36 Burst results for "twenty five years"

Fresh update on "twenty five years" discussed on The Gravel Ride.  A cycling podcast

The Gravel Ride. A cycling podcast

01:12 min | 32 min ago

Fresh update on "twenty five years" discussed on The Gravel Ride. A cycling podcast

"Telling me about these wonderful handmade made tires that they had the nineteen forty that rolled so fast and there were you know thirty five or even forty two movies as wide and. And nothing like that anymore and what a shame. So we started looking into making stuff like that. Again, I imported some very obscure tires from Japan called Mitsubushi Trim lines that We're very good start but we realized that could be improved and we started testing different tires figured out. What makes it? Realize that high pressure weren't necessary to roll past this time when we all wrote that like one, hundred, twenty, five years Ayana twenty millimeter tires and we something realize that that's actually was slower than eighty PSI and the twenty millimeters what's lower than twenty five and that sort of set in motion. The whole revolution we publish the findings we talked to some guys were advising professional teams, and then suddenly you saw Servando and others experimenting with Wider Tyres, they went from twenty three to twenty five pressure's lower that was on the road side but we really want to do the gravel, and so you know twenty five didn't do it back. Then even the we called gravel grinders where twenty eight millimeter tires which is. We laugh about it. Now that we were riding other people were writing eighty PSI twenty, twenty, eight millimeter tires on gravel and. So we were you know we looked into the forty two we looked into the smaller wheeled sixty and all that. and. All those roads sort of led to to the trench spikes because back then in the mountains of the Alps. In France of course, most roads were gravel. So they didn't think of gravel writing. There was this writing and if she wants to do go up the DA or something like that you went on Garoppolo growth. And so the bikes without existed and there were quite sophisticated because. The, how to say the technology hasn't changed that much apart from carbon titanium but otherwise. Human.

Servando Ayana Japan France
Dandole con Todo with Naibe Reynoso

Cafe con Pam Podcast

05:09 min | 1 d ago

Dandole con Todo with Naibe Reynoso

"Navy. Welcome together. Deeper. Coming on how are you? I'm good. I'm good. How are you? Good we are in the midst of a pandemic. We're both I'm stuck at home which you know it's fine. We have Internet and food, and it's it's good. How are you? I'm doing good today was the first day in a while I put makeup on because I knew we were going to do this interview those kind of interesting to get ready for your own house like for your kitchen. But I've been doing good I've had more good days and bad days I think it's it's okay to have bad days because we we should be able to accept those down days and end lived through them and walk through them and not be in denial. So I've had good days. I've had bad days but at the end of the day I'm doing good I just I think we're all in this together. So it's like a collective feeling of support and we're GONNA get through this and I've tried to be productive, and then there's Times where I'm I have productivity exhaustion and I'm just like I can't be more productive like I just can't. So I'll just zone out and watch a Zombie movie. have like a glass of wine and I have to keep reminding myself. It's okay to not always be productive and to just relax and chill you know absolutely no. I I love that because one nobody knows how to deal with US everyone is going through at one hundred percent like you said, and it's a day by day because also things are happening in the world day by day. Allowing herself, grace and compassion, and just living by the hour basically but I'm glad you're being cute. Thank you. So yeah. So tell us who is Ebay what's your heritage for do come from case? So I am Mexican American I was born in Santa. Monica California my parents are from second pick as Mahyco, and I lived here in La. Most of my life, I did move out of state for a couple of years for my journalism career. But I'm a journalist I've been doing journalism for over twenty five years and I've worked for companies like when he be seon and Bella no and CNN is Fine Yawn and Fred's twenty four unreels channels. I've had a really really big mix and now I'm publishing books for children. It's been an amazing transition and it's been a seamless transition because. As a journalist what I did was right right stories and highlight my community and that's exactly what I'm doing with my publishing company control the press highlighting my community in a writing stories but taking more ownership of the of the product of the what I'm putting out into the world because I'm my own boss. So it's been. It's been beautiful. How Fun. So you gave us a story in like twenty seconds, but you know we're going to dissect it. Because I'm a journalist. Yes. So he's like short soundbites because I interview people all the time you know thousands I've interviewed probably thousands of people throughout my career now, like give me that sound bite twenty seconds. What did it a nutshell? So and I know as a reporter or when you're interviewing like symptoms when you're too long winded, it's like kind of wrap it up. I am a victim of lake sometimes condensing it a little bit too much. I ask a lot of questions that we can dissect it. No problem. Also born raising your parents are from psychotic S.. When did they come to the US Vaca- when they were teenagers my dad came to obviously find work like most Mohicans that came and he worked to everything you can imagine they here they met here even though they're from the same town that they were amazed. And their birthdays are one day apart. They just celebrated a birthday in March unfortunately. We couldn't be there to celebrate it because of the social distancing But yeah, they were born one day apart they knew each other some kind of like they found their community here with a by less of like my Kano's innocent that that's how they reconnected and they got married you. Know the rest is history. They know each other am I gonNa they knew of each other. Oh my grandmother. My Mom's mom had a little store of not the indeed that in the little town if you have at the site in these little towns, it's like that's the place to be the center of the universe of these little towns because that's where all the cheese mishap. Other. Women and men go to buy groceries with that's where all the when I used to go. To Grozny, thought would see it's so amazing that that whole culture like you see all the little kids growing up so that the data are really liked the modern day starbucks that's where people go to find community and you know to talk to the cashier and just find out what's going on with with the town with the community. So long story short might might grandmother had one of the and my mom and Oliver Sisters would be the cashiers and that's my dad had stopped in a few times. So he don't they met that way and then have faced. Local.

Bella Navy. Ebay United States Grozny Starbucks Santa Oliver Sisters Reporter LA CNN Monica California Mahyco Vaca Fred
C.I.A. Operatives in the Early Years of the Cold War

The Book Review

05:41 min | 3 d ago

C.I.A. Operatives in the Early Years of the Cold War

"Scott Anderson joins us now from the catskills. He is a contributing writer for the New York, Times magazine, and the author of many books. His latest is called the quiet Americans four CIA spies. Of the Cold War tragedy in three acts, Scott Welcome back to the podcast. Thanks much nice to be here. So you are allowed on the podcast to talk about your previous book Lawrence in Arabia which came out in twenty thirteen hand, which of course feels like now centuries ago which makes it clear to our listeners are longtime listeners that this is not your first. Book. Involving spies I'm curious what what's the draw for you but I think Speiser inherently fascinating in not just to an awful lot of people and of thought about what is I think it's the the allure of having a secret life. I think that I think that for an awful lot of people this idea that you have a whole separate identity is really fascinating New People. What I was drawn to in both the Lawrence and with in the quite America's the foresee a officers I follow is that in both cases, this was at a time when individuals out in the field had a tremendous freedom of action. So it wasn't. People sitting behind desks following policy that they're actually out in the field doing crazy stuff. You also have a personal connection to the story right in terms of what your father did for living you talk a little bit about that. Sure. My father was agricultural adviser for the Agency for International Development, which was a branch of the State Department. I grew up in. East. Asia in in Korea and Taiwan as Indonesia. and. So this was the nineteen fifties, nineteen sixties when I came along American government workers abroad often in those sorts of countries often were two hats whatever their official job was my father's job as agriculture adviser but it was also part of this great anti Communist crusade was happening around the world. So the upfront hearts and minds, soft power aspect of my father's work was working on agrarian reform in line with countries like these countries were were the land was was had been controlled infra centuries by all darkies. But the the more hard power in the darker side of what my father was doing was was setting up rural vigilante squads, home guard militias to watch over the local populace and to make sure that they weren't being swayed by the communist in certainly in countries like Taiwan or South Korea. If you were exposed or accused of being a leftist, your life was not going to go. Well, you know I'm now getting a sense of why one of the four characters in your previous book was an agronomist perhaps. That's right. Yeah it's well It's it's an interesting thing because. It just for national development was often used by the CIA as a cover because. Are Out, in the field, they're not, they're not saying, I'm destined to capitol there often out among the local population and probably have a better sense of what's happening. Outside what you one thing I'll say I've noticed over time in different countries. I've been almost invariably the ex Patriot community that knows best what's happening in the country are tend to be the people are out in the field in often the Middle East is the oil guys. They have a sense much more than than people sitting around in the capital. Let's start with frank wizner. The first person you mentioned, and this is not the the first book to be written at least in part about wisner who was he and what made him. So central to the story wizards amazing Turkey was a corporate lawyer who was working at a Wall Street firm when even before World War Two broke out and he quit his law firm to join the navy, he ended up being an operative for the office to teacher services, which is the the wartime intelligence agency of the of the army that they owe asset kind of the precursor to the CIA. That's right. That's right and he ends up being A. Kind of the first American to to to witness. The Soviet takeover of country in Eastern Europe, and this was in Romanian to summer of nineteen forty. Four So full year before the war ended and a wizard was on the ground as a as an oasis operative and just watch the strong arm tactics did really a matter of weeks led the Soviets to take control the country he and he was sending cables back to Washington telling telling them what are so good allies doing he sees the say he has the same experience in eastern Germany at the end of. The war in watching the way the Soviets for taking over, he goes back to his law from for couple of years for the complete unhappy, and then when the CIA starts up in nineteen forty seven, they have this idea that they wanna start a covert operations branch of of the CIA called the Office of Policy Coordination and frank listeners chosen to head that the name was deliberately chosen to be really boring. That's right and in fact, the name itself, the Office of policy coordination was was so top secret that even you can't even say the name out loud for twenty five years. So in that role wizner e created, what what he called the mighty world, which was this vast covert operations umbrella of a operating throughout the world and everything from hard power aspects of it like dropping dropping partisans behind the iron curtain to everything to cultural stuff voice. Of America. Radio Free Europe that was all came out of the Office of Policy Coordination.

CIA Office Of Policy Coordination Lawrence Frank Wizner Office Of Policy America Taiwan Scott Anderson Times Magazine New York Agency For International Devel Writer Middle East Washington Radio Free Europe Asia State Department Germany
Dont forget to let activists know their work counts, urgesyouth climate adviser

UN News

02:32 min | 4 d ago

Dont forget to let activists know their work counts, urgesyouth climate adviser

"This is Matt, Wells. At U. N. news well, with high level meetings own going to address the climate and Biodiversity Crisis Center stage you and headquarters one of the Secretary General's Youth Advisory Group members urging world leaders to make sure their decisions get back to the people that helped shape policy on the ground, and this Gibson is co Coordinator Three Fifty Fiji regional use lead climate change network in the Pacific driven by young climate leaders and he. Told Julia Dean, of our UN Country Team Australia was important to let groups like his know they've made a difference for me. There are three reasons why we should be continuing to engage young people and the first reason is around young people are the only demographic that has the opportunity, the agency and the capability to be able to respond really quickly and effectively situations that need a response in the Pacific. We Sierra really clear example when it. Comes to responding to natural natural disaster. You look at any cyclone that we've had over the last ten years any development sector agency that's worth. Their salt will tell you that young people have been at the forefront of driving the transformative change to ensure that the response to the crises was done effectively ethically and quickly, and so that's the first reason is the reason we engage young people because without founding biased, we get the job done but. The second reason I think is perhaps more important is because young people have the most vested interest in the way in which the future will pan out. We are in a unique sort of next this position where we have the ability to see the learnings from generations before us, but we also the generation that will be guiding in creating the next generation through the next thirty five to fifty years. So our interest is not just our own. But also the interest of ensuring that our children have a life that is something that is worthwhile and something that we would like for ourselves and fraud Johnson, and then of course, the third reason is because you've will be the population that drives future innovation. So the reason that we work with youth now is not because we want them to feel cool and fancy and like social influences. Now, the reason we work with youth now is to. Ensure that we're laying down the foundations so that humanity and society is going forward are fighting trump because at the end of the day, the leaders that we have. Now that you know pushing retirement age won't be there twenty five years from now to see their plans to fruition. So we need to be able to instill enough Dr Anne, capacity and young people to ensure that the future that we have is not just one that we. Wants, but it's a, it's a reality

Pacific Co Coordinator Three Fifty Fij Julia Dean Gibson Youth Advisory Group Biodiversity Crisis Center Un Country Team Australia Matt Dr Anne U. N. Wells Fraud Johnson
Dosomething.org - Earning Scholarships Through Community Service

The Scholarship Shark Podcast

02:10 min | 4 d ago

Dosomething.org - Earning Scholarships Through Community Service

"Often students struggle with finding unique and creative volunteer opportunities. And today scholarship tip combines two things in that is community service and scholarships end. So I wanNA talk with you about do something dot org. On they offer scholarships but the way students earn scholarships is through community service. So I like to use the page in two ways not just for the scholarships, but it's also a great resource to help soon, think through some service projects that they can be a part of me launch on their own or at least get involved to. Win. One of the do something scholarships. So the way they do something scholarships work for students who are twenty five years old or younger than they live in the US or Canada. They're going to school or planning to go to school. they're able to participate in this community service scholarship. There's no essay, no GPA requirements recommendations no. And the other nizing as you can enter multiple scholarships at the same time So the organization is very generous awarded over one million dollars in scholarships over the past six years with over three hundred winners. And you know if you win and you're not in school yet, they will hang onto that money for you until you graduate and go to college. So I did an episode where I interviewed a do something dot org that's episode Number One, twenty three and I'm going to include that Lincoln the show notes. So definitely check that out because you learn a whole lot more about this scholarship and the organization and how their scholarships work, but they have scholarships all the time and this is really good because often. Younger students will say you know maybe if sixteen or seventeen year old maybe ice will more junior may say you know I wanNA start applying for scholarships want to start. Working towards winning scholarships. What can I do? This is a great one. So definitely, check out do something dot Org and learn how you can earn scholarships through community service.

United States Canada
Why Esports Coaches Don't Fill the Same Role as Traditional Sports Coaches

Esportz Network Podcast

07:34 min | 4 d ago

Why Esports Coaches Don't Fill the Same Role as Traditional Sports Coaches

"This is actually focused on coaching I. Think this is an interesting parallel of the were talking about. There's an aspect of the MLS LCS COMP that relates to coach and it specifically how coaches approach roles for players and a trend I think started about twenty five years ago where there's this whole thing for young athletes hey, they need to specialize early and they need to find. Not. Just the sport they WANNA play, but the position within that's what they wanna play so that they could focus on it completely. and. It's something that creates a potential issue in terms of teamwork and. Understanding of. Either the field or the virtual or the rift depending on what what you're playing. And that's something that is sort of changing in the sports world a little bit over the last ten years who actually? No, it benefits our goalies to understand what it's like to be an attacking player. They can have that experience. That's good. You flush aw bat specific cop and why that relates to coaching and how it impacts the ability of coaches to really be successful. Of course. Yeah. Yeah. to miss it. Did you ever play a traditional sports? I did I was a soccer player in high school. I'll split tennis basketball really all around until I got injured and play sports because I need competition. I think we're we're pretty similar So. When when when I first started playing like as you mentioned like there was this focus on his Asian and the parallel to. Something like Lee. Legends is abundantly clear especially in North America. players will before they're even like in in ranked 'cause you have those thirty levels to get to. To get to before you start playing rank games. They're gonNA choose favorite position and like that's just Kinda engrained. And that's Kinda rough. But I think that needs to be that needs to be tackled that needs to be gotten rid of because when you're only. Focusing on one position and we have a lot of that and it's hyperfocused in North America. We have things like one called one tricks where you only play one champion. So it's it's hyper focusing on hyper focusing even more than is already have like should be happening. So we have these these one tricks and these one position players. And they're they're going all in and the as you said, they know nothing about the other player. So where coaching comes in is like there should be a focus on foundational knowledge and just general knowledge that will contribute to the overall play when when you're playing midland when you're playing midland in League of legends and Everybody knows most people know and Lee legends that the Mid Jungle Synergy is incredibly important has amid later if you know where your juggler is going to be and where the opponent judy is going to be, you can plan accordingly But if you all you know is about your your mid lane like position like say trade against your enemy mid Lehner and like a manage the waves effectively while that's important. Knowing about the other aspects of the game is it is expansive like you'll have a massive over the other teams and it. It's crazy to me that this the like just knowledge this is just knowledge. It's just being neglected we and I feel like it's just so much more potent in in North America still while still needs growth in other regions like a do follow g to at all. Of course alibi European friends Yeah Yeah G. to. Last year did something unprecedented. They sent a perks down to the bottling and they brought in caps who was a world class midlander, and so perks demonstrated something that no other team had really done before and that a role swap can happen and it will benefit the team like he went from. Midland to bottling lane in they played even better than they did before if anybody in North America attempted the same thing, I don't think we would find. Any semblance of the success that G. to did and I it's. I I think we should start working towards that coaching and House how this relates into coaching is. Is just the the emphasis on on knowledge. Our emphasis is always just as I said earlier, just the position that. You're already play and there are so many holes. There's so many things because people are just rushing to. Can like immediately I feel like I've gone a little rambler here real. They're made for rambling that's the whole point of the medium. It's I think you bring up a really good point is that position Louis play is the hardest thing to do at any most consistent marker of the greatest players and the greatest teams. If you watch a premier league soccer, for example, I was watching Liverpool. Play this past weekend at the way they move even compared to the MLS is completely within motion they're all. Moving with each other if that means that the midfielder needs to go back to Centreback, he does that without debate he's thinking about, Hey, this position I need to be he understands how the team needs to move around the ball and that's something that like you mentioned with g two, it's possible to do if you understand all those positions. But when you're one trick, this is true of MLS is somebody will miss their assignment and the whole defense fall apart because it's all predicated on everyone playing that one specific role, and it does not nearly have the same. Level of. Cohesion of of nuance that that the best teams in other countries are playing for an to America's credit. That's true of other sports say basketball when you watch a team in North America play or in the NBA play basketball, we're moving very position Louis. Format where it's Oh. It's people playing around each other The big men are no longer just staying underneath the basket there out by the three point line. And in other places that's not true because America's got the best basketball player at the best basketball league and it's sort of a martyr of. You have the best players and the Games take on added level of synergy. That's only really seen at the absolute top level, and that again comes down to coaching and a lot of ways coaching from early days, and then also coaching that continues into the pro play and having players who are receptive to have coaches actually talk with them and I think that's what are the big things we need to talk about his eastwards coach is. Especially in North America Arthur coaches respected some are but quite a few. Probably. Just got thrown into their role.

North America Basketball America Soccer LEE League Of Legends Louis North America. Tennis Centreback House NBA Lehner Judy Liverpool
Really Slow (MM #3473)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 5 d ago

Really Slow (MM #3473)

"The Maisonette with Kevin Nation. I've noticed lately that our internet seems to be really slow now. It's a relative term of course because really slow is not be true. I started back on the internet when you'd literally open up a web site and then go walk away for twenty minutes waiting it to upload the pictures now thanks to high-speed internet. It's not the same. It's not really slow. But it is you want it to be in ten years now, and now that we have the technology it should be instantaneous. But of course, it's not now. The reason our Internet is slow has a lot to do with well the fact that both my wife and I are working now on the internet at home and during the day I didn't have to worry about my wife when she was working from the office. She's on the internet all time. It's what she does for a living. She's got constant teams calls and zoom calls things like that takes up bandwidth and therefore the bandwidth I was using all for myself before is now being shared amongst two or three computers. I just wage number back twenty twenty-five years ago when the internet really was slowed when the internet first started out and I'll spoiled we've gotten yes. I realized we've come to expect things that are instantaneous, but every now and then I have to pause whether I want to or not dead.

Kevin Nation
Why Mitch McConnell is unstoppable

Post Reports

05:07 min | 5 d ago

Why Mitch McConnell is unstoppable

"The reality is in the Senate right now, it takes just simple majority to advance any presidential nominee Paul Kane is the senior congressional correspondent for the post whether it is to some random commission overseeing the Great Lakes or the Supreme Court of the United States of America, and that has left the minority party with very few options. The reality is that there's not a whole they can do. and. What are some of these theories that we have heard of that Democrats could do or that people think the Democrats could do right now oh, there's this thought of if you impeached someone anyone bill bar or in the trump again and sent to that resolution across the capital that it would instantly stop all other action and forced them to hold an impeachment trial. You know I got an email from a reader asking about they could just deny unanimous consent blocking unanimous consent is something that blocks the action from taking place and basically would make the voting process go much more slowly. Yeah. But there are provisions. Already in line for how to deal with those things, you file something called a cloture motion. That's the that's the way you blocked a filibuster defeat filibuster and yes, it'll take three days to overcome that process but think of it this way if there really were away for this minority party to block this Supreme Court nominee then Mitch McConnell would have thought of it in the eight years that he served as minority leader and was considered the obstructionist in chief. He was considered the greatest structure in the history of the Senate blocking Brock Obama at every possible way if there were ways for digital block Supreme Court. Nominations of Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan from the minority position McConnell would have done it but he couldn't do it, and then I've heard these ideas that potentially if Democrats were to win control of the Senate in November, and if there were to be a Democratic president that there's this idea, you could pack the court afterward, you could just change the number of justices that there are on the Supreme Court and increase them. So you could have two more. Democrat appointed justices or you could have four more. Well, that is a the that is something that can legitimately be done in the legislative process. There was no. Foundation in the constitution that set the number of surpreme. Court justices at nine. It started with six justices the chief and five associate justices an grew over the years and you know to be sure you know the considered the greatest Democratic president of all Franklin Delano Roosevelt tried in the nineteen thirties to pack the court and very infamous way and eventually was shot down and the reality is if Democrats were to go through the couple year process of adding justices to spring court that would immediately be met in return with Republicans. Next time they have the power and you know we just would go back and forth by. In twenty years, we might have twenty one justices and also probably need support from actual democratic leadership, and this seems like something that Congressional leadership isn't that interested in something that Joe Biden has said that he straight up doesn't think should happen Yeah Biden had got a little bit cagey the other night when he was asked about it in a local interview I think it was in Wisconsin and he basically said that he didn't want to answer the question because of the answers the question. Then that's GonNa change the. Discussion and what Democrats are trying to do right now is to avoid these. These are processed fights. I know that there is a bigger bigger goal at hand here in terms of overall policy and how that policy is reviewed at the supreme. Court. But most of the public tunes this stuff out because they, they hear things about over Republicans are being hypocrites and well like eighty nine percent or more of the public says, yeah, they're all hypocrites no big deal and they really want to try and focus this fight politically. On, what the impact of trading in Ruth? Bader GINSBURG. The most iconic liberal justice of the last twenty five years for a very staunch conservative jurist like amy, Coney Barrett like that is the biggest ideological jump that the court would have seen since thurgood Marshall was replaced by Clarence Thomas They WanNa make this fight politically not about these seemingly random efforts to put more justices on the Supreme Court and they want this fight to be about the impact on the affordable care act on voting rights on clean air clean. Water

Supreme Court Senate Mitch Mcconnell Joe Biden President Trump Great Lakes United States Bader Ginsburg Sonia Sotomayor Brock Obama Paul Kane America Ruth Thurgood Marshall Elena Kagan Franklin Delano Roosevelt Wisconsin Clarence Thomas AMY
Bank stocks knocked as Suspicious Activity Reports come to light

CNBC's Fast Money

01:26 min | Last week

Bank stocks knocked as Suspicious Activity Reports come to light

"Bank stocks getting crushed today a new report about the big firms dealing suspicious finds Wilford. Frost Scott the details wealth harmless. So Bank stocks were down sharply today following large declines for their European counterparts, Deutsche Bank for example, closed down nine percent on European trade. Standard Chartered down about five percent both hitting twenty five year lows in London trade earlier US banks ended up down about four percent. This is in part due to investigation by the International Consortium of investigative journalist that highlighted suspicious activity from various banks in the past specifically money laundering following a review of more than two thousand, one hundred reports filed by the US Treasury financial crimes. Enforcement Network a slew. Mentioned including I said HSBC Bank Standard Chartered JP Morgan and Bank of New York Mellon amongst others clearly, this activity is embarrassing for the banks however important to note in the past and that government and regulators were already aware of these details since suspicious activity reports by their very nature all reports between the banks and the government in the first place for example, for example, Deutsche Bank told me this is not new information to us or regulators Today off therefore much more down to the broad cyclical selloff linked to covid economic headlines, and also that Supreme Court news further making a stimulus bill less likely something that banks are disproportionately reliant on compared to some other

Deutsche Bank Hsbc Bank Standard Chartered J Bank Of New York Mellon Standard Chartered United States Us Treasury Wilford Supreme Court Scott Financial Crimes International Consortium Of
Judge dreadthe fight for Ruth Bader Ginsburgs seat

The Economist: The Intelligence

08:29 min | Last week

Judge dreadthe fight for Ruth Bader Ginsburgs seat

"On Friday US Supreme Court. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg died of cancer at the age of eighty seven. A candlelit vigil was held the following day outside the Supreme Court. Justice. GINSBURG was only the second woman appointed to the Supreme Court after being nominated by Bill Clinton in one thousand, nine hundred. I. In. Solemnly swear he was a champion of women's rights, and later in life she achieved restore status especially among young women. Now her death has set the stage for a divisive battle to replace her on the court. She was born in Brooklyn to an immigrant Father Dad was from Odessa in in Russia and to a first generation mother she was Jewish John. Fascination is the economist Washington correspondent and she was a trailblazer throughout her life. She was one of only nine women among five hundred men at Harvard law school, and when she arrived. Erwin griswold, who was then the Dean asked women in the class to stand up and justify taking a spot that could have gone to a man. She said the reason she took the spot is it was important that she understood her husband's work that would've made her husband Marty last Mardi was tax attorney well known in his own right he predeceased her but they had a famously loving and productive and equal partnership. She had a relentless work ethic in. Twenty five years in the Supreme Court she never missed today she's arrived four bouts of cancer before this fifth one killed her it was only after she got sick that she called by phone to oral arguments. I. Think People often have this idea that Supreme Court justices are sort of Stentorian wizards ready to shout down lawyer who they disagree with justice. GINSBURG was not like that she spoke very slowly very deliberately, which mirrors I think how she wrote and how she argued and how she thought she was meticulous. She was precise she she was not a showy justice. She came onto the court actually considered a moderate. There are a lot of people on the left who were upset when she was appointed because she was considered sort of two centrist. But as the court steadily moved rightward during her tenure, she has found herself the de facto leader of the courts liberal wing. Junk she spent a long time on the court. What did she achieve? Well, she was on the Supreme Court for Twenty seven years, and before that was on the DC Circuit Court of Appeals, which is widely considered the second most important court in America for for thirteen. So she was a judge for forty years I was age sixty when I was nominated in some people thought I was. Too Old for the job. Now I'm into my twenty-seventh starting my twenty-seventh year on the courts on one of the longest tenured. Justices. So if you worried about my age. It was unnecessary. Before that, she argued six cases before the Supreme Court and she was involved with thirty more as the first director of the US women's rights project. The first of those report court cases was in Reid versus Reid for which she wrote a brief arguing against the law in Ohio that preferred men to women in naming executive estates. She won that case in her first oral argument before the Supreme Court. She argued against the military policy that denied many husbands, officers, the same housing and medical benefits that automatically provided officers. Wise. The thinking was that women are somehow inherently more dependent on their husbands and husbands on their wise. Now, in that case, remember she effectively represented the husband she represented family but she represented the shoes argue in favor of the husband's benefits and she austin said that she was not arguing for women's rights she was arguing for the constitutional equality of men and women. Her death is come at a critical time in American politics. It's just six weeks away from the election. So what impact does that have? Well I think it's a little too early to say that definitively. It looks as though both sides are gearing up for battle, but they seem to be quietly circling each other in two thousand sixteen. The Supreme Court is central to Donald Trump's success I think because. There is an open seat in two thousand, Sixteen Justice Antonin Scalia died, and Mitch McConnell who is then the Senate minority leader rather than hold a hearing on Barack Obama's chosen replacement for Justice Scalia whose Merrick Garland he came up with a rationale disguises the principle which was that the causing election was coming up the speech beheld open. So the voters could decide now that had never been done before it was clearly a power play. It was a live sort of issue for Republicans impelled I think a lot of them who otherwise would have held donald trump at arm's length to decide that just had to vote for him this time I. Think Donald Trump is hoping for a similar effect this time, but he also wants to get the filled as quickly as possible. For Democrats donations had started pouring in, they have been pouring all weekend. Democrats seem riled up by this. I think in their view if Donald Trump managed to get a successor onto the court, this'll be the seconds effectively stolen seat right? The I was Neil Gorsuch. who was given the seat that was held open by Mitch McConnell, and the second would be whoever donald trump nominees to replace justice GINSBURG who gets the seat because Mitch McConnell did not follow the principle he set up in two thousand sixteen. John Do you think Senate. Republicans have the numbers to they have the votes to get in trump's nominee through before the election. Well this is the question on everyone's mind. Right so far Susan Collins and Lisa Murkowski Republican senators from from Maine Alaska, had said that they will not vote for replacement before November third they have said that the president who wins on November third you choose the replacement now that only gets Democrats to forty nine and they need fifty one because in the case of a tie Mike. Pence cast the tiebreaking vote Lindsey Graham had previously said he would abide by Mitch McConnell's rule from twenty sixteen. He has now gone back on that apparently because he's angry Democrats didn't roll over for Brad Cavanaugh Chuck. Grassley, who's a senator from Iowa has also previously spoken in favor of McConnell's precedent. I, have a very hard time imagining that when push comes to shove, he'll stand by his. Word and so there really is nothing Democrats can do unless they can persuade two other Republicans to come join them, and if they can't persuade those Republicans and tip the balance what happens. Then what are the consequences for the years ahead on American politics? It's clear that what McConnell did in two thousand sixteen was a tremendous violation of norms I think it's not a good principal to. Uphold I think arguing that this is now how Supreme Court seats should be awarded that in an election year, you effectively have to hold the seat open until the end of the election is a bad precedent but I think there's a difference between saying Republicans should be consistent for the sake of consistency and Republicans should follow this principle because that's how court seat should be given out now. From the Democratic Base, there's been a tremendous push to threaten Republicans with repercussions if. Retake. The Senate and the president in that includes making Puerto Rico in Washington DC states, which would effectively at least in the near in medium-term Give Democrats four senators people have also been talking about expanding the court. So the reason they are Nice Ring Court justices is not constitutional legal. It's just a statute. So if they were minded and had a majority had a president who would sign it into law, they put eleven or thirteen justices on the supreme court. The problem with that for Democrats I think is that it sort of shifts the terms. Of the debate that they are now winning I think the way Joe, Biden has pitched. This campaign is on the one hand. You have the sort of chaotic destructive Donald Trump on the other. You have Joe Biden Palm known figure who will get us back to normal. If, he comes out and endorses expanding the court or State of DC in Puerto Rico, which to be clear he has not done. He is actually a opposed expanded from court but if he comes out if Democrats threaten this, then the debate becomes a lot murkier. Then it becomes the radical change that Joe Biden wants to do right take fifty, two states and putting thirteen on Supreme Court against Donald Trump will keep things as are I think that debate does not play out very well for Democrats. John Thank you very much time.

Supreme Court Donald Trump Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Mitch Mcconnell Dc Circuit Court Of Appeals United States Joe Biden Senator Senate Justice Antonin Scalia Democrats John Bill Clinton President Trump Erwin Griswold Harvard Law School Brooklyn Puerto Rico Odessa Washington
Talking Arab-Israeli Peace with Acting Consul General Israel Nitzan

People of the Pod

04:31 min | Last week

Talking Arab-Israeli Peace with Acting Consul General Israel Nitzan

"Israel needs on is a veteran. Israeli. Diplomat who has served in a diverse array of postings from Egypt to the UN to his current role as Israel's acting consul general in New York. There's been a lot of news out of Israel lately and Acting Consul General Nitzan joins us now to help us break it down and to share his country's view Israel. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you very much. Now we wanted to have. You on this week in particular because Israel has brand new diplomatic ties with the UAE and bunkering and you are one of the relatively few Israeli diplomats who actually already has experience representing Israel in an Arab country what do you think actual practical on the ground peace with the in both rain might look like is it going to be similar to the Israel Egypt relationship that you know up close or is it going to be something totally different? Of. All I. think that it is different. This agreement is an important milestone region undermine stolen today in our Middle East. So we strategically and regionally, it strengthens our actually formalize ties within our relationship with very important regional glares in the Arab. Gulf. Sunni Arab countries who first of all perceived a threat posed by Iran we showed the perception of the threat posed by Iran and we agree also on the ways to address this threats basically I think that in the last few weeks I, think that both Israel and needs Sunni Arab neighbors in the Gulf called on the International. Community to continue in the maximum pressure on Iran. So this is at least from this angle. Secondly, you mentioned Egypt and I think that in many ways yes it is going to be a different kind of beast i. think it seems that is much warmer piece. I think that the key to peace in our region is encouraging more and more people to people engagement, and this is what we've seen in the last few weeks when people from the Gulf on social media, it seems clear that there are thrilled about the relationship very excited, actually encouraging and initiating a dialogue with Israelis This is great and I think that this is the key to any future of peace in our region especially with our neighbors that people people engagement is so key and it's so interesting. I mean Israel has had peace with Jordan for. Twenty Five Years Twenty six years peace with Egypt for even longer there's a little bit of Sinai tourism but like it's not a thing for Israelis to you know drive to Amman for lunch right? Do you think Israelis are going to fly to Dubai? Abu Dhabi. Fly to Montana and kind of explore the Arab, Gulf. I think definitely, yes. Of course, we are in a different reality to covid nineteen but I think that the expectation is already an ongoing dialogue between Israelis and moralities over zoom Israeli universities, research centres startups have already reached out and initiated this very important dialogue with their colleagues into golf. They'll talking about basically using our innovative meaning both Israel and the UAE innovative spirit. You know the the needs of people and I think that this is also one thing that is clear that the idea here in this piece that we prioritize both Israel in the UAE, prioritize the needs. Of their people and this is the first step you know to promote the regional peace no. As we said, there is an ongoing dialogue between the peoples between Israeli civil society between startups between companies in Israel I. think that You you mentioned my experience in Egypt and I think that what? I know from my experience in Egypt, the pieces for our job I need must be nurtured, and in many ways, the key to everything is education especially educating the younger generation basically educating them to accept the other two except the different to accept Israel as a legitimate neighbor. In many ways, I, think that the secret to success of any peace in our region will be found in the media and the textbooks, and basically these two means educating people today first of all in the media forming an encouraging public opinion supportive of peace. And also the textbooks educating the leaders of tomorrow through schools, universities, and basically educating them about accepting the other accepting Israel as a neighbor as A. Member neighbor-. Neighborhood

Israel Egypt Israel Egypt Gulf UAE Consul General Iran Middle East UN General Nitzan New York Abu Dhabi Dubai Montana Jordan Amman Sinai
Dealing with COVID Anxiety

The Psych Central Show

05:42 min | Last week

Dealing with COVID Anxiety

"And welcome to this week's episode of Psych Central. PODCAST. I'm your host gave Howard and calling into the show today we have. Dr, just lean shot wall. She is the chief medical officer and Director of Mood Disorders Program at Sierra Tucson, a premier residential, behavioral, Health Treatment Centre Dr Chow while welcome to the show. Thanks for having me. I'm delighted to be here. We are super excited to have you here today because you're also an anxiety expert and many people who aren't used to feeling the effects of anxiety are because of covid. So I WANNA start with are you seeing people that never had anxiety? And stress issues before suddenly developing anxiety disorders because of the global pandemic. I am noticing that there are a lot of people who noticed anxiety type symptoms and since they've never really experienced them before they're really taken aback and they don't really know what's going on and so I feel like one of our big duties at this time is to help people become more aware because I think once you can name the beast benefits a lot easier to tame the beast and I think a lot of individuals will have a hard time if they don't know what to call it or what to do with it. The psych central podcast has been on the air for almost five years psych central dot Com has been around for twenty five years. So we are well versed in mental health advocacy. And for the most part, it's always sort of been in its own little corner. There's the people that have a mental health issue or a mental illness, and they understand it. There's people who developed one or have a loved one who develops a mental health issue or mental illness, and they're searching for information, but by and large the majority of the population. Was Not discussing this openly we've seen that changed dramatically in the last six months where suddenly it's sort of mainstream news about how adult that never had any mental health issues before are suddenly a suffering from the symptoms of depression anxiety stress and on and on and on. It's a lot of people talk about anxiety like it's a pathological thing. I really try to. Explain to people how anxiety is normal. You have to have the neurobiological fear response to see safe as a human being like you are going to the Grand Canyon and walking over the skywalk. The fact that we don't just climb over the rail and try to jump down is because we do have a biological response to anything that's not within the normal human experience or. Scope if you think about having a snake your chair, you want to have an anxiety response so that you can quickly panic and run and what will happen. If you don't have that fear responses, you will die because the snake will bite you or you'll have some pretty negative consequences of that. How can you not having society when you're being told all day on the? News that you need to take all these extra precautions to just be safe to not fall sake to make sure your loved ones don't die. That is something that just normally will cause some degree of anxiety the difference between that type of anxiety and what can be called a DSM anxiety disorder ends up being that it becomes overwhelming to the point that you can't function. And what we start to see people who may have had a higher level of anxiety before were being able to do things to help themselves like going to the gym to work out or going for a run outside or spending time with loved ones all people they're coping skills have been taken away, and that is where you start seeing that they now fall into more that clinical anxiety. Disorder category if you look at most mental health conditions, they are on a spectrum and it just really depends on how far along the spectrum you are. Today could be that today it's a disorder, but a week ago or two weeks ago wasn't quite meeting the criteria. One of the themes that runs through the sake central podcast we try to explain that mental health and physical health actually. Are. They have a lot in common meaning most people have good physical health. Most of the time you can still get a cold. You can still get injured and that's a very temporary problem but you can also have, for example, diabetes, which is severe and persistent and lifelong mental health is the same way I. Think a lot of people think that you either have good mental health or. You're mentally ill and that there's nothing in between do you believe that because of the pandemic people are starting to realize that everybody has mental health and that you can have the equivalent of of a cold which in in this case is stress and anxiety or panic do you think this is helping to educate people that we all have mental health and anything can trigger bad mental health. I think reading a lot more content about that in very popular channels, Navy your podcast, or me this our world. But other people for whom this is not their world. We are seeing them talk more about mental and in my own World I try not to talk about somebody having just mental illness I think about mental health on a continuum. You can do things every day to improve your mental health and you can do things every day that may not really be serving well, the kind of food you e the places that you go to the people you spend time with each of those things can help build up that mental hell.

Anxiety Howard Grand Canyon Sierra Tucson Dr Chow Medical Officer Director Of Mood Disorders
UN chief names COVID, a ceasefire, and climate as UN75 priorities

UN News

10:57 min | Last week

UN chief names COVID, a ceasefire, and climate as UN75 priorities

"Let's make sure. That we have a global ceasefire, let's make sure that you'll have a vaccine and let's make sure that when we rebuild our economies through so. Fifteen. This. Is Colin from U. N.. News. September marks the most high profile period in the calendar the opening of the new General Assembly. session. This year is a special, the organization as it reaches its seventy fifth year. But preparations of overshadowed by the global. covid nineteen pandemic which has led to practically all of the events surrounding the general debates of the General Assembly being moved online. Ahead of the opening, you news may Yakub sense down an appropriate distance with the UN Secretary General Antonio Guitarist in this special that his own podcast find out what he wants to get out of the event and what can be salvaged from a year ridden with multiple crises. May began the interview on the subject that can't be ignored covid nineteen and Austin UN chief to assess global progress so far I'm very worried. I mean the pandemic Sean, the enormous fragility of the world's the not only ration- tool. The coffee that I mean, we have friend Julia. Climate Change to the lawlessness in cyberspace even to the risks of nuclear proliferation to the impacts of inequality. In the cohesion of societies but the the vitals that is a microscopic vitals has put us on our knees, and unfortunately, these should lead to a lot of humility in world leaders and to unity and solidarity fighting the coverage. Now that as we know unit, each country has adopted some strategy and we see the result, the vitals as progress to hear, and at the same time, there is not enough solidarity in relation to the developing countries and we see all in the. People are suffering so much and to a certain extent disease negative for everybody because. If we are not able to address properly the COVID also in developing countries. The vitals goes back and forth and. We will pay a heavy price even in the richest countries in the world. What would you hope government and community to do to overcome and emerge stronger? We need everybody to work together in cooperation, and now we have a good test and the test is the treatment and the vaccine. It is absolutely essential that the vaccine be considered a global public good people's vaccine and that we want have a competition of countries trying to get as many vaccines as possible for themselves. Forgetting about those that have less resources, we need a vaccine for everybody everywhere in affordable. The conditions because we will only be safe everybody's safe to think that we can preserve the rich people and let the people suffer. It's a it's a stupid mistake because there is no way. Everybody will not pay heavy price if not everybody is properly. Supported by the vaccination. On Climate Change Covid nineteen may have diverted attention and resources away from the urgent need for climate action and you have said categorically, people have to raise their voices. Business has to their site. Major emitters need to do more to save our planet. You'd recently said call is going up in smoke. What are three key things that must be done immediately for the Paris accord to work and the word to shift skier so we What is our objective? The objective has been defined by the scientific community. We absolutely must limit the growth in temperature to one point, five degrees namely at the end of the century for that, we need to have coronal throw in twenty fifty, and for that, we need to have a reduction of about forty five percents of emissions in the next. So the objectives clear. How can we reach them? We need a total commitment special if the big images to all the transformation elections, inanity, negative culture, you need history in transportation in all his whole life. We need transformational actions that make it possible to reach those objectives and it's very simple. We should stop spending money taxpayers, money and subsidies for fossil fuels. We should massively invest in renewable energy because it's cheaper, it's most profitable. It's it's not only the right thing to do is the best economic sink to do We need to stop the construction of coal plants we need to invest. In. New Forms of mobility namely through electric cars we've invested in either login that is the will of the future. And at the same time, we need to conduct the. Protection of Biodiversity Protection of forests transformation. In formations in our agriculture In, all these aspects we need to work together with a common strategy and with the clear objective, we need to be carbon neutral in twenty fifty. The twenty thirty deadline set for the achievement of these seventeen sustainable goals is really not too far away. How should world leaders refocused efforts? To achieve a disease after all, it's our blueprint. For a more sustainable and equitable planet, we'll because of the covid nineteen in the needles to recover economists, we are spending trillions of dollars at the present moment. So if you are spending billions of dollars, let's do it in line with the sustainable development goals that's fluid in line with agenda twenty thirty. Let's rebuilt. Is Better. With more equity fighting inequality, more sustainability, fighting climate change and all the other aspects of relevant in this Central Government Wolves beat the delegation of poverty be to the protection of the oceans beat. Seems ready to education to health to governance. So the the cover these threats is a problem, but it is also an opportunity because as to change. We can change in the right direction as we are mobilizing massive resources to rebuild. We can rebuilt in the right direction and our blueprint must be the agenda twenty thirty and disassembly Robbins schools. The UN has been around for seventy five years and you've called on everyone to participate actively in the UN seventy-five conversations. especially, those not often heard including youth you have spoke to you. But. Also, you were often in listening mode. What encouraged you from those conversation with us A very strong commitment of us to International Corporation The Yankees much more cosmopolitan than my generation. They feel universalist approach to problems. They understand that we need to be together and so the stand that we need a stronger multi-lateralism but the multi-lateralism that is also multilateralists in which they can participate a decision making. And these very strong commitment of the young people to ideas like universal coverage to ideas like the climate action to ideas like more justice inequality in our societies gender equality. Fight Against Racism all these aspects show a very. Young people. That is the biggest hope I ever to our. Common. Future. Some twenty-five years ago the Beijing Declaration was a historic turning point for advancing the rights of women. But Millennia of Patriarchy have resulted in a male dominated world. What would you like to see men do to ensure we have gender policy party and equality men must understand that it is these are. Not only of women to have gender equality agenda parody because the world will be better. It is relieving a male dominated world with a male dominated culture. That is why it is so important Indian which parity and we have done it at top level, but we need to do it everywhere. There is essentially a question of power. And we need to have I. don't like to use empowering women. It looks like we're giving bullet women. Power novel is not given it's taken, but we need to have women moving in order to assert their role in society, and we need men understanding that that is a positive thing for them. Mr. You've spoken passionately about inequalities and justice. The. Cause of many unfortunately problems in the war today. What are some of the most damaging example of these and how can multilaterism be the answer for all humankind to benefit it's very shocking from the point of view of wealth and income to see percents of humankind having more resources than off of the world's population. But I would say the most shocking aspects of inequality are not necessarily linked to money. It's equality linked to discriminations in relation to gender inflation to. Racist. Innovation to religion insulation to. People with this with ability in addition to the LGBTQ community. I mean we need to have a society in which cohesion is all objectives which we need to invest in the collision to make every community indigenous communities. Minorities in societies, every community to feel that their identities respected but they also they are part of the society as a whole. Mr Finally the ward the last word is for you. This is a virtual general assembly. Devoid from the usual trump far. But full of urgency and Gravitas and hope. What would you want? Would leaders and the public to take away from this UN Jason Of course many things, but if I would have to choose. Priorities I would say, let's make sure. That we have a global ceasefire. Let's make sure that you'll have a vaccine that is a global public good at People's vaccine, and let's make sure that when we rebuild our economies new to each governor. That was UN Secretary General Antonio guitarfish speaking to you a news current unit chief May Yaacob for the special three. UN. General Assembly addition of our flagship podcast the zone. I'm Connor Lennon thanks for

UN General Assembly Austin Un Secretary General Antonio Guit Colin Secretary General Antonio Guit Julia Beijing Connor Lennon Paris Yankees International Corporation Mr. You
Internet Archive Book Scanning with Davide Semenzin

Software Engineering Daily

15:08 min | 2 weeks ago

Internet Archive Book Scanning with Davide Semenzin

"Welcome to the show. Thank you. You're on the Internet Archive. What does the Internet archive do. That's a great question. Deterrent archive is the world's largest digital library, and whereas most people may know of us because of the way back machine, which is this really rather needs tool that allows you to go back in time and kind of see what web pages used to look like. We really are fully-fledged online is the library and that we have different types of media types. We hold texts and television and audio images, movies, all sorts of things and yeah, the introduce archive you can think of as this huge repository of Internet. When did you start working there? I started here in two thousand sixteen. So. We've been yeah for years. And what do you work on their today? Well, I work on the books. That's mostly what I would I have always been on. I'm spending the bits inside of this. So usually when we think about our media types, we think of in terms of bits and bits out how we procured them, and how we distribute them. My specialty is working on the book bits in saw in order to build up our collection of almost four million books we have Candan, and my job is to sort of keep running the whole pipeline that allows us to do that. So over the last four years, we've my team, I built it. And now we achieved over our objective of being able to digitize million books per year which we're doing, and it's pretty interesting challenge so far. So you work on book digitisation and I WanNa talk about that. But first, let's talk more about the Internet archive at a high level. He told me about what is being stored across the Internet archive and who pays for it, and how do people use it just share a little bit more about the Internet Archive. Yeah. That's a great question. So I'm going to start from a WHO pays for it because I think that's the result of depth and that question Internet Archive. If you think about it as a repository, it's just essentially a bunch of hard drives spinning connected to the Internet. Somebody's GONNA. Pay For both danger and connection and hard drives and the electricity and all of that largely you can think. Of of our revenues in treated front weight. So we're a nonprofit and we don't really run for profit businesses. We don't benefit in any way of the data that comes on on our servers. We do benefit from your donations and so by and large, we are a community funded effort, and so if you type slash donate, we actually just added integration with apple pay so people will not help us. That'd be great. So we receive a fair amount of money that we we need to run from patrons, Cintas like people who supported us. On the side, we do have some some small some businesses. So we have our archive it. Our arm where essentially contract alto were machine capabilities and we we are maintaining a very large amount of curated website collections. In fact, we I, think we have about seven hundred can ization that are that are partnering with us to create these collections and if you tens of billions euros that have been collected for for our partners, and so they pay us to do the service and we do it for them and same is true for books. digitisation. So as we have built up to large infrastructure that is required to do this kind of tasks, we have to an extent, the ability to contract out to third parties, and so we do get some some revenue streams that way not anything particularly substantial in terms of like our ability to to sustain ourselves. But you know every little bit helps and then obviously throughout the twenty twenty, five years of our existence, our founder Brewster Kahle has. Chipped in here in Deir a significant amount, I guess over the years to to keep us running. So we have donations we have a little bit of our non for profit business, and then we have brewster who is there so This is in terms of who pays for it, but the question would be I guess who benefits from it. Right and that's a very, very large segment of the Internet. We're not the biggest website on the Internet. They think we are. We're ranking about two hundred and something the Alexa rank. But since we've been around for a long time, the users that that lovers the Lavas like I, every day I am in contact with people who tell me their story about how they use the Internet archive for their specific need always always amazed by the depth and breadth of. The of the use cases user spring to us. So it it spans from teachers to researchers, journalists to lawyers Theresa very, very large diversity also in terms of the country's from the backgrounds from from when users from. So it's kind of hard to to to paint them with the same brush but in general I want to say they are people who have some degree of laugh for knowledge and you may know our our motto, our slogan our mission is Universal Access to all knowledge, and so I guess people who have an interest in that eventually land on on our website. Okay. Well, let's talk about book digitisation as a particular project that is under the auspices of the Internet Archive. What is book digitisation? So, books digitisation is the effort of transforming physical books into digital artifacts. So that's the definition can take it forms. You know if you are if you have a scanner in your home and your scanning document in a way, that's obviously that's digitisation if you take pictures of the book. That's a book book digitization. So the definition that needs to be applied to the use case at hand, there have been other efforts at large scale of books. This decision famously Google had one but dare. Different From Ours, for instance, where they did distractive digitisation so they would pull the spines from books and and turn dot process into a sort of sensitive. Kind of problem we do non destructive book dissertation and I think non-destructive bit. It's just a little bit as important in the Beth nation as the fact that we're these books digitizing them so that we can keep them so that we don't destroy them. So the process by which we turn books into bits and then returned books to wherever they came from or wherever they need to go. So Why would I want to digitize a book and how many books get digitized each day just tell me more about the volume that's going through this. I'm very happy to answer this. So the reason why you would want to digitize book there's multiple. So think about for instance, the first thing that comes to mind is obviously preservation if famous birtherism is that accessibility drives preservation so if you don't have something. It's almost like it doesn't exist especially in this age of information, we do have immediate access to all of all of these resources and so if we if you actually think about this, if you have to go to the library to to procure a certain book chances are you won't, and if the if the record of that book actually doesn't exist, you may never get to it and were. This is a problem is for all of this huge amount of books that were printed in the twentieth century for which there is really no digital equivalent books nowadays that are published like currently obviously, they have a book artifacts. That stuff is not to get lost. and. That stuff is searchable and it's reachable but we have. Tens of millions of books that are unaccounted for and as time progresses getting lost, and if we if somebody doesn't save them, they will be lost forever and that's that would be a pity and huge loss of human effort and so but first of all, I think important to scope the problem I think the D estimates that there is about one hundred, million books out there. Give or take unique unique books and. Scanning them we're, probably not gonNA scan all all one hundred of them first of all because. You would be able to source and that's my fire the hardest thing. So we tried to scope down the problem and trying to figure out. Okay. How can we do this in a way that is useful for people so first of all, I think we had to come up with a list of books that we wanted to get into we knew. Books that are important and we need to can these first so that? We'll. We'll get. We'll get into to people and this will be evidently immediately useful and a good place for us to start was freaky Pedia, which is collected. A long list of SPN's the where commonly cited in Wikipedia compiled the list came out to a few hundred, thousand books, and so whenever we we come upon one of those sourcing process, we make sure that we get. We can talk about the senator sourcing, Proxima, little bit later but in general, we do have a little bit of a concept of priority or at least we did this was the first million million and a half. And then the problem was that we started running out of books you would be surprised how hard it is to source books by by the half a million you know and if you if you do it by your smaller scale, it doesn't really make sense to to us in terms of maintaining our our economic scale. So the whole system works only if you scan at huge volume and time and but huge volume, we're talking about a million bucks a year, which is about three thousand books day some things some days we'll do thirty, five somedays. We'll do twenty five on a seven days week averages houses about. Between Twenty to twenty, twenty, five, thousand books. Every book is about three hundred pages so that. COMES OUT PRETTY NEAT about million million pages per day five to seven million pages per week and you know that's not a huge amount of data in total. I wouldn't be surprised I. think like last time I checked it was about between ten and fifteen terabytes of data week. So we're not talking about huge amounts but it's not a small amount eater and we can talk about the challenges of Piping data over the Internet in a reliable way later but it's a significant volume and this operation is running you know twenty, four seven. And so. In terms of why even do this? So I called for the first part, which is obviously people want to get to the books. There is a second benefit in having digitize books, and that it's a wholly new format, it allows you to interact with the body of knowledge in a way that you never have before if you have. A physical book artifact, it has some very desirable properties, for instance, very low random access time and doesn't depend on the battery. It's very, very hard to censor, and these are not properties of digital artifact but this is the active factor searchable, and in fact that we have like it's pretty amazing next search engine where you can instantly search all forty million text items that we have. So that's a million books plus all of the patents papers I'll all sorts of stuff and you can search that instantly that was just not possible with the previous format. So I don't think this is dwell ISM in any way I think books. Digital format and books their physical format will continue to coexist. They just help each other out, and in fact, if we are able to digitize them in the first place is because of the properties of. Physical artifacts that they don't just disappear. If we find one, we can scan it. Well. Those are great summary of what you do and I can tell how excited you are about it. Let's talk a little bit more about the high level, and then we'll get into the engineering. So can you describe the steps of digitisation in more detail if I have a book how am I digitized it? Yeah. So, the books that position pipeline is predecing people and it's like in a way if you're an engineer I think is kind of what to expect so I D-. A physical sorting. Step where your book is ingested into the system. It's given ID and it's it's placed in a container. So we know that the the exists. So to speak the second step is it gets to a scanner. The scanner picks it up within the in the machine loads up the data necessary whereby The books method data we can. We're going to have to talk about that. I, guess it's pretty interesting facet of it all and then proceeded to actually scan it, which means they turned the pages page by page and they take pictures of the pages, and once this process done they click upload and the book vanishes into the ether and so at this point, we have a fork the digital artifact goes into our servers divisible artifacts either goes back to the person who gave it to us in the first place or it goes into our warehouse. and. This largely depends on what kind of book it is. So obviously, the recent larger conversation to be had about copyright and like what books is it is it okay to scan and under what guys it is but suppose we are just you know scanning Yearbook Jeff and you you just wrote the book and you want to have it digitized to risk no claim on it just wanted back at the end. So after we're done scanning it, we're handing it back to you with slip inside which will tell you the Internet archive identifier and the. Or is just the name of the item on the Internet Archive. Everything is an item and you're just going go to type slash details, slash your identifier and a few hours. Later, you will find her book. Wile you wait the second part of the pipeline is GONNA kick off. So That's the digital server side stuff and it's divided essentially three phases. We have a first phase which it's a preprocessing stage where we get a look this images that came raw from the camera we'll look at them crop firm we discovered them and we just make sure that everything is is ready to go. There was a second phase of Manual Review Sa- currently all books that we upload have to be checked by a human for correctness, and so this is a step were. Reviewer just goes through the images in shorts that everything is fine and then when this is done, they kick off the third stage of the pipeline, which is A. Is the real processing stage where we take all of these files and compiled them in such a way that they are suitable for consumption by our web front end what we call book reader and from their wheel derive. We call them to rotate formats such as PDF, Abi e POB and either a text file. So CR it all happens at at this stage. This is kind of like the bird I view of the of the books that decision pipeline.

Internet Archive Twenty Twenty Brewster Kahle Cintas Internet Google Alexa Candan Apple Theresa Manual Review Sa Senator Wikipedia Founder Engineer
A New Way To Respond To Old Problems

Joyce Meyer Radio Podcast

04:03 min | 2 weeks ago

A New Way To Respond To Old Problems

"Another way that you can make a day better if it's not going to good. Are Actually, you don't even have to wait for it not to go good some of these things if we would do them on a regular basis, we wouldn't experience as many bad days and have to fight them off how about doing something new that will keep your life from being stale and stagnant because nothing has changed for the last twenty five years. I'M GONNA. If you don't like change well, get ready for. Boring. And then. If, we stop learning and growing were breathing but not truly alive. Joyce Meyer said. Oliver Wendell Holmes said a mind stretch by new experience can never go back to its old dimensions. Now, I believe that learning. Can actually add a little exciting element. To our life every day maybe the biggest thing we need to learn is a new way to respond to old problems. So here's a little story for you. Once upon a time complained or father that her life was miserable and she just didn't know how she was going to make it. She said I'm tired of fighting struggling all the time. It just seems after one problem is solved. Another one comes right on top of our father who was a chef took her into the kitchen and filled three pots with. Water placed each one of them on a high fire wants a three pots began to boil. He placed potatoes in one pot eggs in the second pot and ground coffee beans in the third pot it then let them sit and boyle without saying a word, his daughter, the daughter Moan and Groan complain and she was impatient wondering what was he doing after twenty minutes? He turned off the burners It took out the potatoes. Put them in a bowl full the eggs out, put them in a bowl. Then he ladles some of the coffee out into a cup turn into her and ask his daughter. What do you see? She's potatoes, eggs, and coffee look closer. He said touched the potatoes touched the eggs, SIP the coffee. So she did in noted that the potatoes. were. Soft. Go take an egg and break it and after pulling off the shelves she observed that it was hard. He Nice go to sip the coffee and it brought a smile. The rich aroma brought a smile to her face. Father what does this mean? What are you trying to teach me? He then explained that the potatoes, the eggs and the coffee at each face the same adversity, the boiling water however. Each one reacted differently the potatoes went in strong and hard and came out soft and weak the egg one in fragile with a thin outer shell protecting its liquid interior. But when it was put in the boiling water, it came out hard. However, the coffee beans were unique after they were exposed to the boiling water they change the water and created something new. So when you have. Problems and you know we do have problems and. I'm well aware that some of you have some serious problems going on in your life right now. and. If you're not in this building, surely many watching TV I've gone through. Terribly difficult times in my life, but we have to be so careful that our problems don't make us. We can win be where we don't just start having a give up attitude. and. Then we also want to make sure they don't make hard and harsh. Leave us with a bitter attitude. What we WANNA do we have problems is let God use them to change us and then let us change the world around us because of what God has

Moan Joyce Meyer Oliver Wendell Holmes Boyle
SEC to examine Nikola over short seller's fraud allegations

CNBC's Fast Money

09:37 min | 2 weeks ago

SEC to examine Nikola over short seller's fraud allegations

"We start with some breaking news on Nikola shares they are down in the after hours that follows a big update Bloomberg reporting that the Securities and Exchange Commission will examine Nikola over the short showing fraud allegations stock down seven and a half percent right now guide Your response to that news. Again it probably Brian. Thanks for being here. Again, I can't speak, and I said this last week try to be a little clearer. Now, I can't obviously speak to the veracity of the short soul report accusations of fraud I have no idea what I did say last week, and what I'll stand behind is despite how the GM investment is structured whether they are actually investing money for the deal is structured fact that GM is somehow it linked. Their wagon to Nikola and if these accusations proved to be correct I, think the really deleterious thing could happen in shares of GM based solely on that not because it's just two billion dollars but the in my opinion, the potential for an exponential move based on that and based on the fact that maybe GM potentially didn't do the homework that are the people did that would be my primary concern right now as I look at this entire situation. and Tim to be clear on the story and I know we're GONNA. We're trying to fill up here. Any moment is that you don't Trevor Milton said the other day we're going to basically work with the SEC I wanna be clear according to the Bloomberg report. That's not what this is. This appears that the SEC is now poking into Nikola baby on not on the side of the short seller. But certainly from that angle, this is not some cozy deal between the two going after Hindenburg. No I think ultimately, the the SEC is going to do what they feel is just based upon both again allegations of fraud and actual fraud and investigating what was represented to investors I mean there's there's whether the technology is what it is and guys brought up some important elements of this that I don't I don't think we can know based upon even even if we read that entire report again, this needs to be validated or invalidated. The fact that the company has come out today and said, well, you know we said that it was. That the company was was was was excuse me that the truck was moving as opposed to it was actually individually propelled by our own engine etc I mean you know there's some some really frankly. that. BET semantic hair that's trying to be split here I think is is crazy I mean that doesn't sound good that certainly doesn't sound like something you'd rest. Well, we weren't really you know indicating that we were. We were on our own individual propulsion. So I think you know that doesn't read well. I to me GM the the issue was did this validate some of their fuel cell technology and some of their overall engineering prowess and did the deal makes some sense when you consider that unlike others Nikola was going with an asset light strategy and seeking to at least tap into engineering and we? Capacity that all makes sense. The fact that Jim got this for free was going to be paid seven hundred million dollars for access to some of their technology. I don't think this is necessarily harmful to GM. If this all turn to be a disaster for Nikola I think the fact of the matter is GM is pointing out that they have been in this space for a long time and I, think there's a lot there. Well it Dan Listen. That's the Tim. Actually hit on the one thing in the rebuttal that stuck out to me as well which is yeah. The truck may not have run on its own, but all the parts Kinda worked on their own but together didn't really matter because we're going to pivot to something else. Anyway there's a lot of pivoting going on Nikola and I wonder if investors should just pivot away from the stock because they don't know how this is going to end up. Well I think that's the main point. We just don't know we talked about this on Thursday. The stock was trading about thirty, eight hundred already had a big down day on the day before after that report came out my comment was okay. Well, there was two opportunities, the vet this story and I was a bit Glib about and so I said, you know there probably isn't fraud here. I had a very prominent short seller hit me after the fact on tax and say be careful here this is well documented and devastating I spent some time reading it the rebuttal there was really nothing there from Mykola and I think that's a pretty interesting. Story I'll just make one point and one of the reasons why I made that comment on Thursday I've been in this business for twenty five years. You know if you WANNA create some sort of scheme to rip people off of lots of money doing it in the public eye in front of know financial TV investors who are very well incentivized a sniff it out, and then no shortage of regulatory bodies. It's just not the best place to do it. So that's my first reaction often but who knows here, this seems like a really creepy situation and you know when you don't understand something you just avoid. Yeah, I think that's well setting care and I want to reiterate the news in case audience is just joining us here that the according to Bloomberg is now going to investigate at least sort of at a top level. The allegations of fraud against Nikola made by the short seller doesn't mean they're going to find anything and if they find anything, it may not. Be Serious and it could have some sort of an easy resolution as well. Just because the SEC goes poking around companies doesn't mean there's a negative outcome and I think that's very important to be said but on forget Nikola Karen is there any reason ever invest in the stock of a company where the even sniffing around? Maybe it does create some weird opportunity. Well I guess I point to Tesla the SEC. Sniffing around when they the statements about you know financing secured when when musk wanted to take private for four hundred and twenty dollars a share I guess that would have been one scenario but I agree with the guys on the panel that this particularly this issue of it was whether it was self propelled. We never said it was certainly one could reasonably assume that investors looking at that would think. That trump is going on its own. It just makes you think. All right. What else are they do? They have out there in the market that you know what are they sort of presenting that might not be actually as it appears this is a black eye for GM I'm GonNa Guess that maybe this deal falls apart I think GM I think is one of the guys said they didn't actually up any money it was the putting resources into advancing their. Ev Platform. But this this is a black guy for them. It's bad for them and I'm going to guess that this deal falls apart. We'll very quickly Karen and want to come back to number one on the propulsion sort of issue. Well, let's not forget the Financial Times. Did it's reporting a few days ago that they said they talked to a cameraman who said trump just basically rolled down the hill I think probably all of us that our worst moments of roll down a few hills once in a while after you too many. Let's move aside for that Karen. You think that if this comes out as a worst case scenario could GM's CEO Mary Barra lose her job. That I don't know I, mean imagine it. I. Would think the board probably not delighted by this It it it kind of I mean, maybe they did do their due diligence. Maybe they did know all of the points that were in that extensive short report, which I only read a little bit of to be to be fair did not read the entire thing and that they went through every single thing seemed okay. That's a bit of a stretch for me to believe. So I think the stock had rallied on that on the deal so it would be reasonable to You know I'm going to sell some stock I think. This is a black guy for them and for her and I think she's fantastic but. she is. Go out on religion meeting her and interviewing her and Mary Barra is is a class act all around guy but GM shares are moving on this news not a lot but they are down about one and a half percent and listen Y- again, and there's a lot of if and maybe you don't want to go too much down that rabbit hole you. So adroitly said very much of the top there but it is a difficult situation for GM and its investors when literally a couple of working days after you announce a big deal, basically one full week, you got the SEC poking around the company that you just kind of. GOT INTO THE BOARDROOM WITH Yeah I mean it's concerning again we I and we're all trying to be really careful here because obviously you know none of us know where the trews are and where they're not. But again, I want to emphasize if there's any truth whatsoever. In. Knows Ninety pages of that short sell report I think it's really believe it or not I think it's more of a negative for GM potentially that it is for nickel I know that sounds ridiculous but people will say how could you possibly got into whatever agreement it is whether it's a Deal whether it's just a collaboration thing whatever it is how do you partner up with a potentially something that isn't what they said it is to me that's a really scary notion and I think that's sort of the tail risk that GM is facing right now and obviously you know we're not wishing for this. I think we're just trying to point out what could happen and that sort of our jobs here.

GM Nikola Securities And Exchange Commis Fraud Nikola Karen Bloomberg Mary Barra Brian Financial Times TIM Trevor Milton JIM Mykola Donald Trump Musk Partner CEO
Insurance  - burst 08

Reduce Debt Increase Wealth

03:02 min | 2 weeks ago

Insurance - burst 08

"It may be a lump psalm say like three million dollars but they then they can put that aside and have money to do things like pay off the house pay off some debt have money to live on for a while until they get. You know wife goes to work or you know something happens life goes on. So that's. Got Term Life Insurance, which is for a set period of time at the cheapest way to go says here in my article that it's usually for ten twenty, twenty, five or thirty years when the term runs out to coverage expires. Always thought term life insurance was year to year. You can get a year policy and every year goes up a little bit again, the younger you are the less it's GonNa beat. Then you have whole life insurance. Let can last for the rest of your life and it's also has a death benefit and their what happens with whole life is has a death benefit you pay more in for whole life. It's invest it over time you build up a cash value. and. Then this cast value can borrow against and then repay if you want don't really necessarily have to, and then when you pass away is got a set amount of death benefit or when you don't pass away and you have enough value in there, you start at say when you're twenty five years old when you're sixty five, you can roll it over in some type of nudity and get a monthly payment out of it. That's what a whole life insurance. It's generally a whole lot more expensive than term insurance. So if you just look and. To replace your income upon death then term insurance is the way to go. If you're looking, they used the insurance company to help you in your retirement years. You're not really plan on dying into young, which is an unknown. Then the whole wife may be away that go and this is where your insurance agent can help you identify those. You just gotTa, do your research before you buy it and know what you're getting into before you buy any type of life insurance and they have life insurance for your children for your spouse for everybody for every reason. And then we have disability insurance which I had that when I was south employed when yourself employ. And your income is depending on you doing all the work. And if you're unable to go to work in, then you have zero income, you would need a disability insurance that kicks in after a period of time you have short-term disability and make kick in after two weeks or three weeks, and you have long term disability that kicks in after six months.

Carmakers rev up electric truck, SUV production

Climate Cast

06:48 min | 2 weeks ago

Carmakers rev up electric truck, SUV production

"You, see them everywhere nearly fifty percent of all vehicles sold in the US, our sport utility vehicles the International Energy Agency reports SUV's are second only to electric power for the increase in greenhouse gas emissions in the last decade. But there are a new wave of all electric SUV's and trucks is coming and these new vehicles may be more powerful and boasted longer driving range than many of today's gas-powered SUV's trucks. So, how quickly will high tech these take hold in the next decade Chelsea Sexton is an electric car advocate and consultant hi. Chelsea their quick. Sketch here, how close are we to the next wave of electric vehicles and what will their capabilities be? We're going to start to see more of them in the next year or two obviously things are slightly influx with the pandemic but most of the automakers are still trying to be within a few months of their original targets and we're seeing everything from plug in hybrid jeep wrangler with thirty miles of electric range for around town driving and. Gasoline after that, all the way up to f one, fifty and riven with a few hundred miles of expected range and I'm interested in that F one fifty story because that Ford truck is the top selling truck in America I think there were nine hundred thousand f-series trucks sold last year and I see that they're retooling a factory in Michigan to build the first all electric f one fifty. What do we know about that role? Not very much. We're expecting it late twenty, twenty, one, early twenty, twenty, two something to that effect and they've not released really any specs other than videos of hauling trains and things to try to prove that electric vehicles really do have as much more performance than gasoline trucks, what other electric pickups SUV's Few years I'm watching all of them. There still are some open questions about everyone of them in that most vs today of any model have been sold only in California or the carb states owens have mandates requiring evt's there's not that many vehicles that are available across the country, and that will be a huge thing to prove what the trucks regarding who's serious, and WHO's not. That's an open question for folks like Ford, will they make these things in volume and sell them nationwide and really get behind them with the marketing and dealer support or is this going to be more of what we refer to as a compliance car which is basically Will sell as many as we have to in the places we have to, but not really in it with their hearts well, and part of the answer to that might be consumer attitudes. Right? I mean you helped launch an electric vehicle for GM back in the nineties. Have you seen consumer attitudes change in that time and if they changed enough to bring in the truck SUV drivers ironically that generation in the nineties had more trucks than SUV's in it than than small cars everyone knows the ev one that was the one I was involved in but Chevy and Ford made pickups at the time and Honda and Toyota made small SUV's so it's Sort of feels like we're yanking the automakers back toward where they started. There's still a lot of education that's needed. There are lots of people that are not even aware of electric vehicles, but in part that's because they've never seen one and they've never been available and so people can't buy what they don't know as even possible. So there's a lot of education required on that front but the interesting thing about electric vehicles in general is that it is the only example in the history of the automotive industry in which the industry itself has required demand to predate and continually exceeds supply. What. That sounds like is every time you hear it automaker executive say when we see demand for electric cars will start to build them. So it's always been the market polling for from the automakers versus the automakers trying to build their own market for something. So it's a parallel. Yes. Of course, we need to do more education, but we also need to start building things that people can see our else. They're never going to be aware of them in want to buy one. What about the politics of this? How much do you see that playing into the success of the next generation of truckin SUV models I mean we'll some people just not wanNA drive one because of their political beliefs it's possible however. The irony is that there has always been a fair amount of right wing support for electric vehicles because they use domestic energy, they keep more money in the local economy. We're not sending money overseas before an oil, and so it doesn't always get talked about in this administration because the politics kind of ebb and flow depending on the administration but there is a fair amount of conservative support and they're not just sort of this liberal technology that they're made out to be. So all politics tend to be kind of transient and. I've watched it shift back and forth over the years. So I don't expect the current politics will be permanent But at the same time, this has always been if not politically driven certainly policy driven it is those external incentives and mandates that have helped compel with the advocates and market asking for them electric vehicles for twenty five years, and it will probably remain. So for the next several at least are there any other barriers you see to electric truck an SUV sales? The single biggest barrier today is lack of product. The second biggest is lack of marketing and awareness and education and people not being able to buy what they don't know about and the third biggest dealerships across the board with any EV model if dealers aren't comfortable and wanting to sell vs they're not going to be successful at it, and so we can put billions of dollars into those first two things. But at the end of the day, if someone walks into a Ford dealer in his told well now, you'd really rather have the gasoline f one, fifty, not the electric one that one's Kinda goofy. All of that money and effort is wasted what about the pace of change and I know we're focused on electric vehicles today on the transportation emissions but overall with climate emissions I mean you you live in California you've been watching this for decades. We've got these terrible fires in California and Oregon this week are we moving fast enough now? We're not and that is not a widespread enough opinion yet. But regardless of why they come to the table, the best thing we can do is make more options available and attractive. So it doesn't matter if someone is coming to an AV because of climate change or air pollution or any other reason if they're coming for Torque and horsepower I'm fine with that. The goal is to build more of the table as we have more seats at it not be so concerned about why people come and sit down I'm all about the Torque and horsepower Chelsea, Sexton electric-car advocate and consultant. Thanks so much for sharing your perspective on climate cast today. Thank you for crash your party

Chelsea Sexton Ford California Consultant United States International Energy Agency Ford Truck Wrangler GM Chevy America Executive Owens Honda Michigan Toyota Oregon
interview with Dr Mike Schneider

Moving2Live

04:59 min | 2 weeks ago

interview with Dr Mike Schneider

"Dr Schneider. Thank you for taking time to talk to Pittsburgh Philip PG and moving to live. Sure my pleasure. Guess the first question I. Want to ask because I was I made aware of you because I'm also guilty of these silo knowledge is. You see somebody in the elevator, what's your thirty second elevator Spiel of who are you or what you do Yes. So my elevators. I am a chiropractor by training working in a physical therapy department doing back pain research on a full-time basis. And I know I wanNA touch briefly on how one goes from a career as a chiropractor seeing patients which I know you did for many years we won't say many many years and then you did Not, really a complete one eighty, but a big shift and decided to get a PhD. Briefly. How to do or why did you decide to go into chiropractic medicine and then what was the decision to kind of go and get some additional education and go from primarily patient care to doing research? Sure and I did do kind of a one eighty mid career so. Beginning back to why they go into Chiropractic it's interesting. Her somebody saves me once before we choose our career pass when we're basically teenagers. Right, so I'm. I'm doing Undergrad, studies I went to. University of New York at Binghamton, as a biology major, and I wanted to go into some kind of healthcare profession and. I you know I was was intrigued by sort of the the alternative fields to medicine. I didn't want to go to medical school I wanted to do something else carpet just appealed to me was something different. Alternative. Kind of A. Mainstream alternative and not completely alternative medicine field. So I chose Chiropractic as as my profession being young and. Naive I guess. And I know prior prior to moving to Pittsburgh and becoming acquainted with the number of chiropractors. My thought of Chiropractors were they were somebody that you went to a couple of times a week for basically I'm saying this an air quotes back cracks and I've learned over the past seven or eight years that there's really. Two directions, the chiropractors go there's those that do that. They want to get people in maybe on a subscription basis where they come in multiple times a week, and then there's others that I've been fortunate to meet where they work in a manner that's very similar to the way physiotherapists work in other countries or physical therapists work. Which Direction when you started out in your career path where you or was it entirely different when you started out as far as the directions, the chiropractors tended to go. Well I'm not embarrassed to tell you to my agent I've been practice I graduated from chiropractic school in Nineteen Eighty two. So many many years ago well over thirty years ago. And at that time, chiropractic. Had Not quite evolved to where it is now but over the years since that time we started seeing, I think the boundaries between physical therapy and carpet professions getting blurred and what I mean by that it's probably in the late ninety s crate Lebron Sin The chiropractor from Los. Angeles started bringing his rehabilitation model to car practic. So prior to that most banks just doing the manual. As you call back cracking techniques and then start blending rehabilitation techniques at the same time the physical therapy sessions going the other direction where they mainly just prescribing exercise not putting your hands on people as much and there was an interest in the PT profession and the eighties and nineties start introducing more manual techniques. So I think we're seeing you know blurring of the lines now as evidenced by me a chiropractor working in a physical therapy department. And what was the impetus after working as a chiropractor to as you said, do a career one eighty, get a PhD in rehabilitative sciences and become more heavily researcher. Yes. So even when when I was in clinical practice all those years and I practice over twenty five years before he decided to get a PhD which is very unusual thing I'm finding out that's not typical path. But all those years in practice it always kind of bothered me I was helping people but I was realizing in a sense we're experimenting on patients doing things that I would learn at conferences or at reading books. Would do them my patients. I felt part of me felt badly about that like I. Don't know for sure that this works I. Think it does. And so even when I practice I was publishing papers and trying to get involved research. It seemed like I always was being pulled in that direction. So. Quite frankly was his family events change. I have two kids when I started getting sat empty nest part of life. So we're really what do I to do now right I got my kids through. High School and they're often going into college. I'm going to go back myself.

Pittsburgh Dr Schneider Philip Pg Binghamton A. Mainstream High School University Of New York Angeles Researcher LOS
"twenty five years" Discussed on Business Wars Daily

Business Wars Daily

04:04 min | 2 months ago

"twenty five years" Discussed on Business Wars Daily

"If you're an offroad aficionado or even just WANNA be. This story is a big deal. After a quarter century Ford is resurrecting the Ford Bronco a direct rival to the jeep. Ford produce the Bronco for thirty straight years starting in nineteen, sixty six. The vehicle had only two doors reportedly one reason why Ford discontinued it in Nineteen ninety-six consumer sentiment was shifting toward four doors. Historians say the Bronco Developed Cult Status. After it was discontinued today, the beefy muscular vehicles, a sentimental favourite restored vintage models can sell for up to two hundred thousand dollars with a corporate unit called Ford icons. Ford is Heavily Marketing Nostalgia that division includes the Bronco, a Mustang and a new line of Ford F one fifty pick-up trucks, including a hybrid version, and soon to be debuted all electric. And Nostalgia sells, but it's far from the only reason. The automakers releasing a Bronco for the twenty first century. The company is capitalizing on a trend according to the automaker offroad vehicle, so called rugged SUV's. Twice, as popular as regular SUV's CNN reports that has engineered the new bronco models for quote hard off road driving. You know the kind that allows you to quote. Get far from civilization. An even stay there for awhile. Is the perfect escape for pandemic induced cabin fever. Get a dose of Adrenalin while avoiding the plague. It's a combination made for advertising. Heaven Kit needs to be the jeep wrangler as the Juggernaut of off road vehicles. CNBC reports that automakers have been trying to quote dethrone the Wrangler for decades. Without much success. Even during the pandemic GPS kept selling Fiat Chrysler sold an average of seventeen thousand jeep wrangler every month for the last five years according to the Detroit news last year, almost a quarter, million wrangler flew off dealership. Lots and experts say jeep owners are loyal. To a fault. Still Ford executives have moxie. They're predicting sales of two hundred thousand broncos over the next year, according to Automotive News. and. Keep in mind that the low end version of the new line. The broncos sport won't even be out until years end higher end versions of the Bronco won't be at dealerships until next spring. Ford is doing everything it can to make the Bronco enticing enough to away jeep lovers, and of course to persuade new off roaders to come into the Ford camp that includes besting the ramblers largest tires thirty three inches with whopping thirty five inch tires, Ford says a Bronco outfitted with the almost three foot in diameter tires can easily go through a couple of feet of water models also come with removable roofs and doors. Drivers can store the doors in the Bronco. For, it says. At about thirty thousand dollars, the price of the two door base Bronco comes in at only two hundred dollars more than the base price of the jeep wrangler at the top in a limited number of first edition for door Bronco started about sixty one thousand dollars, Ford began taking one hundred dollar deposits on Broncos last Monday when it released the new line I edition reservation slots sold out within a couple of hours. Still as bullish as the auto press is about the Broncos, the release comes against bleak backdrop for the auto industry. Overall vehicle sales plummeted when covid nineteen emerged shut the industry down for two months recently, both Ford and GM reported second-quarter sales declines of about thirty three percent from a year earlier jeep parent, Fiat Chrysler did even worse with sales down forty percent. And that puts a lot of pressure on Ford to live up to its promise of adding a billion dollars to the bottom line next year through Bronco Sales. And it adds pressure Chrysler to keep jeep at the top of the OFFROAD HEAP Stakes is high as the boulder strewn rocky mountains. The war between Bronco in gene. We'll be fascinating to watch.

wrangler Ford broncos Bronco Sales Fiat Chrysler Ford camp Adrenalin CNBC Detroit GM
"twenty five years" Discussed on Business Wars Daily

Business Wars Daily

02:24 min | 2 months ago

"twenty five years" Discussed on Business Wars Daily

"Get a dose of Adrenalin while avoiding the plague. It's a combination made for advertising. Heaven Kit needs to be the jeep wrangler as the Juggernaut of off road vehicles. CNBC reports that automakers have been trying to quote dethrone the Wrangler for decades. Without much success. Even during the pandemic GPS kept selling Fiat Chrysler sold an average of seventeen thousand jeep wrangler every month for the last five years according to the Detroit news last year, almost a quarter, million wrangler flew off dealership. Lots and experts say jeep owners are loyal. To a fault. Still Ford executives have moxie. They're predicting sales of two hundred thousand broncos over the next year, according to Automotive News. and. Keep in mind that the low end version of the new line. The broncos sport won't even be out until years end higher end versions of the Bronco won't be at dealerships until next spring. Ford is doing everything it can to make the Bronco enticing enough to away jeep lovers, and of course to persuade new off roaders to come into the Ford camp that includes besting the ramblers largest tires thirty three inches with whopping thirty five inch tires, Ford says a Bronco outfitted with the almost three foot in diameter tires can easily go through a couple of feet of water models also come with removable roofs and doors. Drivers can store the doors in the Bronco. For, it says. At about thirty thousand dollars, the price of the two door base Bronco comes in at only two hundred dollars more than the base price of the jeep wrangler at the top in a limited number of first edition for door Bronco started about sixty one thousand dollars, Ford began taking one hundred dollar deposits on Broncos last Monday when it released the new line I edition reservation slots sold out within a couple of hours. Still as bullish as the auto press is about the Broncos, the release comes against bleak backdrop for the auto industry. Overall vehicle sales plummeted when covid nineteen emerged shut the industry down for two months recently, both Ford and GM reported second-quarter sales declines of about thirty three percent from a year earlier jeep parent, Fiat Chrysler did even worse with sales down forty percent. And that puts a lot of pressure on Ford to live up to its promise of adding a billion dollars to the bottom line next year through Bronco Sales. And it adds pressure.

wrangler Ford broncos Bronco Sales Fiat Chrysler Ford camp Adrenalin CNBC Detroit GM
"twenty five years" Discussed on Business Wars Daily

Business Wars Daily

02:05 min | 2 months ago

"twenty five years" Discussed on Business Wars Daily

"Support for this podcast and the following message comes from the Disney Bundle now enjoy Disney plus Hulu and ESPN, plus all for only twelve ninety nine, a month at Disney plus dot com slash Disney bundle includes who lose ad-supported plant access content from each service separately. Are. From wondering I'm David Brown. This is business wars daily on this Tuesday July twenty first. If you're an offroad aficionado or even just WANNA be. This story is a big deal. After a quarter century Ford is resurrecting the Ford Bronco a direct rival to the jeep. Ford produce the Bronco for thirty straight years starting in nineteen, sixty six. The vehicle had only two doors reportedly one reason why Ford discontinued it in Nineteen ninety-six consumer sentiment was shifting toward four doors. Historians say the Bronco Developed Cult Status. After it was discontinued today, the beefy muscular vehicles, a sentimental favourite restored vintage models can sell for up to two hundred thousand dollars with a corporate unit called Ford icons. Ford is Heavily Marketing Nostalgia that division includes the Bronco, a Mustang and a new line of Ford F one fifty pick-up trucks, including a hybrid version, and soon to be debuted all electric. And Nostalgia sells, but it's far from the only reason. The automakers releasing a Bronco for the twenty first century. The company is capitalizing on a trend according to the automaker offroad vehicle, so called rugged SUV's. Twice, as popular as regular SUV's CNN reports that has engineered the new bronco models for quote hard off road driving. You know the kind that allows you to quote. Get far from civilization. An even stay there for awhile. Is the perfect escape for pandemic induced cabin fever..

"twenty five years" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:35 min | 11 months ago

"twenty five years" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In the past when the kind of deals that we've been talking about get made because of colonialism because of the lack of representative government the terms of trade have often been unfavourable to Africa while favorable to a tiny elite whether on giving leases for petroleum exploration or giving an international mining company of the rights to extract from a particular spot of the marketing of these substances once they are extracted does Africa have the institutions does Africa have the where with all now to get a better deal when it's sitting around the table with the interests that want what Africa's god the answer is yes you will seem progressively better governance in some places right it's like you know we'll send fifty five countries very different trajectories I think if you just look at the major markets said Africa Nigeria if you'll be yeah we are C. N. concrete progress in governance that will make it easier or better full Afrin deal does African countries to benefit more from day engagements with these external powers right because in those places the governments are more more accountable to people and there are there is more more sets of consequences for not benefit in the greater population because you know you could actually lose an election and you have real open and some things like that so I I would just I would say yes that were gradually what I see and improvements that make that bargaining power better Alex one beautiful concrete example is the Nairobi to Mombasa railway which was built in the late nineteenth century by the colonial power of the day the British we built in the twenty first century by the Chinese what are the differences between those two construction projects that the promise that order for a better deal for Africa going forward can we look at those two events a separated by a hundred and twenty five years and say no here here look at this we can see now that democracy and independence the post colonial institutions are ready to cut a better deal for the people of Africa by for example sure one of the big weaknesses of Africa in the colonial period and I'm still today is that there is a yearning infrastructure cap Sir if we're to get the growth in Africa including the the Africa and confidential free trade agreement to really work this call to be white a better infrastructure and the yawning gap at the moment it is apprised of between a hundred and thirty billion two hundred and seventy billion annually certain lots more infrastructure quality infrastructure needs to be built annually for Africa to ready become both internally competitive but also to be able to on the day global supply chains and the Chinese do build good infrastructure we've done studies here at my instant you're on the governance of infrastructure looking at countries as varied as I go to court to block to Tanzania and some of the infrastructure as well Claussen ready good and some of it is thoroughly corruption and breaks down and there are no maintenance contracts and and in effect vanity projects created just so that for a corrupt elites can make money out of them so it is a better read story I think looking forward to that the increasing amount of infrastructure that we are having into in the continent B. like Chinese or Indian Turkish or Egyptian some of it will last I'm lost as well as the real way that the British built in Kenya and some of it wiped and that is the same as the story of some of the infrastructure is from the colonial period is there something different that you have to keep an eye on that you have to keep track of between of sovereign wealth funds wore expressions of national development strategies versus corporate investment if Nestle or or of of French based water company builds that rail road would be different from a Chinese national development project is private capital different from national capital when it comes to inward investment in Africa well what we are getting is blended capital sorry you've got kind of development institutions there's one in the UK called CDC and they they they they were bland look for opportunities that we're also seeing many more examples of private public partnerships so these are the hybrids that but I think also with we're going to see the the the the issue for me is it doesn't really matter who's doing this there is a massive gaping infrastructure Greg capital dimension and it it that is about African governments and local authorities insuring that that that the constructions of well thought through that thing the necessary and that the quality on the right good and bad in ugly examples of this Michael would you answer the question the same way that you know as long as the thing gets done and it's bill properly and and build well it doesn't really matter whether it's a decision being made in a government building in a foreign capital or around a boardroom table I agree I don't I think it just needs to be built well until probably would to the proper accountability you know I I do think that we tend to you know when people talk about the Chinese court according vestment an infrastructure is not really investment given that painting coming out loans that these countries have to pay back and compare it to sort of what the west had been doing and that does tend to be a comparison between a most states led intervention from China and the more private sector led intervention and I think that maybe you know if you want to make that comparison then why did differences is that you know the private sector led intervention they never came like companies from the west never came and said we want to build your wrote because it was too politically sensitive and it didn't make sense for the bottom line so if it's private sector led it's going to be looking pretty narrowly after out what's best for the bottom line and that's why a lot of the sort of Weston economic interests was mostly in an extract of sectors because it was the most lucrative any was easiest thing to do right whereas you know from the state ledge Chinese intervention it was sort of more of okay well this is your biggest need it was moss strategic and forward looking in terms of thinking about locking down influence and creating opportunities for states on enterprises and then for Chinese citizens and you know for the economy and all of that so in a No Way you know you can say it is different because private capital will not necessarily find the things that a public goods that that African countries needed to find you know that could change you know we were talking about public private partnerships that that could change if it's done well and structure probably an organized for a plea and and people start to trust more in the governance system so you can build a toll road and not be too concerned that the next governments will cancel your tolls and deprive you from the the payments are you need to pay back your costs when it comes to infrastructure and what gets built in what did doesn't built and what permitting and permission and strategic plans the involvement of Africans in those things how do you not fall in thrall to the one or the ruble with the euro or the dollar and not make the same mistakes again the legacy is about states entities that we created for extraction basically so I mean I'm flying tomorrow to to mothers and bake and there was no there's no real way north south there wasn't to write more so it was just designed as a as a series of regions to service the interiors for extraction and that legacy kind of continues today in terms of the infrastructure that's available that but these things are gradually changing and what you do get is occurring pressure for the centralization of African states to again going with this trend for greater accountable governments and in turn that is about infrastructures of the future Patton in fifty is will be a few it will be a number of mega cities in Africa but bring you the growth will be a lot more middle sized cities that themselves will be magnets and with your trees for a for entrepreneur realism and they themselves will need to be serviced but with with my to infrastructures so I'm seeing an increasing amounts of infrastructural development that isn't about vanity is and it's not just about this a mining company needs a particular piece of infrastructure for for for for for for exporting its commodity and that's a good thing this is what the continent ready needs because it's about I'm looking the real wealth of the continent which in my view is agriculture to service growing urban areas in are you confident that will be increasingly the most urbanized in the wild and will also be the youngest it's also a question of demand right as much as so it's it's it's a bit of a chicken and egg problem the fact that the routes and not bad it inhibits straight but the fact that the routes the the because there's so little in traffic a trade you don't have the routes rate because the patterns in the historical presence has been to treat with you know Europe and now China so I think you know one has to and you you you sort of have to focus on I personally think the focus has to be on in this isolation and production and producing goods that other countries on the continent once and Friday and then you can improve some of those well you have to do it both simultaneously but then you can improve some of those patents because then you you know if your exports a mall not just within Africa but to you know Eastern Europe other parts of the world then you can afford more to make the investments in infrastructure that you need to you know you can afford to have a national airline a lot of a country like manager and doesn't have a national helpline in part because the one I had was so badly mismanaged in that it went down the right now it's not a priority to do on because there's so many other priorities that you know with very little money but you know the more you can afford the more you can invest in some of those improving that infrastructure Alex it sounds like Africa has to wrestle with a lot of the same things that citizens in the three nafta countries have to fight over in the twenty seven E. U. countries have to fight over and and on and on I mean if you want to make things like free trade zones and free movement areas and change infrastructure to reflect where people and capital really go these are heavy questions you have to answer and they're particularly tricky in Africa I think what this should tell your listeners is that there are a lot of things happening in Africa there are actually not exotic will be different because the happening in Africa they are the similar sorts of debates discussions challenges and opportunities that we're seeing do I believe the.

Africa representative twenty five years
"twenty five years" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"twenty five years" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Twenty five years of excellence in Austin they're giving you twenty five percent off your entire job this month if you want to remodel the bathroom do it now how bout that kitchen may be a new patio sun room or pergola or energy replacement windows they do it all and do it extremely well they are the best they've been here twenty five years and they will be here for many years to come call right now get that free estimate and get started five one two three five four twenty seven fifty four save twenty five percent right now statewide remodeling dot com this is a special announcement for men with ET a local medical clinic is offering free doses of a breakthrough ET medication to the first seventy five men who call now this offer is to spread awareness about a treatment that's ninety eight percent effective even for men who can't take prescription ET medications you'll receive a personalized custom blend of the latest FDA approved medications formulated to treat sexual performance problems caused by diabetes cardiovascular problems low testosterone or depression your appointment will be at a private and professional medical office with a doctor rep ending up position network that has helped over fifty thousand men regain their performance in just one office visit if you thought your ET symptoms were untreatable don't miss this opportunity to get a free dose of a highly effective rapid acting medication this offer is limited to the next seventy five men who call you must act now to reserve your free dose of this breakthrough treatment that's eight hundred nine four seven thirty three hundred eight hundred nine four seven thirty three hundred eight hundred nine four seven three three zero zero I summer time to hit the open road and explore the boundless beauty this country has to offer and.

Austin FDA testosterone twenty five percent ninety eight percent Twenty five years twenty five years
"twenty five years" Discussed on WBAI

WBAI

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"twenty five years" Discussed on WBAI

"Twenty five years for one outlet he found dozens of his anti trump cartoons rejected a severance package waiting on his desk did did your editors give you reasons no they didn't give me any reason at all so you'd have to ask them but but the common theme in all the ones that have been rejected is that that I'd say like ninety percent of them have something to do with trump so so there's a clear pattern that they were trying to sort of tamp down the road the voice that I was having about you know being critical of trump that's a very realistic spin on trump's catch phrase you're fired because making fun of reality has become a mine field now show me off to mark was set up in the fifties it's create how to testify in Congress on the negative effects comics hopping on the youth of America consultant doctors spoke at the hair and worried about whether this innocent generation was prepared for the horrors of sata if you without any reasonable doubt and without any reservations comic books an important contributing factor in many cases of the Nile perhaps they knew what was coming but for the magazine it seems society has had the last laugh we're in a an error of political correctness I from a private perspective you have the right to censor anything you want if you don't want **** or you know fetal videos on your on your platform that's totally fine when the government start censoring I find that a bit alarming the idea that some authority is going to determine what safe for us to hear and what's not safe is ridiculous expressing different political opinions is the best thing you can do it's important that people say what they believe it and that's why no matter what the opinion is I'd rather the person say it and believe what they're saying and be able to say it so everyone can look at that in here and and judge it for themselves you're listening to arts express and coming up next paramount at one point told me there's something that you should understand here we don't make films we make money French Canadian filmmaker the Denny are kind has remained fiercely independent making movies his way mostly in French and apparently not into compromising his creative instincts for quote Hollywood the money machine Akon phoned in from Quebec to talk about his latest provocative venture into dramatic socio political movie making the fall of the American empire and what any of this may have to do with van Gogh war hole the box office the magical mystery of inspiration and to the full of the American empires young minimum wage protagonists assertion at one point that quote vacuum cleaners don't bring happiness first some scenes from the director's unusual venture into English filmmaking this feature also about lost youth today the nineteen ninety three love and human remains then the Disney are kind who cares burned with everybody go hello everybody we used to know where they'll go away it's funny how people just disappear ten.

Twenty five years ninety percent
"twenty five years" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"twenty five years" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Write twenty five years before he became a murder me and he said that that first day and it was training with the highway patrol here in Florida he said he knew nothing it was a real eye opener he came home he said and we got to teach this to everyone we know so that's where our little my wife rides and I and I just you know I strip she's taking classes but you've got a really learn before I let you come on that thing but it's funny because I do I often will ride behind motorcycle officers and I and I think you know what they they don't get hurt they must know what they're doing there's got to be something that they do right three techniques three motor techniques they been teaching at the cops for over sixty five years in the general public when they see a turn they think I'm a cop which is a wonderful thing as you do the right thing you do the rector how did you do that what should what should cart watching auto drivers know about motorcyclists what should we be paying attention to to help it be safer for them your phone down yes put it down pay attention yeah yes please it's like you gotta have my head on a swivel every Sunday coming home from work me too so I'm driving I'm always checking the mirrors I see somebody behind me is lane splitting what should I do should I slow down pullover should I just drive straight what do I do well when people here in Florida we can't lane split I wouldn't do it if it was a lot of it is legal in California I see people at seventy miles an hour lane splitting yeah as far as we're concerned it's deadly it's dangerous if you don't know what you're doing a lot of the crotch rocket riders there yeah they do everything fast but the problem is.

murder Florida California twenty five years sixty five years
"twenty five years" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"twenty five years" Discussed on 600 WREC

"It helps these bacteria in our guts, which may even improve mental health, the bacteria in the gut can secrete over fifty known neuro transmitters, we've all heard of serotonin that's the happy juice that makes us happy. And when somebody's depressed, big pharma, makes a pill that makes you have more tone and low and behold, when we eat the proper foods and we have the proper gut bacteria, they producer tone, and that gets into a brain and literally, the bacteria are making us happy, he may have never thought about your gut health, but fencer says it's not too late to start one as you can get some good probiotics or sin -biotics, as it were which will help kind of jump start the process, but to maintain it, you have to do a very simple thing, which is eat high quality foods and real foods authentic foods, organic foods. And why is that because we have to remember that these bacteria have cobalt with us over millions of years. Two co metabolize. The foods we were meant to eat and in the last twenty five years, and fifty years, or so when we're adding things polysorbates, eighty for example, or zero calorie, artificial sweeteners, these bacteria have not evolved to co metabolize. Those compounds fences are nutrition needs have increased over time. And it's important, we keep that in mind when we feed our bodies improving the quality of what we eat may just improve the quality of who we are. Chef Dr Mike fester invites you to read his book shaman and find out more information on.

Dr Mike fester producer twenty five years zero calorie fifty years
"twenty five years" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"twenty five years" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"Twenty five years, we estimate that nearly thirty seven thousand of the deaths that occurred would not have occurred if we hadn't been reading all the research that's out there people still do it. I mean, you can drive on seventy five or eight twenty or thirty five here in the North Texas area. There are people going ninety or more. Legal to drive really fast. And then there's always those that want to drive even faster report shows us, what we in here in Texas know, that there are some stretches of highway where it's eighty five as the legal speed and some other states have eighty in some areas, you also say in the report and correct me. But you're basically saying there's no turning back. Convince. To bring back speed limits. Interstates interstates people just expect to be able to go fast say is if we can't go backwards. Stop where we are right now. Does your research show how much time you're actually saving. So if you're driving along interstate and in Texas, and you're going eighty versus seventy five how much time are you really saving. Well, the best you're gonna do is state, maybe five minutes every hundred miles. And that's perfect. If nobody's in your way. And you don't have to slow down for any reason. Five minutes is all you can get invested time. KRLD is the video game. Fortnight an irresponsible. Addiction care. News time, seven forty three. When there's breaking news NewsRadio. Ten eighty KRLD is on the scene..

Texas North Texas Twenty five years Five minutes five minutes
"twenty five years" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

03:42 min | 1 year ago

"twenty five years" Discussed on WLAC

"For over twenty five years in the middle Tennessee area. And really we help people all over the country, but we've been talking a little bit in the first segment about how he's a collaborative approach of bringing people together in the areas of investment advising retirement advising financial the whole financial planning spectrum. But then also the taxes planning the social security planning and even estate planning, and we we have a team of people that we try to come together to help people to have a one place income was some people are calling it a one stop shop to come together and get answers to how all this works together. And and that's something that we feel I guess Callan. I were saying in the last segment we feel like we've done really well and providing that. Yeah, I think people really like the one stop shop idea, the one stop shop approach where you know, they know that their investment advisers working with their tax repair, you know, to make sure that everything being done is in their best interest. Not. Just you know, their taxes or their investments, but their taxes and their vestments. I think people really like that idea. Are you saying people like convenience? I get crazy. And you know, I mean, I don't wanna I don't wanna be accused of blasphemy, but we're kind of like you're kind of like the super WalMart. That's the analogy. I'd give the super wall sheep, but we're not open at midnight or not a minute. You can't come to our officers. John what I'm trying to check out in their thirty registers. There's only two of them open. You can get everything here. But the good thing is Jimmy. I to me it's not only a matter of convenience. I think has definitely where some people would say this much more convenient because I don't have to go from my tax advisor. And then my finance are my tax planner and then go to my financial adviser. And then go to my attorney and talk to them, and I gotta go security off. So find out this stuff. So it's definitely that of convenience. But the truth is I think it kind of creates. Here's an overused word, but I think it uses it creates some synergy in the sense that we're all on the same page in the planning. So before we suggest something in the investment Cy we've already talked to Kellen because Kellen or or Craig are probably sitting in the room with us while we're doing this. And they're saying, well, here's going to be the tax implications. And this is how we can use these type of investments over a period of ten years to convert some of your money out of qualified to tax free status. And that sounds totally foreign to you don't worry about it. We're going to get into that to this. Show. But I think that's a part of it. Besides just the convenience convenience aspect. Yeah. I mean because the thing is most people who are financial advisor on on tax repairs aren't fluent in the language that that we tend to speak sometimes. So relaying what's going on from your financial advisor to your tax repair is not is not always easy. Right. You know? It's not always really simple to just say. Hey, here's what my financial adviser says, what's your opinion on this? Sometimes, you know, there's a lot of confusion that goes into that. And not every without being negative about anybody not every tax preparer because they don't have this background understands. Tau the investments in the financial planning side is really going to affect the taxes or vice versa. Sure. Yeah. I mean, you know, I think every every tax preparer knows the basics, but certainly there's not going to beat the level of understanding everywhere. Right. That there would be somewhere that that's focuses and specializes in that. Yeah. You know, having everybody under one roof just it prevents a lot of confusion. It prevents a lot of miscommunication. And like I said earlier just gets a lot of stuff done that. Sometimes doesn't get done. Right. You know, when you're running back and forth and try and make sure you're saying it, right? A lot of times you just you give up. He gets sick and tired of it, and you quit..

advisor Kellen Jimmy middle Tennessee Callan WalMart John attorney Cy Craig twenty five years ten years
"twenty five years" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:47 min | 1 year ago

"twenty five years" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Twenty-five years, and it's not so much investing in stocks Janet's putting the plan together. So your investments are in the proper place based on what you're telling them to do. And the problem is too many people as they near retirement still think of themselves as twenty or thirty you wake up when you look in the mirror like I do I feel like I'm twenty. Slapped across the face. But you can't invest like that gunslinger anymore because you can't replace it. If you have a crash or you lose a big chunk of money, you're going to be in big trouble. So inflation is the silent killer. And so you can't just stick it in bonds, especially today, and if you got a bunch of money in the Bank is rotting I tell my clients, I'd rather spend it don't leave it in the banker and two tenths of percent three tenths half. Even one percent. Even two percent. The you've got to do better than what's called purchasing power inflation and taxes. Now, the government tells you that inflation's two percent, but nobody in the government buys milk buys gas buys food goes on vacation. Apparently. Right. Five percent. Let's face it and health care. Inflation is running between fifteen and twenty. Yeah. So you're money needs to be invested appropriately. So you can't leave money in the Bank. Let it rod. You can't just buy a bunch of bonds, and and hope they're going to achieve that. Because bonds are not only going to go down when interest rates go up, but the yield will will not be enough to satisfy so inflation's gonna kick your but. Oh, yeah. So you have to be able to keep up with your retirement master plan. But number five on our must do list today. Keith is a must do for couples. Specifically does your spouse have power of attorney or all accounts held jointly? That's an important question through this in there because it's a different style of question. It's not really investments, and I wanna use an example, I had a client with about seven hundred and fifty thousand and assets. And they had spent it down quite a bit. It started. You know, over a million given a lot of their money away and of the seven fifty about six hundred and eighty thousand was in the husband's name still in a retirement account. They hadn't spent down. He was the sole breadwinner. She'll stay at home. Mom. He had a stroke. His wife had no access to the assets because she had no power of attorney remember with an IRA or any other qualified asset the spouses, not a joint owner. She simply the beneficiary. She had to petition the court. She could've avoided a completely with the power of attorney. Make sure you have an estate plan clients wife died prematurely of cancer originally. And unfortunately, people think it can never happen. If there's not an estate plan, it can lead to a lot of costs and expenses and consider retirement back for the retiring spouse, a tremendous amount and a lot of married couples. They have accounts in just one spouse's name. And if that's post dies it's gonna go to probate, even though they may have trust. Again, a.

attorney Bank Janet Keith two percent Twenty-five years Five percent one percent milk
"twenty five years" Discussed on WTRH

WTRH

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"twenty five years" Discussed on WTRH

"Twenty five years, or whatever I have. I have felt like I had no choice on anything. And I have felt like I was still helpless. And I was scared. I've been scared to to surrender ISD is in my heart many times because I didn't major up to my expectation is my dad when I was on the fence, and so to surrender to goddess father has actually scared me. Surrender. And I go to here was that a patient 'cause I have actually curled up literally on the sofa. Fetal position baby in the womb? With Terry in my eyes looking around the living room just waiting for God. Yeah. But that's not the character of God. See this is what I want us to actually deal with this. Okay. It is normal. Unfortunately, it's normal for an abuse victim to have difficulty. Entrusting their lives to God. And part of the reason is. Well. Let me ask this is that true of you difficulty, because you mentioned it was hard for you to surrender. It's like your will to his will. Because you don't know what's going to happen. You're you're fearful. Okay now. Yes. That's it part of a.

Terry Twenty five years
"twenty five years" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"twenty five years" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"We we we we are not to the place yet where we should be remotely close to declaring that we have achieved what it is we want there's a great deal of work that remains our eyes are wide open with respect to the risks but it is it is our fervent hope that chairman kim wants to make a strategic change a strategic change in the direction for his country and his people and if he's prepared to do that president trump is prepared to assure that this could be a successful transition one more cut cut number eight talking about our objective in north korea cut number eight chris here's what this will look like this will be americans coming in private sector america's not the us tax payer private americans coming into how build out the energy grid they need enormous amounts of electric of north korea to work with them to develop infrastructure all the things that the north korean people need the capacity for american agricultural support north korea so they can eat meat and have healthy lives those are the kinds of things that if we get what it is the president has demanded the complete verifiable irreversible denuclearization of north korea that the american people will offer in spades and as part of that are we in effect saying to cam if you give us what we want you can stay on in power we will have to provide security assurances to to be sure this has been the trade off that has been pending for twenty five years no president has ever put american position where the north korean leadership thought that this was truly possible that the americans would actually do this would lead to the place where more coming up after the break mike pompeo john bolton new and what is going on in jerusalem historic day in america the.

kim north korea chris america president chairman us mike pompeo jerusalem twenty five years
"twenty five years" Discussed on AM 870 The Answer

AM 870 The Answer

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"twenty five years" Discussed on AM 870 The Answer

"Prosperity what does that mean in terms of direct us investment in north korea and are we as part of this willing in effect to guarantee kim security that that regime change will be off the table chris here's what this will look like this will be americans coming in private sector america's not the us tax payer privatesector americans coming in to help build out the energy grid the need enormous amounts of city in north korea to work with them to help infrastructure all the things that the north korean people need the capacity for american agricultural to support north korea so they can eat meat and have healthy lives those are the kinds of things that if we get what it is the president has demanded the complete verifiable irreversible denuclearization of north korea that the american people will offer in spades and as part of that are we in effect saying to kim if you give us what we want you can stay on in power we will have to provide security assurances to to be sure this has been the trade off that has been pending for twenty five years no president has ever put american a position where the north korean leadership thought that this was truly possible that the americans would actually do this would lead to the place where america was no longer held at risk by the north korean regime that's the objectives when i said earlier this week that i think chairman kim shares the objectives in america people i'm convinced of that now the task is for president trump and he'd meet to validate the process by which this would go forward to set up those markers so that we can ago she ate this outcome you have any problem giving kim's history and the history of his family as an oppressive regime any problems with the idea of the us even if we get our deal in effect giving us security guaranteed to the kim regime but we'll have to see how the negotiations proceed but make no mistake about it america's interest here is preventing the risk that north korea will launch a nuclear weapon in l a or denver into the very place where sitting here this morning chris that's our objective that's the state the president has laid out and that's the mission that he sent me on this past week to put us on the trajectory to go achieve.

north korea america president trump kim us chris chairman denver twenty five years
"twenty five years" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:36 min | 3 years ago

"twenty five years" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"She wasn't informed that outdoors developing a promising drug to treat hiv aids and cancer now it may she may have a legitimate sued here if the company approached her having the knowledge that they've got this wiz banged drums ugh that's going to explode and they say well let's see we can get shared a sell us back her shares c h e r s h a r e s sharon shares at at a super low price because the company's basically not doing very well then we can make a fortune which they did because the stock price has gone up substantially now that's if this sale was promulgated by the the knowledge that they add about what was going on and it's hard to believe that they didn't have the knowledge but that's not the lesson to be learned here because one person may say to share said i want to sell my stock and she didn't have an indication one way or the other because it could have been insider trading if they gave her information that this drug was going to come to market an it could have been athena you see it don't know and that's why we have courts of law and that's why it's impossible to predict outcomes was you never know how a judge or a jury is gonna roll trust me on that one and sometimes they get it right sometimes they get it wrong i was watching investigation discovery or twenty twenty on i beer i love those shows by the way i love them but these two guys these two brothers spent twenty five years in prison for a crime they didn't commit and were it not for a really aggressive young female attorney uh and one person that came forward later on my twenty five years later and so we'll wait a minute i was there that night i wasn't those guys are are these other guys these guys wooden have gotten off twenty five years so here's the question the question is should you buy or sell stock on inside information or anything that might resemble it this affects a lot of people in the tech area because technology stocks can move up and down very very rapidly and remember you are not allowed to.

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"twenty five years" Discussed on KBNP Radio

KBNP Radio

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"twenty five years" Discussed on KBNP Radio

"To to put up there that's true so and look the main thing you know you said it twenty five years to write it yeah had you had this flag when you were twenty five years younger is there anything you wouldn't done differently in your life well sure i would have done so many things differently i would have that with them a cornerstone i was taken more time to do path by reflective time rather then go go go with only i would of identified person all these quicker and get away from that i think the number one word the comes out of the the we section of the book his kindness just having empathy and kind of towards other people and remarkably powerful trade is not about accumulating more stuff and more money in more power prestigious about i missed and and helping the helping others one oh with whenever we have a chance on the do cornerstone of i would've because frankly down a little less interested in in going to parties in a little more interested in instead in order in school and the big cornerstone of i had kind of offensive golden and that kind of thing but i think i would have instead of just thinking about gold i would have deliberately written them down because when you take a five and you write it down to commit that in a way that it turned to kind of a daydream or wish into out a role odd goal i would have done those kind of things it's interesting you say that about riding a goal down because as i interviewed the most successful people in a hall of get surprise at the eighth yeah yeah yeah it's in the book and and like as they were there's a lotta notions about their well worth the what does a work in the world of success we took all those and put him out there to five thousand people we statistically correlated them with the other levels of income levels of it you he shouldn't have been to throw man and you're absolutely righted the pop up is a very strategically one goal especially given you're lined of word with this physical all natural disasters it's strike me how careful some of us are two of void type this city with respect that harris raylee or the salami we were talking about but they give almost zero five to the tight fate.

harris raylee twenty five years
"twenty five years" Discussed on Popped and Cultured

Popped and Cultured

02:32 min | 4 years ago

"twenty five years" Discussed on Popped and Cultured

"Twenty five years right so is something for sure and they didn't have ever yeah he gives events close to home who you have a copy in there right have having even though we got and actually they're just even run to play that well diverse beverages right his here you know that he just took off the air but if you know are both but twenty rattlers right i haven't i love elgin there and i'm not going to put any of the bell you know it's very was a things sammy thing i don't know no i'm top flight gone back on what they need your players and let you can the varies was not like he converted but you know what i mean you think that best there it with with beat don't but wondered bigger to come out that you don't play at the you know the best martin wrestling that's really all of that coming even got a bit of me but what i think you know me what a great guy like that that you haven't really you right you know they got a lot double bro i'm stoned you know what i mean right are you right you cities of another big you know but but wasn't all those you know like what we're going to build in game work to go didn't you know and i did go to be real quick and then we'll get back to the inept i'm still not impressed by bronze from him every and said that team right rex right big man you know you know so it was the whole are the broken matt brother near angle i have now hey zero bid to any of the creative of tea and i just the one storyline and then the real life storyline yes some of the second you go yeah i think if mccown longer have eighty one of the sal like getting with all the that's some always know well you and apps no i'm not ready atlanta barry right after the other that he will you have a video have with about the video were to the maybe riches i love it on you know but you know when they do they bring to be backhanded men oh.

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