35 Burst results for "tunisia"

France reacts after Erdogan questions Macron's mental health

Bryan Suits

02:59 min | 4 d ago

France reacts after Erdogan questions Macron's mental health

"The president of Turkey. President Erdogan has decided to chime in today. He earlier on earlier today, he said, Ah, I'm sorry. France earlier today re called It's Ambassador to Turkey for consultations. That doesn't mean they're shutting down the embassy. They that's what you do You bring them back to Paris for consultations after unacceptable comments by Turkish President Erdogan questioning the mental health of French president Emmanuel Macron because of his attitude towards Muslims. Earlier this month. Mr Macron pledged to fight Islamist separatism, which he said was threatening to take control and some Muslim communities around France, drawing a sharp rebuke from the Turkish leader. This is, by the way, there's a lot of myths about the so called no go zones in London. There are flat out no go zones in Paris. You know, the French are on their fifth generation. Of from from the high tide of their empire of Muslim immigration. From Tunisia, Algeria. Send ago Morocco, etcetera, Syria, Lebanon. And they never really assimilated the the mainland. Metropolitan French didn't want them to assimilate. Nor did they want to assimilate just that The French didn't convert them to Christianity at the sword they just tolerated. Muslim immigrants from their empire because that was what the French the French attitude about their empire was. Well. Unlike the British Empire, you you can move freely all about our empire. Oh, it's all France now. And that's why France fought to the last Legionnaire where her for Algeria before Algerian independence. Independence. But anyway there are neighborhoods in the north east of Paris. The 18th arrondissement where French is not spoken. Never mind. You know English should visit. It's Tunisian, Arabic, Algerian Arabic, and that's sort of a point of pride. And you know the reason being that when when these kids graduate if they don't go for a government job They feel a freeze out. You know they're supposed to be on their 4th and 5th generation. They're supposed to be fully assimilated French citizens with the equality, liberty and fraternity. With all other a Frenchman. But the reality is if you leave the dense urban areas of Paris Orly on to Lord to lose here out in the country and France and you're being discriminated and no matter what the French say they haven't assimilated. They're Muslims. And there are laws. There are school dress codes that would be flat out unconstitutional in the United

France President Erdogan Paris President Trump Algeria Mr Macron Paris Orly Turkey Ambassador To Turkey Emmanuel Macron London Tunisia Morocco Lebanon Syria
Libya's rival forces sign permanent ceasefire at UN-sponsored talks

All of It

00:47 sec | 5 d ago

Libya's rival forces sign permanent ceasefire at UN-sponsored talks

"Have signed a permanent cease fire the United Nations offices. We have details from Esmie Nicholson, Acting U. N envoy Stephanie Williams says the ceasefire is effective immediately, meaning that foreign fighters are required to leave Libya within three months and forces are required to withdraw from the front lines. Political talks are set to take place in Tunisia in November to find a lasting solution to the conflict that came out of the country's 2011 uprising, which saw the removal of Moammar Gadhafi. Previous attempts to end the war have failed. But signatures have agreed to establish a joint police unit that will help monitor the withdrawal of foreign militia as well as a joint military force that will report to the UN's military commission. For NPR news. I'm as me Nicholson in Berlin, This is NPR.

Esmie Nicholson Moammar Gadhafi NPR Stephanie Williams United Nations Libya Tunisia UN Berlin
Rape is wrong but death penalty, castration, not the answer: UN rights chief

UN News

01:27 min | Last week

Rape is wrong but death penalty, castration, not the answer: UN rights chief

"U N High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet has called on governments worldwide to redouble their efforts to prevent rape and other forms of sexual violence. She also appealed for a right spaced approach to prosecution after highlighting a new law in northwest Nigeria, which allows surgical castration for male rapists and the death penalty where the victim is under fourteen tempting as it may be to impose draconian punishments on those who carry out such monstrous acts we. Must not allow ourselves to commit further violations she said in a statement, the development follows numerous rapes reported around the world in recent weeks including in Algeria, Bangladesh India, Morocco Nigeria Pakistan, and Tunisia people have rightly been outraged and are demanding justice for the victims and measures to prevent such assaults from happening. Again, Miss Bachelorette noted in an appeal for greater assistance for victims prompt criminal investigations and prosecutions. I share the outrage and standing solidarity with the survivors and with those demanding justice but I'm concerned. Are also calls and some places loss already being adopted, bringing cruel and inhuman punishments and the death penalty for perpetrators they main argument being made for the death penalty is for it to deter rape. But in fact, there's no evidence that the death penalty deters crime more than other forms of punishment the death penalty or other measures such as surgical sterilization of perpetrators will not resolve the barriers victims of sexual violence face in accessing justice misbash let said

Michelle Bachelet Rape Nigeria Commissioner Algeria Tunisia Morocco Bangladesh India Pakistan
Arlie Hochschild with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

06:48 min | 2 weeks ago

Arlie Hochschild with Krista Tippett

"High is at Arley. Yes Hi Krista yes good to meet. Thank you so much for doing this and I. so apologize for the delay as we had in this totally unusual and I think it happened twice with you I. Really Apologize. No problem but but what we need to talk about has not. diminished. So here we are. We have construction going on here in our in our studio and so like coming in. itself is very quiet, but there's just hammering as I walk in. For an audio yeah program. So good. Are you? Are they going to I mean I don't hear it so. Where where are you? Right now. Are, you talking to me? Yes. Yeah. I'm in North Gate Hall, which is in. The basement of the journalism department at UC Berkeley Okay Okay Yeah Berkeley. Three blocks from our home. Oh, what a what a wonderful place to live. I think we're pretty good here. I. Don't like to. I. Don't want to start talking about anything substantive until we're really doing it. So yeah, I. Think we're fine. Good and where you KRISTA. Minneapolis. Okay. Yeah. Yeah. It's you'll. You'll understand this I grew up in Oklahoma and kind of went far far far far far away and And that's become more important to me in these recent years that you know that he and and then our studios in Minneapolis has been for a long time and. I've thought across the years about how the show might have been served by being on one of the coasts and. And in these last few years since two thousand sixteen. I'm I'm so glad we're in the middle of the country you know. It's Really important in life giving. So. Good Yeah So, you were the child of a Foreign Service officer. So you sound like you grew up all over the world. Well. Yes to to some degree. Yeah. Starting at age twelve. Yeah it was pivotal. Father was ambassador us. Ambassador to New Zealand. Ghana and Tunisia. Yeah we don't need to go into his rank spread. Yeah. But did you live where those places you lived in I lived in Israel? And from aged twelve to fourteen, very pivotal experience. And then New Zealand Wellington New Zealand. The university. there Victoria University so in New Zealand and then my folks were in Ghana and I spent a summer. Ana But by then I was in college and then they weren't Tunisia and I. Actually spent five months a doing a study on the emancipation of Tunisia and girls so. These French questionnaires. Second Year of Grad School at Berkeley. So. yes. So I was very. Fortunate, really to get to experience all that. Yeah. Yeah was there a religious or spiritual background to your childhood in your family or in those places? Yeah. Yeah. I would say there there was And So. Are we starting your going? Yeah. All right okay. yeah my parents were very religious, unitarian? And So religious in the sense of it being a very important thing to go to church on Sunday and. My brother and I would. Kind of. Wrestle with each other and tickle. In the back seat of her whole sudden Hudson in Silver Spring Maryland and And Go. Drive to all souls UNITARIAN church in Washington DC very important to my father especially and I didn't feel particularly religious. At that point and. But if I look back on it what. the influence of that was is that. There's An important part of one's self to express and to learn to develop and that. For. UNITARIAN inside the message I took away is that it's very big world and we have to learn to. get to know and. Empathize with. People in radically different cultures and that that's a good thing to live in a big world. I think by the time I was. Sixteen. I had that message, but I felt something missing. And I got interested in quakers who? Be Much. More. Okay Gang. So what are we going to do about it? You know view terriers were very talky. Talkers talk talk of the thinkers looked like they were kind of. interesting. They were doers, and so I would say. That that. Connection for me. when I was in high school very informal I didn't become a former quaker anything. But It led me to volunteer on weekends when I was in high school At something we called Neighbourhood House on tenth and L.. Street. was in the middle of the. the back area of Washington

Tunisia New Zealand Berkeley New Zealand Wellington New Zea Washington Minneapolis Ghana Arley Oklahoma North Gate Hall Israel Neighbourhood House Grad School Victoria University Silver Spring Maryland Officer Foreign Service
Tunisia: Policeman and three militants dead after 'terrorist' attack

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:20 sec | Last month

Tunisia: Policeman and three militants dead after 'terrorist' attack

"Security forces shot dead three suspected Islamic militants who ran their vehicle into police officers and attacked them with knives. One of the officers killed another injured in the attack in the coastal resort town of suit today, the site of Tunisia's deadliest extremist attack. Massacre in 2015 that killed 38 people, most of them British tourists.

Tunisia
What Ruined City Lies Under Tunisia's Waters?

BrainStuff

03:32 min | 2 months ago

What Ruined City Lies Under Tunisia's Waters?

"Episode from our former host Christian Sagar. This one is about the ruins of a lost Roman city off the coast of Northern, Africa and evidence about what led to its loss a. plus a more fishy finding. FEHB rain stuff Christian Sager here archaeologists recently discovered more than fifty acres twenty hector's of Roman ruins off the coast of northeastern. Tunisia. That's a small country on the northern tip of Africa and situated on the Mediterranean Sea the discovery has researchers believing they may have finally found some convincing evidence that the city of Neapolis not to be confused with the Italian city of the same name that Neapolis was wiped out by a natural disaster about a thousand, six hundred and fifty years ago in addition to streets and monuments. Researchers found about one hundred tanks that would have been used to produce a garum that's a fish based fermented condiment commonly consumed in ancient Rome. In an email, how stuff works spoke to Carlos F Norrena associate professor of history at the University of California Berkeley he says that the discovery is important because it lends support to the theory that Tunisia Neapolis was submerged by a soon Nami in the fourth century. That's a useful reminder that environmental catastrophe is not only a phenomenon of the modern world scientists wrote in a twenty thirteen study in the journal Nature that as soon Nami was caused by an earthquake that occurred in three, sixty, five C E in Crete. There's no sure fire way to know the extent of the quake since measuring tools didn't exist at the time, but scientists believe to separate tremors happened in. Succession and the larger one had a magnitude of eight point zero on the Richter scale. The resulting soon Nami destroyed about fifty thousand homes and killed approximately five thousand people in the city of Alexandria Egypt and because the geological fault at the center of the earthquake was located off the coast of Crete that Greek island was actually lifted up in certain areas by as much as thirty three feet or ten meters. Historian. Honest Mercer lineas recorded the event and the newly found ruins reveal that there's much more to the story. NERINA says, the discovery also illuminates the economy of Roman. North Africa and provides further evidence for the popularity of Garum in the Roman Diet. The detail is significant. Garum was a big deal throughout the Roman Empire and as Italian archaeologist Claudio Geraldino has NPR it played a major role in the society's economy. He says that according to the Roman writers, a good bottle of garum could cost something like five hundred dollars today but that they also had garum for slaves that extremely cheap. So it is comparable to a modern amenity like. For instance, the underwater findings of Neapolis and it's abundant manufacturing materials indicate that the city was a major historical hub Neapolis, which means new city

Nami Garum Neapolis Africa Crete Christian Sagar Tunisia Tunisia Neapolis Christian Sager Roman Empire Claudio Geraldino Mercer Lineas Rome Mediterranean Sea Tremors University Of California Berke North Africa Carlos F Norrena
The Philippines Becomes Coronavirus Hot Spot In Southeast Asia

All Things Considered

03:46 min | 2 months ago

The Philippines Becomes Coronavirus Hot Spot In Southeast Asia

"Philippines has over taken in Tunisia as Southeast Asia's Corona virus hot spot even though Indonesia has twice as many people. The Philippines now has more than 136,000 confirmed cases of covert 19 and critics say no coherent strategy for defeating the virus, Michael Sullivan reports. Like other countries in the region, South Korea, Taiwan and Vietnam, For example, the Philippines recorded its first covert case back in January. Those neighbors acted swiftly. They started locking down when they had a few 100 cases and the timeliness of the response was key to the success of Vietnam, Korea and Taiwan University of the Philippines. Covert researcher Ranjeet Rai. They decided to do something significant when they only had relatively few cases, and they were successful with racing and with the isolation very different from the Philippines, where we already had a case in January, and we decided not to do anything about it until March, and it wasn't just the Philippines lock down. That was late health workers say, Dr Tony Luchon. Is a former advisor to the government's covert task force. They started Lee with the AH building up of the health system capacities in terms of testing isolation. And quantum tracing. We wasted so much time about two months instead of trying to build up our infrastructure's adequate testing and contact tracing are still a huge problem, but the lock down that went into effect in March 1 of the longest and most severe in Southeast Asia. Did help reduce the number of new cases until it was lifted in June, when cases started to skyrocket. Over the weekend, the country's medical front liners issued an urgent virtual plea to President Rodrigo did to reimpose the lock down to allow them to regroup. Medical Association president Dr Jose Santiago Jr. Our health care system has bean overlong our head workers are burned out would seemingly endless number of patients trooping to our hospitals for emergency care and ambition. We're waging a losing battle against carbon 19 President Duterte. His initial response was less than empathetic, accusing the health workers of inciting a revolution against his government. You will give me the free ticket. The state's a counterrevolution. How I wish you would do it. The next day, he retreated and ordered a new 15 day locked down. But it's not a stringent is the first public transportation has been stopped. But businesses and retail outlets Khun operated half capacity in an effort to both halt the spread of the virus and allow some economic activity in the country that's now slipped into recession. But critics say this 15 day locked down light won't stop the spread of the virus. If it goes only 15 days, it will start increasing again. And the problem is that our health Care is now a full capacity. We have two cities in Metro Manila, which are at 100% occupancy. So that's a real problem. That's University of the Philippines. Professor Ghetto divvied who's been modelling the spread of the virus, along with his colleague, grungy dry. If we don't manage this this month, we don't take the opportunity to extend the music. You That small window opening lives and livelihoods would suffer at the disruption will become greater and my sense if we prematurely opened, it could be catastrophic for us. But he acknowledges extending the log down will be a tough sell for both the politically powerful business community and the everyday Filipino who's going to suffer because of these extended lockdowns. For NPR news. I'm Michael Sullivan in Ching, right?

Philippines Southeast Asia Michael Sullivan South Korea Vietnam President Trump University Of The Philippines Dr Tony Luchon President Rodrigo Tunisia Indonesia Metro Manila NPR Taiwan University Dr Jose Santiago Jr Ranjeet Rai Taiwan Medical Association
Going old Turkey: a regional power spreads

The Economist: The Intelligence

06:49 min | 3 months ago

Going old Turkey: a regional power spreads

"A decade ago, Turkey's Foreign Minister Audit of Attalou used to boast his country was on good terms with everyone police fantasia want. less confrontation, less tense attitude. Especially, in the region, he spoke at the Council on foreign, relations with the will of the principal. In. Two thousand three. Zero problems with our neighbors. And the made a huge progress. All, that now seems a distant memory Turkey is growing its international influence and not always with a light touch. The country has been backing Libya's government in its civil war. Last month. The Turkish Defence Minister landed in Libya to inspect his troops and opposition warlord warned them to get out or else. Turkey prompted an angry statement from Egypt last week by allegedly planning gas exploration and Egyptian waters. And yesterday Turkish officials railed against an American company for its dealings with ethnic Kurds in neighboring Syria. That Turkey believes to be terrorists. To some, all this adventurism is reminiscent of past chapter of the country's history when the Ottoman Empire ruled all of Syria and far beyond. Turkey, has been playing an especially prominent role in Syria since protests spread into a full blown civil war. Turkey has really become a meshed in Syria since the start of the our spring, the uprisings that took place in two thousand eleven across the Middle East it back. The Islamist. Movements that initially took to the streets and then took up arms. Nicholas Pelham is our Middle East correspondent. But as those fighters were false back towards its border, it's really stepped into try and protect its southern border, stop any more refugees coming into the country and to provide some sort of safe zone for the proteges, and it's also very nervous about the current state law that emotion the northeast of the country. It feels very threatened by the emergence of Kurdish power on the southern borders, and is it reasonable for Turkey to think that those Kurdish forces are really a threat historic? The have been links between the PK, the cuts down Workers Party, which has been waging a thirty five year a war for. Autonomy and separatism inside Turkey. Many of those fighters did flee sought refuge in Iraq and in Syria, and so Turkey is worried about what it sees very much kind of PKK influenced state emerging on its southern borders. So this year it's been launching pretty heavy attacks inside Iraq, it's been sending tanks across the border. It's established positions inside northern Iraq. It's been carrying out drone bombardments, such two hundred kilometers from its border in Saint, John More, Kurds all the way along its southern border inside Syria inside. Iraq see a new Turkish assault, which is pushing deep into their territory and not just unsettling. Kurdish aspirations for sovereignty in Iraq and Syria, and this is also unnerving Arab leaders as well. Who Turkey pushing deep into territory, which was part of the Turkish Republic predecessor. The Ottoman Empire, which ruled the Middle East centuries until its dissolution about a century ago, which is to say that Turkey is expanding its influence is doing this adventurism beyond Iraq and Syria all over the Middle East of the moment. There's a this year has seen the new intervention of the Turkish, Army. Libya. They came to the rescue of the besieged government of National Accord. In Tripoli, which has been fighting a civil war against a renegade general. Khalifa. After Turkish forces established at base on the borders of Tunisia, we're seeing it's frigates make a bid for control of looking coastline and even ward off French frigates. We're really seeing a substantive increase in Turkish. Power across the Middle East and it's not just happening in Liberia. It's happening in Gaza, which is an ally of Turkey. Turkish forces there have tried to help. Cut Break Its blockade by Saudi Arabia they're. A. Few hundred to a few thousand Turkish forces that are they're wasting more Turkish interested in Yemen civil war. We're seeing interest in a Sudanese port and actually Turkey's largest overseas basis in the point of Africa. So really this is a massive increase in Turkey spread across the middle, East and do you believe that the the the Ottoman history plays into that as a return to former glories? In some way? It's very much the in the rhetoric certainly saw Mr. Osman tropes at the at the height of the Arab spring wanted to appear to be the leader of the Muslim world. He was promoting his version of governance across the region hoping to clone the Turkish model across the Middle East. But since the collapse of Islamist movement since its as from power in Egypt and the retreat of many of its forces, he's really kind of played much more on Turkey's national interests. He's ally domestically with what had been his nationals opposition. He seems to be much more concerned on trying to maximize Turkey's economic claims in the. The Mediterranean this since much more about promoting Turkey's national interests than flying it systems colors. This is really an exercise in in hard power and trying to exploit the weakness of others, the retreat of Europe and America from the Middle East. The policies of many Arab governments, and try and push Turkey to fill what seems to be a vacuum of power across the Middle East, and so is that push to serve Turkey's national interests working is, is it benefiting from this from this expansionism? If you're trying to put together a balance sheet of profit balance sheet? Sheet Turkey has benefited from Khatri investment cutters, loans, and investments have helped prop up the Turkish lira. It may be that country's also hoping to fund part of its military costs in Libya Turkeys, keen to promote its companies when it comes to eventual reconstruction of war-torn Libya, which after all is energy rich state, and so long term, there may be benefits, his critics home highlight, the cost it's estimated that Turkish operations in Syria have cost anything up to about thirty billion dollars, and of course, there is a threat that you're going to see a major escalation. Escalation in the Middle East, which could embroil Turkey. It's not just Turkey is entering the middle, East enforce. It's also Russia. Many Arab states are trying to gain Russian support to push back Turkey, not just Syria Egypt the United Arab Emirates looking to Russian support in Libya, and Egypt is sending its tanks to the Libyan borders. The UN warned that the risk of a of a regional war focused on Libya and beyond that that risk was huge. So this is a massive gamble and it looks as if the stakes are going to be increasingly hyphen

Turkey Middle East Syria Libya Iraq Sheet Turkey Egypt Turkish Republic Principal Nicholas Pelham Workers Party Attalou Saudi Arabia John More Russia Tunisia UN Tripoli
Dallas - Tarrant County health director says new number of daily coronavirus infections decreasing

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

00:31 sec | 3 months ago

Dallas - Tarrant County health director says new number of daily coronavirus infections decreasing

"Terek Terek County County Public Public Health Health says says the the trend trend of of new new covert covert 19 19 infections infections in in his his county county It's looking a little better. Finney, Tunisia tells the terror county commissioner's court The new number of daily infections is going to know we had a lot of cases that happened in Texas very fast over the last, you know, five or six weeks. But we're starting to come down from that. You know, recent peak eyes this the end. We don't know. Yesterday there were 240 cases in Terran County. No new deaths. Tunisia did, however, confirm one new death this morning.

Terek Terek County County Publ Tunisia Terran County Finney Commissioner Texas
The City of Carthage

5 Minutes in Church History

04:14 min | 3 months ago

The City of Carthage

"Welcome back to another episode. Five minutes in Church history on this episode. We're going to a place to a very famous city in the ancient world. The city of Carthage Carthage was first settled by the Phoenicians. This of course was a crucial city right as were on the Mediterranean Sea. Carthage came to be known as the master of the Mediterranean. Sea Trade after the Phoenicians was part of the PUNIC. PUNIC empire, and then under Caesar Augustus who reigned from fourteen BC to twenty seven ad. Of course, this is the Caesar Augustus of the Gospel Narratives in the birth of Christ under Caesar Augustus Rome to control of Carthage and it became a great Roman city. It was second only to Rome and the Roman Empire Rivaling Alexandria from time to time for that position, but most give it to Carthage. At any given time in these centuries, the population of Carthage would be two hundred fifty thousand people that had all the telltale signs of a Roman city. There were theaters in the republic buildings. There were the extensive baths. There were aqueducts for. Water across the city, and even into the fields for farming, there was an extensive Roman road system. Soldiers were kept. There was a very busy port city and a very prosperous city. It also has quite a role in church history. It was the home of Talionis. Of course. Is that great church father from one sixty to two twenty as the one who gave us the word Trinity, and brought together all that biblical teaching of who got is in his Trinitaria and being, and so we have the word trinity coined at Carthage and two Oh. Three Carthage was the site of the martyrdom of perpetual and Felisa toss those very brave young women, and the wonderful story of their martyrdom in their courage in their stand for Christ. Well, it was at Carthage. and. The to fifty CIPRIAN was bishop of Carthage. This was on the heels of the decian persecution very intense persecution by the Roman emperor Shas. And after the persecution, and there was some relenting of it, folks were allowed back into the church created quite a controversy was known as the Donna test controversy that raged throughout the church from the fourth to sixth centuries and a key player in that controversy was CIPRIAN Bishop of Carthage. In three ninety seven. It was the site of the Third Council of Carthage. And the topic of discussion was the New Testament Canon and coming out of that council was an affirmation of the twenty seven books of the New Testament, so it played a role in the Canon controversies in development of the Early Church and in four sixteen, the Palais jeans were condemned at Carthage, so it played a role in the development of the doctrine of original sin. So what a fascinating city with rich history both in terms of the ancient world end in church history well as Rome was sacked by the barbarians in four ten carthage was sacked by the vandals and four, Twenty Nine Carthage became the capital of the vandal empire which spanned across that great north. Coast, and of course that North African coast had the Mediterranean Sea to the north, and the vast Sahara desert to the south. Is Long came on the scene, the six hundreds, and began to threaten from the East and Right at the end of the six hundred at the battle of Carthage Carthage fell to Islam. It was dominated by Islamic control. There was a brief time during the Crusades when Carthage was retaken, but only for a short time. It remained Muslim throughout the era of the reformation and right onto the present day. Carthage in the present day is a suburb of Tunis. Capital city of the North African nation of Tunisia. Tunisia's the first government North Africa to give protection for religious freedom. But the nation itself is still dominated by Islam and while there is a church. They're going way back to those early centuries. It is still a church that suffers persecution in our present day.

Twenty Nine Carthage Third Council Of Carthage Ciprian Bishop Of Carthage Bishop Of Carthage Carthage Caesar Augustus Rome Caesar Augustus Mediterranean Sea Tunisia Sea Trade Ciprian Early Church North Africa Alexandria Sahara Desert Talionis Canon Donna Tunis Carthage.
Unjust Systems of Power are Solvable

Solvable

05:51 min | 4 months ago

Unjust Systems of Power are Solvable

"Were excited to share with you. A new season of conversations with leaders and change makers about how to solve the world's biggest problems. This is an extraordinary moment. We're living through global pandemic, and in the United. States were experiencing the most powerful protest movement of my lifetime against police, brutality and racial injustice. It's a time of great possibility. Our Society seems to be open to the kinds of moral and social transformations that were much harder to imagine before the virus, and before the killing of George. Floyd! For this are second season I'll be joined again by by Pushkin. co-founder Malcolm well and journalist and friend and Applebaum a Pulitzer Prize winning historian and staff writer at the Atlantic. To start this season, we're focusing on two problems racial injustice and the twenty twenty election. We can have an election that is participatory. With robust. In twenty twenty justice isn't blind. We have to be far more critical and thoughtful and have that Lens. On today's episode, we hear from an international expert on non violent protests. Let's saw this one big issue. Let's more racial equality. Great to look at our narcissism of small differences later. When the outcry went up over George Fluids, killing peaceful demonstrators took to the streets in Minneapolis then in other cities across the country and across the globe, and a problem arose. It's a problem. We've seen elsewhere. Bad actors outliers with destructive agendas overtaking the news coverage by engaging in retaliatory violence. This isn't a new issue. It's one peaceful. Protesters have long faced in south. Africa Egypt Ukraine Tunisia and during occupy Wall Street. Of Popovich is a Serbian activist and scholar, social movements, organizers from around the world have turned to him for advice about how to strengthen and propel their movements. Popovich, as the Executive Director of the Center for Applied Nonviolent Action and strategies or canvas. He literally wrote a user's manual for successful. Social Change. Our host and Applebaum lives in Poland. She spoke to Popovich from his home in Belgrade Serbia. Here's their conversation. My Solo bill is to create social change through the successful strategic nonviolent movement so surgeon. Why is this your solvable? In other words? What makes this issue personal to you? While first of all I started getting better young on my freshman year on the university, we were faced with a with a crazy regime in Belgrade their nineties any kind of choices, you can fight three concisely. I guess I was stubborn. Police stadiums fight together. Together with a group of France who launched the movement, called out four, which is a Serbian for resistance, and then built from eleven people to seventy thousand people, eventually getting rid of the best guy lawsuits, and I kind of addicted to the idea of the social change. Group People Power movements since you originally began odd for you and your friends without any experience. You had run protests before you had an organized movement before. And now you're able to advise people. So how did you begin thinking through the problem in the beginning was just spontaneous, or did you plan first of all? We started by doing it without planning. Which is why it took us nine years to actually do it so ninety two. We did a little bit of the of locking ourselves in the campuses, seeing east kind of stop. It didn't work because it didn't enroll the rural. Deny, six seven lot of people were mobilized. To smaller places, we protested for one hundred days day by day by day. This refigure out that everyday protest is probably not the best way to do it because it's very exhausting, so we figured out that it is unity thing that we are message. Most of the protesters were getting wall in the protest in, and they say we are too busy to plan so a learning by doing and making mistakes is actually the best way to do stop, but it's very slow so strongly. Advocate to the people start reading books and learn from other people's mistakes, rather than learning from there on. How did you break it down into solvable pieces How should people who WANNA create? Change think. Think about that for a successful protest. You need so much more than the protests. You need an idea what should be different with the cold vision of tomorrow. Then you need to share this vision with different groups. Then you need to work with people. You're not normally alike and probably disagree on many other stuff to really get to the change, so need to take a really sober. Look at the groups you need. And then then we dealt politicizing indulging groups, and then you try to figure out how you work together for the change that benefits everybody because we talked to stand. Social change is a very kind of selfish of for matinee, people and the trick indistinct stinks is. A unifying proposition, which is the smallest common denominator from the groups you want to mobilize and very orchid. You want to agree on what you agree. Also went to read what you disagree, so this is not about the things that that are different among us. We leave this thing for layer, but let's solve this one big issue. Let's get rid of of communism. Let's get rid of luxury L.. Let's make more racial equality, and so on and so forth, and then we are going to look at our narcissism of small differences later.

Popovich George Fluids Applebaum Belgrade Floyd Center For Applied Nonviolent Pulitzer Prize Atlantic Minneapolis Serbia Poland France Co-Founder Pushkin. Malcolm Well Tunisia Executive Director Staff Writer Africa
COVID -19 Travel News

The World Nomads Podcast

06:38 min | 5 months ago

COVID -19 Travel News

"Kim and fill out chat with atlas obscure shortly. But what's the latest news surrounding treble? Fill the vice. President of the European Commission has told Brits it's safe to holiday in Europe this summer despite Corona vars but look contradicting what the UK secretaries' saying they say Britain would be more likely than not to have to forego any international travel. This year's surprised the British the British and the European communication breakdown. And I think that was the point of the big referendum anyway. It's even worse for his trying with any obviously travel unexpected to anyway knee no at least twenty twenty rates outlook recent research nights that million people living in countries where the orders are close to non-citizens non-residents Judah covered Montaigne. That is a lot of people looking for. Hobbies Field Well Tell Tell Tina from atlas obscure. It's an online travel magazine into to accompany fill. You not caught up with them to see how things are traveling or not grown with their operations including looking after their customers during rush. It's been it's been a roller coaster. Being you know operating trips we started to affect US really Back in January because we had troops that were to Vietnam At that time and we even at that time had a a China trip scheduled for March. So it's something that we you know really started affecting us in January Edit in March really just kind of came to a head with You know really just suspending trips and canceling trips across the board because of all the restrictions that really started to come down really heavily And then when those restrictions came down I mean March. Thirteenth was a day where we had We had guests in destination. We had guests in Tunisia and the day before we had guests that were just about to return home from Galicia in Spain so it was pretty much a mad dash. You know all hands on deck to make sure that we could communicate with our guests and worked to try to get them Connected to the proper channels for re bookings so that they could get home safely and just really keep them informed as best we could as the information was changing minute by minute and that's pretty much at least on my side as I guess experience manager. That's been our main cushion. Goal is to really try to keep in front of the information as best. We can keep our travelers informed as these updates start to develop to utilize guest experienced. How tell your operations? So how did it affect you so I think one thing to keep in mind is the adults obscure us? Trips program is quite new. It's pretty young. In Twenty Sixteen. We had three departures in twenty seventeen. We had twelve and we had over one hundred twenty scheduled for twenty twenty so this was our big year. We had started really small. We're scaling quickly. So it was tough to have happen in the year that we were really kicking it up to a much bigger notch and then tap the skill back so quickly so I feel like that was an overarching feeling looking at this is we got. We went big so quickly and then we had to really retract and I think operationally that affects our relationships with the people we partner with on trips and our trips are run on such an individual basis often with one or two people in that destination. It's rarely with DMC And so we're really relying on those relationships and we had really leaned on those people and built those relationships in from one year to eight or ten and so figuring out how to manage it responsibly. And and take that in consideration And just be mindful of how we're all working through this together. It really came down to being really thoughtful about how to approach those relationships. Both for how the rest of this year unfolds. Also how we approach next year. Because that's the thing everybody as travelers we think about how all of this has affected the travel. But when you're in a business like these are the people who are relying on you and you've got to you know you've got to consider them as well especially for these people who so many of our trip leaders were in tourism. They aren't in tourism And so to go from just a couple of trips to a lot of the people I work with now running so many they made a shift and so this of course effects that shift And so they need to figure out how to shoot back or whatever it might be. What do you think guests are going to be looking full from tool provided in companies like us? Sure I mean I think that that is the the million dollar question in that. Everybody billion dollar million dollar question and there. There's there's so many conversations you know going on in the industry around that and I think that I mean I do think that there is going to be somewhat of a of a surge in particular markets and I think that there's GonNa be a retraction and others. I think that the main thing is that what we've been trying to do it. Atlas obscure in this time is maintaining the trust of our guests. I think that people really are going to want to travel with companies that they trust that they know will communicate with transparency and with clarity. And that's something that we've been working really hard to do because I think across the board that it's going to be a portent Especially when you're in a situation where like I said before. Nobody really knows exactly what's going to happen. But if you're with a company that you feel confident will be able to provide the correct information and get you in and out of whatever situation may be that that's going to be of a priority for people when they're choosing a company

Twenty Twenty United States KIM Corona Europe European Commission Tunisia UK President Trump Judah Tina Britain Montaigne China Spain Galicia Partner Vietnam
Virus restrictions ease in England

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 6 months ago

Virus restrictions ease in England

"The some U. popular N. security English council recreational wants pursuits a resolution such as Gulf on the corona could not virus restart pandemic as modest but so the dispute she distanced between easing the U. S. of and the coronavirus China looked over on mentioning restrictions the World kick in Health Organization people remains in England unresolved could not exercise more than once the U. a S. day on Friday with one objected person from to outside a proposed their resolution house sold drafted providing by France they stay and around Tunisia six point five diplomats feet apart said in it addition agreed to compromise outdoor tennis language and basketball with China courts can that be didn't used directly and people will mention also be the able U. to swim N. in health lakes agency and the sea now Russia garden says centers can there's also an agreement happen on well almost potential all house of the buyers rest of the resolution can visit properties the main in person focus and to people back who kind sixty of work general from home Antonio Guterres such as those is in March construction twenty and three manufacturing cool the and global being in college sees files to return to tackle if they can do the so could be in nineteen a complete pandemic secure way meanwhile Germany Charles and Eastern river that's Europe not London have circulated a much shorter draft resolution that focuses only on supporting ceasefires I'm Charles collect as much

Coronavirus China England France Russia Garden Antonio Guterres Eastern River Europe London Charles Health Organization Tunisia China Germany
UN council tries again to agree on COVID-19 resolution

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 6 months ago

UN council tries again to agree on COVID-19 resolution

"The U. N. security council wants a resolution on the corona virus pandemic but the dispute between the U. S. and China over mentioning the World Health Organization remains unresolved the U. S. on Friday objected to a proposed resolution drafted by France and Tunisia diplomats said it agreed to compromise language with China that didn't directly mention the U. N. health agency now Russia says there's an agreement on almost all of the rest of the resolution the main focus to back sixty general Antonio Guterres is March twenty three cool the global sees files to tackle the could be nineteen pandemic meanwhile Germany and Eastern Europe have circulated a much shorter draft resolution that focuses only on supporting ceasefires I'm Charles collect as much

World Health Organization France Tunisia China Russia Antonio Guterres Germany Eastern Europe Charles U. N.
Pick a Plan and GET AFTER IT

Jocko Podcast

08:09 min | 6 months ago

Pick a Plan and GET AFTER IT

"Leadership means firmness not harshness or bullying understanding not weakness justice erase the freedom humaneness not intolerance generosity not selfishness pride. Not Egotism so little quote for you kick things off. This is coming very I ran across it the other day and as I ran across it I saw some of little bit of the dichotomy leadership in there and it just caught my attention. And it's a quote General Omar Bradley General with a good amount of name recognition but a general who kind of flew under the radar sometimes because he was competing with some some big names. You know he's competing with General Patton. He's compete with General Eisenhower. He's competing with General Montgomery so he kind of flew under the radar sometimes even though he does have the Bradley fighting vehicle named after him which is a awesome machine but he absolutely was a well regarded general in his own right born in eighteen. Ninety three in Randolph County Missouri worked as a boilermaker figured out he could get a free education by going to west point so he went to West Point graduated in Nineteen fifteen same years. Eisenhower by the way he was a really good athlete. Baseball Star could've played pro ball but chose to be in. The army chose to go and do his commitment to the army. One thousand nine hundred fifteen. You're probably thinking World War. One W W well. He actually didn't go to World War One and World War One. There were mining disputes in the unions in the in the minds up in Montana and they had to activate some army units to send them up there to guard the minds. And that's what he did. He did that for a little while. And then he did go to unit that was getting ready to deploy to World War One. The Spanish flu came which everyone seems to know about the Spanish flu. Now and there then there was the armistice and he didn't deploy so he didn't get any combat action in World War. One thought that that might hurt his career but he stayed in anyways ended up teaching tactics at the infantry school fast forward through the peace years may general in one thousand nine hundred forty two assigned the eighty second division the Twenty Eighth National Guard division eventually worked under General Patton as the deputy in charge of Second Corps and then took it over himself led the campaigns in Tunisia and Sicily. Ike Eisenhower selected Bradley to command the First Army during Operation Overlord D Day Command. He commanded the most troops of any general. Us General in history when he took command of the twelfth on weaker. One point three million troops to little decentralized command. Better come into play right there. Continue with all those troops to push through Europe until the fall Germany. We covered Ernie. Pyle on this podcast. Podcast number thirty nine. His book brave men. It was the heavies for my favor. Lines Ernie pyle nicknamed him the G. I. General because he was kind of a laid back down to Earth Guy didn't make a spectacle of himself. After the war he ran the VA for a while. The Veterans Administration I ever chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. During the Korean War retired in nineteen fifty-three after thirty eight years of service I found day. The Internet is amazing. I found any evaluation. You know we talk about the evaluations evaluation in the Marine Corps evaluation the navy evaluation. I found an evaluation of Bradley written by General Patent. Pretty cool because it shows it shows what type of a person patent was just in the way he wrote this thing so it says subject efficiency report through commanding general NATO USA APO five thirty four to add adjutant General War Department Washington DC name and grade of General Officer reported on Omar F Bradley Lieutenant General Period covered one July nineteen forty three to eight September nineteen forty two months in eight days duties performed commanding general to core one July nineteen forty three to eight September nineteen something unclear manner of performance superior F- Physical Activity Superior Physical Endurance Superior Knowledge of his profession superior for what command or duty would you specifically recommend him and army and then what opportunities have you had for observing him during period covered intimate daily contact. Does he rendered a willing and generous support to plans of superiors regardless of personal views. In the matter yes which is a very interesting topic to cover mean you think about what they've got in their physical duty not knowledge of his profession. What job would you recommend? Does he give generous supports to plans of superiors regardless of his personal views. No matter so this guy's going to back you up. The answer is yes and ten of all general officers of his grade. Personally known to you. What number would you give him on this list? And how many comprise your list and patterns answer is number one. I know all of them. Further remarks deemed necessary. None signed G. S. junior lieutenant general. Us Army commanded. So that's pretty awesome review. The interesting thing is if you know anything about the history of Bradley and Patton. There's some interesting dynamics. They first of all had very different personalities. Patent was you know flashy and go ego driven in a lot of ways and and Bradley was not and there's some quotes I pulled from patents journal Journals About Bradley. So it's interesting that he can have these right in that glowing like evaluation about him to try and get him promoted but at the same time here are some things he said about him. Bradley's to Conservative. He wants to wait until we can all jump into the fight together. By which time half our men will be. We'll have the flu trench foot. I wish he had a little more daring. Another one. Bradley is a good offer. Buddy utterly lacks it too bad. The IT Factor Echo Charles. Next one brag is a man of great mediocrity on the other hand. He has many attributes which are considered desirable. In general. He wears glasses which I have no idea I have no idea why. That's cool to be a general glasses. He has a strong jaw. He talks profoundly and says little and he is a shooting companion of our present chief of Staff. General Marshall also. He is a loyal man. I consider him to be among our better generals

Bradley General Eisenhower General Patton General Omar Bradley Us Army General Officer General Montgomery General Marshall Ernie Pyle Adjutant General United States Omar F Bradley First Army West Point Randolph County Missouri Europe Montana
Batouly Camara: Awakening in purpose

9INE POINT Started With A Dream Podcast w/ Jacolby Gilliam

11:17 min | 7 months ago

Batouly Camara: Awakening in purpose

"A young athlete. I would say the bars set pretty high. The first time I ever saw women play Played on old boy. Seen when I start playing basketball I was introduced to the game by woman but the first game I ever went to the WNBA GAME. Sounds like me so it was like Here in our from probably one hour thing and all girl play Basketball Naseen. Hulo Professional League ignorance is bliss so I would say it was definitely suggests reach my potential. I don't think I ever really said I saw WNBA. I loved it but I think it was to work to kind of reach mile potential with my biggest goal. At that moment I started ages twelve to two things on that day for you said the retail potential. You know so at eight to twelve. What did that look real? Potential potential. Just Matt being at the peak of of my career because when I went to the game what I loved the most was the diversity I saw a core and how every body and just being a young inquisitive curious kid I went from seeing Kia Vaughn. Who's like six five to like? Leilani Melanie Mitchell. Like you know five six. And she's fine with two nasty and I'm like they're not the same but they've all kind of reached their potential in some way. Some regard are now that I'm older Still playing still working on their craft. But at that moment it wasn't about comparison is about personal growth. But once you reach your personal growth you can then get to. The highest level is a lot so when you have the game like I want to be on that day I wanNA share the court in. I WANNA know papillon whatever may be. How do you think I'm GonNa go achieving that it was just this sense of actually had a podcast with my coach? Taught me how to make like a a layup as you say you just have this kind of hunger about you and again. It was just as curiosity. I didn't know I didn't know any of those players didn't know anyone at that level but I just remember how much it it bugged me inside. We know nights where would turn. And I didn't know who go to our coaches at that point in a you in Eugene was so far away but they really allow me to focus on day to day. So that's why did I focused on the day to day and just really just trying to put in as much work as I can control. Though I've learned from like the guests every on that lobby will have today on idolized. You know that might become emulate their game. You Watch like I WANNA learn their moves. It was definitely I say growing up Having older brother the account and learn about the men's game so my brother loved Hakeem he always talked about him. Entering accused dream. You know growing up in a Muslim household. You know the keenest fate than what he stood for. That was initial draw but as I became more fan in sunny if it works that he accused Work in all the grades he's taught than us aren't look more about women in my more and I just remember watching 'em in the final four in little wayne was on the sideline and it was kind of this weird thing where I just loved jives and she just seemed like she's having so much fun with it. Saudi young age I WANNA. I played really admired economy. Idle and at. What point did you think like you? I'm pretty good at this ball like I can. May I have a channel teaching my potential never after like it's definitely a journey but I would say probably junior year high school? I remember walking into? We have open gym. You know humor coaches come in at that point. I was out of okay you know. Tunisia was okay. And we walk in and we have over. I want to say twenty five college coaches and these are just hide the coaches so he has stanford that day Yukon. We had Kentucky all in this building and it was about five of my teammates. Three of us. Who ARE REALLY GOING TAB? The one and so it was kind of surreal feeling as a young kid but one that didn't take lightly. I was nervous. You know I wanted to be good. You WanNa why to perform It was kind of in that moment whereas like all Kayla avalon way to go. But we're taking baby steps now to what kept you grounded Theme like Kentucky is the part that really ongoing even kill. What kind of help you day. You know that it always more than technology do more. I would definitely say the people. I was surrounded by they even from a young age like for example when I was fourteen. That's what I went to Blair Academy and that's Kinda where really developed my skills who I am was a person and one of my teammates. Her name is bridget and a net. Infamy this core group seniors who just had great might. You were now walking into the gym and for me. I was a freshman. I was good. You not do it I wanNA and they shut it down. Bridget graduated top of her class at West. Point so talk about someone with discipline and so she was just very adamant about the process and they will get every day for six. Am workouts on. Like talk to me if I did it and say you know you need to be there so constantly always telling me you've never arrived at his journey and my mentor. The same way. Schnee saying you know you've never robbed it journey in their quick to say you know this which means getting better on With celebrate knee. But also telling me what I need to do better. You never arrive there. The journey That deep at the can take value from two. You know just that you can always return another level. He Never GonNa GonNa read them mountaintop. Yes absolutely yeah so when Tom Day. Chew that college could you? You know you were a one Top Not by one or two on the team so they wanna give you ever that. That's really what you're like number two I in the shooting school you know. How did you go about that first? Half that it was an interesting process and to me. The recruiting process started off trae stressful. You have all these great schools you know. I used to just pray guy. God is Doin' in options. The options were there so I was super fortunate to have that because I would live in. I was in the same room with somebody who didn't even know if they're going to get a scholarship. So that can be Ground level headed but I did enjoy the process because I was thankful for thankful to get to know coaches so pretty early on. I create a pros and cons. I created questions. I asked each coach. How far wants to go? If distance even mattered if conference matter at the time. That didn't matter to me. And so from the merits my top five. It's my top two which was Kentucky and Uconn and I remember taking a visit early in Yukon and then taking a visit to Kentucky about may NFL. At that time I was exhausted. I my one official visit but I was exhausted with the process house. Like I'm completely over. This and I may great connections with Girls Kentucky with the coaching staff Mafia comfortable. So at that point and not sadness so that way you kind of felt the exact same way you can. I guess it was there in front of me if fell right at the moment and so cast okay. I'm going into my senior year of a you and I didn't want to have to choose a wine to be solidified before seeing junior year because at the time that's when they first changed a rule so I wanted to be committed by senior year I was died. I didn't want the pressure anymore and committed end so that was an interesting process so again now the pros and cons list talking to coaches distance cannot into consideration. The one came down that pros and cons What kind of look like for me. Family is everything and people say that lightly but I wanted somewhere where I was going to be there for four years and my biggest fear was transferred out one life. I wanted to make the perfect decision. I wanted a place where players came back growing up A lot of places and I've learned I've learned now what it really means to come back in Soviet with access comeback. Why they don't why they do. Because you can be on the team with twelve people in. Everyone has drastically different experiences. But I really wanted somewhere where a majority of the players came back. I wanted a place with rich history. Not just a yeah. We're GONNA Iran this conference but rich like Deep Kentucky history. You know I love that you call history at WanNa tradition. I felt that was important. Especially after coming for Blair Academy being able to see a loan to connect with them. I love that that was huge to me player development players who play like me who look like me And how they developed over time and again just that relationship piece so two that to me again with academics being able to holistic route players. Who actually talked about being a person versus those who actually developed in the curriculum. They had in place. So were you reading a book to your team. And where were they nurturing their growth from outside of school so different things than to Alone could it wasn't just people based on the name of the school. It was like there was office behind how you're going to fit in how you going to be able to enjoy love the that freshman year at. Kentucky. How'd you describe that? Chapter title that chapter. It is so funny. You know the theme for that summer I remember our first conditional gap the code saying arson conditioning coach. He said we're GONNA name this summer. It's GonNa be expect. The unexpected now is the name of the summer so you know it was crazy. Be expect the unexpected it. So that's exactly what I was saying encompassing of my time I could learn so much as a great people. A tough conference plane. Sec everyday eating there is nothing like your freshman year. There is nothing like I'm always in pain. There's nothing you can get shake off the grind on schoolwork at feels never ending the season that feels never ending but also opening up in exploring new party. Yourself INAU May. I didn't know I had an emmy. I knocking show up in that moment. So deftly wasn't adjustment but it was incredibly awakening experience the same beliefs

Kentucky Blair Academy Wnba Leilani Melanie Mitchell Basketball Wanna Kia Vaughn Yukon Professional League Matt Bridget Tunisia Eugene Arson Hakeem Kayla Avalon Tom Day Schnee Work Stanford
South Africa to go into nationwide 21-day lockdown on Thursday night

America's First News

00:35 sec | 7 months ago

South Africa to go into nationwide 21-day lockdown on Thursday night

"Africa and it's fifty seven million people are going into a nation wide lockdown for twenty one days starting Thursday that the fight the spread of the corona virus south Africa's president announcing new restrictions Monday as covert nineteen cases there increased to four hundred and two South Africa now the third country in Africa after or wind in Tunisia to close down except for essential economic activity in response to the virus the cases in South Africa jumping by forty seven percent Monday from the day prior with one hundred twenty eight new

Africa President Trump South Africa Tunisia
Leaders: Gisle Rabesahala

Encyclopedia Womannica

03:45 min | 10 months ago

Leaders: Gisle Rabesahala

"Today's leader was a celebrated politician and was devoted to fighting for freedom and her country. She lived through era's colonialism and independence. Let's talk about Giselle Raba. Saha Jeff just sell Roberts Hollow was born on May Seventh Nineteen Twenty Nine Antananarivo Madagascar at that point Madagascar was a French colony. Gazelles family was very politically involved. Her father was an officer in the French army so she spent most of her childhood moving between his different postings and France Tunisia and molly when he died in nineteen forty to Giselle and her family return to Madagascar ask are those. Zell initially dreamed of becoming a nun. She decided against it by the age of seventeen. She was deeply involved in politics herself in the mid nineteen forties. Some political leaders about a gas car led efforts to become independent failed to do so through legal channels some some became radicalized and decided to take more violent measures in nineteen forty seven. Malagasy nationalists armed mostly with spears attacked attack. French military bases across the island. It became known as the nineteen forty seven. Malagasy uprising in response the French French killed many of the nationals estimates from the French said be killed around eleven hundred Malagasy nationals while Malagasy estimates were way higher around one hundred thousand casualties. Giselle was actively involved in a campaign for the rights of political prisoners from the uprising. She fought to free thousands of prisoners. She gathered a committee to support. Prisoners families wrote news articles to attract international attention and worked with members of parliament. Element petitioned the French president. In nineteen fifty six Giselle became the first woman elected as a municipal councillor. She was also the the first woman to lead a Malagasy political party having founded a party called the Union of the Malagasy. People in Nineteen fifty-eight Giselle United. Five nationalist nationalist organizations to help the Congress party for the independence of Madagascar. After a series of revolts Madagascar gained full independence in nineteen sixty when France agreed to let it become autonomous. Giselle then shifted roles from General Secretary of the Congress Party three to Minister of Culture and revolutionary art in that role. She committed herself to protecting people's heritage. She founded a national library. Prairie in nineteen seventy nine oversaw. The publication fifty works in the Malagasy language restored more than twenty five national monuments organized artistic mystic competitions and create the Mala gase copyright office in one thousand nine hundred five. Her policies helped promote national creativity. Giselle served as minister stir of culture until Nineteen ninety-one ten years later. She was also appointed Deputy Speaker of the Senate in addition to her roles in government. Giselle Zell was also on the editorial board of Nationalist newspaper. That opposed French. Colonial rule for much of her life. Giselle never got married or had any children when she was asked about her decision not to do so. She said that she preferred to serve her country instead to Zell wraps a Halla passed away on June twenty-seventh seventh two thousand eleven one day after the fiftieth anniversary of Madagascar's independence. After her death local reporters described her as as mother courage. Mother of the nation.

Giselle Giselle Zell Madagascar Giselle Raba Giselle United Union Of The Malagasy Congress Party France French Army Roberts Hollow Spears Jeff Officer Prairie Deputy Speaker Minister Of Culture Tunisia Molly General Secretary
"tunisia" Discussed on Target USA Podcast by WTOP

Target USA Podcast by WTOP

03:24 min | 2 years ago

"tunisia" Discussed on Target USA Podcast by WTOP

"Is there any particular thing that you want most to happen doing visit to so that when you go back home, you can make a report on any specific thing. Is there any specific point of interest that you would like more than anything to be able to do to achieve while you're here? But I think the most important thing is to end the line, the importance of Tunisia's seething in the endeavor which is which it start in two thousand eleven breeding, modern transparent. What did you can system based on good governance and transparency, and you know, committed to the same values which have driven us for a number of years with this with the United States. United states has been always a country with. Values. It has been an expiration source of inspiration for countries like Tunisia and would like that kind of aspirations to relations coming from new states to continue. We look at the United States country which has no any colonial background, which has been always stunned support for freedom countries looking for, you know, fighting for freedom for democracy for good governors to continue, you know, supporting young democracy threatening to establish in very difficult. Juno zeal, you're gonna context, these these democratic system. So I think we look at the United States as as an ally as important good friend which will continue supporting us. And this. Last thing. Is there anything that you think is important that you'd like to talk about that I haven't asked you about today? I think besides, of course, having these security corporation Tunisia being the on the north tip of Africa, the closes country to Europe, having drawing very good relationship with soups. High in Africa could be very platform for American businessman willing and to explore new opportunities in that part of the world. We have in Mungo all along the years, different up, you know, kind of favorable league and framework with many parts of Africa. We are just last week. I signed agreement where by which became a member of commission, we among the first country to sign the free trade agreement with Africa, the continental free-trade agreement. And also we are integration with your. To have a whole comprehensive free-trade area to be agreement. Sorry with with Europe. So all these legal framework could be an incentive for American companies, willing to look for investment partnership in our country. Tunisia is ready for business has created..

United States Tunisia Africa Europe Mungo
"tunisia" Discussed on Target USA Podcast by WTOP

Target USA Podcast by WTOP

03:19 min | 2 years ago

"tunisia" Discussed on Target USA Podcast by WTOP

"How's the wall coming? It's not one. It's the border fence. It's it's, it's a, it's a Mara high-tech way of overseeing, you know, the traffic between the two countries and you know, targeting any threat coming from our immediately which could be source of. So you don't view it as a wall, it's not what you've you add more as a. Yeah, it's a more it's elect electronic. Yeah. Pillars is kind of pillars where we set elector electronic commerce. So having having not seen it, then this is a good understanding for me to, no, it's not. It's one solid all offense. It's I understand what you're saying. The sensor space sensors. Exactly. All right. So how how would you says the success of the surveillance system? When we're just in the beginning, that fans, I mean, that sensor will be finished by two thousand nineteen. Let's also really functioning and it's very efficient. Helping us, you know, controlling that deserted place. It's it's very, very difficult and desert deserted area where we need, you know, some these kinds of electronic. You know gadget to monitor what is going on. The economy. So how's the economy right now and what is it that the US can buy or can essentially partner with Tunisia on from an economic point of view? Well, the economy though it still facing some difficulties because our hope and expansion is to have better growth rate in order to meet the, you know, the need of young people looking for jobs, but still on the broad point of view, most of the economic sectors are back on the right track. Tourism is knowing, you know, we'll be witnessing this year an increase of two percent. What investments also is back. And we see that the experts Tunisia exports to outer additional. The market, particularly in Europe and also in USA it's is increasing if you're the first few months of two thousand eight. So broadly economy is doing better, but it is not yet up to the level which will be able to meet the need and requirement of those young people, you know, looking for jobs and the real growth which will introduce real dynamics dynamism into the enemy. Kim, I as Geno we for administer from Tunisia in town recently, visit with US officials, and when target USA continues will hear how his meeting with secretary of state. Mike Pompeo went next on target USA.

Tunisia USA Mike Pompeo Europe Kim partner two percent
"tunisia" Discussed on Target USA Podcast by WTOP

Target USA Podcast by WTOP

06:13 min | 2 years ago

"tunisia" Discussed on Target USA Podcast by WTOP

"From podcast one coming up in this episode of target. USA my is give my issue. No EM the foreign Minister Theresa Asia credits itself was being the US's oldest friend Mr. Jena we came to Washington late July. The pay visit to that old friend. Sometimes friendships get tested as has been the case with Tunisia in recent years with terror attacks, Tunisia has been the victim of three or four major that are set that night at two thousand fifteen and early two thousand sixteen, but thanks to support and partnership are having from United Sates. We out for are better trained Nile, and but they quipped the United States helping securing our border with Libya. So how is the relationship between the US and Tunisia and what happened. In his meeting with secretary Mike Pompeo. That's coming up on this edition of target USA Massimo's to carry broadcast from WTO in Washington DC. This is target USA. Russia could render huge arm to this country. North Korea's secret missile capable of reaching the whole of the United States dangerous. Terrorist DC is repeatedly mentioned someplace they would like to see an attack cyber criminal success. America as a target on its back. And on this program, we investigate the threats. The people behind them, the agencies fighting them and the impact on you. This is target USA be national security podcast. I'm Jay, Jay green. The government of Tunisia counted self as the oldest friend of the US. The relationship goes back to seventeen ninety five and over the years as with any friendship, there have been tests and in the last few years into nesia terrorism has really tested the relationship. They needed a lot of help from the US. The US gave it to them, they've continued to pursue more help. So how exactly is the relationship going now come as you know, we the foreign minister for Tunisia was in Washington in late July to speak with US officials about various issues. We got a chance to sit down with them to talk to him about the situation. This is what brings you to Washington right now while you visiting right now? Well, it's an official visit and paying the nation of my colleague state Mike Pompeo. It's an opportunity been here last mush, and this is the second time in Washington since the next the new administration, the purpose of my visit is to review what is going on between the United States and also try and explore our friends here how we can improve those relations, particularly on the political as well as the cooperation fronts. How would you describe relations between the US and Tunisia right now? Well, our relationships and you know, we are celebrating this year, two hundred twenty one years of relationship. We, we were the first country to the dependence of the United States and vice versa. United States was astound support of Tunisia when we were fighting for our freedom and was among the major, the first major power to Caniza our our dependence says, then regardless of who is empower here in. Washington, and in Tunis we kept, you know, strengthening our relationship. We during the Cold War Tunisia choose to be a staunch ally of the United States, and that kind of relationship has increases two thousand eleven when we Sarsour new new new corporation based on the development of democratic system in our country. Which officials have you been able to, or do you plan to meet while you here? Well, first of all, I had a number of meeting this morning, particularly with the prominent congressman as well as others from both members of both houses in different committees. And then tomorrow, of course, would be meeting security of state Pompeo and the other suit, and the secretary of defense, as well as a number of other important figures from the think tank. It's going to be a new opportunity for me to update our France about the isn't development internees, particularly reinforcing democratic system, which was have certain few years ago and then to tell them that you need continue its partnership in developing win with partnership. Tunisia is. Is stanch partner of Tunisia of United States. This country is helping us not the, you know, securing, I mean, fighting a common enemy which is terrorist. We have been non-nato ally since two thousand fifteen sixteen. And since then we have different up emotive sets corporation particular insecurity insecurity. But also we have created a joint economic commission which had its first session here in Washington, and it's supposed to take place..

United States Tunisia Washington DC Mike Pompeo secretary DC USA Massimo Mr. Jena North Korea Libya WTO America Nile Jay green Russia partner congressman USA. France
"tunisia" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:37 min | 2 years ago

"tunisia" Discussed on KOMO

"Tunisia sure it's not easy getting a case before the us supreme court over your fracture the pieces ever make it that far including bitty of great importance but though that the supreme swelled decided lumbermen can be prohibited from taking trees at one part of louisiana where the endangered dusky go for froggatt lives humans were about ninety percent righthanded but do creditors have side preference that give it on equal choice about forty five percent of bees have a tendency to fly right or fly left equally divided between lefties and right is kangaroos tend to be lefties and fourlegged critters are often badly mixed up horses for example tend to be right front left hind leg at or they want to turn to the left or so should become nascar drivers the old journalism adages his dog bites man mud news man bites dog news and so we must tel aviv bus cowan new hampshire man who is accused of making news on a police dog which is fine the man is under arrest it began back in mighty ninety six with dolly the sheep but now the chinese of taken cloning to the level of two identical macaque monkeys named wa wa and zhangzhong although not the first cloned monkeys these are the first under a new technique which will produce identical monkeys for medical research so far while wa and zhanjiang are reported to be fine fine a clearwater florida man has been busted for grabbing fish and a pet store and shoving about his pants presumably not piranhas it summer in australia were mad sahli was riding his bike when he saw a koala bear and stop yelled out his water bottle and the hot little koala bear emptied it you may now all say all it was quite a traffic jam near who follow a oklahoma as a truck calling four elephants stall recently what the good get out and push and there it was in the brian texas eagle newspaper in the obituaries complete with a picture the passing of big momma stephanie swords pet chicken tell me if you cremated chicken you have the option of extra krispy the offbeat i'm jim bohannon congressman john lewis is seventy eight today record executive david geffen 75 actor kelsey grammer 63 america in the morning for wednesday february 21st 2018 is produced by tom to lack associate producer kathy johnson i'm john trout this is westwood one news.

kathy johnson producer kelsey grammer david geffen congressman jim bohannon australia florida nascar Tunisia tom america executive john lewis oklahoma wa louisiana us forty five percent four elephants
"tunisia" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"tunisia" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Holiday cover the thomas cook is resuming flights from the uk or security corresponded brett gardner has been defined doubt how safe to nazir is for tourists now mike todd in tunis the national build unit a checking that weapons outside that base their apply to rate a host were suspected isis members playground well they're just gone into a house here and we can his sharks brought a tiny little backstreet and they're looking for members of an isis sell that has been in libya they suspect so the whole street is flooded with his armed national guard soldiers hundreds of kilometers to the sites it's a scene of total tranquillity this is the beach sousse and it's almost deserted nearly three years ago to nissim isis gunman crossed over from libya and shot dead thirty eight people thirty of them british khalifa shabani from the interior ministry tells me it's libya that worries emerged which could easy for you to and the main problem in tunisia and the hollerin' with africa and even in europe is the crisis immediately about it i'm trying to stabilize that country is in the strategic interest of tunisia and the whole of the move your long tunisia's mediterranean coast role navy instructors of teaching national guardsmen pledged to intercept suspect vessels on the border with libya the us has provided xray screening machines and british detectives of trained up hotel staff to look out for any suspicious activity at four key airports british aviation experts of installed new screening equipment sale whilst louise desouza britain's ambassador to tunisia host safe is it now well no country is one hundred percent safe as we saw with the tragic attacks in london and manchester last here it is safer here than it was in 2015 because the champions capability has improved down the coast model steer iphone german tourists who been coming here europe to europe as a few machine zia's have lowered i feel absolutely fine here says crystal from cologne i'm not scared or toll yield the beaches ten is your has a rich culture and the government wants to expand tourism the biggest terrorist threat to tunisia comes from across the border libya despite the security here at this checkpoint is an ongoing fear the two museum gia heaviest account training camps across the border prepared to carry out attacks in tunisia.

thomas cook uk brett gardner libya tunisia us louise desouza britain europe zia nazir mike todd tunis africa mediterranean london manchester one hundred percent three years
"tunisia" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"tunisia" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Really as review offer valid were those wartime clinton pebble forecast overnight periods of rain likely on and off isolated thunderstorm possible lows fifty six to sixty two sunday and isolated thunderstorm possible otherwise periods of rain likely high sixty eight monday a fifty percent chance of a shower high sixty four and tuesday a thirty percent chance of isolated light shower high fifty nine low fifty wsb storm tracker radar is clear sixty were hit is far from clear there is showers all over metro atlanta and through the north of the metro area so really heavy showers it's 62 degrees on peachtree street at twelve thirty five i'm charlie o'brien news 955 and am 750 wsb depend on it back to the law is that neck i do i have that right calf tunisia hello tunisia hi my unit was so uh about a year ago on we've got a new property management company we just met that landlord only one time the first incident occurred uh we got the place ten eight the security guard at the property manager higher attempted to break into the unit while we're in a hotel in how loud attempted to break their neighbor watch them and actually called the police with happening would do nothing show up they didn't even show up all right middle of the night okay so you have a witness saw an but they did but he wasn't able to actually breakin correct now we actually got the key then broke off in a lock okay so i don't i'm just trying to figure out damages here i yeah did he did not get into the property right now located guide when that's good news all right yeah so second ansett in occurred on they hire the property manager hired of painter to come in to paint the unit we were gone on according to the neighbors they had their whole family they're running in a now the unit when we came back i had about two thousand dollars worth of jewelry thrown in jail i notify the property manager um he said hey sumi we caught the cops i've got a police report but that that was his answer act.

atlanta tunisia property manager charlie o'brien sumi two thousand dollars thirty percent fifty percent 62 degrees
"tunisia" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"tunisia" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"State militants lend joined now by scott lucas he's a professor of us politics at birmingham university in a regular voice on monocle 24 welcome to the daily scott now alqaeda in the my grab which is where we're focusing on two nyse has it is a huge huge force for a long time but then it went into decline didn't it yes i mean there were internal rivalries between different groups it split into factions of the islamic state was of course competing for influence on for several years especially in places like libya and in tunisia alqaeda in the maghreb as well also politically didn't really carry that type of the pierre were that type of traction of as long as in areas such as tunisia for example especially after two thousand eleven when you had the change that in europe spring that overthrew the regime as long as you could show hope political hope economic opened development but al qaeda in the maghreb is a political movement is not just terrorism and violence it's it's a political movement that seek legitimacy and when you have economic issues across north africa when you have questions about political gytims he of governments alqaeda in the mud rebel try to move in there who try to feast upon that and that is what we're seeing now we're seeing concerns that tunisia having serious economic issues of with the ability of the group distill move between algeria tunisia at times that you could have this socalled research team's and and the killing of an age to a top alqaeda leader was assigned.

professor birmingham university libya pierre tunisia scott lucas europe north africa algeria
"tunisia" Discussed on The Schmidt List

The Schmidt List

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"tunisia" Discussed on The Schmidt List

"Is sufficient to communicate with the developers now now look at my my deliverables from before there's a you know a fully interactive fully annotated actor prototype which is what we needed before because we didn't have the luxury of this instant communication that we do now so it goes back to the agile manifesto of favoring communication over documentation rate and that as what you're talking about is i mean somebody's got to be a bit tunisia's at least in certain organizations to make that a thing the way you're describing it yeah what about let me flip that on its head for you've got a designer that's saying well you know why don't they come to me it's not my job to figure this out for them how would you coach that designer saying you know but if you're if you're more part of the team and you're not just punching a clock you're going to do better work right i mean but how do you have that conversation i'm not entirely sure what you're getting so you like you were saying you're saying go after it yeah but i've talked to a lot of user experience designers that are like did you come to me that's not my job okay so so you are saying what using i'm going to be a jerk for a second say it's really difficult for me to get in the mind of that person okay i would not hire that person right.

tunisia
"tunisia" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"tunisia" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To me it seemed like almost a model of how to live your last days if you can elector type the strings it's a cliche but it is underestimated as a of as of now she's a gone all levels putting our house in order is one of the most uh if you can do it one of the most comforting activities in the benefits are incalculable that is a great deal of new material that i have sorted out fifty or sixty unpublished poems the third songs halfway through the not bad listen to the bird who's wings cameras see listen to the humming bird the listen to me who listens of the butterfly these but number three listened to the butterfly don't listen to me listen to the minds of god which doesn't need to be listen to the wind of god don't listen to me so this halfway at i want to go able to finish the sauna zuhdi illegal immigrant got a second wind tunisia reza became of god these folks to say.

tunisia
"tunisia" Discussed on Pop Culture Palate

Pop Culture Palate

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"tunisia" Discussed on Pop Culture Palate

"Hence so we're going to give you this money and ask that you please that blow it on anything and whenever he um was over over in uh the uk and tunisia filming movie the the crew didn't believe in it if there are i mean they they were actively not working on the movie they refuse to work long hours that were required they didn't like george lucas himself uh and the conditions were harsh the of the cast and crew kinda hated each other the guy who played a c3 po didn't like the guy who played are to be too uh dumb i mean it was just it was it was pretty bad and here's george lucas he doesn't know how is going to get all of these effects done so he actually starts up his own company called industrial light magic and they blow through most of their budget in less than a year and they only had three shots that reusable so when whenever they went to toro or the place to find out why it's costing so much money for so little they discovered they the caught them picking up a freezer and dropping it on the ground to see what it sounded like that's how hard they were working and the in in fact the only reason why there is is a trench end the deaths star is because the model builder who built it who was actually going to be at pensacola on a gun in colin can't well he actually contacted.

george lucas pensacola colin uk tunisia
"tunisia" Discussed on 790 WAEB

790 WAEB

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"tunisia" Discussed on 790 WAEB

"This morning thankful for so many reasons thanksgiving indeed of course hopefully you're at a wonderful thanksgiving concern i were just talking about our thanksgiving than how very very grateful we are how very blessed we are uh for me it's my daughter's kgb through his daughter and his granddaughter's goodness and hopefully you have similar story similar feelings similar gratitude this morning a couple of days removed from thanksgiving but it doesn't mean we can't be every bit as grateful this morning as we were just uh this past thursday and on a absolutely spectacular november morning gorgeous biamba operates a little chilly i get that his november finally uh the weather system kind seems to have settled in tunisia to the normal way of things uh twenty wanted this morning a little further up the line but still goodness abbott crisp and clear and the sunrise this morning was back takkula uh uh for those of you that didn't realize it their there's this sunrise it it's not all is it yeah and it's not just the sunday as the sun rise uh she didn't realize that welcome to more than money and give you we give you the weather insights we give you all that stuff all that stuff and we're thrilled to do exactly that if you're loyal listener you know exactly how this works momentarily will give you several ways that you can join the show and uh the most additional of which old give us call six one zero seven two zero seventy nine hundred he taught to lovely in town to john elliott.

tunisia thanksgiving john elliott
"tunisia" Discussed on 790 WAEB

790 WAEB

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"tunisia" Discussed on 790 WAEB

"This morning thankful for so many reasons thanksgiving indeed of course hopefully you're at a wonderful thanksgiving concern i were just talking about our thanksgiving than how very very grateful we are how very blessed we are uh for me it's my daughter's kgb through his daughter and his granddaughter's goodness and hopefully you have similar story similar feelings similar gratitude this morning a couple of days removed from thanksgiving but it doesn't mean we can't be every bit as grateful this morning as we were just uh this past thursday and on a absolutely spectacular november morning gorgeous biamba operates a little chilly i get that his november finally uh the weather system kind seems to have settled in tunisia to the normal way of things uh twenty wanted this morning a little further up the line but still goodness abbott crisp and clear and the sunrise this morning was back takkula uh uh for those of you that didn't realize it their there's this sunrise it it's not all is it yeah and it's not just the sunday as the sun rise uh she didn't realize that welcome to more than money and give you we give you the weather insights we give you all that stuff all that stuff and we're thrilled to do exactly that if you're loyal listener you know exactly how this works momentarily will give you several ways that you can join the show and uh the most additional of which old give us call six one zero seven two zero seventy nine hundred he taught to lovely in town to john elliott.

tunisia thanksgiving john elliott
"tunisia" Discussed on 790 WAEB

790 WAEB

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"tunisia" Discussed on 790 WAEB

"This morning thankful for so many reasons thanksgiving indeed of course hopefully you're at a wonderful thanksgiving concern i were just talking about our thanksgiving than how very very grateful we are how very blessed we are uh for me it's my daughter's kgb through his daughter and his granddaughter's goodness and hopefully you have similar story similar feelings similar gratitude this morning a couple of days removed from thanksgiving but it doesn't mean we can't be every bit as grateful this morning as we were just uh this past thursday and on a absolutely spectacular november morning gorgeous biamba operates a little chilly i get that his november finally uh the weather system kind seems to have settled in tunisia to the normal way of things uh twenty wanted this morning a little further up the line but still goodness abbott crisp and clear and the sunrise this morning was back takkula uh uh for those of you that didn't realize it their there's this sunrise it it's not all is it yeah and it's not just the sunday as the sun rise uh she didn't realize that welcome to more than money and give you we give you the weather insights we give you all that stuff all that stuff and we're thrilled to do exactly that if you're loyal listener you know exactly how this works momentarily will give you several ways that you can join the show and uh the most additional of which old give us call six one zero seven two zero seventy nine hundred he taught to lovely in town to john elliott.

tunisia thanksgiving john elliott
"tunisia" Discussed on KROQ 106.7FM

KROQ 106.7FM

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"tunisia" Discussed on KROQ 106.7FM

"Yep the when the valley police said ludi lin uh the him no dortha gene oh the mm nate solder yagudin oh the way in them one one with matching gene food jeff since tunisia right well we not yep is owlry yes god yeah.

tunisia
"tunisia" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

TEDTalks (audio)

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"tunisia" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

"Let me give you an example let's take tunisia for example we're not telling tunisia you should move as fast as finland no disrespectful and where telling tunisia look at vietnam the spent similar amounts for primary and secondary pupils as percentage of gdp per capita but achieves today higher results vietnam introduced than does that assessment for literacy and numeracy teachers in vietnam are better monitored and other developing countries and students achievements are made public and he chosen the results in the 2015 pisa programme for international student assessment vietnam outperform many wealthy economies including the united states now if you're not an education expert you may ask what's new in different don't all countries trek student progress and make those achievements public now the sat answer is no we have very far from it only half of the developing countries have systematic learning assessment and primaryschool and even less so at lower secondaryschool so if we don't know if children are learning howard she supposed to focus their attention on delivering results and how our country is supposed to prioritize the education spending actually on were deliver results if they don't know if children are learning that's why the first bake transformation before investing is to make education system deliver results because pouring more money and broken systems may only fund more inefficiencies and what deeply worries me if children go to school and dumped learn it values education and it devalues spending an education so that governments and political party can say who we are spending so much money and education but children are not learning they don't have the right skills.

tunisia finland vietnam united states per capita howard
"tunisia" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

KKOB 770 AM

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"tunisia" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

"The original protesting group you saw this as an amazing leap in the power that you have now and you don't want to let that go now now they want to see jerry jones on tunisia's yes and then you have to take an elbow then dare to take a hip instead of any tunisia's tunisia two elbows then laid out laid down which will where i what is next hoppy hot what's going to happen this week it well that's and that was my question the other day it is that if if you try and make this goal way will the those who were part of the original protest remember capper next not playing but some of the others are well they don't want this to go away you with your door to this the nfl opened their doors though the owners opened their doors it here's here's the thing because it's interesting to people will the eu will analyse in say trump wins meanwhile the left to say no we believe were winning mmhmm right so politically who's actually winning out of this weld's anyone expect trump to do you know back away from now positioned no he's not going to which means that there has to be more reaction and and and how do you react you react with more the say all he has to do is every friday or saturday tweets a better not if they if they do it this weekend then they should double secret probation firing yeah i it's it's interesting but i i think the nfl's is right now i think they thought we can do this as we can get abides i think they believe that but you can't it may not be as a parrot this coming weekend but the problem is is that you've lost part of your fan base how big that is remains to be seen how long that lasts also remains to be seen.

jerry jones tunisia nfl eu trump
"tunisia" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"tunisia" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Sousse tunisia trying to rid the world of polio this is the pulse of the planet book polio is something that is for the most burden but a radical across the planet but there's at least three countries where it still endemic pakistan afghanistan and that believe nigeria peter vigorously professor of civil and environmental gene nearing at virginia tech polio is essentially a disease that people that have it they may not know that they haven't and so that there are fairly large percentages of the population in some of these countries that have polio but don't show any exterior signs of having the issue with police is that the vaccine when it's orally administrated it still has some potential to cause polio like symptoms and if anybody that's been vaccinated has the capacity to relief polio in their feces when it goes into wastewater and when it's in that form it can be disseminated in the environment and it so the question is how do you detect poliovirus in a wastewater stream and how do you do it on a costeffective basis where you're out in the middle of a barrier and development and you're trying to find and detect supplement very hard to find but you wanna do it in the field and you wanna do it cost effectively with the help of technology professor vicious terms.

tunisia polio nigeria professor pakistan afghanistan virginia