs of their heads of ford wanted the beer right right right now honestly this is a model that i don't believe anyone else had built as far as what i've done where i've taken the multitude of credible scientific information and come up with a robust model of how dna can be own to essentially photon that passed through other types of dna and the light will change the way that the dna structured so it will rearrange your from one type of species to another how quickly do you have to wait a million years or down wait a couple of weeks now to the russian scientists dr peter gary i of rap egg that were laid by a fraud with a laser beam that shines through salam intereg right and those projects mutated into fella matters immediately emeap really bright so that can happen within one generation and so i do believe that we see longer term uh cycle where changes start to occurs we get close to these note point right but then after no point there does appear to be solar.

david fraud rick ford dr peter gary i twenty million years million years
"twenty million years" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

02:31 min | 4 years ago

"twenty million years" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Do you would think have any ochre mental transitional coins behind it and then there's a third one at called the founding colony and i think go gould kill you elke also tried to come up with this to defend sort of evolution and away and the founding colony say on the bottom of what is now the mediterranean there's a small area where there is a species that gradually evolving incremental steps but then we're down happen it covered over after the ice age and and the water flows and kills up the mediterranean and so we do not bind those ochre meant coup steps until you know some submarine leaner something hits it and we'll say oh that's where that creature came from so there's that um founding colony isolated grew that that went the classic pattern but we just haven't found it yet we know the results to creature did show up in other parts of the earth there's the punctuated equilibrium wear something suddenly no i got tremendous kuhn a t and then there's the cosmic rays i think every twenty million years we go through a part of the solar uh the the the galaxy were the sun goes through a phase only get hit by a huge number of alpha particles which is terror dna apart okay rick great statement but did you have a question or what would explain some of these very strange creature that a hint appear outta nowhere and cannot be explained by slow transitional mutations which which we should be able to see an apostle record there you go okay david he all three of those oh choices are correct and they all work in synchrony and there's a fourth though oh he just came here right heirs of their of four wanted the beer right right right now honestly this is a model that i don't believe anyone else has built as far as what i've done where i've taken the multitude of credible scientific information and come up with a robot model of how dna can be own to essentially photon that passed through other types of dna and the light will change the way that the dna structured so it will rearrange.

david gould elke rick twenty million years
"twenty million years" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

02:11 min | 4 years ago

"twenty million years" Discussed on WLAC

"Away and the founding colony say on the bottom of what is now the mediterranean there's a small area where there is a species that gradually evolving no criminal steps but then we're down happen hit covered over after the ice age and and the water flows and kills up mediterranean and so we do not find those comment who steps until know some submariner something he hits it and will say oh that's where the creature came um from so there's that um founding colony isolated grew that that went the classic added in but we just haven't found it yet we know the results i know the creature did show up in other parts of the year there's the punctuated equilibrium wear something suddenly no a tremendous removed asian and then there's the car mcrae i think every twenty million years we go through a part of the solar are the the the galaxy where the sun goes through a phase and we got hit by a huge number of alpha particles which is care our dna apart okay rick great statement but did you have a question what would that explain some of the very strange creatures that a into pure out of nowhere and cannot be explained by slow transitional mutations which which we should be able to see an apostle record there you go okay david garrahy all three of those choices are correct and they all work in synchrony and there is a fourth though oh he just came here right areas of heads of four wanted to beer right right right no honestly this is a model that i don't believe anyone else had built as far as what i've done where i've taken the multitude of credible scientific information and come up with a robot model of how dna can be own to essentially photon that passed through other types of dna and the light will change the way that the dna.

mediterranean rick david garrahy twenty million years