17 Burst results for "tristen McNeil"

"tristen mcneil" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

10:24 min | 1 year ago

"tristen mcneil" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Tristen McNeil but they were heading back to the grocery aisle for a closer look at all things cereal in the most whimsical or nutritionally questionable at all of this in every part of the complete breakfast then we'll dig into the weird stories and surprising facts behind our favorite brands as well as a few of the lesser known breakfast cereals that time forgot them a bit later we'll be joined by gave fun soccer is a TV writer and he spent more than a decade collecting childhood nostalgia in the form of vintage cereal boxes it's a fascinating collection yeah and he's also the host of this really fun you too serious because here real time which is the series on the subject of breakfast cereal I mean he's been doing it for a couple years now so I'm super excited to just hear how we got started yeah what will games among the most devout of cereal and through the years but he's definitely not alone in this meet lots of people love cereals and in the hundred and fifty plus years since it came out of the market cold breakfast cereal has become a staple for millions of people around the world and you know strangely this love affair got its start in the late nineteenth century kind of as an accident he knows this invention of fundamentalist Christians who were seeking to promote a healthy skin free lifestyle and much of this is it you know stories that people of her but it's still pretty interesting the the bland foods as you know like toasted corn and oats where they were sought to help suppress sexual urges and prevent arousal so this thinking led to the creation of a few notable foods including Graham crackers of course but the one that really caught on with the public was serial so Dr John Harvey Kellogg the superintendent of a sanitarium in battle creek Michigan and his younger brother well they stumbled upon the recipe for what would ultimately become corn flakes after allowing some of the cooked wheat to set out for too long the Kellogg's returned to find the weed have gone stale but rather than toss it out as you might think they what they decided to roll it out into thin flakes and then toast them and the corn flakes were a big hit with their patients to the Kellogg's decided to start marketing them to a broader public yen as interesting as the early history is it's pretty familiar by this point so instead of going deep on sanitary items and grape nuts we're gonna focus mostly on the second act of the serial story that's appeared from about nineteen fifty did the early nineties when marketing to children really took off and sugary cereals really began flooding grocery store aisles well before we dive into the colorful history I I thought we could take a quick look at the state of cereal today you know just by the numbers and a it's amazing how far Cerialis come from its early years as this niche product to the mammoth industry that it is now so just looking at the U. S. market alone the breakfast cereal industry now generates nearly ten billion dollars in annual revenue and that that's according to more to our intelligence could could you say more door to you know like a hobbit it's kind of jarring name if your lord of the rings fan but it's just a coincidence unfortunately event yeah like I was saying Americans lead the world in cereal consumption ranks fourth on the list of the top ten package goods sold in the U. S. and ninety two percent of American households by a box of cereal at least once a year we're not the only ones who love it Canada the U. K. Australia they all have zero markets that rivaled the size of our own and in recent years has also gained in places like China and India and Brazil in fact the breakfast cereal marketing industry rakes in about thirty five billion dollars in revenue each year from the farm markets so I when I took my kids to India last year I I remember waking up jet lagged the first day and they were already up watching cartoons and more wired on a bowl of chocolate Chaka is in all my years ago in India that we never ate breakfast cereals and we never eaten from the TV so it was always trying to see this American experience translated to India but you know sugar in green is obviously this winning combination but I have seen a few reports about sagging sales is more more people opt for you know either easier or healthier breakfast options of pop tarts or avocado toast or you know maybe a quick trip to the drive thru on the way to work and and of course there's this growing segment of the population that just doesn't eat breakfast period so when you're listing those easier and healthier options and you said pop tarts which one of the I'm guessing that's the easier they are delicious well is as big as the cereal industry as today there's no question that he used to be bigger according to NPR cereal consumption peaked right around nineteen ninety six I guess it was and deadly gone downhill ever since generally by a full percentage point each year and all the stuff you mention is definitely played a part in that decline it's really due to a combination of factors you for example back in nineteen ninety lawmakers passed the nutrition and labeling Education Act and that made it mandatory for all products to include the now commonplace list of nutrition facts on the packaging and this made it easier than ever for consumers to see the nutritional value or lack there of I guess and if they could look at this and all of their cereals now at this point and as more people became educated about just how much sugar and carbs they were eating or feeding to their kids yeah we started to think twice before tossing a box in the car whenever they with grocery store so I looked into just how sugary cereal can be and it's in the same like the whole cereal industry is around eight hundred sixteen million pounds of sugar in its products every year and apparently most of that's going into honey smacks if for some reason you're not out there that's the one with the cool frog wearing a backwards baseball cap on the box cutters are gonna be first honey smacks nine oh come on honey sexes are consistently ranked the worst serial for health because it has less than two grams of fiber per serving and its ingredients break down to almost sixty percent sugar he Steve but according to the environmental working group there's more sugar in one Cup serving of honey smacks and there isn't a hostess Twinkie No Way Out amazing sweet obviously I knew it wasn't good for you but honestly like that the taste of twenty six I wouldn't of gas yeah the most sugary cereal but it kind of makes my teeth hurt just thinking about that but you know that that sugar to fiber ratio might make us cringe but there's one particular cereal eating demographic that you're not gonna hear complaining about this and that's kids release my kids my kids there actually juror on there is this great Calvin and Hobbes where Calvin's eating his favorite cereal I think it's something like chocolate frosted sugar bombs and he gives Hobbes a try and hogs just are shaking gagging from the soonest and Calvin says actually they're kind of blandly scoops of sugar on what I find really interesting is how deeply ingrained the finest for breakfast cereal is and so many people in house so much that seems rooted in their childhood yeah I mean I say for most adults here leaders it's a big part of the allure minutes what you're saying about your kids there's these you know memories of watching Saturday morning cartoons with a big bowl of cap'n crunch in your hand or maybe indulging in a late night fix of lucky charms sitting in your college dorm I don't know who you're talking about right it's sort of a comfort food in a way I mean it takes us back to simpler days when most of us were a little more carefree about what we ate and why yeah so it missed out here is definitely a strong factor actually what are some of the weirdest discontinued zero as you can think of I was I think about this earlier and I remember seeing a Q. Bert zero when I was a kid Girona keeper in a video game character and and also eating one with mercury systems like my parents only really bother sugar cereals for maybe a year or two but I remember sampling some weird ones yeah I I mean I always thought it was completely bonkers that some cereals did even mask the fact that they were candy like you know Kellogg's that candy corn pops but even more blame than that there was a nerd ticked off that I never tried it zero by the way listeners I I just want a break for saying because will and I've been debating what the official candy of part time genius should be and what we're saying it should be atomic fireballs obviously and I was thinking nerds so if you have any thoughts on this please let us know on Facebook or Twitter but well you're right nerds serial is insane but looking back like the box was so cool it came in these two flavors just like the candies and you could pour orange out of one side and cherry out as in like who would let their kids violence it also is you wonder like if so much Israel's appeal is rooted in the past like what does this say about our future well you know there's a new generation of kids getting hooked on cereal now and many of them will stick with it into adulthood and that's part of the reason they're so many brands duking it out you know trying to get kids to eat the cereal is because people's breakfast routines tend to be the same you know pretty much every day but there's another point to consider and and those declining sales numbers we mentioned earlier also coincide with declining birthrates so you know it's it's not like the birth rate will ever drop to zero or anything like that but fewer kids does result in fewer serial fans obviously yeah it's it's funny that something that started out as health food became so dependent on selling sugar to kids but I I guess that's usually how it goes with food trends like someone with these very altruistic intentions gets the ball rolling hoping to better society and and then you know at a certain point the marketing team steps and yeah doctor Kellogg is to give lectures about his methods for leading a healthy lifestyle and he would sometimes get out the recipes for his cornflakes so that people could make them at home and at one talk he told the crowd you may say I'm destroying the health food business here by giving these recipes but I'm not after the business I'm after reform he did seem to believe in what he was selling sure but the problem is that the same could be said of his brother will call again and will tried for years to convince his brother add sugar to their serial believing it would add some flavor to what he called horse groups spent the tipping point came in the late forties when their competitor post cereals release sugar crisp so posted branched out beyond the health food market with its for sugar coated cereal and like it or not Kellogg kind of had to follow suit yeah but it's really post World War two that the industry started to focus on marketing directly to kids I mean cut companies had dabbled with these ads before including Kellogg's use of snap crackle and pop as the characters for rice Krispies and that marketing began in the nineteen thirties but even with cartoon gnomes pleading their case you need.

Tristen McNeil
"tristen mcneil" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

10:24 min | 1 year ago

"tristen mcneil" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Tristen McNeil but they were heading back to the grocery aisle for a closer look at all things cereal in the most whimsical or nutritionally questionable at all of this in every part of a complete breakfast and we'll dig into the weird stories and surprising facts behind our favorite brands as well as a few of the lesser known breakfast cereals that time for god little bit later we'll be joined by gave fun soccer he's a TV writer and he spent more than a decade collecting childhood nostalgia in the form of vintage cereal boxes it's a fascinating collection yeah and he's also the host of this really fine you teachers because the real time which is these theories on the subject of breakfast cereal I mean he's been doing for a couple years now so I'm super excited to just hear how we got started yeah what will games among the most devout of cereal enthusiast but he's definitely not alone in this meet lots of people love cereals and in the hundred and fifty plus years since it came out of the market cold breakfast cereal is become a staple for millions of people around the world and you know strangely this love affair got its start in the late nineteenth century kind of as an accident you know is this invention of fundamentalist Christians who were seeking to promote a healthy send free lifestyle and much of this is it you know stories that people of her but it's still pretty interesting media bland foods as you know like toasted corn and oats where they were sought to help suppress sexual urges and prevent arousal so this thinking led to the creation of a few notable foods including Graham crackers of course but the one that really caught on with the public was serial the doctor John Harvey Kellogg the superintendent of a sanitarium in battle creek Michigan and his younger brother well they stumbled upon the recipe for what would ultimately become corn flakes after allowing some of the cooked wheat to set out for too long the Kellogg's returned to find the weed have gone stale but rather than toss it out as you might think they what they decided to roll it out into thin flakes and then toast them and the corn flakes were a big hit with their patients to the Kellogg's decided to start marketing them to a broader public yen as interesting as the early history is it's pretty familiar by this point so instead of going deep on sanitary items and grape nuts of where we're gonna focus mostly on the second act of the serial story that's appeared for about nineteen fifty did the early nineties when marketing to children really took off and sugary cereals really began flooding grocery store aisles well before we dive into the colorful history I I thought we could take a quick look at the state of cereal today you know just by the numbers and and it's amazing how far Cerialis come from its early years as this niche product to the mammoth industry that it is now so just looking at the U. S. market alone the breakfast cereal industry now generates nearly ten billion dollars in annual revenue and that that's according to more to our intelligence is the same word or I feel like a hobbit so it's kind of jarring name if your lord of the rings fan but it's just a coincidence unfortunately event yeah like I was saying Americans lead the world in cereal consumption ranks fourth on the list of the top ten package goods sold in the U. S. and ninety two percent of American households by a box of cereal at least once a year we're not the only ones who love it Canada the U. K. Australia they all have zero markets that rivaled the size of our own and in recent years has also gained in places like China and India and Brazil in fact the breakfast cereal marketing industry rakes in about thirty five billion dollars in revenue each year from the foreign markets so I when I took my kids to India last year I I remember waking up jet lagged the first day and they were already up watching cartoons and more wired on a bowl of Choco Choco in all my years ago in India that we never ate breakfast cereals and we never even from the TV so it was always trying to see this American experience translated to India but you know sugar and grain is obviously this winning combination but I have seen a few reports about sagging sales as more and more people opt for you know either easier or healthier breakfast options of pop tarts or avocado toast or you know maybe a quick trip to the drive thru on the way to work and and of course there's this growing segment of the population that just doesn't eat breakfast period so when you're listing those easier and healthier options and you said pop tarts which one of the I'm guessing that's the easier they are delicious well it is big is the cereal industry as today there's no question that he used to be bigger according to NPR cereal consumption peaked right around nineteen ninety six I guess it was and deadly gone downhill ever since generally by a full percentage point each year and all the stuff you mention is definitely played a part in that decline it's really due to a combination of factors you for example back in nineteen ninety lawmakers passed the nutrition and labeling Education Act and that made it mandatory for all products to include the now commonplace list of nutrition facts on the packaging and this made it easier than ever for consumers to see the nutritional value or lack there of I guess and they could look at this and all of their cereals now at this point and as more people became educated about just how much sugar and carbs they were eating or feeding to their kids yeah they started to think twice before tossing a box in the car whenever they with grocery store so I looked into just how sugary cereal can be and it's in the same like the whole cereal industry uses around eight hundred sixteen million pounds of sugar in its products every year and apparently most of that's going into honey smacks if for some reason you're not out there that's the one with the cool frog wearing the backwards baseball cap on the bus structures are gonna be first well honey smacks nine oh come on if you will how the sexes are consistently ranked the worst serial for health because it has less than two grams of fiber per serving and its ingredients break down to almost sixty percent sugar Hey Steve but according to the environmental working group there's more sugar in one Cup serving of honey smacks and there isn't a hostess Twinkie No Way it is sweet obviously I knew it wasn't good for you but honestly like that the taste of twenty six I wouldn't of gas yeah the most sugary cereal but it kind of makes my teeth hurt just thinking about that and you know that that sugar to fiber ratio might make us cringe but there's one particular cereal eating demographic that you're not gonna hear complaining about this and that's kids are like my kids and my kids to actually deliver on there is this great Calvin and Hobbes where Calvin's eating his favorite cereal I think it's something like chocolate frosted sugar bombs and he gives Hobbes a try and hogs just are shaking gagging from the sweetness and Calvin says actually they're kind of bled into these groups of sugar on but what I find really interesting is how deeply ingrained the fondness for breakfast cereal is and so many people in house so much that seems rooted in their childhood yeah I mean I say for most adults here leaders it's a big part of the allure I mean it's what you're saying about your kids there's these no memories of watching Saturday morning cartoons with a big bowl of captain crunch in your hand or maybe indulging in a late night fix of lucky charms sitting in your college dorm I don't know if you're talking about right it's sort of a comfort food in a way I mean it takes us back to simpler days when most of us were a little more carefree about what we ate and why yeah so it missed out here is definitely a strong factor actually what are some of the weirdest discontinued zero as you can think of I just I think about this earlier and I remember seeing a queue for it Sir when I was a kid juror Keith in a video game character and and also eating one with mercury systems like my parents only really bother sugar cereals for maybe a year or two but I remember sampling some weird ones yeah I I mean I always thought it was completely bonkers that some cereals that even mask the fact that they were can be like you know Kellogg's that candy corn pops but even more blame than that there was a nerds ticked off that I never tried it zero by the way listeners I I just want a break for sync as well and I've been debating what the official candy of part time genius should be and what we're saying it should be atomic fireballs obviously and I was thinking nerds so if you have any thoughts on this please let us know on Facebook or Twitter but well I you're right nerds serial is insane but looking back like the box was so cool it came in these two flavors just like the candies and you could pour orange out of one side and cherry out imagine like who would let their kids violence it also is you wonder like if so much Israel's appeal is rooted in the past like what does this say about our future well you know there's a new generation of kids getting hooked on cereal now and many of them will stick with it into adulthood and that's part of the reason there's so many brands duking it out here trying to get kids to eat the cereal is because people's breakfast routines tend to be the same you know pretty much every day but there's another point to consider and and those declining sales numbers we mentioned earlier also coincide with declining birthrates so you know it's it's not like the birth rate will ever drop to zero or anything like that but fewer kids does result in fewer serial fans obviously yeah it's it's funny that something that started out as health food became so dependent on selling sugar to kids but I I guess that's usually how it goes with food trends like someone with these very altruistic intentions gets the ball rolling hoping to better society and and then you know at a certain point the marketing team September yeah doctor Kellogg is to give lectures about his methods for leading a healthy lifestyle and he would sometimes get out the recipes for his cornflakes so that people could make them at home and at one talk he told the crowd you may say I'm destroying the health food business here by giving these recipes but I'm not after the business I'm after reform committee yeah he really did seem to believe in what he was selling sure but the problem is that the same could be said of his brother will call again and will tried for years to convince his brother add sugar to their serial believing it would add some flavor to what he called horse foods spent the tipping point came in the late forties when their competitor post cereals release sugar crest so posted branched out beyond the health food market with its for sugar coated cereal and like it or not Kellogg kind of had to follow suit yeah but it's really post World War two that the industry started to focus on marketing directly to kids I mean cut companies had dabbled with these ads before including Kellogg's use of snap crackle and pop as the characters for rice Krispies and that marketing began in the nineteen thirties but even with cartoon gnomes pleading their case you need to be.

Tristen McNeil
"tristen mcneil" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

10:25 min | 1 year ago

"tristen mcneil" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Our producer Tristen McNeil but they were heading back to the grocery aisle for a closer look at all things cereal in the most whimsical or nutritionally questionable at all of this in every part of the complete breakfast and we'll dig into the weird stories and surprising facts behind our favorite brands as well as a few of the lesser known breakfast cereals that time for god little bit later we'll be joined by gave fun Sucka he's a TV writer and he spent more than a decade collecting childhood nostalgia in the form of vintage cereal boxes it's a fascinating collection yeah and he's also the host is really fine you too Sir is because the real time which is these theories on the subject of breakfast cereal I mean he's been doing it for a couple years now so I'm super excited to just hear how we got started yeah what will games among the most devout of cereal and those he has but he's definitely not alone in this meet lots of people love cereals and in a hundred and fifty plus years since it came out of the market cold breakfast cereal has become a staple for millions of people around the world and you know strangely this love affair got its start in the late nineteenth century kind of as an accident you know is this invention of fundamentalist Christians who were seeking to promote a healthy skin free lifestyle and much of this is you know stories that people of her but it's still pretty interesting the the bland foods as you know like toasted corn and oats where they were sought to help suppress sexual urges and prevent arousal so this thinking led to the creation of a few notable foods including Graham crackers of course but the one that really caught on with the public was serial so Dr John Harvey Kellogg the superintendent of a sanitarium in battle creek Michigan and his younger brother well they stumbled upon the recipe for what would ultimately become corn flakes after allowing some of the cooked wheat to set out for too long the Kellogg's returned to find the weed have gone stale but rather than toss it out as you might think they what they decided to roll it out and then flakes and then toast them and the cornflakes were a big hit with their patients to the Kellogg's decided to start marketing them to a broader public yeah I'm as interesting as the early history is it's pretty familiar by this point so instead of going deep on sanitary items and grape nuts we're gonna focus mostly on the second act of the serial story that's occurred from the nineteen fifties to the early nineties when marketing to children really took off and sugary cereals really began flooding grocery store aisles well before we dive into the colorful history I I thought we could take a quick look at the state of cereal today you know just by the numbers and and it's amazing how far Cerialis come from its early years as this niche product to the mammoth industry that it is now so just looking at the U. S. market alone the breakfast cereal industry now generates nearly ten billion dollars in annual revenue and that that's according to more to our intelligence could you say more Dorgan toilets like a hobbit it's kind of jarring name if your lord of the rings jam but it's just a coincidence unfortunately even feel like I was saying Americans lead the world in cereal consumption ranks fourth on the list of the top ten package goods sold in the U. S. and ninety two percent of American households by a box of cereal at least once a year we're not the only ones who love it Canada the U. K. Australia they all have zero markets that rivaled the size of our own and in recent years serial is also gained in places like China and India and Brazil in fact the breakfast cereal marketing industry rakes in about thirty five billion dollars in revenue each year from the foreign markets so I when I took my kids to India last year I I remember waking up jet lag the first day and they were already up watching cartoons and more wired on a bowl of chocolate Jocko in all my years ago in India that we never ate breakfast cereals and we never even from the TV so it was always trying to see this American experience translated to India but you know sugar in green is obviously this winning combination but I have seen a few reports about sagging sales is more more people opt for you know either easier or healthier breakfast options of pop tarts or avocado toast or you know maybe a quick trip to the drive thru on the way to work and and of course there's a growing segment of the population that just doesn't eat breakfast period so when you're listing those easier and healthier options and you said pop tarts which one of the I'm guessing that's the easier they are delicious well it is big is the cereal industry is today that there's no question that he used to be bigger according to NPR cereal consumption peaked right around nineteen ninety six I guess it was and deadly gone downhill ever since generally by a full percentage point each year and all the stuff you mention is definitely played a part in that decline it's really due to a combination of factors you for example back in nineteen ninety lawmakers passed the nutrition and labeling Education Act and that made it mandatory for all products to include the now commonplace list of nutrition facts on the packaging and this made it easier than ever for consumers to see the nutritional value or lack there of I guess and they could look at this and all of their cereals now at this point and as more people became educated about just how much sugar and carbs they were eating or feeding to their kids yeah they started to think twice before tossing a box in the car whenever they with grocery store so I looked into just how sugary cereal can be and it's insane like to hold through industries around eight hundred sixteen million pounds of sugar in its products every year and apparently most of that's going into honey smacks if for some reason you're not out there that's the one with the cool frog wearing a backwards baseball cap on the box cutters are gonna be first well honey smacks nine oh come on well honey spices are consistently ranked the worst serial for health because it has less than two grams of fiber per serving and its ingredients break down to almost sixty percent sugar tasty but according to the environmental working group there's more sugar in one Cup serving of honey smacks and there isn't a hostess Twinkie No Way amazing sweet obviously I knew it wasn't good for you but honestly like that the taste of twenty six I wouldn't of gas yeah the most sugary cereal but it kind of makes my teeth hurt just thinking about that but you know that that sugar to fiber ratio might make us cringe but there's one particular cereal eating demographic that you're not gonna hear complaining about this and that's kids release my kids my kids there actually juror on there is this great Calvin and Hobbes where Calvin's eating his favorite cereal I think it's something like chocolate frosted sugar bombs and he gives Hobbes to try and Hobbs just are shaking gagging from the sweetness and Calvin says actually they're kind of bled into these come from sugar on but what I find really interesting is how deeply ingrained the finest for breakfast cereal is and so many people in house so much that seems rooted in their childhood yeah I mean I say for most adults your leaders it's a big part of the allure I mean that's what you're saying about your kids there's these you know memories of watching Saturday morning cartoons with a big bowl of captain crunch in your hand or maybe indulging in a late night fix of lucky charms sitting in your college dorm I don't know who you're talking about right it's sort of a comfort food in a way I mean it takes us back to simpler days when most of us were a little more carefree about what we ate and why yeah so in this house is definitely a strong factor actually what are some of the weirdest discontinued zero as you can think of I was I think about this earlier and I remember seeing a queue birth when I was a kid Gerard keeper in a video game character and and also eating one with mercury systems like my parents only really bothers sugar cereals for maybe a year or two but I remember sampling some weird ones yeah I I mean I always thought it was completely bonkers that some cereals that even mask the fact that they were can be like you know Kellogg's that candy corn pops but even more blame than that there was a nurse ticked off that I never tried it zero by the way listeners I I just want a break for saying because will and I've been debating what the official candy of part time genius should be and will was saying it should be atomic fireballs obviously and I was thinking nerds so if you have any thoughts on this please let us know on Facebook or Twitter but well I you're right nerds serial is insane but looking back like the box was so cool it came in these two flavors just like the candies and you could pour orange out of one side and cherry out of magic Mike who would let their kids by it also is a wonder like it so much is the real deal is written in the past like what does this say about our future well you know there's a new generation of kids getting hooked on cereal now and many of them will stick with it into adulthood and that's part of the reason there's so many brands duking it out here trying to get kids to eat the cereal is because people's breakfast routines tend to be the same you know pretty much every day but there's another point to consider and and those declining sales numbers we mentioned earlier also coincide with declining birthrates so you know it's it's not like the birth rate will ever drop to zero or anything like that but fewer kids does result in fewer serial fans obviously yeah it's it's funny that something that started out as health food became so dependent on selling sugar to kids but I I guess that's usually how it goes with food trends like someone with these very altruistic intentions gets the ball rolling hoping to better society and and then you know at a certain point the marketing team September yeah doctor Kellogg is to give lectures about his methods for leading a healthy lifestyle and he would sometimes get out the recipes for his cornflakes so that people could make them at home and at one talkie told the crowd you may say I'm destroying the health food business here by giving these recipes but I'm not after the business I'm after reform yeah he really did seem to believe in what he was selling sure but the problem is that the same could be said of his brother will call again and will tried for years to convince his brother to add sugar to their serial believing it would add some flavor to what he called horse groups spent the tipping point came in the late forties when their competitor post cereals release sugar Chris so posted branched out beyond the health food market with its for sugar coated cereal and like it or not Kellogg kind of had to follow suit yeah but it's really post World War two that the industry started to focus on marketing directly to kids I mean cut companies had dabbled with these ads before including Kellogg's used to snap crackle and pop as the characters for rice Krispies and that marketing began in the nineteen thirties but even with cartoon gnomes pleading their case you need.

Tristen McNeil producer
"tristen mcneil" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

10:03 min | 1 year ago

"tristen mcneil" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"And as always I'm joined by my good friend man guess how to get there and on the other side of the soundproof glass with only a couple hundred or so pieces left on his lego Taj Mahal that's our friend and producer Tristen McNeil not building this thing has been no small feat for Tristen because the Taj is actually one of the biggest lego set ever produced it's just shy of six thousand pieces so you know all that finished model does look pretty stunning he's definitely had his work cut out for him yeah I mean he's only the bill takes about twenty five hours total and he's pretty much spent all week on it the courageous though is that the top model isn't even the biggest let us out on the market there's a bigger one that just came out based on the Hogwarts castle from Harry potter that only has about forty more pieces but then there's also this millennium falcon one that came out last year and it's actually the state with the highest peas count today it's got a whopping seven thousand five hundred forty one pieces and of course if Tristan wants to make that his next challenge to shell out eight hundred dollars to make it happen good grief well I'm guessing that's a little out of his like a budget I hope it's a little out of his life but yeah I know lego mania can be a pretty powerful thing when it takes all not to mention expensive and it isn't by chance that lego has held steady as the world's most valuable toy brand for the past several years now those little plastic pieces yeah they give these analysts opportunities for creative play and that flexibility is definitely capture the imagination of kids and adults alike for more than half a century that's right in fact this year actually marks the sixtieth anniversary of the like a break as we know it is one of the fortieth anniversary of the lego mini figures that populate our lego towns and pile it are like a spaceship so to kind of celebrate all those milestones I think now is the perfect time to break down the little known history behind one of the world's most popular play thanks definitely because for as long lived as these two figures are the lego brick and the many figure the company itself is really a fair bit older so today we definitely want to dig into those early origins as well as some of the different ways the brand has managed to reinvent itself throughout the years and a little bit later will also check out a few of the more creative ways that lego fans are found to put their favorite breaks to good use the first mail I know you wanted to give a quick note on terminology right yeah and I know it's a little weird to be a stickler about terms when discussing a kids to it but one of our researchers was adamant about this and I'm gonna tell you I like I said one of the researchers you know I want to avoid another lecture from and it is kind of interesting so the first thing he remind is that the word lego is actually an adjective not a noun and this is something that's even reflect in the name of the company which isn't simply let go but the lego group and if the company had its way no one would ever refer to one of their pieces as a lego but as a lego brick and of course that doesn't always happen lots of people just use the word on its own we talk about the pieces and that little slip up usually gets a pass from the company and its fans so long as you don't compound the problem by adding an S. to the word to make it plural apparently that's beyond the pale for most people because the true plural of lego is just let go never legos all right okay well we will try our best I think I mean there are times where I'm just thinking you know what I'm just gonna say legos lego legacy driving crazy but I think we'll try to stick to those ground rules and now that we got the semantics out of the way let's go back to a time before the lego brick and and actually before the company itself because the family business that would eventually become the lego group was actually established under a different name now this was back in August of nineteen thirty two that's located in a rural village and Denmark and the business was started by this master carpenter and woodworker name Ole Kirk Christiansen in those early years old Kirk made a living selling things like step ladders and stools even ironing boards but the business was slow this was you know think about the timing this was during the Great Depression that have been brought on by America's stock market crash just a few years earlier and so few people have the money to buy these expensive or hand made furniture pieces and soul Kirk was struggling to turn a profit with this would work so I'm just going to guess here that's when he came up with this idea for wooden building blocks I mean this was nineteen thirty two cents to the wooden building blocks have been around for for quite some time at least by that point but the depression did motivate all Kirk to seek out new product ideas which is what ultimately led him into the toy business so he thought that you know despite the financial strains of the era people were willing to indulge their children with the occasional gaffes of course provided that the price was low enough but that's personal Kerr to whip up his own batch of brightly colored wooden cars and animals and this was really just using the wooden scraps from his workshop that's pretty awesome I love that the Great Depression basically turned them into this like real life to peta yeah then that move it seem like a safe bet the Ole Kirk but sales pretty much stayed flat for the first year and I thank all Kirk even went bankrupt at one point and had to take a bailout loan from his siblings but they actually insisted one of the conditions for the loan was that their brother would give up on toys and go back to making furniture bill Clark was pretty stubborn and he refused but somehow managed to get them to loan the money anyway Hey any become convinced that toys were the future of his company all he needed was just a catch your name and you can decide whether you think you need to catch your name the name of his business was the bill in the machine joinery and carpentry business wait though that's in this office called after they switched to Rimini feels really like like why would they think that would work I know I will thankfully all Kerr came up with something much more evocative later on by truncating the Danish expression like god which means play well he landed on the word lego so I actually took Latin in school and I I don't heard that lego was the Latin phrase for I put together so here's the weird thing you're actually right about that that is the meaning and Latin but that was actually just a happy accident because apparently all Kirk found out about this years later that this is what it meant and Latin but no matter what he thought it meant that renaming efforts definitely paid off for the company and it quickly grew from what was a six person operation in nineteen thirty four more than forty employees by the early forties how much of that growth was due to the national popular evil Kirk said durable line of pull toys you've definitely seen these kinds of things before you know you've got the hand painted wooden dock on wheels that would open and close its beak that you know as you pull the string and pretty neat to see those things but the lego dog sold for barely more than a dollar at that point this was when they were released in nineteen thirty five but as one of those earliest and most recognizable lego products if you got your hands on one of these things these days a single dot can fetch more than two thousand dollars at auction it's so funny because like these are things that you see N. like villages in India these pull toys they don't feel that special what made them change from like wooden docks to plastic bricks but it definitely wasn't overnight as a pretty gradual change and and much of it was brought on by necessity so in Denmark they've been under German occupation during the second World War and by the time the war finally ended in nineteen forty five many of those materials that were traditionally used for consumer goods you think things like steel and wood they were tough to come by and so that was a problem actually all over the globe not just there and Denmark now the result of the shortages was that many manufacturers started experimenting with a new development and plastics this was called plastic injected molding this is that process were melted plastic is shot into a precise mold of whatever it is that you're trying to make and then once it cools and solidifies you simply pop them out and you've got your finished item and so was a much cheaper and faster way to make these plastic goods compared to earlier ways of doing this sure and so this breakthrough is really what made plastics a viable alternative for the manufacturers at that time so all Kerr could felt the pens from the lack of raw materials so he decided that the lego company should take a chance on plastic toys see that's what a little bit to nineteen forty six and he placed an order with the U. K. company for what ended up being one of the first plastic injection molding machines the only problem was that the material shortage had led the Danish government to ban the commercial use of that machine until the following year fortunately they decided to spend their time wisely soul Kirk and his son got freed were were still able to experiment with the machine and kind of study the various sample products that have been included with it and we're really trying to see what they could make from it one product that they stumbled into was this set of self locking building bricks and was made by a British company called Kitty craft so they had these colorful two by two two by four breaks that had this special design features that set them apart from the traditional cube shaped building blocks of the past because each one was hollow on the bottom and have these forays studs on the top this probably all sounds pretty familiar in the design added stability to whatever structures the kids built because the stud held each break in place so this is obviously really interesting to me but I'm not sure I like where it's going and I I feel like I'm a little worried that you can tell me that like just didn't invent the lego brick but they just kinda stole this idea and I I'm not sure I can handle that sort of does I think the truth is probably somewhere in the middle on this one because once the Christians were finally allowed to put their machine to work that's exactly what they did if I may nineteen forty nine the lego company was producing around two hundred different plastic and wooden toys and many of the plastic ones were simply new versions of earlier designs and things like that plastic planes or trains or you know different things like that but among the repeats was this.

producer Tristen McNeil
"tristen mcneil" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

12:40 min | 2 years ago

"tristen mcneil" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Just mystic club. That's our friend and producer, tristen McNeil now a lot of people don't know, this, but tristen very nearly booked himself on a trip on the Titanic back in nineteen twelve thankfully, the plan fell apart at the very last minute. You know, an account of his, not having been born yet. So ultimately, he bist the boat, which is just such a lucky break tristen isn't alone. And telling tall tales about how he narrowly escaped death on the Titanic. In fact, just five days after the sinking their already press reports about the so-called just mystic club and how it already had six thousand nine hundred four members. And so this is obviously tongue in cheek but it was also kind of true like a suspiciously large number of people had come forward, claiming they'd missed the boat because they've been running late that morning or they got sick, or whatever. But. Everyone knew most of the stories were completely made up like in one of the press reports, I mentioned, they had a sarcastic quote, from a guy who said, quote, I count, it lucky that I didn't have the money to go abroad this year. If all of us who just missed it had got aboard the Titanic. She would have sunk into Liverpool dock from the over. Glad the public didn't fall for all these stories. I mean, it's such a strange compulsion in the first place to lie like that. Because I don't know because you want to attach yourself to a tragedy. I guess that goes to show how captivated people were by the story of the Titanic, and the really amazing thing is that more than one hundred years later. Many of us are still just as captivated. So at this point, the disaster, if feels like it's taken on kind of a mythical status in world culture. And it's become one of those stories that everybody seems to know in fact, I read Smithsonian that Titanic is, actually, the third most recognized word in the world hot just below God and Coca Cola. And while it's true that interest in the story, as ebbed and flowed over time, it's still something that we always seem to come back to. So today, we'll take a look at why that is and why Titanic still fascinates as all these years later and help answer that we'll talk about the impact that tragedies had on the world both in the short term and the long term and also dig a little deeper into life aboard the ship which includes the surprising stories of a few standout. Passengers is definitely a lot to cover. So let's get to it but. But where do you wanna start mango? Well, I thought we could start with one of the biggest reasons that people have stayed invested in the Titanic. And that's just the ship itself. So most of us know that at the time it was the largest ocean liner, ever, constructed and more broadly, the largest men made moving object in the world. It was about eight hundred eighty feet long and one hundred seventy five feet tall. Which means the ship was as long as three football fields, and as tall seventeen storey building is then saying, I mean, it was definitely a massive ship for its time. No question about that. But it wouldn't really be that impressive today though. Right. I mean we have cruise ships that are more than four times that size now. So it doesn't make me wonder why the size of the Titanic's still captures people's interest. So I think it's partly the perception that the Titanic was kind of tempting fate in a way like the fact that the ship held that title as the world's largest and ended up sinking on his maiden. Voyage, it feels like this cautionary tale about man's hubris. Some people's minds like it's almost like. Tower of Babel situation or something where mankind overreach and then was made to suffer for it. And I think that still resonates for people, especially since we've heard so many stories now about how luxuriance and decadent the ship was especially compared to others at the time, all right? Before we get to that fateful night with the iceberg, I do wanna spend a little more time on board. And, and talk about a few of those decadent details that you alluded to, for example, the Titanic was one of the first ships to have electric lights in all of its rooms also had way more amenities than most other ships. And so just looking at the list here among those were four elevators, a heated swimming pool to libraries to barbershops a squash court. Turkish bath and even its onboard newspaper called the Atlantic daily bulletin, so I hadn't heard about the I'm guessing that means that they had a printing press. I mean, there was a small print shop on the d deck. And of course, this was close to the butcher shop. Now, I know where I get my trauma. Right. I mean it really does thought about everything. My favorite Titanic entity though, is probably the onboard gymnasium like it had all the best equipment naturally, including old standards like rowing machines, weights, punching bags. But it also had this cutting edge gear like they had to static Faisal's with two foot dials attached to show the distance that been traveled. And there were also a few electric horses, which were these big mechanical saddles meant to mimic, riding a horse. I mean, does that even count as exercise it kind of feels like it'd be less of a workout for the writer, then for the horse the saddle in this case? I mean, I think it was opposed to strengthen your core or maybe some leg muscles. But either way, I doubt any of the passengers worked that much of a sweat. Like if you look at pictures from floating gyms on the Titanic and other ships ehre, most of the passengers are exercising, while they're wearing their full get up. So it's like a bunch of really sedate and calm looking people in these. Three piece. Suits are big dresses, and hats and kind of halfheartedly pedaling on the bike or whatever it's pretty lazy looking. Yeah, I've actually seen some of these pictures, and honestly, my guess is that it's the first time in a gym for most of them because nobody looks like they know what they're doing at all. I mean, it's a good thing that they had a personal trainer on board. The titanic. This real his name was Thomas MacAulay. And it was this guy's job to show passengers how to use the and even to provide one on one training sessions. And it seems like we call took his job super seriously because the night, the ship, sank, yes, she chose to stay at his post in the gym and go down with the ship. Wait. Seriously? I mean, I don't wanna speak ill of the dead, but that's sort of seems a little bit unnecessary. I mean, we did talk about how the band chose to continue playing as the ship sank, and to me that makes sense because it was a way to sacrifice and a calm the passengers or to give them at least some sense. Of peace, but I mean why keep the gym open? I can't imagine anybody was thinking, like I think I'll just get in a few more reps. Whatever happens happens. Yeah. Probably if anyone was trying to burn a few calories for the road. I really wouldn't blame them. I mean, the meals on board the Titanic, where treaty ethic, at least for the first class passengers. And so the dinners were gourmet affairs with up to thirteen courses each of which came with its own wide. There was also a pre dinner cocktail service that was added as a concession to American passengers. Apparently European passengers weren't fans of this idea because they thought mixed drinks ruined or palate before eating but from start to finish these elaborate meals could last as long as four or five hours and because I menu was actually later recovered. We actually know exactly what the wealthiest Titanic has had for dinner the night, the ship went down, and it was an incredible spread the fees started with raw, oysters and selection of orders, followed by choice of two soups, then came a lightly. Atlantic salmon topped with the rich moose for the fourth and fifth courses pastures chose from such rich entrees, as a filet Mignon, or lamb with mint sauce. And then at the halfway. You gotta palate. Cleanser. Puncher of in which I guess, is a boozy Mixim wine Rahman, champagne. And then once you've regained your appetite. The feasting resumes. There's a row squad course cold asparagus. Vinaigrette soi gras. And then there's desert, which includes peaches, and chartreuse jelly, chocolate vanilla, Clair's, French ice cream and then to close off the meal. There's a variety of fruits nuts and cheeses with coffee port cigars and Cordial's. It's pretty it feels like they just accidentally went ahead and cooked everything for the week for one meal. These people get up and walk after eating all of this stuff. I don't feel like I could make it through a single meal. I know. But if you did want to try, they're actually places all over the world that now offer dinners that recreate that last meal that the first class passengers on the ship, and it's kind of a Cobb, but some people claim, it's a great way to humanize the tragedy or better understand the history of the ethics aside. Like the biggest drawback is probably the price of these dinners. So, for instance, there's one restaurant in Houston. It offers the ten course menu for a thousand dollars per person. Also version of this on a luxury hotel in Hong Kong where the prices doubled because reportedly serves this vintage nineteen o seven bottle of wine. That's actually salvaged from the wreck of the Titanic. I like this idea that somehow humanizes the tragedy by just sitting there. Yourself and drinking wine. Don't forget, I guess, they know exactly what it was like to be on the Titanic feels a little too rich for my blood. I feel like maybe I'd spring for recreation of maybe like third class to be a lot cheaper, right? Like I imagine they were a bit more down to earth at the second and third class tables, right? So I think that's a really funny idea. But not as much as you think the first and second class, dining rooms actually shared a galley. So there was probably a good bit across over when it comes to what was served business the first class on a plane or something. But the main difference would have been that second class diners wouldn't have had all the crazy one pairings a few other frills that the first class, people enjoyed and honestly, even third class. Passengers didn't have it too bad when it came to. So there was a lot less lamb with mint sauce, and a lot more roast beef and boiled potatoes. But you actually wouldn't hear that many people complaining about it at the time, most oceanliner. Required. Third class passengers to bring their own food to last tire voyage, which would made the Titanic's prepared meals seem really decadent to most people. I mean, the same can't be said for the accommodations. There were actually only two bathtubs for all seven hundred third class passengers to share. Oh, gosh. Well, let's, let's not dwell on that. Getting back to the food. It's hard for me even wrap my head around the amount of work that must have gone into feeding this many people and multiple times a day. There were twenty two hundred people aboard the Titanic. You've got thirteen hundred passengers nine hundred crew members. So still in the math three meals, a day, that sixty six hundred meals that the kitchens had to crank out every twenty four hours of it. Must have been a pretty colossal effort. It definitely was I read this interview with Dana McCauley. She wrote a book called last inner on the Titanic, and she says the Titanic's kitchen crew included one hundred thirteen cooks, fifteen first cooks, who supervise things twelve pastry chefs, six bakers five butchers in five sous-chef and, you know, you think about that. That's not even mentioning the dozens of waiters or busboys each meal required. Yeah. I mean that's a pretty huge step. But I'm actually a bit surprised. It's not even bigger when you consider how many people they were feeding and just the level of sheer variety on those menus that you talked about. But since you mentioned the Titanic's bakers, I wanna take a second and talk about the ship's chief Baker, he was a guy named Charles Joffe, and he was a survivor of the wreck and live for decades afterward, but he was also examined as part of a British inquiry after the accident and the picture. He paints during his testimony is really pretty amazing. So after the Titanic hits the iceberg sorry for the spoiler there, but Charles immediately gets to work, and he starts rounding up all the bread he can find to help bolster their provisions and all the lifeboats. Now, he ends up sending something like forty pounds of bread loaves to the upper decks, and then he heads back to his cabin where he proceeds to steal himself with what he called, quote, a drop of liqueur. And I have a feeling a little more than a drop in honestly that situation. Who can blame him but then Charles heads to the deck, and he starts helping to load the lifeboats now this is something I hadn't heard before. But apparently, many of the passengers were reluctant to leave the ship like in the first hour. So after the collision when only the lower deck's were flooding at that point, a lot of the people tried to wave off the danger in actually refused to get on these life, Charles knew better in this situation. And so when he found women and children just squatting on the.

Charles Joffe Liverpool tristen McNeil producer Thomas MacAulay Atlantic daily bulletin Coca Cola football Hong Kong Dana McCauley Faisal writer Baker Rahman Clair Houston one hundred seventy five feet eight hundred eighty feet one hundred years
"tristen mcneil" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

Part-Time Genius

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"tristen mcneil" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

"Hey, there podcast listeners. Welcome to part time genius. I'm we'll Pearson, and is always I'm joined by my good friend main guest ticket her and sitting on the other side of that soundproof glass, proudly displaying his first edition, captain underpants book that are Powell and producer tristen McNeil. So I mean, I know it's a cute gag from just in showing off how many captain underpants books he has. But did you realize that in two thousand twelve captain underpants was actually the number one band book in America? No, really. Yeah. Apparently, the LA or the American libraries, those Asian releases his annual list of the titles that were most challenged or banned at libraries and schools and that year, captain underpants actually beat out fifty shades of grey for the title as well as thirteen reasons why which you know, some say glorify suicide eight also beat out classics like brave new world and to kill a Mockingbird. That's what I do have to say the book does come with a warning on it that warns readers, and parents of readers from the outset it's sturgeon. General's warning and reads, some material in this book might be considered offensive by those who don't wear underwear. That's a helpful warning. I mean, you you can see how the word underpants might set off some alarm bells for parents. And it seems like it's going to be this rude book instead of actually a very sweet win. But you know, on the other hand the word underpants is exactly why kids get excited to read the book. I mean, the only movie my parents ban me from watching was fares Buehler's day off, which I know, you know, but I still think it's weird. And obviously, it's because my dad went to college at like thirteen or something and then failed out because he was working on this underground newspaper and playing in Rolling Stones cover band and entering jitterbug contests, Bradley, but yeah. Visually. He was doing everything except going to school. But my mom didn't want me to get any ideas from the movie. So did you ever actually get to see fares peelers day off? Yeah. I saw like the weekend after it came out on VHS uncle's house. You know, immediately became my favorite movie. Yeah. And it is a great movie. So I'm glad you finally got. And I liked that. We've already talked a little bit about captain underpants. One of my kids favorites, of course, when they first discover it, but let me read you a few other children's books that have been banned that that actually kind of surprised me. And I'm going to kick it off with Winnie the Pooh, which oddly has been banned in a lot of countries. So is this because the piglet 'cause I I know miss piggy was banned in Saudi Arabia for I guess for just being a pig. But actually before I let you go. I've got this tangent. Route picks did you see that Pepe pig was banned in China, which is just so sad. But I did see this. This was just last week. Actually, see why was banned. So probably the cartoon character has been associated with like lazy? And slackers and also gangsters for some reason like people getting Pepe pig tattoos, which makes no sense, but the country's instead asking its citizens to tune into the government created alternative. It's called little pig. Dodo? But I cut you off. So tell me a little bit more of Winnie the Pooh. Well, you were right with one of the guesses, and that that's that some Muslim nations have banned the book because of piglet, but you know, courting to the books enthusiasts site bookstore. It has this long history of being banned and Winnie the Pooh first came out, some American and polish leaders were outraged because talking animals, can I guess be seen as an insult to God. But the more interesting thing and something I hadn't thought about was that the books are often banned in communist countries. And that's for a different reason. It's because the animals are seen as representing the seven deadly sins. So if you think about it, PU is a glutton Alice too proud, I guess we've got piglet who's envious and yours, of course, lawful. Rabbit gets a little too angry or raffle. And who does that leave that leaves us with tigger who is I dunno bouncy that one of seven candidates? But the books are read is trying to inspire religion. Which is of course, problematic in communist nations. So I mean that makes sense. But what are some of the other surprises you found? All right..

Pepe pig Powell Pearson Bradley tristen McNeil America Alice producer Buehler Saudi Arabia Rolling Stones LA China
"tristen mcneil" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

Part-Time Genius

03:50 min | 2 years ago

"tristen mcneil" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

"Either podcast listeners. Welcome to part time genius. I'm wilkerson. And as always I'm joined by my good friend main guest ticket or and on the other side of the soundproof glass, just rocking another one of his brilliant shirts. And this one says Buenos nachos. That's our good friend and producer tristen McNeil. Now mega this is a fun episode. You know, because we're we're we're both big fans of cheese dip, we have been for years. And I'm guessing we ate no less than four to five tons of it in college between the two of us. So anyway, with that in mind, it's up to you where where do you think we should start? Well, I think I'm going to save the cheese differ a little later on. It's too good. And and start with something a little more basic, did you know that chips and salsa is the fischel state snack of Texas. Not only did I not know that. But I guess I didn't know that states had official snacks. But at the same time, I guess it's not all that surprising. So tell me more. Yeah. I guess it isn't that surprising. But how it became the state snack is super fund in two thousand to this. Second graders from the Leo Marcel elementary school in mission Texas decided that they're Steet needed its own officials stack so Texas at the time already had a state dish Chile a state, fruit grapefruit and a state pie pecan. So the kids decide a lobby for this official snack. But the competition was fierce than you might imagine. So the kids came up with all these nominees, including pickles Doritos flaming hot Cheetos. And in the end, I guess the victory went to the good old chips and salsa. Yeah. I think I can agree with that one. So so how did they actually get this passed? I guess four kids actually testified before a house committee on on behalf of chips and salsa. And while all the kids spoke with you know, the sort of passion that chips and salsa demand. A little girl named Audrey made the most convincing argument, and this is what she said quote first salsa contains two ingredients that are state symbols already. The jalapeno is the state pepper and sweet onions or the state vegetable put them together with a few more ingredients, and presto, perfect salsa that just makes sense. Does. It's so cute. And apparently, she wasn't the only one who thought. So because Rick Perry actually signed the resolution into law not long after. Wow. That is pretty amazing. I really liked that one are we'll since we're doing nachos facts. I feel like we should start with the chips themselves because there's actually a great origin story there. And this goes back to the late nineteen forties to Ellesmere up a tortilla factory. And this is in Los Angeles. And it became one of the first to automate its production of these tortillas. So the company had installed the state of the art tortilla making machine and pretty soon it was cranking these things out like twelve times faster than they could by hand. So the only problem with this is that many of the tortillas came out misshapen or kind of twisted up. And of course, those ones couldn't be sold. So one night the co owner of the business, Rebecca Webb Carranza. She takes these reject tortillas. She just brings them home and has a family party. And so she decides to cut the tortillas into triangles fry them up. And then serve them to her guest as what she called, torture, and because relatives love the chips so much Crohn's started selling them for ten cents a bag at this local Mexican deli and also right outside of the factory there. So you fast forward a decade to the nineteen sixties and Korans is torture. Chips were available up and down the west coast and not only that the chips were so popular they became Elza out Bay's main business. Oh, that's pretty amazing. I didn't realize that like the chips had their own story. I feel like it's like one of those things you just assume exists forever. Right. Like, so here's the fact that I might have heard before. But it's still surprising to me. Do you realize that Chipotle lay and jalapeno peppers are the same plant, which he's new that? Yeah..

Rebecca Webb Carranza Texas Buenos nachos official tristen McNeil Audrey Leo Marcel elementary school producer Rick Perry Crohn Chile Los Angeles Chipotle Elza out Bay Ellesmere Korans five tons
"tristen mcneil" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

Part-Time Genius

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"tristen mcneil" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

"Podcast listeners welcome to part time. Genius. We'll Pearson and his always I'm joined by my good friend, mango ticket her and on the other side of the soundproof glass just captivated by this terrible monster movie. I mean, it is terrible called pogo. Sorry, he's watching this on his laptop. Tristen pay attention here and producer, tristen McNeil. And if you've never heard of pogo sorry, it's definitely worth checking out. So the monster is it's basically North Korea's answered to Godzilla, right? And it's produced by Kim Jong Il back in the mid nineteen eighties, I believe. Yeah, it's pretty well story. So when Kim Jong Il was in charge of North Korea, he had this nasty habit of, you know, kidnapping people from the surrounding countries to do as bidding and in nineteen seventy eight. He snatched a famous South Korean film director. This guy named Shinzan oak and his actress, ex wife, and Kim was supposedly this big movie buff and he wanted his captives to help him create this North Korean film industry. But thankfully Shinhan is x. were eventually able to escape while they were attending a film festival. Vienna, but that was actually after eight years of captivity during that time, shin was forced to direct a total of seven films for Kim and polka. Sorry was actually the last of those. So I, it's a standard Godzilla movie or what I mean, there's a rumor that the director secretly intended the monster to be a metaphor for Kim Jong Il and that's pretty easy to take away. When you look at the movie's plot, which is all about this oppressed feudal society, it's eventually liberated thanks to the help of this monster who citizens view is their benign hero. But in the end, the monster betrays, the people. He goes on a rampage and the peasants wants protected than after rise up and destroy him. He comes to spoil the movie for him, and for all of our listeners might need to put a warning at the beginning of this person..

Kim Jong Il North Korea tristen McNeil director Shinzan oak Shinhan Pearson kidnapping producer Vienna shin eight years
"tristen mcneil" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

Part-Time Genius

04:03 min | 2 years ago

"tristen mcneil" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

"Guess what mango was I will. I know we've been competing this week to see who could come up with the best, what's big in Japan thing, but I actually have saved one for you. And did you know that adult adoption is actually a pretty big thing in Japan. In fact, most adoptions in Japan are adult adoptions. So I, I don't think I even know what that means. Exactly. Well, sometimes it has to do with inheritance. So say you've got a business owner who wants to keep his business in the family, but I don't know. Maybe he thinks his kids are too lazy or not smart enough to take it over to the owner might select an executive from that company and just adopt them. You know, like to keep the business in the family. That's pretty funny. I, I mean, I have heard of people joking about adopting college grad so that you have someone to take care of you when you're older. But I mean, this is kind of surprising to me. Yeah, it is well, and sometimes it's also just like this kick in the pants that the business owners kids need to start working harder and it gets complicated. I guess what this new sibling rivalry, but you know, Japan such a fascinating place and we thought we'd just take a deeper dive into some of the customs and culture you might not usually hear about. So let's dig in. Podcast listeners welcome to part time genius. I'm, we'll Pearson and his always I'm joined by my good friend, man, guess shot ticket her and on the other side of the soundproof glass super focused on his latest origami creation. That's our friend and producer tristen McNeil. So. So what's he working on mangoes trying to is that is that a bear? I think it's actually a sailboat. Oh, okay. Well, it's a very interesting sale. They'll keep it up. Tristan looking, really good are we'll today's show is all about Japanese society and culture, but rather than taking a deep dive into the nation's long history or maybe focusing on a single aspect of its culture. We're gonna share some of the strangest most surprising things that we recently learned about Japan. So where do you think we should start mango? Well, I mean something I think we should address up front is this incredible balancing act that Japan does between the past and the present? All right. So give me an example of what you're what you're talking about. Well, one simple example is that their smartphones are actually waterproof, and this is existed in Japan for over a decade at this point or. I feel like such a recent technology here in the US like all the commercials last year were so focused on that. Yeah, it really is an. I actually saw this guy at the beach last summer and he kept accidentally dropping his phone in the water then like wiping it off and taking a picture. And I guess he was doing it to impress the women around him or like some of the other people he was with. And at first I was kind of impressed too. But after like the third or fourth time, he dropped it, I was just rooting for the ocean to take that phone away from though. No kidding. I would have done the same, but back to Japan. So the first waterproof smartphone rolled out way back in two thousand five. And according to a number of electrons companies, the reason waterproofing was introduced. So early is that manufacturers quickly learned that Japanese consumers were fond of taking phones into the shower or bathtub with them. Wow, you know, you always hear about screen addiction and how people are finding it increasingly harder to disconnect from their phones in this kind of feels like the extreme of that. Exactly. So that's what I thought it was at first to, especially when you hear these reports of gamers and how addicted they are video games, but that's not actually what's going on there. So waterproofing is really the industry standard in Japan ninety and ninety five percent of all smartphones sold in the country are waterproof and it's because of Japanese tradition. So as you might have heard, bat time is really important in Japan, like public bath houses called center the, they've been pillars of Japanese society pretty much from the start, and thanks to the country's many volcanoes. They also have, like I wanna say it's like twenty thousand natural hot springs around the country for people to soak in and are their traditions around these or what?.

Japan business owner Tristan tristen McNeil US Pearson producer executive ninety five percent
"tristen mcneil" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

Part-Time Genius

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"tristen mcneil" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

"Guess what? Mango? What's that? Well, all right. So we decided to do today's episode on different dances. I started thinking back to all the dances that we learned as kids in all the songs where every kid in school felt like they had to master the dance moves. When you think about this, what dances come to mind. So you know what stages I was actually thinking about this recently, and obviously they're moves like the Roger rabbit or whatever, but actually kind of feel grateful that we grew up in this era when there weren't a lot of great dances. And at least when we were in middle school, like all the break dancing and moonwalking was over by then. And then all the songs seemed to be just about jumping like pain was jump around criss cross that song. John, of course, like dancing and nirvana was just like bouncing up and down bumping into each other, and it was holy right about this. I didn't think about that so much easier than like watching what my kids have to go through just to keep up with like the shoot and the Whitney a and like practicing how to floss all the time. Yeah. I get what you're saying, but I, you know, a few others do come to mind for me and and probably to stand out above the others. The, you know, the first of these was definitely Michael Jackson's thriller, and I know I've mentioned this before, but my sister was a few years older than me. And so when she was out with friends or still at school, I would often sneak into her room and listened to tapes on that fancy double cassette box that she had, yeah, might pop in some Duran Duran or the Bengals or any number of other tapes that she had. But my favorite was definitely Michael Jackson's thriller and I was terrible at dancing to that song, but it didn't stop me from trying to master it, but the other dance that comes to mind and you might argue this one was a little bit easier to master. That was the electric slide. So I remember going into the school dance and like sixth grade, and suddenly everyone was doing the electric slide and I couldn't figure out like, had I missed a class where this taught because like everyone knew how to do. Well, it might have felt like everybody mastered it, but my guess is the dances, creator, Richard silver. He might not agree with that, you know, especially if you weren't doing all twenty two proper steps of the dance. Now, this may seem a little bit silly, but he was serious about this. So silver was this well known dancer and the New York City disco scene. And he came up with the electric slide in nineteen seventy six. And he was more than a little particular about people doing it just right, especially because there was this version of the dance that caught on that only involved eighteen of the twenty two steps that he choreographed and get so angry about people doing it wrong, that for years, he would threaten to sue people who were doing it incorrectly and even convinced YouTube to take down several videos of like weddings and bar mitzvahs and other parties that involve people butchering his creation is this not nuts. That's amazing. But he finally gave up on trying to police the world on behalf of his Dan. When this other civil rights organization, they actually sued him on behalf of a man whose party clips had been taken down from the web because of silver. But anyway, this this bizarre incident got us thinking about the unusual and often controversial origins of some of the most well-known dances in history, and that's what we're going to be talking about today. So let's dive in. Hey, there podcast listeners welcomed the part time. Genius. I'm well Pearson and his always I'm joined by my good friend main gas hot ticket or and on the other side of the soundproof glass practicing the steps for the official arch deluxe line dance. That's our friend and producer tristen McNeil. Now I have to admit, I never heard of this, but apparently this dance was part of a McDonald's ad campaign back in the mid nineties. Do you remember this mango? Yeah, the arch deluxe, it was a giant failure from what I remember. Yeah. And I guess the company was trying to attract older customers.

Richard silver Michael Jackson Mango Whitney Duran Duran John McDonald New York City Bengals tristen McNeil YouTube producer Pearson official
"tristen mcneil" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

Part-Time Genius

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"tristen mcneil" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

"Podcast listeners welcome to part time. Genius. I'm well Pearson, and as always I'm joined by my good friend main guest ticket and on the other side of the soundproof glass drafting what does that a Craigslist ad in search of a skydiving partner? That's our friend and producer tristen McNeil. And if that sounds like a weird way to find a companion. Well, I think you're right. It is a weird way. Well, in his defense, tristen plan was inspired by the meeting habits of bald eagles. So vol deals actually use a special kind of skydiving when they're testing potential meets. So I the love birds fly super high, and then they locked their talents together and start tumbling cartwheeling towards the ground. This is a move that researchers actually referred to as this death spiral a deaths. Yeah. So it gives you an idea of the stakes and the birds mostly like before they hit the ground. But the whole thing is a test of the eagles can judge each other fitness and whether they're good enough for each other to be a match. And if they are, they'll actually mate for life and they won't have to do this sort of dating technique thing again the next year way, though I'm back to Tristan like, is that what he's basing his plan on or what I think so. And it's why my motto is always never take dating vice from birds of prey. That's pretty good advice there mango. Yeah. The animal kingdom is full of plenty of other equally dangerous and complex or just downright bizarre. Mating habits. You know, you think about like the fist pumping fiddler crabs to the OCD Bauer birds. It's it's a wild world out there when it comes to the animal love lives. And so with that in mind, we thought it'd be fun to devote an entire episode to some of the weirdest and most surprising courtships from all kinds of different species. So we'll look at all the biological reasons behind each animal's preferred method of attraction and who. Knows maybe we'll pick up a few tips along the way. Well, probably not from these first year because I thought we could follow Tristan's lead and get some of the scarier mating habits out of the way I answer if you look into it, they're actually a lot of those. So humans have the luxury of thinking of sex and positive and pretty pleasurable terms. But for most other animals, sexist strictly for survival, where creating offspring is really the only goal and many of the tactics forgetting there tend to be pretty unpleasant. So there's this biologist, Karen Bonder, and this is how she put it from bugs to mammals and everything in between. The scene is set for violence, conflict and war is Shan paid no rose. That note, where do you want to start? Well, I don't know if I want to talk about war, but I do want to start with Arabian camels. Now these are the one humped camels that you'll find mainly in the desert of the Middle East than in Africa. And while they do have all kinds of cool ways to help their bodies retain water and beat that scorching heat where they live, the males of the species also have this really gross adaptation that they use just to let the lady camels. No, they're in the mood. So I like the word gross gone. Well, it's called a dull, and it's basically this inflatable air sac in the mail, camels throat. So when one of these guys is ready to mate, they'll puff up their dull and once it's nice and big lump it out of the side of their mouth for all the females. See, see one of these things before until we were doing the research for this episode you see before, and the thing is just nasty like it's pink and slimy and definitely doesn't look like something you'd want. Hanging out of your boyfriend's mouth. Apparently that's what Campbell's are into. I mean, that does undiscussed ING, but is that where it ends like, do they just flop this gross air psych out in the roads? And then just the ladies come running. You'd think. But actually it's just the beginning. So once there are inflated, the Arabian camel start gurgling their spit to produce this deep, low mating sound. And this gets so intense that the camel start foaming the mouth, which is, of course, just like that makes their Dulles that much grocer. But if that isn't enough to catch a lady, camels I, the males will then you know they use use a good trick..

eagles Tristan tristen McNeil Craigslist Pearson producer Middle East partner Dulles OCD Karen Bonder Africa Shan Campbell
"tristen mcneil" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

Part-Time Genius

03:12 min | 3 years ago

"tristen mcneil" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

"Guess what? Mango? What's that? Well, so last year click hold this ridiculous article that I just found so funny like I do many of their articles, but the title of it was security failure, epipens database of everyone who's allergic to bees, has been obtained by bees, here's a line from the article. So it was this prepared statement from the company's website, the epi pen company website, and it says we do not know what they plan to do with it, but we. Can confirm that bees have a list of everyone who has ever purchased an EPA pen b.'s, heavier information. Now we are very sorry. You know what strange is. My dad has a severe allergy to fire ants, and we only realized this when he was in his forties, we're in Florida visiting DisneyWorld and cypress gardens. And this is when we were kids. He got bitten and then rushed away. Like my mom said, his face swelled up, like Martin short impure luck, which is just such dated Reverend. But that's what she always brings up when we talk about this is a pretty data reference, but it was also a pretty funny and ridiculous scene. But back to your dad, like I assume he was okay. Yeah. I mean, my diving my dad, he just played it down the whole time and it actually ended up being a strangely wonderful day for us because while my parents were at the hospital, my aunt and uncle were with us and we somehow got to pet a baby white tiger like, what are the people at cypress gardens? Let us do this. So my memory, the Tiger Cup plays a much much larger role in the day. Then my dad's. Not being obviously really concerned about your dad. But you know, now my dad just carries his epi pen with them everywhere, which is a literal lifesaver. Well, I know we both suffer from allergies at least to some degree, and you know, with the pollen count is high as it's been today, felt like a good time to do a show on what allergies actually are and thinking about how close we are to finding a cure for different types of allergies. And also, of course, answering the question is putting vacillating up your nose, a good life hack for stopping pollen. So let's dive in. Hey, there podcast listeners welcome to part time. Genius. I'm well Pearson. And as always I'm joined by my good friend, man, guess shot ticket or and on the other side of the soundproof glass, keeping his allergies at bay by brushing his teeth of all things. That's our friend and producer tristen McNeil numbing all admit, I thought Tristan had lost his mind yet again when he told us that he'd started treating his allergies with toothpaste. But in doing our reading for this week, I, it turns out it's a legitimate treatment and mango. You can back me up on this, right? Yeah, it's a real thing. It's called Allerton and it basically works the same way as typical allergy shots where you, you know, inject a tiny amount of an allergen as a way to get your body used to it accepted this case, the allergen extract is mixed into your tooth pastes instead of loaded too needle. And it is just such a remarkable idea. You know, I have allergies. I often forget to take my medication, but I don't forget to brush my teeth and it seems like a simple solution..

cypress gardens Mango Tristan Florida tristen McNeil Martin Pearson producer
"tristen mcneil" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

Part-Time Genius

02:55 min | 3 years ago

"tristen mcneil" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

"Podcast listeners willing to part time. Genius I'm manga should take, and my good pal will Pearson is off on holiday. So instead I've got the wonderful gave Muzy here online with me how you doing. Gave up doing great. Happy to be here. Yeah, we're thrilled to have you to and on the other side of soundproof glass trying his hand at the fine art of citrus stacking. That's our friend and producer tristen McNeil and gave. I know you can't see it, but this is a mighty fine pyramid of oranges. He's got going on over here. I'll take your word for it. But I mean, you know what's funny is that Yohannes Kepler. He was the first person to suggest that appear amid was the best way to stack three d. spheres stuff like cannonballs or oranges, and this was way back in sixteen eleven. But sadly Kepler was never able to prove his theory on paper, but in nineteen ninety eight a university student named Thomas Hales. He took up the challenge and he published a three hundred page proof on Kepler's behalf. But Kepler was absolutely right in the end like pyramids really are the best way to stack your spears. I can't believe you brought this back to Kappler, but I do like how we took four centuries and three hundred pages of pay for to like confirm how to best stack fruit and grocer was known the right way to do this all along. Right. Oh, yeah, definitely. Over the years, grocery stores have grown into a complex and carefully tailored industry and as looking to this. You know today they're roughly thirty eight thousand grocery stores in the US which together bring in about six hundred seventy billion dollars in sales each year. So with that in mind, I thought we should take a look at the enormous role supermarkets have played not only in our economy, but in the development of our society is well from how they've offended the way. We shop to all the little in subtle ways. They manipulated as so I thought maybe gave us you kick this off. Sure. So I thought we could start by tracing the volition of grocery stores and sort of charting all the ways they've gradually changed over the years. And so the roots of modern grocery stores in the US they really lie in the small regional chain stores that started cropping up Durling during the early twentieth century, and these early grocery stores were much smaller than what we're used to the they typically release than the thousand square feet. And of course, that also meant they stocked much fewer products. And in fact stores of this era, they typically carried only one. Type of grocery and these were the so-called dry grocery. So things like canned goods, spices and other non perishable stuff. Right? So there was no produce. No meat, no dairy. None of that stuff. Nope. Nope. None of that. This was still a time when customers had to visit a number of separate specialty shops in order to get every item on their list. So you'd head to the grocery store for your dry goods, but then you'd also stop off at the butcher shop for your meet.

Yohannes Kepler Thomas Hales US Muzy Pearson tristen McNeil Kappler producer six hundred seventy billion do four centuries
"tristen mcneil" Discussed on Committed

Committed

02:48 min | 3 years ago

"tristen mcneil" Discussed on Committed

"Finished editing this episode on charlie's first birthday my mom flew in for it and she's upstairs right now making a massive pot of monkey bread a couple of dozen friends and family members will get here in about an hour marianne tommy's love story really is an inspiration it's about them but it's also about the love of a parent it's about how hard linda worked to make sure that her daughter had this kind of life this kind of love and it's a nice reminder to me on my son's first birthday of the kind of mom that i hope i can be this episode was hosted reported by jo piazza special thanks to marianne and tommy pilling as well as linda martin for the very special thanks to lindy newman it was produced an edited by ramsey aunt with a digital editing by tied claiming and mixing by tristen mcneil the executive producers are joe piazza mingas ticket her and we'll pearson theme song and original music by trista mcneil with additional music by josh woodward come eko salamo soften furious alpha hydra and tequila moon rise comments suggestions or to be part of the show sent an email to joe committed podcast dot com that's j o at committed podcast dot com committed with joe piazza has been a production of how stuff works family producer stevie is located in the land of georgia you can grab a copy of joe's book how to be married on amazon or wherever books are sold this is a time of great opportunity for us from modern medicine advancements are being made every day for more than seventy five years the central state hospital at new canaan has provided treatment for those with mental disabilities but in recent weeks something has changed one of our doctors has adopted methods of treatment that are more experimental in mater methods one might consider ethically questionable the control group is tim part scripted drama subscribed for free on apple podcasts and never miss an episode is that what you think on doing and flitting har to be honest i don't understand what you're doing and that's what frightens me the most the control group from how stuff works

amazon apple tim producer executive ramsey lindy newman tommy pilling jo piazza charlie georgia stevie joe piazza josh woodward trista mcneil tristen mcneil linda martin marianne tommy seventy five years
"tristen mcneil" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

Part-Time Genius

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"tristen mcneil" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

"Hey there podcast listeners welcome to part time genius i'm willow pearson and today i'm joined by our friend and researcher gabe losey a man gash is still on vacation i am happy to report my voice is back from its vacation feels good to be speaking normally again but gave how's it going it's going well thanks for having me on well of course and on the other side of the soundproof glass sporting a fetching new goatee i wish you could see this thing gave that's our friend and producer tristen mcneil oh well i'm not so sure about that if if star trek's taught me anything it's to beware the sudden appearance of wells sculpted facial hair so it's usually a sure sign you're dealing with an evil twins watchers though well honestly though unless you know how to work the sound equipment i think we're just gonna have to take our chances here and besides if that is tristan's evil twin then after at least give him props for staying on theme here feels appropriate because today's show is all about twins duos doubles and because this is a bit of a grab bag episode we can start pretty much anywhere we want so so gay you're joining us today what what sounds good do you where do you wanna start well i don't want to go to dark too quickly but i'd like to stick with the whole evil twin thing for a minute if you don't mind yeah because on one hand you know i it's just such a weird leap to make right like just because two people look the same they must be polar opposites in terms of morality when i mean on some level the idea's really struck a chord with us because it's not like evil spock was the first of his kind or anything and in fact humans have a long track record of being distrustful of doubles like the birth of twins was long thought to be a bad omen and many cultures and there's all kinds of folklore from throughout europe and africa that tells about these socalled changeling and these were said to be like as supernatural children.

willow pearson facial hair researcher gabe losey producer tristen mcneil tristan europe africa one hand
"tristen mcneil" Discussed on Committed

Committed

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"tristen mcneil" Discussed on Committed

"Move out of our apartment by recently was accepted into a master's program for writing columbia and so i will be starting there in the next semester that's a lot in a way you almost get to choose what you're going to remember you can select the very best things and put those into storage keep them and toss out the bad bits the rubbish i also know that if i get your tainted about something i know that all forget it and so i'm actually much happier person in everybody in my life that knows knee really well has said that they noticed that about me that there's sort of been a weight lifted off of me and and it's true because i don't carry around anger and sadness like used to because really truly i just forget about it you know give me a couple of hours i won't remember it it's kind of a blessing in a weird way there's this quote i keep thinking about from the handmaid's tale the book not the hulu series and i don't just go around quoting feminist topi novels all the time i'm not daria but this one fits it goes like this when we think of the past it's the beautiful things we pick out we wanna believe it was all like that gwen ken believe it was all like that when my therapies ended i didn't really know what to do with myself and yasser was the person that said you know what this is your do over thank goodness i never forgot yasser and i never forgot how much i loved him this episode was hosted and reported by jo piazza special things to going to be your man and yester salem as well as nick and charlie astor this episode was produced an edited by ramsey yacht with additional editing by alex williams and tyler clang additional recording by julian weller and daniel waldorf mixing by alex williams and tristen mcneil original music by tristen mcneil with an original song by one of your men the executive producers are joe piazza mangum had ticketed and we'll pearson for comments suggestions

gwen ken yasser charlie astor alex williams tristen mcneil hulu daria jo piazza yester salem nick tyler julian weller daniel waldorf executive joe piazza mangum
"tristen mcneil" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

Part-Time Genius

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"tristen mcneil" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

"Podcast listeners welcomed the part time genius i'm we'll pearson and as always i'm joined by my good friend mangueira shot ticket and sitting behind that soundproof glass assembling a mix tape for his next house party i hear these raging events that's our friend and producer tristen mcneil yeah i took a peek at the tracks tristen together it's got everything from like beethoven bsides to mob vishnu orchestra to spice girls remixes it's pretty eclectic i gotta be honest wouldn't expect anything less from tristen but you know today's show is more than just setting the mood with a soundtrack we've got preah parker author of the new book the art of gathering on the show now if you've ever wanted what's the right size for a party or how do you gently tell someone they're not invited to a gathering or something even bigger like how do you bring nfl players and owners together in a way that makes them both feel at ease and then has them leaving experience feeling bonded pre has this amazing amount of experience and insight so pre apar welcome to part time genius thank you for having me we're fascinated by your background you know from the world you were bridging as a child to the events you organize and consult on now and i was curious before we get into all the conversation around gatherings i was hoping he just tell us a little bit about your background and conflict resolution and then of course how you grew that background into starting thrive labs so i was born in zimbabwe perhaps uncommon place to be born and i come from two different worlds my mother is indian grew up in in india born and raised and then immigrated to the us for graduate school and met my white american father in iowa where he is from and for about thirteen years they they were married they traveled the world together my mother's a cultural anthropologist at my father's a hydrologist and so i was born in zimbabwe and fast forward nine years from my birth and they separated we were living in virginia.

india us iowa zimbabwe virginia producer tristen mcneil beethoven tristen preah parker nfl thirteen years nine years