35 Burst results for "tundra"

Animal Migrations Track Climate Change

60-Second Science

02:37 min | Last month

Animal Migrations Track Climate Change

"Change is altering the migration routes of animals worldwide. Here's a look at new research on how to species have been affected first mule deer. Every spring in Wyoming vegetation I appears at lower altitudes before progressing up the mountainside, migrating mule deer, follow and forage on this Green Bay, but as a changing climate leads to more frequent and more severe droughts. The Greenery is not as bountiful as it used to be. For Her PhD research at the University of Wyoming Ellen Atkins tracked mule deer as they to the green wave, the green up lasted across the landscape for about half as long in drought years in comparison to wet years, and also the order of green up along these routes were less sequential, so an ascents drought compresses at reshuffles the green wave, and just makes it so that this forging bonanza that dear depend on in their spring migration is really compressed in time, and although the deer were able to keep up with the faster green wave, the nutritional value is lower leaving the animals less prepared for the challenges of the year ahead. Meanwhile in Europe. The population of swans that spend the winter in the United Kingdom and the Netherlands is declining. But when researchers looked at the data more closely, they found an increase in the wintering population of swans in Germany. It turns out that since the nineteen seventies, the swans wintering habitat has shifted an average of thirteen kilometers to the east each year. What we think is that the swans like do spent time in areas where it's five degrees Celsius, and this item has shifted in the same rate as the swans shifted eastward sets a strong indications for us that and actually move with this temperature line. Russia announced of the Netherlands Institute of Ecology. Her team also found that the swans. We're spending less time in their winter homes before flying back to the Russian. Tundra to breed. Neither the mule deer, nor the Buick Swan is endangered, but the findings have broader importance for our understanding the conservation of migratory animals because If you stop thinking of protecting certain plot of land, it's not just the current situation that is their nature is dynamic, and the species that are present now might not be present in ten years time, and not because we didn't protect, but maybe because these species are actually dynamic in ways. We need to include this resilience and the dynamics of nature into our legislation and management.

Green Bay Russia Wyoming University Of Wyoming Buick Swan Ellen Atkins Europe Netherlands Institute Of Ecolo United Kingdom Netherlands Germany
Rocket Roundup for June 3, 2020

Astronomy Cast

05:12 min | 2 months ago

Rocket Roundup for June 3, 2020

"Twenty twenty. Today's livestream was hosted by Anne Wilson. And our audio is reported by me Allie Pelfrey. Most Mondays through Fridays. Our team will be here putting science in your brain. Usually Wednesdays for rocket roundup, and we have some catching up to do. Let's get to it, shall we? A JAKSA H. to be rocket launched the H. T. V. Nine Mission Aka. WHO NATORI Nine on Wednesday may twentieth, twenty twenty at five thirty one PM ut see. The mission patches a gold ring around a blue and yellow graphic of the H. T. V. Capsule with a yellow image of the ISS in the distance against a black background. The text H to transfer vehicle and mission designation HDTV, nine, or in the yellow ring. The Japanese characters say Kuna Tori nine. There were to last for this flight. This was the last flight for the H. to be the first flight of the H. Three is planned for later this year. This was also the last Katori. A new Japanese cargo vessel is expected to launch and twenty when he to. A lot of cargo went to the ISS ON HDTV nine. Six thousand two hundred kilograms to be exact. That's four four thousand three hundred kilograms in the pressurized compartment and one thousand nine hundred kilograms in the unpressurised compartment. This includes a solid combustion experimental module. The module will continue research on combustion in microgravity, also on board were six new lithium ion batteries for the space station and fresh bell, peppers, Kiwi and citrus fruit for the crew. All fresh fruits and vegetables were grown in Japan. One of the other experiments was a wireless. Lan Demonstration or W. L. D. pronounced wild. Wild was an experiment that was performed during Kuna Tori nines flight. This was tested during Katori nines approach where video taken by a camera attached to the craft's propulsion module was broadcast in real time on board, the space station via a wireless data link the technology tested by wild will enable ISS cruise to monitor approaching vehicles during an autonomous docking. This was the first time to spacecraft communicated using w LAN during a rendezvous. On May twenty second at seven thirty one am ut see Russian. Armed Forces launched a Soyuz two one B rocket with the cosmos, two five four six mission. This was a military mission. So details are a little scarce. Here's what we do know. The payload was the Tundra Fourteen L. satellite that will be used for an early warning system, replacing the aging US K. and US Komo constellations. This is the fourth satellite and the newer. Tundra Constellation. The satellite was placed and ammonia orbit, which is a highly. The satellite was placed in a Molnia orbit, which is highly elliptical and highly inclined. When I say elliptical I. Don't mean a tiny bit. egg-shaped were straight into severely stretch territory with altitudes ranging from six hundred to nearly forty thousand kilometers above earth. At that long oval of an orbit and place it at sixty three degree angle relative to Earth's equator, and you get the highly inclined orbit. The what's the purpose of this orbit? Thanks to orbital mechanics. Ammonia orbit is uniquely suited to providing useful satellite coverage for earth, observation and communication services needed by ground terminals operating in high northern latitudes. Those areas are not easily serviceable from satellites in the typical geosynchronous orbits over the equator. Because any antenna you're using would be pointing at such a low angle that a small hill could easily block the path of the signal. And even though polar orbiting satellites can reach these same latitudes, they only have coverage of any given spot for several minutes at a time. The MONJA orbit is inclined in such a way that the desired areas are not only clearly visible. The satellite is pause for a time at its highest point. Thanks to orbital mechanics, which provides several hours of uninterrupted coverage that. L. E. O. AND GAO satellites simply can't

H. T. V. Nine Mission Aka Kuna Tori Nines United States Anne Wilson Twenty Twenty Kuna Tori ISS Allie Pelfrey H. T. V. Capsule Japan Armed Forces GAO W. L. D. L. E. O.
Pokémon Sword and Shield expansion launching June 17

Gaming Ride Home

00:38 sec | 2 months ago

Pokémon Sword and Shield expansion launching June 17

"Poke commands I'll of armor. DLC has a release date. Game Freak and the POK Mon Company announced to planned DLC packs for Pokemon, sword and shield back in the beginning of this year, but it only said the first the aisle of armor was coming in June and the second, the Crown Tundra would becoming in the fall. This morning the I of armor was given a specific launch date of June seventeenth. Nicole Carpenter! Reported on the release date announcement for Polygon which comes from Japanese trailer and wrote poem on Sword and Shield Expansion. The aisle of armor will be released on June seventeenth. The POKEMON company announced

Pokemon Pok Mon Company Crown Tundra Nicole Carpenter Game Freak Polygon
Stratton brothers trial began - May 5, 1905

This Day in History Class

03:21 min | 3 months ago

Stratton brothers trial began - May 5, 1905

"Nineteen O five the stratton brothers trial for the murder of Thomas Farrow began. The straightens case marked the first time anyone was convicted for murder and Britain based on fingerprint evidence the study of fingerprints and their use in identification picked up considerably in nineteenth century Europe. That said the history of fingerprinting is inextricably linked with colonialism and racism in Eighteen fifty-eight William James Herschel. An Englishman became an officer in the Indian Civil Service. He was posted to Present Day. Junkie POOR IN INDIA THAT YEAR. He had a local man. Place his handprint on a contract. In lieu of signature personal goal was to keep the man from being able to deny his signature at a later. Time Herschel continue to require handprints from locals on contracts eventually realizing that he only needed prints from the index and Middle Finger. He was convinced that fingerprints were unique and permanent and believe they could be used to prove someone's identity other. Europeans also focused on the potential for fingerprints use and identifying suspects in solving crimes building on others work eugenicist and polymath Sir Francis Golden identified patterns in fingerprints and published a classification system for them the use of fingerprints and forensics didn't really take off until the turn of the twentieth century as he's a little hot in. Tundra both are credited with creating the Henry classification system for fingerprinting by nineteen one. Scotland Yard also known as the London Metropolitan Police established a new fingerprint bureau. The next year the first recorded trial in England that relied on fingerprint evidence took place in the trial. Harry Jackson was sentenced to several years in prison for burglary in London. After his fingerprint was presented as evidence in court just two years later the first murder trial in England in which fingerprints were used as evidence began Thomas. Farrell was found dead after a robbery and his wife and died a few days later. An empty cashbox was found in the apartment. As well as two black mass a fingerprint was found on the cashbox and inspector Charles Collins from Scotland. Yard's fingerprinting bureau examined it but the print didn't match the Faroes the officers or anybody in the bureau's file but witnesses reported seeing two men in the area on the morning of the crime and police track down and arrested Albert and Alfred Stratton. Their prints were taken an Alfred. Right thumbprint mashed the print on the cashbox. The brothers trial began on May fifth. Nineteen O Five. The fingerprint was the strongest evidence linking them to the crime scene and using fingerprints. Evidence was still a relatively new technique but collins explained the classification of fingerprints to the jury. And how he had never found two prints that had more than three characteristic in common in this case. Alfred Sprint and the cashbox print had multiple similarities. The Stratton brothers were found guilty of murder. And sentenced to death by hanging fingerprint. Evidence has been used in criminal investigations in cases ever since though techniques and technology in the field have changed significantly.

William James Herschel Murder Alfred Stratton Charles Collins Scotland Yard Thomas Farrow Officer England Alfred Sprint London Metropolitan Police Middle Finger India Sir Francis Golden Britain Indian Civil Service Harry Jackson London Scotland Farrell Robbery
How Herbivore Herds Might Help Permafrost

60-Second Science

02:45 min | 4 months ago

How Herbivore Herds Might Help Permafrost

"Arctic. Permafrost is melting and fast. That's bad news because these frozen soil store billions of tons of carbon. Just waiting to be unleashed. So is there a way to save the permafrost? One team of researchers thinks that may have found a possible solution. Vague animals urban offers animals. That you only plants back in nineteen ninety. Six researchers started an experiment called Pleistocene Park they fenced in about eight square miles of land in northeast Siberia and then they introduce different types of herb avars reindeer horses Moose Bison Sheep and other large critters since then scientists have studied these animals effects on the ecosystem. One outcome is that these large are before help. Keep the ground very cold cooler than it would otherwise be. The snow in winter is important for temperature because it doesn't insulating layer so the air in winter in the highlight juice much cooler than the saw Philip pirata vegetation ecologist at the University of Hamburg. So the idea of this experiment was to introduce a large herbivores and to a quantify the effects on temperature to see if they can actually protect permafrost soils against thawing and this works because The animals trampling to less insulation of soil against the cold air temperatures and results in a cooling effect freezing era of reaches the soil more easily. Priroda and his colleagues realize the significance of this effect so they pulled data from place to seem park as well. As from Sweden. To model what effect urban force could have on permafrost if they lived in large numbers in the the researchers found that even in a worst case scenario some four degrees Celsius global warming. These hobie voice in the model reduced substantially by a one point seven degrees on the average and this leads to a preservation of around eighty percent of the original. Today's permafrost area and with our hobby for effect in the model. So the control run. We found that only fifty percent of the permafrost area would remain by the year. Two hundred hundred so we can say that the effect of the heavy was in the model of lead to a substantial addition of Paraphra so the studies in the journal Scientific Reports. It may seem strange to have herds of horses in cold adapted sheep grazing the Arctic Tundra. But then again. We're living in strange times.

Arctic Tundra Pleistocene Park University Of Hamburg Philip Pirata Scientific Reports Sweden Paraphra Siberia Priroda
"tundra" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

01:33 min | 4 months ago

"tundra" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"At the Toyota tundra a twenty four hour traffic center can extend seventy newsradio other powerful storable low pressure and associated front coming in cold system once again temperatures will stay in the upper fifties low to mid sixties today with southwest breeze around that's below average and we may get a little bit of rain scattered showers around most of precipitation like probably read on the white perciform fact odds for the colder air lowering snow levels down around the great fun as we head on through tonight early tomorrow maybe a couple of inches mostly accumulating snow is going to be coming above about five thousand feet from the weather channel restate you can extend seventy newsradio currently downtown Los Angeles it is fifty seven degrees eight forty seven ad KNX continuing in depth team coverage of the corona virus crisis the largest T. shirt manufacturing company in the country is now helping make protective face masks and the company's called bayside it is based here in southern California in Bray and the owner says he bought the equipment himself trained about five hundred employees on how to make them is really behind me have never saw him us ever before I've never been amassed never sold never distributed he tells CBS two that is ready to produce these long term if he needs to it was millions of dollars with the B. villians amassing a that's such a shortage that we need to fill and its long term it could be up to eighteen months the massive three layers are hundred percent cotton washable reusable but they are not medical grade so because you haven't gotten the message about those are safe at home during the corona virus outbreak you may get a phone call in the city of Glendale.

Toyota tundra Los Angeles KNX California Bray CBS Glendale
Global warming shortens Arctic ice road season

Climate Connections

01:11 min | 4 months ago

Global warming shortens Arctic ice road season

"Many people avoid driving on ice. He wrote in northern Canada's Arctic Tundra. Some roads are made of ice. A network of seasonal roads on frozen rivers and lakes allows trucks to reach remote areas. Many of these places are otherwise accessible. Only by boat or plane but as the climate warms. The ice road season is getting shorter. Show Young of the University of North Carolina. Chapel Hill analyzed more than three decades of satellite images of rivers around the globe. He looked at which rivers were frozen and win way to take the widespread gig client in river is in the past thirty years. In general have later frees up of the river surface and we have earlier break up of the river surface and has consequences for when you actually built. This is roads young also studied. What is likely to happen to river? Ice If global carbon pollution and temperatures continue arise. He found that by twenty one hundred. Some rivers could be ice free for weeks longer than they are now so global warming could continue to the ice road season and make it harder and more expensive to reach some remote and isolated places in the Arctic.

Arctic Tundra Chapel Hill Arctic University Of North Carolina Canada
Modern lifehacks

Pass It On

06:34 min | 5 months ago

Modern lifehacks

"Headphone shudder you. I'm trying I'm trying to Steve. The volume control on your smartphones headphones can be used to such release this way. You can take a picture with your camera without your camera shaking Christopherson brought by ferry. Andy Right WHA- okay. I know so the Plus Button. Yeah the plus and minus button. You hit for more in line in line remote control when thanks to camera can also click the shutter on your camera so you say your camera up somewhere tripolar slightly making something and if you if you act of pressing the sharp button with your fingers with. Chiku camera is we. Using a like effective August photographers would use a remote lease shelter. And you can take that. She can alternatively at airports. That does it. Doesn't you right attentively? If you have an Apple Watch then you can see on your watch. What camera you're seeing so up. Go back to join. The group praised the three second timer casually hands in your pockets having check the freemen. Take a job son. Drake Group selfie right on there. Like Saudi full Griffey okay. How many times of US Postal weekend zeal? Coney deal right. I'm going to is that. The is that the metric for us. I'm going to introduce an innovation to the puzzle and tips podcast. I'm going to stop just because it seems to me and for this week only I'm going to introduce a scoring system so I'm giving but them I'm giving that tip to Tim O. My God harsh. I knew Jake rival Harvard over but no I don't think I would use video of I understand. I can see saying but when when I said tips and hawks I meant clever little things what people have discovered and have found useful. No that's take that was invented by UPPAL as I was the operating system of a piece of technical but not everybody knows that. I didn't know that you'd iphone could do that. So I should apply. I think having no Shared the Katina for success with us. The had some guys life is about teaching house. You don't you're not gonNA clever whatsoever because you're not going to understand it whatsoever. Yeah I'M NOT GONNA go and Miss Steve. I can't read. I like Steve. Rc At lake. Steve Fake Tan move. I mean he's aisling ordered count so hard to get off and would deliver yes. Yeah Yeah exactly. So you kind of have to this. This is more of a story than a tip but I might let down to Monday. I'm going to have to explain. Fake Tonto Steve. And that's a whole entire podcast concept of. Yeah Okay So. It's hard to so if you want to take off an old layered and put on a newly are for an eye or whatever you have to take off so have you seen those scabby things that you get that you put the Lid Fadi. Let quit and two. They're totally several times. You say yeah so I use one of them. Like Scouts Scouting pods felt with victim over what she can buy an score and actually works. Very well obviously distill your tip to. It's very sick to get this stuff of your skin you know. Don't boss. I scar point. Leslie will bleed but once you take that many layers of skin on with with a this scatter ADESCO Dr. The delivery mechanism built into it. Sorta stop so. When you need to take de ton DEATON BEC- be Thanh on. But you want to take off on Morton which is against you back to the same place. I am the point right so use you wash vigorously with a fairly vigorous sponge like thing so uteck pint. Dusk is this guy with with the with the sun in the handle is being dispensed through the sponge. I think was it a such a thing as speak Tundra move. Oh Yeah I mean it's not belly and you still need to give up available. Spa Alpha also known to use 'em to they call it cream am I just couldn't stop. I've ever heard of the pink stuff. They'll top of 'em pink makes full like like scoping for like using on. Pvc and stuff of us. That and I'm going to have no skin left by the time in theory. I think it's a clever thing this scattered thing with the insight. I know feeling I was Louis really harsh. I was overly harsh. Calibrate your scoring system like trust you've been elevated to fool and I'm GonNa get you don't you all during the to your deck. Come on you're doing something that doesn't need done with something that sneak. John was on with the old fake ton. What's wrong with snobby? Look at Skopje known. What's on with not having just being you know so scotch. You're not giving me all you know. One did think of a one. But I'm giving you tonight. Okay can I. Oh you're going again. No score years. You certainly can.

Miss Steve United States Andy Right Steve Fake Tan Christopherson Skopje Apple Rc At Lake Harvard Griffey Drake Group Coney Tim O. Jake John
A Climate Change Solution Right Under Our Feet

Gastropod

10:55 min | 5 months ago

A Climate Change Solution Right Under Our Feet

"Got into soil as an undergraduate student at the University of Osmar. This is Asmara at Bir. Hey she's a professor of soil bio geochemistry at the University of California and mirsaid where we went to visit her but her lifelong love affair with soil began in Eritrea. So when I started I was an eighteen year old student at the university. It didn't know really anything about soil. And I took an introduction to soil science course I was blown away at how that opened my world in my eyes. I was hooked still learning Asmara at fell in love with something that seems just like this every day brown thing we might occasionally get stuck to our shoes but really what is it. What is soil? It's a product of breakdown of rocks and also incorporated incorporates residues of dead plants and animals that used to live in the land before but the mixture of this breakdown products of rocks and residue of organic matter that lived creates these incredibly rich resource that we then every living thing on. The face of the earth depends on for our life for our livelihood for our food. Fiber needs in everything else. You can imagine there's only about six foot of this magical rock and residue mix covering the earth surface on average and so it's not very deep when you think about it in reality it's that thin veil that represents the difference between life and likeness in the system all this is beautiful and obviously incredibly fundamental life on earth and there's plenty we could and probably will say in the future about soil and food but this episode we're focusing specifically on the carbon and soil in carbon is continuously being exchanged between the soil and the atmosphere because when plants photosynthesis they take up carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and then they use it to build their bodies and upon death the bodies in the bodies of every living things that consume the plants into the soil and get stored there are soil carbon basically carbon gets into the soil through two main butts. There's the plant matter itself when it dies but also while the plan is live its roots. Push out carbon-based sugars into the soil to feed microbes. Those microbes are also of course made of carbon. So that's more carbon the soil but like Asmara's said this is a cycle plants take up soil. Carbon use it for food and some of the carbon escapes back into the atmosphere some carbon just cycles through soil really quickly. It doesn't stay in the soil but some of it does. There are particular microbes that can help soil carbon get stuck together into clumps so it can't be consumed or escape to the atmosphere and there are particular soil minerals that react with soil carbon and form chemical bonds that also keep it from being consumed in released scientists call these clumps aggregates basically they're like little vaults some carbon might leak out of those vaults but most of it stays there for decades some of it stays for centuries so in a way you can think about the soil serving as the bank for Carbon Carbon comes in carbon comes out Just like we deposit money in our bank and then was drove over time. But if you deposit more than you withdraw than your bank account grows and the soil carbon over time basically grew because the system as a whole we were depositing more into the soil carbon bank than we were withdrawing but right now we're doing the opposite in the past our soil. Carbon Bank account was in good shape. We're talking geological time here but over billions of years more carbon got deposited than was released. That's what made places like the midwestern prairies. The world's great agricultural soils so fertile. But here's the thing in the past two Hundred Years. We've released a lot of carbon from soil. Scientists disagree about the exact amount but everyone agrees it's a lot billions and billions of tons. So how exactly did we lose all that carbon for soil bank account? What have we been doing since the war? The farmer has nearly doubled his production until today. He is beating himself and seventeen others. What made this greater increase possible. Power power made available through the farm tractor which meant greater efficiency modern agriculture and especially tractors. Anytime you break up soil and expose it those clumps. We talked about release. Their carbon in the past farming was more small scale and not mechanized so it causes less disturbance in the soil and so it released less carbon. But that's not how things work today. Tractors Rolling over fields and breaking them up so they can be easily planted that releases a lot of carbon quickly over a much larger area plus all these machines mean. We can farm a lot more land more quickly which means we release. Its carbon to the amount of land used for farming around. The world has grown exponentially especially since World War Two. Of course there are other things that expose and break up. Soil deforestation draining wetlands but agriculture is huge. A profound drop in Solar Ganic matter has happened virtually everywhere we've farmed no one contests this somewhere. Between thirty and seventy percent of the Solar Ganic matter is gone from agricultural fields after several decades once. You Start Farming Tim. Cruz is the director of research at the Land Institute in Salina Kansas and he says soil that has lost that much. Carbon is considered degraded so there was a recent report released by the UN that stated that close to about half of the world soil so now considered degraded half which is obviously not good. So why don't we stop with all the tractors in the plowing to understand why we need tractors our current system? Why we tear up the soil for all our crops. The critical thing to understand is that nearly all of our crops are annual plants. Annuals have to be planted each year and at the end of the season they die. Most plants in the world are not annual plants there. What's called perennials? They just grow and then one day after decade or hundreds of years in the case of trees they die. It's interesting note that there's almost no natural. Ecosystems that are dominated by annual plants in the world it just does not exist prairies forests savannahs deserts. Tundra and rainforests all of these ecosystems are overwhelmingly dominated by perennial species. And it's the roots of those species that developed the soils have the world most plants are perennials are of course some manuals in nature as well but if most plants are perennials. Why are nearly all the plans we use for food annuals to answer that we have to go back thousands of years to before the start of agriculture so when you start looking for grains to eat annual wild plants tend to have relatively large seed and relatively large amounts of them? Wild Bernal's tend to have lower C- deal so if you're looking for something to eat usually going to be attracted to that while Daniel Plant laid to haunt is a plant breeder who works with Tim at the Land Institute and he says our ancestors would have found these large seeded annual grasses bringing up in disturbed areas maybe like an animal wallow because that's the ecosystem that annuals are adapted to. They thrive on freshly churned up land but annuals turned out to have an even bigger benefit for our ancestors than just their grain size now of course thousands of years ago. They didn't know anything about genetics or breeding but they would have planted seeds of those annuals and then each year. They chose their favorites to eat and replant. Annuals were perfect. For this process you can get robbed cycles. Obstruction happening unintentionally. Because every year. It's going to have to come from a if you had perennials growing out. There very hard to just accidentally improve them improve their seats is because you just keep going back to the same old plants and harvesting them and they would never change so there was some sense to choosing annuals for our food crops but that choice locked us into tearing up the soil each year to make the kind of environment are food. Plants prefer so with agriculture. What we have to do is mimic disturbance so when I give a presentation to show a picture of volcano. 'cause that's kind of what we do every year. Now you're cultures we level everything we'd wipe out all above ground plant life and re seed our annual grain crop so you're starting from kind of biological ecological ground zero every year we do it. Some perennials mostly fruits and nuts that grow on trees. There are some wild grains like wild rice that's a perennial but eighty percent of all. Our crops are annuals and we locked into that way of growing food at the beginning. And we've lived this legacy when farmers plow their fields before sowing the seeds each spring that triggers a big withdrawal from the soil carbon bank because it busts open those aggregates that were guarding carbon safely in the soil. And when you break it open with with tillage plow disc microbes have access to that stored carbon and they have a heyday. They just start shout out and they eat up that Solar Ganic matter and they breathe out carbon dioxide in the process micro string and honestly a drink might not be a bad idea at this point because the impact of tilling the soil like this is pretty bad first of all like we said disturbing the soil releases a bunch of carbon into the atmosphere and then of course that carbon isn't available in the soil for the plans to use his food soil carbon is also critical for water storage because those clumps help soil hold onto water when the klumps break up the structure of the soil changes. It doesn't hold water as well. Water runs off the fields. Instead of thinking in and the soil runs off to erosion becomes a bigger problem so carbon storage and soya's good for many many reasons beyond climate change mitigation but also so carbon is really important in terms of climate. Change Mitigation. Because there's so much carbon and soil compared to the atmosphere the small change in the amount of carbon stores and soil can dramatically change the concentration of greenhouse gases in the earth's atmosphere and hence the atmosphere temperature and because so much of the earth is farmland a third of the entire planets ice-free surfaces farmland. That means changing the amount of carbon and agricultural soils would have an outsized impact. Carbon in soil is great for plants and great for the environment and so people have been working on ways to get more carbon into soil for a while but this focus on climate change is a new one because it's becoming clearer and clearer each year that we have to do something anything about our carbon emissions. So what do we do? How do we build our soil carbon backup? I mean the only way to get it back totally is to reverse the process totally and go back to how that organic matter was accumulated in the first place which involved perennial species and not disturbing the

Carbon Bank Asmara Land Institute Eritrea University Of Osmar University Of California Professor Solar Ganic UN Mirsaid Wild Bernal
Climate Change Threatens Alaska Census Count

Environment: NPR

04:46 min | 6 months ago

Climate Change Threatens Alaska Census Count

"Now News. to Alaska where some communities are on the front lines of the impact of climate change warming temperatures and thawing. Permafrost are forcing some Alaskan native villagers to look for firmer ground on which to live. And that's also making it harder to get an accurate population. Count for the twenty twenty cents in parts of the state. NPR's Hansi Lawan has been traveling to some of these remote areas for this report once a decade the US government's largest peacetime mobilization officially begins with a trek to the most northern state in the Union Census Bureau officials crossed the Tundra of Southwest Alaska by Bush plane last month to reach the fishing shing village of took Sook Bae Ba. I community in the country to be counted for the twenty twenty cents. Is You land on a strip of Ice Jessica Amazon she coordinates the bureau outreach to tribal governments in Alaska the airport terminal is essentially. It's not even building. It just hasn't mention their blocks the wind. And then you go go up to the actual village typically by snow machine after each villages counted census workers often hop back attack on a snow machine. Or if you're in the lower forty eight a snowmobile or sometimes into a dog sleigh to journey across miles of frozen ground and ice roads to reach the next village village temperatures in Alaska though have been heating up twice as fast as the global average making counting in some parts of the state more complicated we seen gene landmasses just disappear overnight and we're talking a big chunk Alan up twenty feet or so Romi caddy anti is a relocation coordinator for village northeast of took bay called new talk. Many residents. There have been forced out by erosion and rising waters that seep through floorboards and lead to black mold and homes. There are leaning telephone poles all over the village structures are beginning to fall from their foundation. Dacian the two thousand ten census counted just over three hundred fifty people. Living in new talk and the community has used that number to get its share of an estimated more than one and and a half trillion dollars a year in federal funding guided by Census Data Ba last fall a third of new talks residents relocated into new homes in mocked Avik. It's replacement village. That's on higher ground and this year. The Census Bureau is planning to count the community as to villages would separate population counts. So I asked Romi Taty Day. Hey what does that mean for. How much funding the community receives over the next decade? That's a very good question and a very scary question. There's gotta be a way Eh. For communities that spurious these kinds of threats to have additional funding in the transitionary period recent global warming and how slowed affect in coastal areas rivers and. It's not just one village in all the villages back in took set bank tribal administrative Robert. Pit Gus says. Climate change brings a particular challenge to Alaska native villages that rely on funding tied to their census numbers. What are you worried about about over the next ten years? I'm just worried that there may be lack of funding to fix all kinds of erosion occurring in many villages indescribable for Diana Turkic. It was partly forseeable. Turkic is the operations manager for the took base of regional clinic. And she's worried about the ice road. Other villages rely on to get to took suck base health clinic and research winters. It's sometimes been too warm to drive over a nearby river it hasn't frozen Over and it's made it more typical to get seen over here so they rely on. Claims Moore Turkic says the rising temperatures reminder of what you elders have long predicted and she wonders census workers who often have to use ice roads to get around may encounter a vastly different Alaska by the next count in twenty thirty. The way things are going. Maybe they won't maybe they will not have winter. That's like so many years from now and I just don't know Romi Cayenne Tei says in new talk. Many residents are not waiting to see what else climate change brings. There are so many people that are scared about the weather so a lot of people have been seeking shelter with their relatives all over the region. So you're GonNa see that census number drop a little bit ten years from now though. County wants to see new talks community reunited on solid ground in their new village of mocked Avik population. Three hundred fifty by the twenty thirty cents is he hopes or maybe even higher

Alaska Census Bureau Union Census Bureau Census Data Ba Operations Manager Romi Cayenne Tei Southwest Alaska Romi Taty Sook Bae Ba NPR United States Avik Hansi Lawan Moore Turkic County
Dining in Murmansk, the Largest City North of the Arctic Circle

Monocle 24: The Menu

05:25 min | 6 months ago

Dining in Murmansk, the Largest City North of the Arctic Circle

"This week. We hit well off the beaten track to Russia's mortar monarch the largest city in the Arctic Circle Monaco's the're merits is our guys to the local cuisine which in spice of the harsh conditions is bursting being with flavor. If you're choosing restaurants now in London. I'm Dan Paris or Berlin. What factors are you basing your choice on? Maybe it's equality of the foods. Maybe it's the prices. Maybe it's the atmosphere I most of the time. It's a combination of a three. What you're probably not thinking about is whether the food is going to help you to survive the winter but things are a little different in Murmansk the manzke a Russian ports? That's the biggest city in the Arctic circle in January I traveled to moments from my Titan in Moscow to write an article about how the three hundred thousand people who live there. Make it through the night. The city in the west of Russia about one hundred miles from the border with no way is so far north that for forty days in the winter it has no direct sunlight at all. It's is not completely black. When the sun comes close to the horizon there is a predawn light and then a sunset light for a few hours but the darkness nevertheless takes its toll on the locals when I ask people about how they got through? This period are expected to hear about seasonal affective disorder lamps the importance to try to stay positive the importance of exercise or maybe a little bit of vodka could take the edge off. What I didn't expect was that to be quite? I'd say much. Focus on food as a way of combating the Winter Blues Am. I really didn't expect the much of the feet on offer would be so good. My culinary journey began on the thirty six hour sleep train up from Moscow their flights that take just two hours buzz. If you're making the trip to Murmansk to see some of the stunning Arctic landscapes around the city or perhaps catch a glimpse of the northern lights. It certainly worth going the slow way. Not least the Lakers to sell their wares platforms as he approached the Arctic circle offering cartons of berries. Hey made jams and pies. On the second evening. The photographer I was traveling with picked up his smoked whitefish for dinner. A meaty oily northern fish that similar to salmon. The smell didn't make acoss to popular with our fellow travelers but it was delicious. Once we arrived in Murmansk we set out for a swim with what Russians call. walruses people who jumped through holes in phrase naval lakes and swear that the ice and dip is what keeps them going through the winter. I asked one of them Alexander. Whether he took took any supplements for his diet now he laughed. You get everything you need from fish especially herring on the called for which Murmansk is famous in the rest of Russia Alexander catches card. But there's no need to do this yourself instead to Andhra. The city's most fashionable restaurant breath. Here Murmansk called is served with a side of cramped mashed potatoes. There is salmon steaks which locals swear a tastier than then nowegian cousins dozens. There's a rich potato. Seep with local scholarships or there's giant crab which tender insists is imported from the far east of Russia as it's legal to catch them. I'm here for environmental reasons. Desert so heavy on local berries. And there're all say berry infused tease. The wolves decorated with dried moss in a nod to the rustic many. If you're after something. Meteor try restaurant called SASKIA hotter or the royal hunt this owned by the same people as Tundra. This one's a little bit picture with Russian fake decorations and I hanging over wooden. Beams this fish head to but but there are several variations on rain day on the Arctic themed Menu Strips of meat served with celery mash or a reindeer heart on a bed at blueberry source source in terms of legal fees. There are flavored spirits. Called in a streaky or a vote could like liquor called poly Gar for something sweet. Try Cafe called old. Morowski named off the optic freight that in English is called Cloud Burri the cafes just behind the city's main drag Lenin Avenue and there are plenty of good pastries here but the highlight has to be pancakes with sour cream and cloud breach on the free. Looks like an orange rasberry and in terms taste. It's a little bit like a cross between a rasberry and goose berry. You can find it. Brewed and tease in Murmansk T. If after all of this you're still feeling the dog head to the best restaurant in town. The world's northernmost McDonald's unfortunately there's no reindeer Burger or cloud very mcflurry Lori but there is a little plaque next to the counter that testifies to the outlets distinction if you do remember is medicinal according to local Doctors Fassi comforting. Bright Foods are the best way to make it through the polar night for monocle in Murmansk. I'm the see I met.

Murmansk Russia Arctic Circle Monaco Moscow Dan Paris London Lakers Berlin Cloud Burri Berry Andhra Mcdonald Lori Morowski
After prank gone wrong, Corona man charged with murder in deaths of 3 teens

KNX Evening News

01:02 min | 7 months ago

After prank gone wrong, Corona man charged with murder in deaths of 3 teens

"A capital murder case has been filed against a corona man accused of intentionally ramming a car full of teens causing a collision that killed three of them after they pulled a dang it dong at DH prank the map is now facing three counts of murder and three counts of attempted murder authorities say the sixteens were having a sleepover one was there to do a doorbell ditch they drove to a house nearby rang the bell ran back to the car and took off prosecutors say forty two year old underdog Chandra who lives there got in his car and chased after them on to Moscow canyon road near trilogy parkway he allegedly round the teen's car seats feeler tenet David Yoplait said earlier this week the collision because the teen driver lose control and slammed into a tree witnesses they came for and the subsequent investigation we're able to determine that if it was an intentional act the three boys who died in Sunday's crash were all sixteen years old the eighteen year old driver and two other boys ages thirteen and fourteen suffered non life threatening injuries CHP officers arrested tundra at its home a few hours after the crash Chandra is in custody and awaiting

Murder Chandra David Yoplait Moscow Canyon CHP
Pokemon Sword & Shield DLC: Here's Every Returning Pokemon Confirmed So Far

Gamepinions

01:56 min | 7 months ago

Pokemon Sword & Shield DLC: Here's Every Returning Pokemon Confirmed So Far

"Been a lot of news this week and we're going to just hop into the The first just a bit of it here and it is Nintendo and they had an intendo direct. This week is more or less a pokemon direct. I mean literally was a Pok Mon direct And they revealed pokemon sword and shield expansion pass. And for what. I'm what I think. I wrote this down correctly for forty five dollars. There's your adventure continues with pokemon sword expansion pass containing new stories to experience new pokemon to encounter and wild called areas to explore. You'll even meet new and returning legendary pokemon along the way. The expansion packs contains two expansions releasing in winter. Twenty twenty and in Spring of two thousand twenty respectively gotTa throw in respectively the following the L. C. is included the isle of Armor Scheduled to release these by thirty. Well man they jacked up the the dates for this or are you talking about expansions I mean and how fast is it to get through that game. Well it's is you know from what I've gathered. It's pretty. It's a pretty easy game so I I think your sister said she got there quickly. Yes she said she just kind of like they just want money for expansions. I kinda cheated. Then I know But so basically The Isle of Armor is scheduled to release by June thirtieth twenty twenty The Crown Tundra era scheduled to release by November thirtieth at twenty twenty. I don't know why they had include that again. But they needed to and so this year basically like into year yes yes towards mid to end. Maybe I mean our garage so purchase benefits when you purchase the Pokemon Sword Expansion Pass.

Twenty Twenty Nintendo The Crown Tundra
Boston police suspend officer accused of writing fake ticket

WBZ Midday News

00:48 sec | 7 months ago

Boston police suspend officer accused of writing fake ticket

"A Boston police officer is on unpaid leave after allegedly sending a fake ticket to a driver and that's not all try fighting this I dare you that's what the hand written notes said to the driver reads along with a seven hundred and eighty dollars citation the alleged victim did fight it appealing and the court could find no record of state police writing that ticket but the investigation found it appeared to come from Boston police officer Christopher Curtis's ticket book the driver who got the ticket recall being aggressively delegated by a Toyota tundra on ninety three north of the city Curtis unusually denied being the center of the citation or the driver of the Toyota but sell records allegedly show he was in the area and he owns a Toyota matching the description Curtis hired in twenty seventeen is off the job

Officer Christopher Curtis Toyota Tundra Toyota Boston
Pokemon Sword & Shield's Expansion DLC Explained

Giant Bombcast

05:05 min | 7 months ago

Pokemon Sword & Shield's Expansion DLC Explained

"Poke them on the announce a season pass poke expect. DLC POK MON at them do they call it an expansion passing a season pass. Okay so this is the first time that they are foregoing making a third game or sequels to the existing games and just strips doing post game content. which is I personally? Think is very neat and like a good direction for them to move afford because it was kind of a slog to have to start from the very beginning to get all the new stuff. What's an example of a previous generation? Like what are the two uh-huh after game diamond and Pearl would be the original games. And then they'd release pokemon platinum or or like red and blue but then there was yellow. Yeah okay or black tube way to Omega Son et Cetera et CETERA. And I am A. I'm glad because now you can just jump straight into it and they're air for their releasing expansions for thirty dollars versus a whole release in a bunch of people are pooh-poohing as like. Oh this stuff that could have been in the game but that will never die that will that will never die so for thirty dollars you'll get these two expansion passes time for deals exists exists. Oh boy well actually So I'll of arms coming in June of this year with a and then Crown Tundra later in the fall and you're going to get like a new rival a new master or like a bunch of other characters. Interact with this new map map. The wild area right kind of like the wild area area. It seemed like they were also on top of adding more to the wild area. There'd be like another town to visit possibly another gym maybe a couple of gyms but they're adding new legendary pokemon. There were missed in the original release of this releasing cub Fu which will evolve into earth she fou- and has two different forms and They're releasing like a balloon. Dear thing named cowl racks which grant psychic. It's pretty exciting. 'cause that ever been done before. Yes okay. Yeah it's been it's been done before but the exciting part is they're bringing I'm back all of the legendary is and a couple select. Poke him on from the previous generations that they were saying like. Oh they're never coming back in two hundred pokemon or something something on roughly two hundred including legendary so that pairs down that number two. Maybe like one fifty ish but still like a good chunk and they teased dowd. Designs designs but models of existing pokemon. That would be coming back and it's a lot of. It is fan favorites that got skipped out on And I think it's pretty fucked. Need a bunch of cosmetics on top of that next. Those Pok Mon will be like even. If you don't buy the passes you can still use them so you can pull them out of your box if you have them yes or you can trade for to get them and that's stuff. So yeah so the language was if you do not want to buy the expansion pass vehemently against it or you know you just can't buy whatever you can't trade it from pokemon home or you can receive it in game from other players so you know if you you aren't in a place where you can play the expansions you can at least through trading surprise trading or whatever come across these POK MON or even battle I'm assuming that's kind of cool. Yeah it seems like a nice modern direction for a percent. It's like you know instead of doing the shirt g game game or whatever it's like okay we're GONNA put. DLC into the main game like a modern solution to the weird nicest used to do it. I see these kind of hardcore like legacy. Japanese Games Adopting these methods instead of just kind of sticking with this evolving. Yeah yeah say yeah okay. I'm really excited about it. It's funny the competitive. pokemon world loved D- Exit. Actually because a lot of the POKEMON that would be complete tears in these scene gene. We're like suddenly ejected out. Oh let me and it was actually like a nice opportunity for them to rebalance the basics but now with some of those being reintroduced traduced shaking things up which is which is interesting. It's great I like it a lot. I keep people on their toes in the competitive pokemon seeing a one hundred percent. Those hooligans run on wild to destroy the Meta rebuild it exactly. I love it if they said anything. I don't think there's anything in the direct I guess but like the performance of that wild areas still still pretty. Yeah are they actually put into more water They released a patch the same day as the direct I personally haven't noticed. Any performance changes or whatever and a lot of it was just content stuff nothing performance wise which is which is a bummer. Yeah you want that place for as much as presenting to perform well when you're interacting with a bunch of people but it's still kind of

Crown Tundra Pearl Dowd
"tundra" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

04:17 min | 7 months ago

"tundra" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Tacoma and tundra models as well as some twenty nineteen Avalon corolla models Toyota says is still developing repairs and owners should be notified by mid March Chuck C. written ABC news life threatening injuries to a man hit by a car in Drake it last night police say the man was dry try to cross the street outside of Duncan when he was hit by an S. U. V. the victim flown to tufts Medical Center the driver of the SUV is cooperating with police in Drake AT and two people nineteen and twenty years old are ejected from their vehicle during a rollover in Methuen last night one of those victims pan underneath the car it happened on route one thirteen both of them take it a little general hospital with serious injuries one now listed in stable condition the other in critical condition the never ending saga known as bridge gate finds its way to the U. S. of in court you may recall back in two thousand thirteen a couple lanes were shut down on the George Washington bridge in New Jersey causing huge traffic jams turns out those closures were done by two officials tied to then governor Chris Christie as a way to punish the mayor of Fort Lee New Jersey for not endorsing Christie's reelection today the country's highest court will decide whether Bridget and Kelly and bill Baroni should spend any time in prison also before the High Court today women's handbags CBS legal analyst Thane Rosenbaum with the update the Supreme Court will hear oral argument in a trademark infringement case involving a retail store that sells handbags and a manufacturer of magnetic fasteners the manufacturer discover that a number of handbags made with counterfeit fasteners were being sold in the market the infringement of the trade mark is not the issue here but rather what is the remedy a damage award where the actual profits that were unjustly gamers trademark infringement case comes from Connecticut it is eight eighteen and thirty seven degrees in Boston no sunshine today it's all clouds but mild temperatures into the middle forties little bit later on Cambridge becomes the fourth community in Massachusetts to ban the use of facial recognition technology the city is joining a small but growing number of community stepping up to protect people from intrusive tack Brookline north Hampton Somerville of already passed similar band Springfield is waiting in the wings to a bill before the state house would establish a statewide moratorium on facial recognition technology well this is a scandal that many say helped fuel the opioid crisis in America the first punishment in a pharmaceutical bribery trial is handed down in Boston federal court details now from W. B. C.'s Kim Tunnicliffe Michael gari stood silently as the judge sentenced him to thirty three months in prison for his role in the insists bribery scheme he also has to forfeit three point six million dollars hill's self report to prison on February twenty fifth before sentencing curry apologize to all the victims who were hurt by the over prescribing of the Sentinel spray substance three of those victims got up and spoke talking about how the drug nearly ruined their lives the prosecution told the judge the entire scheme bribing doctors to prescribe subsystem to people who didn't need it would have failed if it worked for Gary's unit that unit was created to lie to insurance companies so that they would pay for the drugs Kevin Tunnicliffe WBZ Boston's news radio twenty now a passenger jet bound for Australia lands in Hawaii instead after a man dies during that flight the thirty eight year old was reportedly not feeling well prior to take off now Ben autopsy will be conducted more than two hundred passengers on the Air Canada flight were instead forced to stay in Honolulu overnight and a medical emergency because as one of the world's largest passenger jets to land in Maine first responders got together in Bangor International Airport to unload the passenger from the Emirates Airbus flight from do by they needed some extension ladders to do that no word on the passenger's condition the flight was able to continue on to its destination of JFK airport in New York City traffic worse than ever lately it's now you breaking down this often do you resisting for almost every week and you are right.

Tacoma corolla
Toyota recalls nearly 700K vehicles to fix faulty fuel pumps

WBZ Morning News

00:25 sec | 7 months ago

Toyota recalls nearly 700K vehicles to fix faulty fuel pumps

"A recall on the way for drivers of some of the most popular vehicles in the U. S. Toyota is recalling some seven hundred thousand vehicles in the U. S. because the fuel pumps could fail causing the engine to stall the company says that could increase the risk of a crash the recall covers certain twenty eighteen and twenty nineteen Lexus models twenty eighteen and twenty nineteen Toyota four runner Camry Highlander land cruiser sequoia Sienna Tacoma and tundra

Toyota Lexus Highlander
Toyota recalls nearly 700K vehicles to fix faulty fuel pumps

WBZ Morning News

00:25 sec | 7 months ago

Toyota recalls nearly 700K vehicles to fix faulty fuel pumps

"A recall on the way for drivers of some of the most popular vehicles in the U. S. Toyota is recalling some seven hundred thousand vehicles in the U. S. because the fuel pumps could fail causing the engine to stall the company says that could increase the risk of a crash the recall covers certain twenty eighteen and twenty nineteen Lexus models twenty eighteen and twenty nineteen Toyota four runner Camry Highlander land cruiser sequoia Sienna Tacoma and tundra

Seahawks ready for game against Packers

Inside Out with Tami Michaels

00:50 sec | 7 months ago

Seahawks ready for game against Packers

"Seahawks ready for the playoff match up in Green Bay and head coach Pete Carroll says part of the reason is that they got a chance to practice out of the cold Thursday before he left for the frozen tundra the weather was just right for us the it was a really good opportunity get out the temperature was about five degrees in game time you know what it looks like you sell more we feel really good about getting a chance to you know get that come in that regard the record grade twelves were outside of the mac yesterday to see the team off to the airport including Michael Scott who says it's fun to see all the support from all all these these plans plans plans and and and then then then later later later when when when you you you see see see pictures pictures pictures from from from on on on the the the bus bus bus and and and you you you see see see players players players go go go on on on this this this is is is the the the reception reception reception we we we get get get when when when we we we lose lose lose it's it's it's it's it's it's awesome awesome awesome I I I think think think it's it's it's great great great support support support and and and just just just like like the the twelves aren't worried about the weather here coaches saying he's not worried about stone Wisconsin interfering with their Saturday workout game time tomorrow Seattle time at three forty snow and very cold is possible in the

Seahawks Green Bay Pete Carroll Michael Scott Wisconsin Seattle
Dissecting Trump's Twitter 'Diplomacy'

Monocle 24: The Globalist

09:37 min | 7 months ago

Dissecting Trump's Twitter 'Diplomacy'

"Their Israeli for better unusually for worse no more enthusiastic proponent of twitter diplomacy in US President Donald Trump joining us now to dissect a representative few of trump's interestingly punctuated blurts. Is Brian Close political scientist. I author and Washington Post columnist by way of imbuing trump's tweets with a finesse. The ill deserve. They are read by foreign desk producer. You'll engulf on any and all grammatical infelicitous of the fault of the author not the narrator September fifteenth two thousand nineteen mystery missiles target. Saudi oilfields Saudi Arabia. Oil Supply was attacked. There's reason to believe that we know the culprit are locked and loaded depending on verification but are waiting to hear from the kingdom as to who they believe was the cause of this attack and under what terms we would proceed. This is amazing tweet because this is the second time that Donald Trump has issues locked and loaded. The first was when he was saying that he was about to attack North Korea. And it just shows you know the twitter diplomacy made on the fly where nobody believes what trump obsess anymore. You know that He. He is a saying who's behind the attack. People are questioning that and then you have. This claim that he's about to attack them which people again are questioning with good reason that his twitter threats are increasingly erratic and also unfounded and never backed up October. First two thousand seventeen reaching out to Kim Kim Jong UN being nasty Rotman hasn't worked in twenty five years. Why would it work now? Clinton failed. Bush failed and Obama failed. I won't fail. I love this tweet. For several reasons I is that he's has been nice to rocket man hasn't worked in twenty five years. Kim Jung took office in two thousand eleven. So penalized him when he was a child probably wasn't going to be a very fruitful way of conducting diplomacy anyway Clinton and Bush of course did not even deal with Kim Jong into any point and then the second layer of this of course is saying that being nice to him hasn't worked it won't work now. Well trump said that he was in love with Kim Jong Hoon after this tweet so I would classify that as being nice and then finally. I won't fail well. I mean what's happened. Since trump's multiple summits with Kim Jong is that Kim has gotten a massive boost international national profile and legitimacy by meeting with President without any preconditions and has simaltaneously ramped up the missile program and the nuclear capability which is the only point of involving involving Kim Jong UN and diplomacy so there are many many problems that tweets but my favorite one is the idea that trying to have diplomatic relations with a three year. Old Somehow didn't work. July thirtieth two thousand nineteen trade wars are good apparently and easy to win. China is doing very badly worst year in twenty seven was supposed supposed to start buying our agricultural product now no signs that they are doing so that is the problem with China they just don't come through. Our economy has become much much larger than the Chinese economy is last three years. Where do you start with the stuff of it? The idea that the US economy has eclipsed the Chinese economy in the last three years because because of trump is an amazing claim. And then the other thing. That's sort of unspoken this tweet but if you know trump's tweets really jumps out to you is the number of times that he contradicts himself so he constantly says things on twitter like China has just announced that they are going to be buying massive amounts of soybean from a great Patriot farmers and then a week or two who later. He has this tweet where he says. Effectively they're not actually doing it and then he'll come back and make the same claim again and so it's this sort of whiplash that twitter allows him to get away with because his base. Here's this they think okay China's now going to buy some soybeans well. The people in his twitter base are not the people who are actually selling soybeans. So they don't know if it's happened and they believe him and he can get away with it and this is where I think. Twitter diplomacy also bleeds into domestic politics. Where you end up having a lack lack of accountability because you can just shoot off a claim everybody moves on and then it's like it never happened when it's false? I think that the trade war stuff though is also indicative of how miscalculation can be very dangerous because China is actually reading these tweets trying to make not just sense of them but make policy based on them and they have no idea what it means. I mean it's riddled with Typos and grammatical errors. And then you know. They're they're scratching their their chins sort of saying will two weeks ago. He seemed to be happy with President. Then she now he's not and this causes again. Miscalculation which is I think the name of the game for twitter diplomacy July eighth two thousand nineteen some thoughts on Brexit and on the. UK's outgoing going. I'm blessed to the. US have been very critical about the way the UK and Prime Minister Theresa May Handle Brexit. What a mess? She and her representatives have created. I told her how it should be done but she decided to go another way. I didn't know the ambassador but he's not liked or well within the US we will no longer deal with him. The good news for the wonderful United Kingdom is that they will soon have a new prime minister. While I thoroughly enjoyed the magnificent state visit last month it was the queen who I was most impressed with so this tweet I think unveil some of the other problems with twitter when it comes to diplomacy and that is that statements of national importance is can be made without vetting. You know if there was actually communicate from the White House in the past this would have gone through a series of different advisors it would have been checked and the first instance in which trump trump tweeted about theresa. May He misspelled her name and accidentally tagged somebody with I believe one hundred sixty twitter followers. So you know. It's not exactly a crack team at the White House when it comes comes to twitter but then beyond this when he says she didn't go the way that I said what he's actually talking about according to the UK government is his suggestions that she sued the the European European Union as a way to solve brexit which his maybe it's ludicrous it's idiocy it's not going to work and then you have sort of the basic ignorance that comes out of these types of tweets. Were win actually. Trump arrives in the UK and gets pressed on various tweets though ask him questions and the followup about say is the NHS on the table the National Health Service on table in trade negotiations and he doesn't know what it is and this is again. You know this is the problem when you can make a statement you interfere in the affairs or politics of an allied country country and have no idea what. You're talking about October sixteenth two thousand eighteen taking Saudi Arabia's word for it just spoke with the Grand Prince of Saudi Arabia who totally denied any knowledge of what took place in their Turkish consulate. He was with Secretary of State. Mike Pompeo during the call and told me that he has already started and will rapidly. Expand fanned a full and complete investigation into this matter. Answers will be forthcoming shortly. This is of course about Jamal Kashogi who's a fellow columnists the Washington Post just before he was murdered and dismembered by the Saudi government which then led to a series of attempted cover ups by the Saudi government's with trump's help where he tried to sweep it under the rug. And and say you know they don't know anything about it and provide political cover to the Saudis and I think you know. This is the dark side of twitter where you can very quickly spread. What is clearly misinformation in pursuit of diplomatic relationship where trump clearly values for a variety of reasons whether it's strategic reasons or his financial conflicts of interest with the Saudi Kingdom? And you know a different president a pre twitter era first off would not have made the statement and secondly would have waited till the facts came out before staking the credibility of the White House on something something that was going to be very quickly debunked. I mean one of the famous examples during the Kashogi investigation was the idea that he had left the consulate. When the Saudis put a body double in clothes it was similar to Shoji's but forgot to change his shoes I mean it was amateur hour and for the US president in the White House to be affiliated with it because of such sporadic in a quick quick tweets was just embarrassing for the credibility of the United States August? Twenty of two thousand nine hundred an attempt at humor accompanied by a mockup of a trump trump casino on the Tundra. I promise not to do this degree land so this is a a photo shopped photo of trump property a trump hotel in greenland amongst a sort of sparse looking fishing village. And I think this is well is one of those moments where you have trump make a comment in the sort of real oh world right off off of cyberspace where he says. Maybe we'll buy greenland and then it sparks. This whole controversy of how Silva's claim is this proposal etc and and then he tries to make light of it as though it was a joke to begin with on twitter. But I think that this is also important in highlighting the risks of twitter in terms of photoshop or doctored images and trump did this with greenland as joke and there was obviously a joke. But there's other times where he's done and hasn't been a joke so he has sent tweets where they have basically doctored video video of Jim Acosta the CNN reporter who was temporarily banned from the White House looking more aggressive than he was because they speed it up his arm movement yeah right and this went throughout the conservative twitter sphere. Very very quickly. You can imagine something like that happening in diplomacy to. That's the big risk is that as deep technology for example fake videos that look very convincing or photo shopped images or any sort of disinformation campaign actually gets promoted by governments and by presidents presidents. That's where we answered very very dangerous territory and this type of stuff. I mean again when you think about the combination of Dr Video doctored images all being promoted by trump trump with no regard for the facts and the lack of credibility that he already has how much more dangerous it gets when you try to make sense of as a foreign diplomat Brian. Close thank you

Donald Trump Twitter Kim Kim Jong Un United States White House Saudi Arabia United Kingdom Kim Jong China Washington Post Kim Jong Hoon President Trump Theresa May Kim Jung Prime Minister Saudi Government Scientist Oil Supply Producer
"tundra" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

04:28 min | 8 months ago

"tundra" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Welcome to our frozen tundra yeah it is cold out there I hope you're not too well you've warmed up a little bit I hope well I think I'd better understand why you're best friends with Carol Burnett now after watching lots of tales and stories about my my good chum she's also a good mother to my daughter with to my right books and she's been of come for years yeah talk more about Carol and more of your co stars and your amazing films and your life and your amazing new book homework that route with your daughter Emma we'll talk about all of those things many of you have filled out cards and also submitted questions I have them somewhere here in my pocket there are many many more we're going through right now we'll get to those in not just a little while but to start off talking about your your early years your book covers your motion picture period of nineteen sixty three to basically nineteen eighty six but I just want to touch a little bit on the early years because one of the things that really struck me and watching the montage was you were so young when you start it if you were a teenager on Broadway yeah I will and so so lucky to be there absolute Johnson that was phenomenal and I was about seven I guess dean when my stepfather who is new in my life and I was not very fond of him new new step dad of course I loved my dad and didn't want anybody else around but to he was a fine tenor and at my mother was a wonderful pianist and together they had avoided will act and toured all over England and he sang she played for him and he decided for some reason that I think was to do with my school closings due to the escalation of World War two he decided to give me some singing lessons to sort of keep me quiet so to speak and discovered they discovered that I had this kind of freak voice which you heard which could you know dogs would howl for miles around when I when I went up to those high notes and it was kind of unusual for a about seven years old younger he's very quickly it passed me on to his wonderful singing teacher with whom I've studied until she passed away she was a wonderful teacher a dramatic soprano and she gave me older technique that that I needed and then some and at lessons off to lessons and so on but the voice just kept improving and improving and about twelve I made my first debut and the S. then from then on just two would endlessly with my parents for awhile around and around and around England at least six or seven times completely round and I didn't know if it was going to stand me in good stead what was I doing it was it where was it going to lead and I couldn't imagine a where it would lead but of course it led eventually to Broadway and then eventually by miracle to Hollywood and the Hollywood years of what the new book is all about the first book I did was about eleven years ago and that was simply cold Houghton and so home and then homework because that's what I had to do in order to catch up with old it was happening yeah well we're to talk about all that on to your question I know to be easy as the interviewer tonight I say put a quarter in and let her go that's about it yeah.

"tundra" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"tundra" Discussed on 710 WOR

"If you do that tundra and thousands of times over forty years, you get a lot of experience of you have a busy medical practice of a lot of experience that if you see patients and try to understand what's happened to them. You get a lot of experience. And that's why experiences so wonderful valuable and how it makes doctors so helpful to other people. And that's of course, why I went to medical schools to be helpful to other people. So talk about a woman who came here from Ukraine's interesting, which is born in Ukraine's, the former Soviet Union than right after the war, and then she moved to Lithuania for better quality of life, and she taught English there. So she. Came from eastern Europe with this perfect English American accent. And she's seventy two years old. She came with her son should a handsome son, and obviously a devoted son. And well, this is her stories you seen by gynecologist because chevette discharge and the Ghana college saw mass in the Jain. And then he examined the rectum and found the mass and the rectum and anus area. And the patient choosing was sent to guest on rollin just who's a specialist in the gastrointestinal tract. And the patient was advised to have colonoscopy which is scheduled for next week. I saw this woman yesterday. So so super fresh in my mind should been seen by Ghana college. Young college is shut an amer-. I in them, right? Should amass in the anus and vagina and rectal area. And should fin having bleeding for months. She has some discomfort. She's not sexually active. She's has difficulty. Moving her bowels most likely because this big mass in the area of the rectum the innocent of China. All those areas are very close to each other. In fact, the rectum and the anus and the China really share a wall the wall between the rectum and the and the vagina. So the back of China is facing the front part of the rectum, and her weight is one hundred sixty pounds. Shows. No, headaches, shows difficulty, passing stools, says difficulty defecating, and well, she's had trouble sleeping because of this. And while she saw surgeon who wanted to remove her anus or rectum or vagina. And she, of course, did not want that to happen. She said was planning to see gastroenterologist this coming week, and she came to me for consultation. And I saw her yesterday. I examined her and her story exactly as I've told you examined or just as huge mass in the vagina and the rectum and the anal area and so- worse mass because it's so extensive, and in fact, she didn't know it. But one of the doctors even did a biopsy on her and found a squamous carcinoma. Of that area. And they're already proposing surgery to remove her anus and rectum and a Jain which is quite a radical surgery. I think anyone would say it's quite a radical surgery and never staged her up. They never looked beyond that Mariah the local area them, right? Was only the pelvic area. And so what did we do? The I got blood tests and cancer markers. And we talk about that commonly. We wanna make sure there's ways to measure the cancer and understand the cancer better. And we also have mmediately immediately obtain the best possible staging tests, which I believe would be a pet scan and the pet scan shows activity already in the inguinal lymph nodes inguinal lymph nodes are those flows right between the leg the trunk on either side of the genitalia, so sor- pets game was positive there and the physical exam like I described and well, I saw her before the.

China Ghana college Ukraine Soviet Union Europe Lithuania gastrointestinal tract rollin Mariah one hundred sixty pounds seventy two years forty years
"tundra" Discussed on Psychedelic Salon

Psychedelic Salon

06:48 min | 1 year ago

"tundra" Discussed on Psychedelic Salon

"The seventeenth century model of how historical processes work because history for thousands of years has pushed toward the kind of super self transforming momentum that we now. Have we have we are up to take off speed? And in fact, the end of the runway is a head of us. We don't have a choice about take off. We have reached take Steve speed. And now there is nothing left to do. But grab the stick and pull it back and closure is and hope because if we don't make that commitment to the planetary process. The end of the runway is thirty five years in front of us. I mean, that's it. There is no more. So there has to be a a perturbation a Tommy and catastrophe that hurls us into an entirely new cultural milieu. Well, I maintain that the catalysts for this have been present on the earth for eons, and that culture has. Taken a vacation in to dominate her models and egocentric models and materialistic models and models, which flatten and simplify and distort. And fuck life out of reality that you know, we are seeing what the Faustian price we had to pay for the terrific understanding of matter that the tools of Greek science have betrayed into our hands. Yes, we can bring the power which lights the stars and ignited in the desert of our planet. And if necessary knighted over the cities of our real or imagined enemies, yes, we can generate the bare-bottom coir can machines the mile and a half across the us as much actresses. Is produced in the entire United States for few seconds. We have gained a tremendous facility over matter. And in our naive Tate when we made that Faustian pact back there around the time of failing. We didn't realize that the price would be to lose contact with our souls, and this is what we have done. And now, we cannot find it. And now, we need it. We need some kind of larger vector field into which to cast the human situation. So that we can see a way out of the mess that we have created. Well, I name tain the only way this can be done is by a return to the situation in prehistory. This is what I call the archaic revival that his. History is to be seen as the peregrination of kind of prodigal, son. And that now the peregrination must stand the prodigal son who is western humankind. And the episode democ tools that we have developed must now return to the human family outside of history. Which means the people who have been in the rainforests and on the Arctic tundra. They never left it. They kept the knowledge of this, hyper dimensional face space. But for them. It was always a domain of matching mystery and uncertainty. We actually bring something new to it. I am not saying that we must simply return to the old ways that I think we have something which can in ROY. Mitch the old ways that what we have learned about languages about mathematics, particularly this is what we perfected. Our pride is not in our science, which is destructive toxic childish, our pride is in our mathematics, which is an intimation of the trans dimensional object that is outside of historical face space, and the cast and enormous flickering shadow over the human enterprise, it is through mathematics through first of all the probability theory more recently things like fractionals and dynamic modeling. It is through these things that we are able to give a kind of imperial grounding to our visions because what what we see in our visions is not. Hallucinations? What we see in our visions is the higher truth. And we have never faced this in act. This is what we repress hallucinations are devalued the phenomena of the mind are called subjective. This is a knock, you know. When you call something subjective. It means it's inconsequential, or it's a matter of opinion. We don't realize the primacy of mind. So our value systems are in need of reconstruction. I think what lies ahead for us as a planetary cultured. Once the agenda of the archaic revival is fully in place. As it must inevitably be is a culture reared in the imagination. That this is what the petition for completion in the realm of EPA genetic, coding, and art, and engineering and thought and poetry all this will coalesce into a domain of art. This is what hyperspace is you? See novelty become so Khun crest that there can be no more of it in historical space time..

Hallucinations United States Steve Arctic tundra EPA Tate Mitch thirty five years
"tundra" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

04:49 min | 2 years ago

"tundra" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Talk on the train. I can do. I can do anything for you. If you want. I can do the southern Frankenstein for you. Can you do an Irish one Irish sure a Dublin? Frankenstein. Yes. Gotcha. Okay. Okay. Maybe like palmetto Ston. Maybe something deep insult trialist. Really good. You think like is Andy. Actor can do is be able to be fluent in in being able to a great tool. It's a great tool, especially in the program. I did at the university of Minnesota Guthrie BFA training program. They they give you all these dialects, and they train you to do classical a huge repertoire of things often like British RPG or some sort of thing and. Is like what you would hear in pride and prejudice or fence insensibility, something a little more proper old school, not really spoken, the common English tongue now and the way you do that is to just practice and say it out loud and do parts. Is that what you do? Valid sounds you Linda, simple changes and as long as you're consistent. You can fool most people. Yeah. But yeah, it's it's pretty simple. You got to turn your tongue a little bit. Sometimes because summer weird some, you know, sometimes you're thick and your accent. It's hard to shake. Yes. It is. I can do no other sides. I know no Ryan in this plane with fire. So are we like in set the stage for us of where we are like in the world, and what's happening is that olden days of eighteen hundred or when? Okay. Oh, yes. So it's definitely eighteen hundreds and the place starts in the North Pole. That's an Arctic tundra. You see two men in full coats to standing in this desolate wasteland with this huge, gorgeous rock ice sculpture. And the whole thing really takes place in the Arctic tundra. And throughout the story. You get these fever dream flashback memories that burst into the space. And that's where you meet me. Young victor. Young doctor, Dr Victor Frankenstein. Thank you. Respect on the back. So it really weaves throughout the Geneva, Switzerland as well as English dot, which is where Victor Frankenstein studies. Does all the galvanise anatomy as well. As physics, and he combines all these these schools of thought in these about wells of knowledge into this one creation. But really the whole thing revolves around these two men in the Arctic kind of having this very cerebral philosophical discussion about morality and the responsibility of a creator. And as a scientist, just because you can does it meet new, should, you know? So I think for people who who know the book, they'll be really pleased with the intellectual discourse that takes place. I think I think they'll be in for a real treat for a real treat of of a monster. That's really highly intellectual and not the arc Frankenstein. But to Mary Shelley's novel turn crap for writing this book. For being a woman and right writing. I mean, I just wonder for the time if if that caused a hullabaloo, if you know, well, I know that she was you know, she was in the company of other great writers like Lord Byron. I'm who's maybe one of the famous names right is at the time and her husband Percy, Shelley and this novel the story came about when they were kind of famously in like in Switzerland. And there's a stormy night and their challenged each other to write the best like spooky ghost story kind of thing. And I don't think anyone in that room would have guessed that Mary Shelley's was the one hundred years. Must've been gone when because it's just this year that we're celebrating the two hundred two hundredth anniversary of the book of Frankenstein. You know, writing the book, and then regionally she it was published under another name or anonymous. And then people thought her husband wrote it and she didn't get credit. But then she did get finally get credit. And she, you know, it's a classic. We you must sit around I must've been gone. But I know that story about the three writers and scary. And she just had the best idea. Yeah. And it took the climate of the time that they're writing in science was really evolving like there was this whole shift of. Yeah. She's really writing about the technologies at the time of people really like French revolution. So real thing is referenced in the book and rent I in our show that people were taking the decapitated heads of the French nobility in applying static electricity to reanimate. And they were they were and then they would be burned alive because it was, you know, this sacrilegious thing to touch the body to deal with a dead body this way. So there's really wrapped up in what was going on in her world. Live..

Mary Shelley Frankenstein Dr Victor Frankenstein Arctic tundra Victor Frankenstein Switzerland Ryan palmetto Ston Dublin university of Minnesota Lord Byron Geneva Linda North Pole scientist Percy one hundred years
"tundra" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"tundra" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"But he we went to movie and he he has a brand new chevy tundra like nickel began out any went to lock it would lack and he said i john what do won't back and he's running what do you think is still running and how many running and we must be running in exactly that it was so silent but it was gone but he can't you can block it a lot you don't let the cars you know but his wouldn't last if it was so funny but i think it's a great idea and you know my mom has a brand new toyota rav four she'll be ninety one on and yeah i i worry i worry about presided curious will right but much less at the times is people leave the key fob in the car so let's take a scenario where you've got the key fob in the car and you don't take that with you.

tundra toyota chevy
"tundra" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"tundra" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Forty seven jeff wagner double t m j michelle in grafton hi michelle i got this is funny because i would have thought what is the cannot hear it funding up ritchie teak and then i went out to dinner i've an avalanche of course you can hear it when iran but it's older ami i love my car yeah and you can't walk away if you put it your garage running you get out but he we went to a movie and he he has a brand new chevy tundra like the bells began out any money iraq it would lack and he said i was wrong what do you think it's still running and how many running and we must be with running and exactly like you said he was so silent but it was still on but he can't you can lock in lock you don't lock their cars with rocks you know but his wouldn't like it right but i think it's a great idea and you know my mom has a brand new toyota rav four and she will be ninety one time and yeah i i worry i worry about well right but much less not thanks to call me see here's the here's the thing for exempt the technology does exist ford for example they have they have this they say they've had this two thousand thirteen in their kilos automobiles and what they say they do is that if the if you walk away if you don't have the key fob in the car and it's more than thirty minutes the car automatically shuts off i think it would be a good idea to require that now let's be honest though that doesn't solve the problem completely because there's a couple of different things first of all any of that technology is going to be based on the key fob leaving the car right because i mean that that's what keeps the car running you know you're sitting in the car with the key fob what happens in michelle was alluding to this just a minute ago what happens a lot of the times is people leave the key fob in the car so so let's take a scenario where you've got the key fob in the car and you don't take that with you.

grafton tundra toyota ford jeff wagner michelle i iran chevy iraq thirty minutes
"tundra" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"tundra" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"Dr the jeep he told me i i drive a toyota tundra made in san antonio nice qualify yeah absolutely yeah in what you were saying talking plug by immigration yeah and so here you are as as far away from the us mexico border as you can be and still be in state of texas and the people in booker have this on their mind and they had just witness the deportation of an honor roll student at booker high school back to his country of origin and as conservative and republican and disconnected from the border as booker might be the people in booker absolutely got what's going on and they knew that they had invested in this young man in the property taxes it paid to finances education the quality of life in the community and just when he's about to produce a return in whatever he does the business he starts the people you hires the family he raises the quality he brings to that community he's been deported back to his country of origin where he probably doesn't speak the language may no longer have family and if he's successful against what i think are incredibly long odds he'll be successful there and not in booker and so they want him in their community they don't want a wall they get that especially if i share the facts that the us mexico border has never been more secure we've had the lowest levels of northbound up retentions very often their kids in if they are lucky their kids with their parents fleeing a salvadoran honduras and guatemala and there are presenting themselves to border patrol agents and customs officers not fleeing from them a wall will do nothing at a lotta texans that are on the border they do not want construction of a law in their backyard absolutely so maybe other people who aren't from texas won't get this but if you're in texas you understand the wall will not be built on the littoral usmexico border which is the centre line of the rio grande river chan can't build in a river you can't build in a river and and what you will see our walls built well into the interior of the united states were mission texas at a place where they are actually about to construct part of a.

toyota tundra texas booker booker high school honduras united states san antonio mexico guatemala rio grande river
"tundra" Discussed on Around the NFL

Around the NFL

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"tundra" Discussed on Around the NFL

"Support for today's show comes from square space rated start your new business why wait until the new year to start your plans and action the future is coming make it brighter with square space with beautiful templates created by worldclass designers square space makes it easy to turn your idea into a new and unique website and it's all optimized for mobile right out of the box there's nothing install patch or upgrade ever a dream this is mlk right this is a this is a human dream a dream is just a great idea that doesn't have a website yet make it reality with square space legend head to square space dot com for a free trial and when you're ready to launch use the offer code around to save ten percent off your first purchase of a website or domain that square space dot com offer code around round the jazz hain heading to the super bowl i'll go back to another edition of the around the nfl podcast presented by head and shoulders my name is dan hanson i'm joined by rebelled with heroes marc cecillon chris westlink and greg rosenthal what's up boys aiden last show and beautiful california before we up on a plane and fly into the tundra about that the frozen tundra that's see that's wisconsin bro i'm like that they don't like road i'm just trying to warm up to the idea that i'm staring at dan hands this wearing a dan hans this shirt a picture of himself on the short i love dan leads the fantastic am lead the alltime using the third person standings on this podcast like eighty seven two two this i don't know who has to about so wearing your own tshirt make sense now let's cleared up for the audience a little bit this shirt was a gift from a really talented illustrator his name is electric excuse electric i calm electric alexis frederick frost and he he actually sent us so this children's books that he illustrates it has since become jacks favorite book ever out so so check that out the book is called again a plug in their efforts going to come up.

dan hanson california super bowl i nfl chris westlink greg rosenthal aiden wisconsin frederick frost ten percent
"tundra" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

Part-Time Genius

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"tundra" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

"Officials actually had the chance to resolve the matter and they asked members of the cbs team if they could review the tape to confirm what had happened cbs obliged dan in doing so they actually came up with something that became indispensable in all sports the instant replay so that all started from the winter olympics no that's pretty cool i i guess you're accurate so 1960 was a pretty big year for the winter games but it actually one of my favorite innovations didn't come along until almost thirty years later it was in the eighty eight games in calgary and that was the year when the national research council of canada devised the special all weather olympic torch this was to be used in the traditional relay before the games and unlike previous torches this one was designed to be especially lightweight and it was powered by this special fuel that allow the flame to stay lit during its 88 day eleven thousand mile trip across the canadian tundra that's amazing across the tundra and actually reminds me of something i read about this year's olympic torch relay which is going on right now but apparently in december there was one leg where the torch was carried by the south korean robot named hugo wade is that allowed a thaw had people no we can't friendly and the best part was that he will use the power drill to cut a hole in a wall and then he passed the torch over to the inventor who created it had is a little bit ridiculous but i mean also a good reminder that the olympics can be pretty entertaining center especially when you add robots the mix which is something south korea is going all in on this year yeah you know i was reading about how they're ministry of science is working with these local companies and so they're rolling out new technologies all through the games like apparently they've been testing these multilingual an autonomous robots at the airports so they can guide visitors to correct gates or provide information about flight times and then when they are busy with gas they just roam around and clean things up that's awesome as of the hope is that the bucks can be put to work in pyongyang chang as a way to give visitors around this language barrier there as pretty knee and from everything i.

calgary canada hugo wade cbs dan olympics south korea pyongyang thirty years 88 day
"tundra" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"tundra" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is scientific americans sixty seconds science i'm emily swing when you look at satellite images that easy to pick out hurricanes desserts from the work of a certain semiaquatic rodent and the reason you can be reactivated from space it because they we even mark on a landscape can tape is an arctic ecologist at the university of alaska fairbanks to they make the pond and when upon forms of my idea was that you know we could we could in for it was a certain kind of pondering we could see a fever down there we could him for that you know beavers had moved into that area or moved out of that area if it took the deavere pond that ukraine tape and a team of other scientists used land sat satellite images that cover more than nineteen thousand square kilometers of arctic tundra in alaska we saw lots of new beaver ponds uh i we saw fifty six new beaver ponge formed between 1999 in 2014 beavers are considered keystone species which have an outsized effect on the recourses tim and i think it particularly true in the arctic because it's underlain by all the frozen ground he's talking about permafrost and what happens is when you start flooding permafrost areas permafrost starts to deteriorate and you know really the glue that with binding the soil to gather the holding a landscape together start stuff off keeping colleagues presented their findings december eleven at the annual conference of the american geophysical union he says the implications of beavers northward expansion are big imagine that you just dropped fifty six groundwater springs into art extreme environments right a groundwater spring in the arctic is a rare thing in its wake this of biologic activity a for fish spawning and things like that beavers may be following the northward expansion of vegetation onto the tundra but the other possible driver is rebound from heavy trapping a century ago if they contribute to the.

fever deavere pond alaska arctic american geophysical union university of alaska ukraine nineteen thousand square kilom sixty seconds
"tundra" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"tundra" Discussed on KTRH

"You well i have you cars onethird two thousand eleven nissan versa it has how hyperbolic and i'd still about four thousand on it never 2014 nissan central we have slow mileage and all about two thousand on it but i would like to do and one and asking your advice on is whether or not i should trade them both and on either like a certified new use or um truck fullsize from so you need a pickup instead of a car and you've got to cars and so the question is trade both cars in get them paid off in bob pickup threat okay what any any thoughts on what kind of pick up what brand the digital partial sun oh my friends are are recommending like m a tundra or like us so silverado something like fairly big just because i want that set luxury and feel to it you know what were the with a bit on back i love the tundra it's just when you drive a tundra you realize how big it is and it's just a huge truck and i mean you were you notice it is parking in making uturns and things like that are you gonna be hollinger towing anything not really um it's more for like i'm hauling like i like to flip furniture and things like that can really thought the trucks i i see personally you'd probably lacked the ride and drive of the silver auto better and there are some fantastic incentives right now on the silverados um all and they will be through the end of the year so you know i think it sounds like year probably okay in both your trade ends and then you you get a get car pro show special pricing on a new silverado dummy drive the two hundred and see what you think i don't wanna talk you out of it is just my experience with you know people who aren't used to drive in trucks that the the silverado just is is just big i mean that the tab of knowing the way put the tundra the tundra i'm sorry i describe it often as a threequarter turn pickup in a halfton body because as it's kinda what it.

nissan versa nissan hollinger threequarter
"tundra" Discussed on Showmakers

Showmakers

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"tundra" Discussed on Showmakers

"It's not like a very uh this is just not a hospitable place in general so it was but it was like a really good like diving into the deep and those kind of the first was the second really but uh the first video that was purpose built kind of around being shown in location yeah and and the where did you say there are kind of hotels okay um because it is a it's actually the the the title of the video was why the northernmost town of america exists because it's it's almost is kind of strangely large for being in such a kind of desolate please pray has like five five thousand inhabitant okay which for that far north is pretty large i mean it has grocery stores in wifi and it has delete multiple flights per day on like a jet from anchorage oh wow that's the brizo yeah is not hard to get too it's not like your you know walking across the arctic tundra for four days to get there or driving over the arctic tundra whatever else can fly they're very easily from from anchorage inn you know an hour and a half and three hundred bucks right radio now that was also kind of a reasonable but now i that video ended up being pretty popular because it was pretty cool i think um by no no not not really delighted anything cools because it was very cool location so were kind of think and i also didn't in collaboration with real life lower and the channel sect and second thought uh kind of looking how how we can up our game next year nia yeah because it.

wifi america four days
"tundra" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"tundra" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"To the frozen tundra this afternoon you wanna make sure you plan ahead fans heading the lambeau we'll have some construction projects to deal with on both i fortythree and brown manner to lock in cheboygan counties and i fortyone in brown and outta gamey counties the dot will have as many lines open as possible for tonight's game but they remind everyone that barrels will still be out and some of the lanes may be narrower than year you steal it's a good idea to adjust the tiny leave to take into account any slowdowns also you may want to have some alternate routes ready just in case you run into a backup teddy lazett got wtmj news a mountain of supplies waiting to get to puerto rico's storm victims he appears senator marco rubio of florida says he wants the us military to take charge of what he calls is shattered supply chain the only dynamic that will shift this is a significant surge uptick in the military presence it is the only organisation quite frankly in the war hold that is able to appear on scene and deal with these logistical challenges this is what they're trying to do in the battlefield and this is what most certainly what they are capable of doing that here at home the milwaukee film festival kicking off tonight nearly 300 films from forty different countries the ninth annual milwaukee film festival starts today the fuss vote growth as far exceeded my expectations executive director jonathan jackson couldn't be happier with the growth of the festival but it's not just the number of screenings offered our programmes for developing filmmakers for educating youth for community building for making milwaukee a destination and for the.

senator marco rubio florida us supply chain milwaukee cheboygan puerto rico executive director jonathan jackson
"tundra" Discussed on Rocky Mountain National Podcast

Rocky Mountain National Podcast

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"tundra" Discussed on Rocky Mountain National Podcast

"Natural banzai or something of super goes to the ground langley are old they mother nature data literally lockett sia yeah anywhere riddick and find a little bit a shelter from the windy from themselves um it's amazing a thick ingrown okay so alpine tundra rocky has a lot of alpined under route about alerted apart by a third of the park um in the park is just under a quarter million acres so a lot of areas of alpine tundra and i think one of the things that makes rocky so cool in unique is that we have this road that takes you right up in alpine tundra it's pave too you can see it in the summer when the road is open um and so when people dr enough that's what they're seeing um one thing that i wanna make sure we talk about so we'll talk about it now with alpine tundra so no trees can grow up here but other stuff can grow up here what other kind of things grow on alpine tundra and wind that grow yes so surprisingly i think to a lot of visitors um and even staff when they first start working here is how diverse the alpine tender is you know thirty five miles an hour in your car can kind of look like a lawn uh but when you stop and really spend some time taking a closer look there's actually over 300 plant species that make their home while in the m alpine tender here in the park yes emma of are endemic to higher elevations in this area so they're only found their only found kind of in a southern rocky mountains and then some of them are circum polio polar you'll find m a in tundra uh above the arctic circle you'll find him in other mountain regions in the world so it's it's a pretty cool mixed of plant species a lot of flowering plants which certainly is what draws a lotta people that come here up into the hail of asians in the summer issue the wildflowers yeah um and then it's just amazing how tiny and slow growing making be.

lockett million acres
"tundra" Discussed on Rocky Mountain National Podcast

Rocky Mountain National Podcast

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"tundra" Discussed on Rocky Mountain National Podcast

"You know a lot of permanently frozen ground that certainly i don't think is necessarily the case from a scientific standpoint today by when tundra was um kind of a initially used it was to describe a an area free of trees that had a lot apparently frozen ground um and then that either you know occurs where you are at a um you know really far north latitude ah in the northern hemisphere or your it of really high elevation which is of course what we have here in the park right okay so tundra place without trees that's due to temperature i guess instead of this sort of alpine tundra is because of alpine being high ovation right so it's exactly tudor civilization arctic tundra which grave yeah yes so if you want to find a uh tundra due to latitude you have to go very far north you're if you want to find tundra somewhere like colorado yussef to go up to in rocky were does tundra begin generally speaking what's the so generally speaking it occurs around eleven thousand eleven thousand four hundred feet no evasion uh in rocky in kind of in the in this region of the southern rocky mountains i certainly as you go further south tundra is found a higher elevations you go for the north it's found at lower elevations mean there's alpine tundra at the equator ram if mountains are high enough if it's tallinna exactly exactly the hour and denali national park for a while and i think there.

south tundra denali national park colorado eleven thousand eleven thousan