35 Burst results for "tran"

Canadiens Eliminate Golden Knights

After Hours With Amy Lawrence

01:59 min | Last month

Canadiens Eliminate Golden Knights

"Six technically Playing for the first and only time moving forward for the trophy, usually awarded to the Western Conference champions. The Vegas Golden Knights in their third Stanley Cup semi final round in the four years since they've been in existence, had a tall task ahead of them. The game would be a 21 Montreal lead deeper. The third period, the scarce crowd was on the edge of their seats with ice cold Molson Molson's being down by the minute. Time ticked and ticked. The night season was in jeopardy. But then Alec, I will take game taught tying goals for 500 leaders. Carlson out high in the slot. Tran Djalo shoots gloves, same price rebound score. Could not secure it. Vegas has tied the game. Alec Martinez poked it through the legs that goal, courtesy of Dan Do about the Vegas Golden Knights radio network. Yes, Alec Martinez, tying the game with just over a minute left into the third period. Hold off the celebration. Poutine. We were headed to overtime. I miss wrote that now I'm gonna have to go back to my notes. It will be a quick action. It would be a quick session just overnight. All right. It would be a quick 321. It's Canadian. Make it all right guys. Usually, though, the game now is tied. If you're following along, we're going over time right? It would be a quick session just over 90 seconds in a Vegas turnover led to glory. It led to a work of art Terry Dental cutting to the Net. Here's a chance. Surreal working in has sent the Canadians to the Stanley top final that call courtesy of Dan Robertson on the Canadians. Radio Network. Sing us A song are Terry LinkedIn, You are the drought ending, Man. A Montreal did in

Alec Martinez Vegas Golden Knights Molson Molson Tran Djalo Vegas Montreal Alec Carlson DAN Terry Dental Dan Robertson Terry Linkedin Radio Network
"tran" Discussed on Asian, Not Asian

Asian, Not Asian

09:12 min | 2 months ago

"tran" Discussed on Asian, Not Asian

"One calvin. Calvin tran has just started doing comedy somewhere. Appear outside of his house. You know careful buddy. Yeah dude. I don't know but i mean thank you for coming on the show. We're big fans of yours and you know you listen to our story here about corporate fuck ups you know so something like that happened happened to you. I mean. I always not to me personally although the the most i love that you guys are getting asked to do. Api shows. i've only gone asked to do one. It was for the bone marrow. Society shout out to bone marrow. You'll be are you get cancer. What was just like bone marrow donation donation. You should which actually you should. We really don't donate enough. There's something i know that. Yeah yokel now. I feel bad that i passed on it because we'll the message is out there because i felt so because it made me feel they. They were like you know you could like you can just. It wasn't asking me to do standup. It was an hour long panel where they were just like. Tell us about. Like what what it's like to be. Asian and how important asian life is and i was like. We'll that is a bizarre bizarre. Like azure life is like how important asian life is. I like what am i am. I selling my humanity is this. We recently heard that. Asian people are also humans. Can you tell me more central weird thing. Because some of these panels can be overly discovered us or they were just like we realized we should actually listen to you which is kind of like. I guess it's nice that you're finally paying attention but also at the same time of course. Why did you do this. But they don't know what to do with us. I think a lot of the panels. Not not all of them. We've done the good ones that are like these panels been like like our people. How is it like a a thoughtful moderator. People asking thoughtful questions. We want kind of about the kind of breaking breaking out of the model minority myth or mode. And they're like he just tell bus. Can't tell us about your journey about like how you're not a doctor and we ended up talking about how doctors. Yeah you know. I really like thirty minutes crying. Just going so. I should have tried harder. One thing. that's cool is. We've been doing some college ones. And what's what's sweet at. This is a lot of colleges but we did one like kind of like a gamut where we did one small community college in southern california and then we did like a nicer nicer but like a more drag that community college another school. We did another school and both of them. The students They would start off with their pronouns. And there was like a thing. There would start off with by saying they're pronouns and i didn't know if was a widespread thing it seems like it which honestly i'm into and i thought it was. I thought it was sweet and it was likes supernatural. The one we did at one of the schools wasn't like this big official thing was just the students and they all just jumped in and just did it and it was like no problem wasn't like a big deal you know. I always feel like on the news. They make god like indoctrinating students. Oh yeah yeah. They're being four show their on screen and and they're making everybody now everybody's a third gender and his every word but it's really not a big deal at all. It's like he was my pronouns. Whatever let's just keep talking. You know i mean. What am i with all the pronouncing. I remember when like i was part of a group and we were first doing it and like truly very bro. When asked for his pronouns he was just like the old ones the oldest the boring the old fashioned way. I'm traditional and i'm like well we haven't invented new pronouns this. There's no new. We haven't innovated on pronouns being thoughtful. You heard about what what school is that. Can i ask. Was that like you know like a school in pennsylvania or something or was that it was part of like It was part of cbs showcase. So these are like liberal. Comedians either liberal comedians. Just like tripping. This was a couple of years ago. So maybe maybe this person has grown. Maybe this person has to give back to your question about court like seeing seeing seeing all the streamers all of a sudden like put a specific bar that is just like all asian american stories or like voices and it is it is a shortlist roy it really. They really have to dig. It's strange. i personally offended. that mortal. Kombat isn't brought up more. I think it's very vietnamese. Oh yeah i was surprised. I was surprised to see Not tokyo drift on their fast and furious that you know. I know you're going do it. Just go for it. Go for it right. I mean sure. The original fuck in fascinating series is shot in garden grove that little. That's an asia story. That is a very asian story garden. Grove is a character in that movie garden. Grove is a character you know. He's got a whole arc and everything like that. And that's i feel like we talked to who was at alex. Babette said black people will go and try to find black characters in anime. And i feel sometimes with asian people will like claim something as that person's asia now. Sometimes i didn't know anderson pattern. You're a little bit your interest in this past march madness. Did you guys watch are you is basketball fans. I know what's happening are you. I'm kind of a jock. I'm a little bit of a job. Get into that But i watched all of march madness and johnny. Juicing is vietnamese played for ucla. And as soon as i don't even care about ucla. But when i found out that he was like half vietnamese. I was like this. Is the best team ever. I hope they win. I thought i go to the top. I feel that way about top chef. Yes anytime. there's like an asian chef their personality. I'm like a half to root for this. I have to root for this person. Yeah were you. Did you get real into jeremy lin. When during lin sanity and all that stuff that was hell ya yeah and when he has terrible haircuts. I'm like yeah. These are pretty cool. Pretty cool he can do it. Okay way so are you. Are you a jock. Because i know you grew up in erie. Pennsylvania which when people were from pennsylvania. And i understand. That's not the mid west. I'm a mid west asian. I'm from ohio. And i i love bonding with part of ohio's from columbus that's close to erie so if you save from pennsylvania it's like if you're from the phillies side then like i came when they relate with you but if you're on the ohio side i feel it's very very similar like the culture and stuff like that so did you play like. What were you like a basketball player. I i've actually never mentioned in person. You could be like justified. I have to be very tall and who knows. Maybe i'll tell you. I feel like i've i've never we've never we're combined combined. Were five foot five. Okay so we walk around doing shows one on stacked on top of the other one wearing a big trenchcoat and then when i have a show we just flip. Who's on top and that actually a jock like did you play a lot of sports and stuff of that. I played. I played so much soccer. I played yeah. I played all through childhood high school. I don't want to be that person that's like played in college. But i. But i would've sat but i would've sat on the bench like i would've sat on the bench like some bad. We'll all but that's amazing you're talking to schools. I got to talk to to school. Two schools recruited me. But i didn't want to go. Their names names was an hbo. Max university max. Okay mortal kombat. College didn't want me after. I met with them. No bucknell is a small hands lavinia and then university of pittsburgh also had..

pennsylvania erie ohio Pennsylvania columbus southern california thirty minutes ucla both Calvin tran jeremy lin Two schools Max university five foot march madness One thing first lavinia couple of years ago four
Final 2021 NFL Draft Quarterback Rankings: Trevor Lawrence and Then What?

Big Blue View

02:06 min | 3 months ago

Final 2021 NFL Draft Quarterback Rankings: Trevor Lawrence and Then What?

"So guys let's start off with the quarterbacks as this is probably the least eventful group especially because we just let mark handle this position group. Because that is his forte his speciality. We don't even really need to go through the ordering or anything specific with this one as we're going to do it the other position groups but the thing that's worth noting is it. Mark was highly reluctant to really go past mack jones and then after thinking it over he threw in kellyn mind. Davis mills kyle. Trask jamie newman. And that was pretty much it so i think we can all agree here that the quarterback class in in this year's nfl draft isn't exactly very good on the back end. There's a lot of really good talent at the top but as we start to push towards the second and third round like we don't even have a third rounder in this group. There's not really a lot of good options now. It doesn't really tier that way. Joe obviously you have the tran said quote unquote time trevor. Lawrence. and then. There's a lot of debate on who that actual second quarterback would be adjusted sales from ohio. State zack wilson from byu. Mac from alabama. It seems like the jets. Presume that zack wilson from byu. And i mean. There's a lot of rumors that three the san francisco forty niners are really all in on mac jones but we'll find that out next thursday. It's gonna be interesting. I mean outside of the top five quarterbacks in legit all five of them could go for the giants would be ideal for the new york giants. That would be absolutely but outside of those five. It's it's kind of a crap shoot between callum on. I'll trask davis mills. Yeah i actually wasn't surprised to of see the look of pain almost on mark's face when he had to we almost twisted his arm into throwing out his like second and fourth round quarterbacks. This is a very top heavy quarterback draft class and part of that could just be the position. Where if you've got a quarterback who is able to be accommodated starter. He's probably going to be a first rounder and probably a high first

Zack Wilson Mack Jones Davis Mills Trask Jamie Newman BYU Mac Jones Kyle Tran NFL Mark Trevor Trask Davis Mills Niners Lawrence JOE Jets Alabama Ohio New York Giants San Francisco
Stars unite to condemn anti-Asian racism

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 4 months ago

Stars unite to condemn anti-Asian racism

"Celebrities of Asian descent are speaking out as part of a new campaign hash tag stop Asian hate in the wake of the Atlanta massage business shootings that killed eight people six who were women of Asian descent actress Kelly Marie Tran knows first hand about racism after she was cast as a lead in a Star Wars movie now she's speaking out against the violence sweeping the country stop Asian eight joining the campaign will on actor who only we got here four hundred years ago or for we are home and M. butterfly playwright David Henry Hwang we need you to stand with us singer milk also lends her voice these women were more than somebody's temptation on a bad day you're somebody's mother friend you see and hear more on their social media pages I'm Julie Walker

Kelly Marie Tran M. Butterfly Atlanta David Henry Hwang Milk Julie Walker
"tran" Discussed on It's All About Evolving

It's All About Evolving

06:01 min | 4 months ago

"tran" Discussed on It's All About Evolving

"This is just this. Is their joy moments right right. You know. I must say not that. I'm saying there's anything wrong with strip in. I mean right a stress like pole dancing you use it in a different way and strippers use it in a different way like this is not the episode. Where we're gonna The down to anybody. I mean but if you like to do that and that's you like i guess the thing is what you're i guess what you're trying to say too. Is that people. Ges look at a certain things or because you're doing a certain an activity i would say that's gonna lead to that. No it doesn't doesn't and it all comes down to. I believe whoever is thinking that is their perspective and how they see things and what they believe in their belief system. So it's not really much about you. It's much about the other person's belief system and what they believe. So i would always say like do up makes you happy and ignore the noise. I mean you can get feedback out steve box. Pick the ones out the king you can know when a feedback is coming from a good place. Now when it's coming from a negative plays so you know yeah and plus you only have. I mean for a lot of the girls that i'd take hold classes with or the people who are thinking about it they already are have our internal monologue during the dance. Like always for myself. I can speak for myself like I mean i don't really belong here and then now you have all this external horses. It's like we'll talk the object. Let's do it. Yeah let's just get on. I mean for me i like. Let's just get on this journey already. You know that's on my bucket list. And i'm gonna stay in touch with you because i want to learn this. I know yeah oh yeah you just. Ira can see at you. You on your fingers through your hair or you can do Another type of tone like is just pulled using it can be. It can be sexy. A can be an expression of sadness. It could be expression anger just any emotion. It's just like any other dance but with a metal. Stick okay button. Leads me to my next question. Do you pick your songs of say to dance. To base off your. How do you think your songs. I don't want to use the word emotions. Because i could be wrong. But how do you pick your songs when you're preparing for competition. Actually i'm glad you brought that up because for me would define dance as emotion could into body movement so i picked my songs based off of by emotions or whatever chapter going through in my life like there was a time when i did a comedic dance where i had like a ninety s colorful. Suspender hat with the spinner fan at the top. And i wore suspenders. I were big black glasses. I was supposed to be like a complete dorky nerd on stage. Yeah and the song was call. The song i danced. Who was called powell. I know which is like originally by whitney. Houston but i did the glee version and it was like about me being clumsy and how i feel like this boy will never noticed like oh how will i know. So that's how i came up with. That routine is because in that chapter in my life i had a huge crush on this guy out was thinking. Oh he's never got a notice me. Connor like too dorky for him to notice. I put that into by competition routine and that was the nationals piece. Wow okay hanes. Why rephrase the question and ask with vance in. If it's just that you choose based off your emotions or it's just like arts just look at it then and what i grabbed from it right. So you know for me i would say is an outlet of my immersion. Okay and what comes out of. It is hard to because people are like. Oh that was so beautiful. And i was that he didn't notice me that ballet's actually thing that's the thing with art. That's why i love art so much because it gives me on an extra insight on the person who is looking at the same art. As i am so i will hear their feedbacks and then i can tell i could tell certain things then put it that way over dance. It's a bit tricky to. But i love that you brought that up so it gives me a perspective to look at it right actually so when i look at after a competitor finishes piece. I have a better insight of the person that they are. 'cause if it's like they're they're telling a story via body movement and whatever story they tell i'm thinking by the end of it i'm thinking wow like i just feel like ahead. A peek into more of the personality are yes yes. That's what i want to do with my art too. It's like you kinda saw a glimpse into a chapter of my life. Yes and i will be playing this Video as well well for those who are listening once you see the youtube saying her dance class. It's so beautiful. Like i love it but so everybody can see you know the your talent. 'cause i call that talent lake thang about before i let you go. This is my favorite part of an episode. So one question would ask yourself that. I didn't i. I think you pretty much covered all the bases that i wanted to go over to. I say something. I've asked myself is.

youtube whitney ninety box one question Houston Ira powell
The One Thing About Raya and the Last Dragon That Never Changed

WLRN News Programming

01:56 min | 4 months ago

The One Thing About Raya and the Last Dragon That Never Changed

"Celebrating Southeast Asian culture. It's now in theaters and streaming on Disney, plus the lead character. Ryan is introduced as Disney's first Southeast Asian princess. Now, in order to restore peace, we must find the last dragon. But some critics have called Disney out for casting only one actor of Southeast Asian descent in a prominent speaking role. Kelly Marie Tran, who voices Riah. Those roles mostly went to actors of East Asian descent. Why Chan Booty is a film critic with slash film. Most of the reaction I saw online Woz praise and general positivity from Southeast Asian critics, although if you have voice the same criticism I have towards the film's melting pot approach, and even more are unhappy with the casting choices. It's mostly goes into the issue of treating Asians as a monolith, no matter which country they come from, and there is a distinction between East Asian countries in Southeast Asian countries. We reached out to Disney about the casting issue in particular, and they put us in touch with a co writer of the movie Adele Limb. And we've got a clip of her response. Let's listen any time that there is a prominent Asian forward movie or we have Asian leads. You know that one project has to kind of take on the burden because there's just not enough of them particularly pariah. We just feel so lucky that we have the actors that we have who have just connected so deeply and so meaningful Lee to their parts. So what do you think It sounds like She's setting the bar sort of low so they can celebrate it when they surmounted. Yeah, And this is an issue that is muddy even among the Asian, American, Southeast Asian American communities Riot and the last Dragon. Is build so heavily as that first Southeast Asian inspired Disney animated movie so it feels like a large missed opportunity to not cast the main

Disney Kelly Marie Tran Riah Chan Booty Adele Limb Ryan Southeast Asian American Commu LEE
With 'Raya,' Disney has their biggest animated action hero to date — and yes, she's still a princess

Fresh Air

06:10 min | 5 months ago

With 'Raya,' Disney has their biggest animated action hero to date — and yes, she's still a princess

"Chang says the new Disney film Riot, and the last Dragon is not just for kids. He calls it a gorgeously animated fantasy adventure with a hopeful message. For this moment, the movie began streaming on Disney plus today. Ryan and the last Dragon is the lovely moving surprise. Its big selling point is that it's the first Disney animated film to feature Southeast Asian characters. Like so many movies that break ground in terms of representation, it tells a story that's actually woven from reassuringly familiar parts. Didn't mind that in the slightest. The movie directed by the Disney veteran Don Hall and the animation newcomer Carlos Lopez. Estrada brings us into a fantasy world that's been beautifully visualized and populated with engaging characters. And it builds to an emotional climax that I'm still thinking about days later. Story is a little complicated as these stories tend to be It takes place in command Ra and enchanted realm inspired by various Southeast Asian cultures and divided into five kingdoms, named after a dragon's body parts heart Thing, spine, Talyn and tail. Before they became extinct centuries ago. Dragons once roamed the land and served as friendly guardians to humanity. Their magic lives on in a Jule called the Dragon Gym, which is kept in a cave in the heart, but the other four kingdoms covet. It's mighty powers. One day all five factions come together and try to reach a peace agreement. But tensions erupt. Ah fight breaks out, and the gem shatters into five pieces that are scattered across come, Andhra. This opens the doorway to an ancient enemy called Bedroom, a terrible plague that turns people to stone. Actually, a hero must rise and save the day. Her name is Ryan. And she's a young warrior princess from heart voiced by the excellent Kelly Marie Tran from Star Wars. The last Jedi. I Ryan manages to escape the drone, though her father, her body whose leader of heart isn't so lucky. Now Ryan must recover the pieces of the Dragon Jim, reverse the damage and banished that room for good. This is the first time we've seen a brave young character embark on a quest for magical bottles. And Ryan and the last Dragon is rooted in traditional fantasy lore with the Lord of the Rings and game of Thrones being just the most obvious influences. Movies, Intense scenes of sword play and hand to hand combat. Give it a tougher, more grown up field and most Disney animated fantasies. My own young daughter had to cover her eyes a few times. Some other recent Disney princesses, including marijuana, and Elsa Ryan has a bold, adventurous streak and isn't all that interested in romance? Unlike them, she doesn't even have time to sing a song. That said the movie still has plenty of lightness and humor. Screenwriters. Quick win and Adele Limb have provided the usual Disney array of cute critters and lively supporting characters. None of them is more colorful than see Soo Ah friendly water Dragon who is magically resurrected during riots journey. She's the last of her kind, and she has a crucial role to play in the story. She's voiced delightfully by Aquafina doing one of her signature chatterbox comedy routines and selling everyone of ceases and naturalistic wisecracks. In one scene, she touches a piece of the dragon Jim and magically Lights up. Which riots sees as a hopeful sign. You were glowing. Oh, thank you. I use Alan Rivers climb. Maintain my know this'd my little sister office magic. I got that glow in your little sister's much jack. Yet. Every dragon has a unique magic. Okay, What's yours? I am a really strong swimmer. Wait, wait, wait, wait, wait. You touch this gym piece, and it gave you powers. You know what this means? Right? I no longer need a night light. What? No, you're still connected to the jumps. Magic, not means you can still use it to save the world. If we can get all the other Jen pieces, you can reassemble it and, well, the drooling away. And bring my bar back and bring all of commander back Ryan and sees his journey takes them toe. All five kingdoms of command ra all of which are so vivid and transporting, I found myself wishing they really existed. More than I could have at least seen them on a proper movie screen. There's the town of talent, which is built at the edge of a river and the desert wasteland of tail where Ryan and See Soo must enter a cave of obstacles straight out of an Indiana Jones adventure. As the two of them search for more dragon Jim pieces. They, of course, pick up a few friends along the way. There's a street smart boy who cooks a mean shrimp Con ji and a toddler pickpocket, whom I found more creepy than cute. The movie's most intriguing character is no Mari arrival. Princess from Fang, who's voiced by Gemma Chan. As a side note. Chan and Aquafina both appeared in crazy rich Asians, which, like this movie was co written by Adele Limb. Mari and Roya used to be friends until the fight over the dragon Jim rip them apart. Now they're bitter enemies, and their emotional dynamic is fierce and complicated in ways that relationships are rarely allowed to be in Children's animated films, especially between women. Contrast, See, Sue is all feel good vibes. She's a dragon, after all, with little understanding of how treacherous humans can be. She doesn't get by riot and the Mari distrust each other so why they can't just set their differences aside and defeat the drone together. It's Caesar's sincerity and purity of heart. That makes the stories finale so unexpectedly stirring, especially now. Our fates are closely bound together. It reminds us as it builds a case for forgiveness, reconciliation and mutual sacrifice. The emotional power of riot and the last dragon sneaks up on you. Its lessons aren't knew exactly, but it makes you feel like you're learning them for the first time. Justin

Disney Ryan Don Hall Carlos Lopez Adele Limb Kelly Marie Tran Aquafina Elsa Ryan Estrada Chang Alan Rivers Andhra See Soo Jim Pieces Con Ji Gemma Chan Mari Roya Indiana Jones Fang
Kelly Marie Tran on Quitting Social Media and Becoming a Disney Princess

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

03:41 min | 5 months ago

Kelly Marie Tran on Quitting Social Media and Becoming a Disney Princess

"Earlier. Today i spoke with actor. Kelly marie tran. We talked about going from star wars to portraying disney's first southeast asian princess in russia and the loss dragon. Kelly marie welcome to the daily social distancing. Show gosh here. thank you so much. The last time we spoke we were talking about the journey that you had had you know being part of star wars being the face of what many felt like was like bullying online. You know where people were like. This is part of the biggest problem that we have on social media. Since then you life seen seems to have been like really peachy before we talk about making a new disney movie. I wanna know as one of the few who's doing it. What what what is the world when there was no social media. It's made dang. I mean. Okay i will say this. I do have like a lurker account. Because i want to know what's going on about the active stand of the world right but not having to constantly be sort of publicly on. It is the best thing i've ever done for my mental health. I will say that. Yeah so you're saying that you don't wake up every day with people just telling you that they hate you. This is not a thing that you do know now. That's not a thing that i do. Well i don. I don't know what that's like. I wake up every morning. And i check and i'm like yep they still there and then i start my day now. I feel like. I'm going to use my lurker account just to be like we love you. We left me. No don't do that. Don't even do that. don't do that. I hate because then i go. At least they see me. They see me You you've had an amazing journey. I mean not being in you know. It's not just one not two not three but it's going to be like what four disney movies. You'd use like the disney darling right now. It feels like the movies ryo and the lost dragon. Tell me a little bit about the story. I mean i've watched it. But i don't wanna spoil anything for people so it is about a young girl named riot. Who is technically a prince aspen. Think what's really cool about this movie. Is that really sort of flipping the narrative on what princesses. She is actually really warrior. And she comes into the world and sort of has this really idealistic way of viewing the world and then the world breaks apart and then she starts really distrusting. Everyone the whole movie sort of is her journey on a figuring out how to find the good in the world again in figuring out how to trust people again. The whole story is about how the world was working and then everybody started believing that in order for them. To succeed of the people have to fail. And that's when the world starts falling apart and it feels like that's the world we live today. What's also cool is that you know. We live in a world where everybody who is generally not white gets put into one category with asian asian would done. But what's cool about the movie is. It's like no it tells. The story of life was like. Hey this is not a monolith. This is not homogeneous. There are asian peoples. You know. obviously this story takes place with a south asian perspective but it is still a story about like all different people coming from the asian sphere. You know there was so much research done to make sure that this specific part of the world was honored in a really authentic wave so to be able to be part of that had to be able like you said to serve china's spotlight in all these really specific things like not only. Are we talking about the specific fabrics that people from different tribes but also the type of martial arts that you're seeing depicted is specifically from this region of the world and the food and it goes on and on non so to be able to recognize how i guess how important it was too. Isn't he just made me really happy as someone who was really starved to see herself as a kid.

Disney Kelly Marie Tran Kelly Marie Russia China
The Case Of The Dead Fortune Teller

Sword and Scale

04:43 min | 5 months ago

The Case Of The Dead Fortune Teller

"On april of nineteen. Seventy five the. Us army pulled out of the vietnam war as the capital city of saigon fell to the socialist people's army of vietnam in the days prior and the days and weeks following the fall of saigon the. Us military accused several operations aimed at evacuating refugees. Fleeing the communist government operation baby lift evacuated over three thousand three hundred children and the operation. Frequent wind rescued more than seven thousand vietnamese operation. New life and new arrivals saw these refugees processed in guam before being transported to a few army bases across the united states. One of which was camp pendleton in orange county california all in all orange county slowly assimilated thousands of vietnamese thirty years later in two thousand five that influx of vietnam refugees successfully transformed a stretch of strawberry fields and salvage yards in westminster calif into something more familiar. The area is now known as little saigon. Little saigon in westminster california is the largest vietnamese population outside of saigon. A a result of that There are often street signs in little saigon that are in vietnamese businesses. Use silage in vietnamese. It almost gives you the feeling of being in vietnam but you're in california as a result of that. There is a large presence of cultural traditions in little saigon. The cafes are popular karaoke bars. All kinds of ethnic foods and things like dad can easily found in little saigon. This a place where people from the vietnamese community can gather and talk and there's a sense of community there. This is sonia but yesterday my name is sonia. Chief deputy district attorney at santa barbara. Da's office a decade ago. I worked at the orange. County district attorney's office vietnamese in orange county brought with them to the united states. The kind of determination that only comes with the suffering and adversity that they had endured but also they brought their culture their food and their superstitions one major aspect of the vietnamese culture is what some in the us might consider a novelty pastime. Fortune telling to the vietnamese is serious business deeply rooted in their cultural history. Community members will consult fortune tellers for all sorts of reasons like making sure their businesses are properly situated for the flow of good energy to ward off evil spirits and haunted souls with rituals and spells to diagnose supernatural causes of illness establishing lucky dates for personal undertakings and to predict the future of wealth. Health and love. Then two thousand five. One of the most popular fortune tellers in little saigon was haas smith who went by the name. Jade i say was because in april of that year. She was found murdered in the home she shared with her daughter. Anita vo anita's ex-boyfriend young tran would visit regularly. Bringing coffee and snacks. In an attempt to rekindle their relationship him in anita had been dating for a period of time and very young love and as such can be kinda volatile times deterrent in the sense of It wasn't a serious romance at least it wasn't for anita but there was a real friendship there so i think that in his efforts to not only lure her back but general friendship and carrying it would not be unusual for him to share a meal. Bring over some coffee or just talk to her on a regular basis even if they were not quote unquote boyfriend and girlfriend. So happens is young. Tran goes and delivers coffee and biscuits and he leaves it in the front door area of the home he never enters

Saigon Vietnam Socialist People's Army Orange County Westminster California United States Sonia Us Army Pendleton Guam Calif Haas Smith Santa Barbara Anita Vo Anita Young Tran DA Anita Jade Tran
Tracey "Africa" Norman reflects on the start of her legendary modeling career

LGBTQ&A

04:36 min | 6 months ago

Tracey "Africa" Norman reflects on the start of her legendary modeling career

"Something that i think is so interesting and special about. Your story is the number of times throughout history that someone has been outed and lost everything. We don't know their name. History doesn't remember them. Are you surprised how well known. Your story is and has become from the very beginning. I've been shocked about it. And the interest that has grown to wanting to know my story in the beginning. It's been overwhelming but i'm kind of Not getting used to it. But it's still surprises me. I mean i have a long list of reasons for why i think your story is special and why still telling it but i just wonder how do you think about your impact and why it matters. I because of A lot of the girls like me or now in front of the cameras. Like on television and writing singing and modeling. And they've all congratulating me by being the first but to be clear. I never identify with transgender. The term always identified as being a woman. I say yes so. I i i mean i understand the reasons why they are advertising that they're transgender in my generation. I couldn't oh so you're saying that back then you could not use the word but you're not saying that you don't identify as trans now. Is that correct yeah. I don't i identify as trans. Always have done a bite as a lot of being a woman. Oh i see. It was new york mag and The london times and mary cliff south africa That put the word trans and attached it to my name. I i mean. I am publicity for it and the interest that it that it drummed up but i made that very clear in every interview that i never identified as trans but as far as getting interest that it drunk i totally get that allow because i consider you an icon and trans history. And so i've actually never heard that you don't identify as being a part of the trans community. Yeah i mean. I i understand where you're coming from so i mean i don't have the people using it. I'm just saying me personally. I've never identified with the word tran or or being tran. I guess because of the time difference. And and i didn't grow up around gay people. I only had women around me still being shy child. I mimic my so after women. I've watched how they talk converse with each other having wall cavity that you know. I was just enthralled wink. Femininity of of a woman. And that's what i wanted to be. Oh i see so when you were outed. I believe it was was it. One thousand nine hundred eighty nine hundred seventy nine. Yeah it was a time for acid magazi- route so your outed in your professional life so then also transferred over into your personal life as well my in my professional life the date in my personal life not per se because Not my mother was always there. I've been her her oldest daughter since i was born. She always knew that she had a special child. She was mind. Remind me of that. In fact our conversation would either be in the car or we're walking the dog together or meeting at the dinner table laughing and joking. She would just stop and periodically. Tell me her words would be tracy you born before your time and all of those years. I never understood what that meant. Until until i was reached out for my story and when clairol's me to another three year contract then i realized what my mother meant by that because by that time the other trend girl were out in themselves and the reason. Why because that prevented anybody to have a secret hanging over their head. Which i did so that gave someone power over me.

The London Times Mary Cliff Tran South Africa New York Tracy Clairol
Amber Hurdle Cuts to the Chase With Her Velvet Machete Brand Strategy

Dose of Leadership

04:30 min | 7 months ago

Amber Hurdle Cuts to the Chase With Her Velvet Machete Brand Strategy

"Hurdle friend on those of leadership. Welcome to the show. I'm so excited to be here. You know we know each other almost eight years. Did you knew that. I was looking at the calendar. Almost eight years. I was thinking about that. Yeah because it was like right after. I left gaylord hotels. It's crazy and i was like in watching. Your journey has just been amazing. It's been so fun to watch and just remember back in the day back in two thousand thirteen right when we that kind of we met through a Kind of. I guess it was a facebook. Entrepreneurial group that john lee dumas mastermind e type thing in there. Was me you anthony tran. There's about eight of us that kind of clicked together right and we kind of started sharon and in the paul. Good for me anna. And we're still good. We're still connected all those people they all come to nashville. They see me. Yeah austin netflix. Austin yeah yeah. He's still going and Oh gosh i could go on go on yellen selwyn. Yeah killing it and arizona. Yeah i remember. I met with him. Gathering owen and somebody else in phoenix. Oh the guy He did aaron. Pierre use aaron pierce curson in owen and owen had just moved to phoenix. He'd moved from new york and he moved to phoenix and was in phoenix. Mo- behind in new york s right and then we all had lunch and met paul. I was had lunch with paul somewhere. I tried to hook up with you a national lane and it didn't work. You were going something. I was nashville. And you and your husband were going somewhere. Gosh dang that's just so fun to see that here we are. And i've never had on the show i've been wanting to. I've been a big fan. Because you're i think of all the people that were there. You were the closest to what i was doing in terms of thought beliefs on leadership and entrepreneurship. And i love your story so we're reminiscent of all these people were talking and it was like. What are these people talking about. What did they see it. Like for the four pull out for the audience. Like i can't even of all the times. I've called you or you like i remember standing in the middle of academy sports like in the adidas section. Because i'm told you re run dmc that way like you calling me and like running an idea by me and and so you should. The audience were sitting here talking about this person. This person and we're having our little memory lane trip but the best part of that is that we have a crew of people that are similar in our values who've been on a similar journey for a similar amount of time. yes we'd all be at different levels and where we've gotten in that amount of time but we can lean on each other in that strong people environment almost like a. You know your own board if you will as entrepreneurship can only especially how we do it. And that's really important. Like it's really important that i can call you. I know you have a mortgage and children and like grown-up responsibilities. At i can call you and you can share perspective with me as a business owner with the same responsibilities and help me in context make wise decisions. That is a great point to do what you say. Maybe a lot of people that listen to show or no listen to show never really talked about that but the importance i've talked about with guests on the show the importance of finding an inner circle or your tribe or your mentors if you will in the people that we've talking about here and the people listen haven't really seen it but i have leaned on all of you guys over the last eight years for exactly what you said right like ham doing this. I'm struggling with this. What do you think and never really thought about that too. You said that. Like how many times i have reached out to all eight of you during the during these eight eight years i think it's it's invaluable right in its requirement for leadership in for entrepreneurship. Insurers like you've got you can't do it by yourself now you've got to have. We don't have another office to pop into a departmental meeting like you would in a corporate office where you bounce ideas like. We don't have a white board room. Like i haven't and you know said you have to figure out how to recreate that team or that perspective The way that you'd hand how

Phoenix Owen John Lee Dumas Anthony Tran Yellen Selwyn Aaron Pierce Curson Nashville Gaylord Paul New York Netflix Sharon Pierre Anna Aaron Austin MO Arizona Facebook
Enby People Don't Owe You Androgyny

Is It Transphobic Podcast

05:24 min | 7 months ago

Enby People Don't Owe You Androgyny

"What we're talking about today. Is this idea of and rajini and that Tran or that trans nonbinary folk. But specifically non binary folk half to feel the pressure to conform to androgen e Now we're gonna be talking a little bit about that. But how do we define androgen. I'm sure that we can find it in a dictionary but like what does androgen e what is the definition of androgen e that we can work with that. The audience can sort of understand a little bit easier. I always think of like the the way androgen. He is generally portrayed in media where it's like a. It's generally like i think of you know like bowie or someone like that. That's you know very like and it's usually usually are either an Assigned male person or an aside female person with a smaller chest. It's usually about being very small and kind of like lake Ethereal looking. I guess thing and it's a it's more about like not having any defining gender caracteristics in your appearance than like actually being any any you know. Form of non binary Me like a good example. That i like to Exactly what kind of looting to somebody. Purely neutral in their appearance right. So oftentimes that means that they're lending or attributes of the two sides of the binary. Right so somebody be in a suit wearing make right you know for the rest of piety. That's a combination of two sides of one coin that everybody else kind of sees whereas you know internally especially for folks who are non binary sometimes. It's it's not about the appearance. It's about how you feel or how you act so i know like for me I enjoy wearing a tux in getting dressed up. But i also really enjoy playing on my skintight floral chance or you know or I do do make up every now. And then and sundays depending on how the winds blowing. I really enjoy that or sometimes. I don't care you know so. I think that there needs to be understanding for the audience that what the world thinks is android genie versus what i think nonbinary people think is android need. There's a slight deviation there In that the we don't have to work so hard to show the world androgynous in the way that you expected right like i said i don't know if that helps the audience understand. What makes it even more vague. But i think that's kind of yeah. It's that like that like It expects you have aspects of both ends of the gender spectrum as opposed to like it they want you to be like right in the middle of it as opposed to like like ashley was saying. It's a whole a whole bag. And i think that was for me. roadblock came to was that i am very comfortable being sam presenting like You know i. I like where closed from the men's section occasionally and just kind of grungy but like overall i'm presenting which really was Like even even in the queer community. I felt like i. You know i like appeared as a woman and i wasn't sure how to make that distinction and that was it ended up being. I just talk about and say it all the time which works. But yeah i felt like because i wasn't interested in appearing like a man and especially because i i wasn't you know necessarily thinking about any actual medical transitioning that i was excluded from that world The as i was like well. If i'm comfortable appearing like this then. I can't actually mean it. I was gonna offer one other examples. So i mean some of the examples. We've talked about about what the world sees androgen. He said like bowie stuff of that. Where it's like taking a little bit from both sides Another really good example. I mean If anybody's watched the show sheron a huge fan of sheron. I think the queer community inherently lows. She raw for reasons. Hail yeah Double trouble in a perfectly neutral character and it was it wasn't even it wasn't ever questioned or considered you know what side right of the historical binary that you know that person would all on and the characters only ever used day to address double trouble so you know dole troubles like a perfect example of somebody. That's perfectly on that neutral line that doesn't waiver to either side. And even that's a form of androgen that i think is a high expectation but it's another good example of just perfectly right there in the middle and so i figured i'd offer that or that helps the audience

Rajini Tran Bowie Sheron Ashley SAM Dole
Seattle taking applications from small businesses for next round of COVID-relief grants

Our Auto Expert

01:03 min | 8 months ago

Seattle taking applications from small businesses for next round of COVID-relief grants

"Small businesses have another chance to get some grants to keep their business is running. Come. Oh, Suzanne Phone has details. Restaurants bars fitness centers. Just some some of of the the businesses businesses hit hit hardest hardest in in the the latest latest round round of of code code 19 19 pandemic pandemic closures. closures. And And now now Washington Washington State State is is stepping stepping up, up, hoping hoping to to help help there's there's money money available. available. And And so so we're we're encouraging, encouraging, especially especially all of our businesses here in South King County. To apply and to apply early businesses like the Teacup Cafe in Des Moines. We have over tea smoothie and also some Vietnamese food sandwiches and soup. Like so many others, the small businesses had a tough time at the beginning of the pandemic. We close for about almost three months have been Tran hopes, working Washington Grant for as much as $20,000. And help him with rent and payroll. We really hold that we can get the grand so we can we can. We can maintain the business that's called Moses and fun. There are grant limits and requirements to see them. You could go to our website at Co Moh news dot com. The

Suzanne Phone Washington State State Teacup Cafe Washington King County Des Moines Tran Moses
Streaming Data Integration Without The Code at Equalum

Data Engineering Podcast

04:24 min | 8 months ago

Streaming Data Integration Without The Code at Equalum

"Can you give a bit of an overview about what you're building at equal am and how it got started and you mentioned that you've been there for a few years so maybe a bit of how you got involved with the business as well case old building a platform for data ingestion physically. Etl system with the goal of providing open source benefits to the enterprise domain. I'm sure that everybody who's tried to use soles in the enterprise and found on the difficulties in how chips around implementing it. And we're trying to bridge the gap and get the best out of Into enterprise ready application product. So that's foiled goals as for myself. I've been working for about three years. Almost as implem-. I'm started out a halfway william equal actually started with that goal but had quite a few steps around it. We started with a very simple system and ended up with a full stack of spa kafka and all the jason competence and a food system so solid very simple the overall space of data integration and. Etl has become relatively crowded in the market. And they're a number of different approaches where some people are advocating for e. l. t. Where you just do extract and load and using something like maybe five tran or the singer set of tools or some people are focused on batch oriented workflows using more traditional et l. approaches and. I'm wondering if you could give a bit of context as to how equal and fits in that overall market and some of the differentiating factors that engineers should consider when they're debating what tools to use. What approach to take the main differentiator for us is a customer that once a system that is mature and a lot of indications of open source products and open source. Capabilities are still in the making and still growing as you grow with them. And we'll aiming at providing the whole system and to end to someone who wants etl rather than a lot of moving parts thing. That's the main thing we don't want to provide yet another software that relies on five to ten different vendors so for example if you're doing streaming you might implement calf and you might need zookeeper and you might monitor it and i'm sure that everybody who's done that. Seen model confidence that you end up with. And i would say that when you start with a data engineering project usually end with. They'd engineering plus a whole division of devops. You want to end that mess and provide one product with one vendor gives you the whole thing end to end everything and relevant to the use case rather than to the in terms of the overall ecosystem of data you mentioned wanting to be able to the benefits of open source to the enterprise. And i'm wondering for people who already have started down. The journey of building out a data platform they might have some capacity for data integration in place what are the components of the overall ecosystem that equal is designed to replace outright and which are the ones that it is designed to integrate with augment. Let's stop replace serves as an ingestion system so the workplace depends on what you're doing. I can certainly give you. Examples from implementations we have replaced system using open source spent the whole on top of our and a lot of station around building the flow in bento executing the flows in monitoring and getting everything working together. We have replaced the whole thing with just one system and again one vendor for the whole thing not mingling too many companies and getting them to work so i would say for that use case the replacement would be for the end to end system so it depends on the use case itself but we are aiming to replace the whole integration and to and from source to target to get data transformed in reached and managed to the level of. I read it from the source whether it is a string soul veg souls luck as three or even see souls and writing. It's to whatever they might be snowflake for data warehousing data lakes so it is an end to end solution that is aimed at providing the full stack that you require full. Data integration

William Equal
"tran" Discussed on Poetry Unbound

Poetry Unbound

05:32 min | 9 months ago

"tran" Discussed on Poetry Unbound

"There's a technique of echo the hallway throughout the poem You see this enlighten language. Being echoed early and panting hearing themselves. Punting keep going someone keeps going deeper and deeper others other some some life. Life is seemed wild alive moving when someone moved casting their shadows on the shadows and so this is in conversation with itself. They function like an echo and then finally at the end of the poem. We hear the strange echo of outside and this vast perspective change that's happening and the exchange of ideas that seems to need to happen between the ideas of the outside of the insight and the ideas of the insight of the outside and this poem is echoing itself like a vast cavern does and inviting whichever one of us is exploring the cave to be in conversation with the echoes as well as to be in conversation with people who've taken this journey before as well as to be in conversation with people in other caves of exploration joseph campbell has said where you stumble. There lies treasure the very cave. You are afraid to enter. Turns out to be the source of what you were looking for. The damned thing in the cave that was so dreaded has become the center. And i think paul tran is responding to joseph campbell in the unconscious and paul. Tran is taking something. That is a human archetype and inviting.

paul tran joseph campbell Punting
Invisible marketing  with Jeff Lotman

The Futur

04:51 min | 9 months ago

Invisible marketing with Jeff Lotman

"Great Gun and welcome to the future podcast. Today's guest is the founder and CEO of Brand Licensing Agency global icons. Now, you may be asking yourself what exactly is that? And Russ assured you're not alone as he puts it they operate in an incredibly misunderstood field that no one knows about except we see every day. Remember Flintstones, vitamins. You. Don't think hanna-barbera actually created those do. Yeah totally neither did I. In, this episode he and Chris Talk About the world of invisible marketing pairing brands with products that you wouldn't think necessarily go together. BMW Strollers Porsches Sunglasses. Forever Twenty One and the US Postal Service. It is a super interesting field that I had no idea existed but after hearing about it seems so obvious and brilliant. Please, enjoy our conversation with Jeff Lyman. Okay. So my my audience might be familiar with this idea. It's called a mash up it's when to artists or maybe through a DJ or mixer puts things together two genres that don't belong like rap and country The most famous examples I can think of as an artist whose name is danger mouse he took Jay z's black album and the Beatles white album and put them together and created magic between I. I think if I understand what you do correctly jeff that it's kind of like what you do you take two things that we love and you smash them together and it's just wonderful thing and most. Of US are completely oblivious to this happening you write about this in your book called invisible marketing now do I have this Jeff? No I think that's a really interesting way of looking at it and I've never ended describe like that. But I think you're right. I mean that's exactly what we do. We really put a manufacturer together with the brand usually have someone that wants to create a product and he's trying to break into the market and they're trying to figure out the best way of doing it, and of course, they could call it jeff or they call it Lamborghini including the their name WanNa, compare to my name what goes up dramatically. Okay. So this is fascinating because this is a world that we all kind of are somewhat subconsciously aware but until we learn about what Jeff does, then it becomes very clear what's happening. So Jeff for people who don't know who you are, can you introduce yourself and let let us all know kind of what it is that you do. Short. So my name is Jeff Lottman. I'm the CEO Global Icons, which is a company that I started almost twenty years ago and were a brand licensing agency and we work in a field that is incredibly misunderstood and no one knows about it. It's really crazy when you. When you tell people what you do, you only have to give them an example for them to understand it because otherwise they won't get. It's very frustrating at times apart parts. Well, it's interesting because I have imagined that you probably don't have as much competition because not that many people understand what it is is that true or now? It's also really s could feel there's not really many people that work in the brand licensing company in our world probably are. Ten fifteen agencies is probably no more than four or five or six of any real size. It's a great business i. mean it's been around really got in. Thirty years ago when really hit his stride compared to entertainment licensing like you know, Mickey Mouse on t shirts have been around. Since the early twenties. Right, so I guess a lot of people don't understand is like a company like Disney makes a lot of their money, maybe most of it through merchandising and licensing and building products based on entertainment Ip, and some some reference or some examples that you gave on different podcasts that are heard you talk about, which will help you understand truly what we're talking about is flintstones vitamins. The flintstones hanna-barbera did not make those vitamins the BMW stroller a BMW. BMW. Did Not make that stroller and then one that I can think of I think is Porsche Sunglasses? Maybe they did make it but it's licensing. Right. So it's a licensing, the brand equity that somebody has built up and moving into different product categories right. Exactly. I also called rarified air because let's face it. What is a brand a brand by you buying something and says a lot about how you feel you WanNa feel. So when you're going to buy apple the great, let's face it apple has built a business not about making the best computers but really telling people that when you use their computers, you're more creative you're more clever. You're you're on. Tran-. You're on edge or Microsoft, is always about we're GONNA make the best computers in our numbers in our ram is this and this and Mac never really sold that I mean they talk about benefits but it's really more about what it does for you and how it releases your freedom and because of that people look at it very differently and that's why there's so much passion for apple compared to Microsoft.

Jeff Ceo Of Brand Licensing Agency Bmw Strollers Porsches Sunglas Jeff Lyman BMW Jeff Lottman Hanna-Barbera Us Postal Service Apple Russ Jay Z Founder CEO Microsoft Chris Disney Wanna Tran Lamborghini
How Belonging Through Dignity, Honors You  With John Krownapple  #007 - burst 01

Loving The Work You Do

01:10 min | 10 months ago

How Belonging Through Dignity, Honors You With John Krownapple #007 - burst 01

"It's hard to listen because you have to go through your own journey and Now, that's when you you really believe what it is that you're doing At least that's been my experience I would love to be able to save people from their own unpleasant journey but. Found that yeah. The MESSI. Bernie. Brown someone who I love to read in she has. The magic is in the mess messy part of in the middle and so when you're going through a transformation similar to A. A Caterpillar transforming into a butterfly There's this really messy disgusting part in the Middle when it comes to butterflies They They the Caterpillar literally digested its own body so it's really gross. Reform into something completely new so I mean you and I were talking before about divorce and yeah, any type of Tran. transformative process that you go through you rebuild yourself into something new, but there's a messy part that in my first book I wrote about it is sitting in the darkness.

Bernie Brown Tran.
They Call Us The Paper Tigers

They Call Us Bruce

06:09 min | 10 months ago

They Call Us The Paper Tigers

"Hello, and welcome to another edition of they call us Bruce unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asia America. I bill you and I'm Jeff Yang and we are here. With the director and writer of I gotTA. Say just one of my favorite films to have come out this year not just because it hits square and kind of like the intersection of. Sweet spots for me. But also because it really revives John that is kind of synonymous with. They cost Bruce in some ways, and that film is the paper tigers and the filmmaker in question is bow tran. Bow. Thank you for joining us on the PODCAST. Welcome. Hello. Hello. Thanks for having. Me Guess. Big Fan. At. Likewise. No seriously about so this film is basically about a set of martial arts enthusiasts young young guys who have grown up learning under a master. who have kept on growing up as a were. Gotten Kinda midlife and found themselves in a situation where they have to kind of recover the skills that they've lost and like I said for me, it really is just at the intersection of a lot of stuff that I care about and or am. So. Thank you for making it. And Yeah, thank you for talking to us about. My pleasure. Thanks for watching. Really glad to hear you guys enjoy. I let me say like, let me express a little bit of. Sorrow and regret. and sadness on your behalf because. The world being what it is the circumstances being what it is. Many people are going to experience. This movie are not going to experience movie the way I really think they should. Experience it which is with an audience because this is such a fun crowd-pleasing movie We should say like I saw it advertised as a as a martial arts comedy which it is. But it's a bummer that we're not people aren't going to really get to see it in that ideal situation. Yeah I. Mean it's kind of a it's kind of a surreal thing to go through this year with all festivals. Now pivoting to virtual and we had a world premiere couple of weeks ago at Fantasia, which is usually out of Montreal and We did have a zoom QNA afterwards. And is actually fun because it was the first time. The actors saw the movie for the first time and all that and then Cuny was over and I got kicked out of the Zoom Room. There I was sitting in the dark? The World Premiere. Back. But. You know you know we we may do I, mean. That's kind of the way things are, and we just have to Kinda forge on. But Yeah we all had always hoped in envisioned to be able to play this in front of crowd because I think that's kind of like the best experience at least for me growing up as well. Just watching movies that I love. And then be able to kind of bring that. Old old-timey feeling back again. But hopefully, maybe oh Soon soon, enough will be a on our recovery in fields. Kind of have a place when we can share it altogether. I. I kinda figured out what the the genre of this sort of ends up being in white works for me. So well, it's basically old school meets old just. But. I mean these AVIV, the the issue of where we are. Now how this all landing I I will say that. There's something really special about seeing the movie mean it's taken a while to get here and I know this of course, I was fortunate enough smart enough to be early on the bandwagon on this thing asked for it in the kick starter as was Hudson Yang. And Shout shout out. Yeah and it feels a little bit like it's bringing with it. A breath of what it was like before all this happened I. Mean you know we're for me the the things that make the movie just. Feel, special to me is. It's it's the kind of film that you can't really make in quarantine at all. It's film that it's not like a giant. You Know Effects Laden blockbuster, but it has the the effects that you can only do with people are trained and skillful right which is. People finding hand hand. Real. Martial, artists in. Most cases. Who are are going head to head with choreography that you can't hide right there. This does really feel to me and we seen other attempts before. Like A legit revival of that The film right and? I mean I wanted to kind of dig a little into your inspirations and influences in deciding to. Revive this Jonah to begin with. And here a little more about the way this journey started. Yeah I mean I could have imagined. No. You guys have been tracking project for a long time. We've been you know I, I was with Mike Alaska's my producer and we pitched this at the C. Three Project Market V. C. You know twenty eleven in front of like Daniel Day Kim and Desirous Yamashita in. A Teddy Zee. Like nine years ago when I had a one page treatment and it was just like. A hair we are. So I wish I could say we planned it, but we really just got in by Cheney chin-chin in terms of just shooting this film at the at the end of summer last year two, thousand nineteen, and then we were imposed all the way up until you know when the lockdown started happening and all that stuff. So yeah I mean literally is that Snapshot Wife Before. the pandemic and a lot of ways. So it's just it's just kind of worked out that way and if we waited any any additional months or waited, you know in any way to to shoot the film I, don't think we re we would be here having this conversation. Yeah. So it's Kinda trippy looking back on just the timing of it all.

Bruce Jeff Yang Teddy Zee Asia America Montreal John Midlife Director Zoom Room Hudson Yang Jonah Cheney Cuny Writer Mike Alaska Daniel Day Kim Desirous Yamashita Producer
"tran" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

07:47 min | 11 months ago

"tran" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"I read into your title. Is. Is this this whole sense of sadness of regrets of disappointment and then gone and not not not that it's final but that there there's been a transition like you you've moved past a lot of that struggle. Not that. There's not more struggle ahead of you but anyway, I I think there's that piece to in the title at least I read into it and it gives me some hope. Yeah Yeah, no I appreciate that I really liked it. You know I think it's I think it's operating on a lot of different levels and and and also like it's just like a sweet pun to you know Oh. Yes. Sure. That too. Yeah. Well okay. Now, I've got to ask you as we get to the end here Phuc. What are you right next? You can't write a second memoir yet. It's too soon. It's really funny. Yeah, I mean I don't feel that way. You know a lot of people have a lot of people written me and they're like, what? Like what like how they couldn't believe that I ended? The book is, school graduation. Latin and Tattoo you. Know like I'm not sure I definitely am interested it was writing is probably one of the hardest things of ever done top five for sure and You know like much like Greek right? I was like Oh shit I wanted to do that like that sounds hard. So I'm I'm. GonNa I'm actually GONNA be talking with my agent later this summer just about like what what's next you know like I'm not sure I've got gas in the tank for writing I. Think for me like it's really important that it. Comes from a place of passion. You know I've got super stoked about it. I don't WanNa waste anyone's time like certainly I don't WanNa waste your time and writing a book that like you know you read it. You're like, why did I read that you know? I I feel really fortunate that I'm in a situation where I don't need to write for tenure or like my career you only yeah also but I but I love writing I, just want to make sure that like I'm you know I'm writing with a lot of fire and excitement. So whatever that project is it might be fiction I'm not sure I'm interested in the I'm really interested in the challenge of writing fiction. So we'll see I don't know you have suggestions. What are you? What are you long? Yeah la I just finished. I guess it's a three books into a series that I hadn't heard of. By Joe, Ebay he's a Japanese American. Fiction writer and he's created this African American from the hood. Detective. Private I name Ike is his nickname is. And and so joey has so He's coming on. Pretty soon but Joanna grew up just loving sherlock holmes kind of stuff but he's he's dropped it into the hood and in Los Angeles. And apparently yeah, it's called high. Five. That's the latest one and bad kept guessing till the last page is like, wow, really interesting. Yeah. It's On route like a thriller crime detective. Yeah. Yeah Yeah Yeah and and so you know hats off to him and it took me a little bit to realize that his protagonists was African American. I. Just because reading the name and it's like Oh okay and they go with that and that's part of what I want explorer. For A non African American author to actually create this. African American character and you know not not just automatically get slammed for doing that. I yeah tricky. Tricky. Yeah I mean this is a real I mean I think like? You know if I write fiction or like, let's say any person of color or Lindsey Glynn. Asian person. If they write fiction like do the protagonist to be -ation, you know why had would is the operating assumption there you know like because I don't believe in like right what you know like that seems really lazy to me like I would rather like right should I don't know but then also like if I write a book that doesn't have Asian characters in it like what does that what does that say? If you figure it out. Let me know. Why I know that you're giving me great question to ask joke because I don't think there's Asian American characters in his book and in this atmosphere of you know cultural procreation paranoia you know he he seems to be doing. A stellar job at pulling it off. So yeah, you have to listen to that episode might life. Yeah my thinking is maybe you'll be working on a screenplay for a Netflix TV series. I'm. GonNa. Come back to that especially because especially because of how you ended with your your graduation of high school speech and then you end up in the diner that just seemed like the closing scene of a Netflix. Series and it's just like you know I. Don't know if that excites you to kind of revisit this memoir. But I'm sure it takes work to put it into the form of an episodic series. But. But again, I just think that would be fascinating. Yeah. Thanks. Thanks I mean we definitely I mean you know there's they're definitely people who are interested in talking to my agent about it I mean. The end of the day you know who knows Nothing happens but I'm also like I think like you know as much as I veered out of my lane like I'm not sure like filmmaking is like a thing. With. There are people who do it incredibly well, and I would rather you not micromanage it and just you know find a person who work I really love and just trust the process you know. But Yeah I. Thanks thanks for your excitement your vision for this as a series or something or some something cinematic. I mean they're certainly lots in it. That's like the that would make for hilarious a television. I mean. Yeah and I feel like it I don't know I'm not sure I think also like totally right it's like how do you film something like has comedic episodes also has like sad stuff and you know I think it can be done. You know I. Just you know who knows especially now with coronas like you know. Who knows what studios in what you know? Yeah. Yeah. Form you know a pony up. To do that because now they're just like hemorrhaging cash. Nights. Are was in three avengers eight you know. Like. Like. Yeah. While again, thank you so very much for pouring. So much of your wit and your life and your truth into this first book if people, WanNa get it is it available all the typical? Places and. It's available everywhere books are sold. You know obviously, I've put a plug out for people to support their local independent bookstores because those are you know the mom pop bookshops they're the life of your community. Yeah, you can get. Know. WALMART DOT COM. And do you have a social media presence if people want to continue to? Follow you. Yeah. Yeah, I'm on. I am on instagram. My handle is Pook Skywalker so. Yeah. Yeah. Someone Cigarette for sure. Okay Well all all the best to you great success for your book and they. Just want to really encourage our nate nationwide and global audience that You don't have to be Vietnamese American I'm not vietnamese-american..

Netflix Pook Skywalker Los Angeles Lindsey Glynn Ebay writer WALMART Ike joey Joanna Joe
"tran" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

07:04 min | 11 months ago

"tran" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"Yeah Yeah. So if they give you grief, you know I'll write you a note. Exactly. Yeah. No I thought. It was just. It was clearly your lens of your experience in your family. You know now does that violate some communitarian Asian culture you know rule that you don't get to have your own Lens We don't hang our dirty laundry out in public on. Sure. There are some you know some infractions there but in this day and age, it's refreshing in fact if You know you talked about dumb luck and how you got to write this book food I would say. I if I had a magic wand I, my next step for your memory Dr would be for someone to pick it up and want to do a Netflix movie like A. You know man. Coming basing. We've watched four seasons of thirteen reasons why you know. And and and and I just think you know in a much more upgraded. Sort of way. This is this is a wonderful story because of you're transferring your authenticity and yet from a very. Invisible a person's a point of view. In the media and I, you know I wouldn't be surprised at all. In fact, I would encourage it if someone out there is like Oh. Yeah. That's the next big Netflix's movie or series. Thanks I gosh I I'm so flattered I, appreciate that and I I mean we're living in this really interesting age where yeah I mean they're their stories getting told that I never thought I would see on the big screen right? Like I think when fresh boat the TV series. Hin People are so excited about it, and like there's some referencing Margaret chose kind of like stalled attempts like you know when she had her show and So again like I think it's just like the right. The timing is right. You know that like you know Eddie walked book has shown that like there is an audience for the Asian American story and and that, and they're not all the same I. Think if anything you know I, appreciate you know Viet and I have had a conversation in. Like. He was joking but I think you know kind of how serious? Thanks for trail-blazing for like you know Vietnamese Weirdos because I think we're not all. Doctors. Lawyers, and engineer. Yeah. You on and that is real. That's a real pressure that like a lot of Vietnamese and Asian kids have to be doctors, lawyers and engineers but like also like we can also be like tours and Latin teachers in. A like our humanity is is just as rich and varied and dysfunctional as anybody else's. So we just haven't seen it represented yet. Yeah now, have you gotten much response from the you know maybe it's too broad of a label, the Vietnamese American community to your book. I have. Yeah. I have. It's. Like the most amazing thing is the number of. Vietnamese while I mean they're adults now but a Vietnamese people who've written to me and said I thought I was the only kid only Vietnamese who's into punk rock because I mean you I didn't know any other Vietnamese. Kids in Punk rock and it's all it's just amazing. You know and I was like. Know part me it's like Oh. God. We should have a face sport face o'clock support group or something. But also you know part of it is that. You know when the when the US government resettled Vietnamese refugees and Nineteen, seventy-five, they they had specific policy was called the refugee dispersion policy and didn't want. Vietnamese people to form ethnic enclaves and so they spread them out all over the US and didn't really let them be close to each other. So like like so my story is not unique of like a Vietnamese ailing growing up in a town with no other Vietnamese people around I mean I think the US government. This is going really speed up. It's like sink or swim right? Like they like you the deep. Learning English. Good luck you know. And it's true like I mean we did we did like. It sped up our acculturation very quickly. You know yeah. But I think part. Part of what I hope readers can wrestle with is like at what price, right like yeah. And that that came through loud and clear in your writing I appreciated. Yeah. You're not so enamored of being finding pathways to assimilation you're saying, yeah. Yeah what cost? Yeah. Thank you. I really appreciate the NASA subtlety that I hope is not it's not to subtle is. Know because it is like we pay a price on that like assimilation is like there's something inherently racist about even the idea of assimilation, right? On. Culture is valued over another culture that one is like the the normal, the operating norm, and then the other one is a deviation right here. You know it's it's tricky but but I'm like I'm the experiment you know like I'm I'm Frankenstein's monster. So it's like it's Not all I can do is tell you the story you know. Yeah. Well, you told it very well. Explained the title you know because it sounds like you know what used to be called Saigon in Vietnam but it's There's the CY SIG age comma that's gone. It's not there anymore words that come from. I wanted to have a title that amount. It's operating for me on a lot of levels you know one is you know the idea of loss, right? So it's What what we lose the process of assimilating or Americanizing You know I also wanted to reclaim the way that Saigon the city is written, which is written as two words but in in the US media and the press, they just ride it as one word. So I wanted to like sort of which back on the right at us towards gin and also you know I wanted to create like a metaphor for my experience, which is that it looks one way and it sounds another way. And there's always confusion about what what it is. When you say it, you know like that. That readers are always going to have to be like, Oh Saigon. Oh. No I have to spell it out. You know which is very much like many. Areas of having to explain their existence starting with hey, you know you know my name is Phuc notes. UC L. P. as in Paul H. as in Harry sounds. Like Yeah Ordering A. Like, fifteen minutes to. Put My order. Or. Are you know like my daughter's name is John Nasa and she has a starbucks name, right? Exactly exactly. starbucks I forgot about that. Yeah I mean 'cause I..

US Netflix Vietnamese American community Saigon engineer starbucks NASA Phuc Margaret Eddie John Nasa Viet UC L. P. Vietnam Paul H.
"tran" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

07:03 min | 11 months ago

"tran" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"Know. Describe that evolution of yourself. Yeah. I mean I just you know again, kind of like Dumb Luck my parent we moved into a house. There were the kid across the street and He sold me his skateboard and so I got into punk rock through skateboarding. But like ski and then sort of you start skateboarding there just weren't that many kids in my town who skateboarded. So we kind of like all found each other and you know in the eighties like skateboarding culture in Punk rock culture were were sort of deeply interconnected and so that got me interested in sort of like punk rock music and culture, and then you know it's like when you're in. Eighth grade and you're angry and you know like you know you don't really have an outlet and then all of a sudden you hear like young kids you know singing songs that early really angry you're like, what is this? You know like I remember it was like the first time I ever heard swearing in a song like the F bomb and I was like you can swear in a song food. Rebelling to know. I'm doing that. Yeah. Yeah. Totally. Totally I was like Holy Shit like all right. This is this is really like dangerous. You know like it just it just like. The idea of. You know. Fighting Society right like that. You know like once you're aware of racism nearly what do I do like nobody cares and then like you hear punk rock and like they're singing about like fighting society in like fighting racism and like just you know fighting conformity and like the norm and all those things I was like, yeah, that's me. That's that's what. I'm against you know like I just WanNa to have you know at the end of the day it wasn't about fuck. Society for me was really about like can I just have space of my own where people can respect me for I am known I I feel like there's nothing more important in punk rock culture than that right like this sort of. And creating a space for yourself and a community to support that So that was just incredible for me as a young kid. Now it also though had a kind of conformance uniform. Hates. To, talk about with the new school year starts in your mom is trying to get you the school closed thing I thought that was hilarious. Yeah. Yeah. No, it was just like you know. Yeah. I mean, it's it was the eighties right so you know when I was checking in with my friend who was like the eighties had like A. Head of very kind of. You know like you were a Jock, you're geek. You know you're a prep. You know you're a redneck and until that in in and of itself is very conformist but you know so like if you were into skateboarding punk rock, like you kind of had to look the part if only so that you could find your tribe quickly you know. So you're in the mall you could see other kids and you'd be like Oh. Yeah. You know kind of like flying a slag right Yeah. So like I like my mom took me back to school shopping and like I'm wearing nola ripped up jeans I'm like I want ripped up jeans and she's like are you kidding me like you know like? Are trying to you know she's like we literally are trying to avoid buying clothes at have holes and Ripston. That's right. And they're. The ones are more expensive. Yeah Yeah. Yeah and I'm like I WANNA go to goodwill by close. She's like no, we're not poor anymore. You know like we can go to like a real store. McDonald's cool. She she you know she was like what the Hell's wrong with you. Children this connect. You know like thrift store you know like is because we'd like we'd gone to thrift stores but that was when we were poor and like you know she understand it in of course why would you understand it? Now did did she get? Excited when she saw how much lower her back to school clothing bill was. She didn't but my dad did my. A. Penny pincher. Yeah. No but my mom like they just like they were so freaked out I mean this wasn't in the book. So freaked like punk rock thing that like they they actually sent me away. You know like they sent me to Vietnamese Gulag, which was basically like my grandparents house for the summer. Grandparents. Lived in. Oklahoma so they were just like, oh, my gosh. Yeah and then they the worst bar they sent my brother along with brother didn't do anything. They're just like, okay both the you get the fuck Outta here and they said, they sent me to Oklahoma for a summer thinking that would cure me of my punk rock. Doubled down. Wasn't good. Now your brother has he read your memoir. He has yeah and What's what's his response been? Yeah, it's it's great. You know he was the person. That I was most nervous about reading it to be honest just because I'm closest with my brother and. We sort of have like the most shared experiences. So I was I was really worried. He was gonna read I'm like dude, this is not what writing but he rented and he was. he you know he texted meany You got it like camp. You nailed it like you captured our our childhood you captured Carlisle, you captured like the dynamics of our family. You know I think if I gotten any two of the three things I would have been really excited. But I it. Thumbs up from my brother that that sort of captured the spirit of our childhood. Was, really exciting for me. and. He said, you know if he if he had written a book, it would have been a little bit different but sure you know different people in different experiences but yeah no. Yes. So I got up from Lou and he's a lawyer so you know he's litigious. Oh. Yeah. Well, I mean that's got to be probably wanting me your cherished reviews. Yeah absolutely. Absolutely. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. For sure I don't know if my parents have read it you know my. My next question. Yeah, yeah my my mother is no functionally she's illiterate on. So you know I mean the book is just to literary for her into my dad can read it I. Don't know if he has. You, know I think it's tricky for them because I, I you know I think with at least with my my parents. and. Maybe in Vietnamese households at many of them at least the ones that I've been in like it's like you can't critique your parents like there's no such thing as. You your ungrateful, Phuc. Exactly. Yeah. Totally it's like they're either on a pedestal or you're shitting all over them. But yeah, there's a lot nuance in that conversation and I think if any so I think I I worry and I you know I can't control it so like all I can do is put a book out there as I presented my parents in in a nuanced kind of three dimensional way you know that like that they're complex people right like the they tried the best they could. You know they went through some Traumatic experiences and you know in their their three dimensional people. They're not I. Hope I hope it didn't come through that like they felt cartoonish monster ish you know not at all. Thanks..

skateboarding Oklahoma Phuc McDonald nola Ripston A. Head meany Carlisle Lou
"tran" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

07:33 min | 11 months ago

"tran" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"Dude, like that just seems so inappropriate right and then he rolls up his sleeves and he used to be a drummer and a heavy metal band before he became a banker. And he was like sleeve tattoos all the way past shoulders right and and he's like. Yeah I didn't anticipate this career, and so I just know that these rich older folks with all the money they probably wouldn't trust me if they saw my arms, it's so what a weird prejudice right I mean. Yeah. I know truly I think we're we're moving beyond that little bit. But it's still there. It's yeah it's bizarre I. Don't I don't understand it but it's funny I mean I think it's worth. It's we're talking about because I think it's interesting the for everybody to unpack the assumptions that they have right about what does it mean to be tattooed person in like? Yeah you know are you clean? Are you trustworthy drugs? You worship the devil and the? Offer to be like an Asian person heavily. You know that the whole thing I mean I remember like when my mom I only found out that I was tattooed she like cried and she's like oriented. Nineties you know she's like are you in a gang and? then. She didn't like say jeeze. What is wrong legitimately. I mean. Like. Yeah, she lost her by but yeah, fine. Now. I definitely want you to share the story of of win. You had this moment when you wanted to change your name to an anglicised name and and I'll tell you you know. Vietnamese names still are a challenge to me somewhat right and so I was looking up how to say your name and it's like well, it's not even pronounce like Luke like the it's like more like fuck. Right. That's on like Oh what. But then he he really seems enamored of the Luke sounds especially Luke skywalker. So. So I love I love that story when you decided 'cause 'cause you already I'm sure were made fun of Noah's GonNa Save Up Right? They're saying and then then then they mispronounced that. So, tell tell our listeners if you would like what happened when you decided I done with the Vietnamese name. Yeah. And it wasn't. You know it was really funny like I like first through fourth grade like kids actually let me at least in Carlisle, like they would make fun of my Ray, my nationality but it was never like a thing about my name like no one made fun of my name. But then like in fifth grade like like the the the profanity sort of crept in, you know like I try to think about like when kids start dropping f bombs right and. You, know kids are like, fuck you fuck this or whatever, and I was like, Oh, I was like shit that sounds a lot like Phuc. Like, okay like that doesn't sound good that like my name sounds a lot like So I thought all right I'M GONNA change my name. I'm not avoid like being like Oh fuck you because it just like it was like that's annoying and whatever. So so fifth grade and I was like, okay. My patron saint patrons paintings were raised. Catholic was Saint Peter I. was like okay and I was like L. Super Comic books in like Spider, Man's house like alright yet under good. Player. Yep. stolid choice right. A fifth grade I roll in and tell my fifth grade teacher I tell my parents I i. I'm GonNa. Change my name and get whatever. That's fine. But you. The the almost like didn't even care like in and what's interesting is like because like so many people in my family had already changed like change their names to anglicized things like. My aunt you know goes by Michelle and like her my uncle goes by Paul you know my dad who's Vietnamese name is Chan. It just was easy for people to say. You know my mom change her name like two times. You know she went from like she lay changing him to like Kim and Lucy, and then you know it was like prince only changed his name from. Puff. Daddy, right. He goes to like puffy and then did he was like Oh my God. So you mom eventually ended up just a symbol. Right. So now now your little, your younger brother was already named Luke wasn't that Lu Lu Lu Okay Okay Emi yeah. So where he was born in the US, more parents are like Yep we're just we're just bypassing all the Vietnamese and we're just GONNA call Louis which is like a French name does Drago's Vietnam So there like that's cool So I. So I told my parents went and changed my name to Peter. Go into school I tell my fifth grade teacher of Michael Cam. Now I'm GonNa go by Peter now, and he's like, all right. That's fine. Makes this big announcement and all my classmates are like all right that's cool and and I think Cardi dodged a bullet. Everyone's cool. No one's GONNA use my name as a profanity. You know I'm GonNa go with Peter Awesome and then and then I'm playing on the playground in this kids like, Hey, suck. My Peter and aw shit why an all laughing and you know like I didn't know that like, Peter you know at the time was like I think it's antiquated now but Peter was another. APPEANAS. Right. So then like kids are laughing and I was like wait why man and so like I literally changed my name like a word, the kids were just going to be like Oh that's that's another word for Dick I was like, right so then I just. For one day keener I got cold to suck my Peter, and then I just told my teacher I was like you know what? I'm just GONNA go back to and then he was like, yeah. Okay whatever. Humiliating this is like their list is like, can someone give me a list of all the names you know like you know? Richard and p Dan Yeah. Seymore Butts. Like Yeah Comey whatever boy. Why I remember growing up at our little bilingual Chinese, Baptist Church in Sacramento, and there was an. Older gentleman and his first name was Phuc right the I guess there's a Chinese name that and you know thank God his last name was in you which is actually a Chinese last thing. Or. If His last thing was Li but I I was like. Oh man had. His name was you I mean, how? How many times he gets beat up? I mean, yeah, do you follow? Did you follow the recent thing at the the Laney Community College where like a professor told Vietnamese student? So her name was Phuc I don't know how she feels. Yes right. Right boy. Named fuck boy you know and like yeah. Go He. You think he got suspended and lost job and all you know it's just bizarre I, mean I think it's also like. You know at the end of the day. It's like what are white people comfortable doing or saying Like the in the Mexican sort of Hispanic and Latino world, right like they don't have any problems with like Pedro or like Jose on except the only exception I think is what when white people say the name exactly the way it should be said is like when you get to Jesus. I was just thinking that. Then the the Latin guy goes no, it's too we. All right right it's like, yeah it's just like Jesus right like, no, no I'm calling you zoos. Funny. Now, how did you get into the whole punk rock scene?.

Saint Peter I. Luke skywalker Phuc Dan Yeah Lu Lu Lu Peter Awesome Seymore Butts Dick I Michelle Noah Laney Community College Carlisle Cardi Baptist Church US Michael Cam Ray Pedro Li
"tran" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

07:34 min | 11 months ago

"tran" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"You could be an emperor well, what it did was and I find this fascinating is it kind of baked into Asian culture and I would guess it seeped into Vietnamese culture to this idea that. So if you're still a pig farmer, that's your fault because you were too lazy to put the effort in to take the test right or if you only got to third level government worker. It's because you're too lazy to study for the fourth level and when I yeah when I read that I was like all that explains so much about what you talked about how effort is seems to be everything and so your fault if you're not at a certain level because you didn't put the effort, you didn't want it. Yeah which we I don't believe. I. Don't believe that I mean. Yeah. Yeah Yeah Yeah. That's really interesting. I love. I. Didn't know that about the Confucian system there the hierarchy that's fascinating. Yeah. I think what it what it did and I see this senior memoir to is it led to kind of compare worth by comparison. Yeah okay. So it's like Oh. What kind of car do they drive compared to my car? Like what's did their kids go to versus Mike Kid and it's like it's this terrible sets off the the there's no inner sense of worth. It's always measuring by comparison. Oh. Absolutely I mean that's I mean I don't know about Chinese without certainly Vietnamese family also like this idea of like, you know like you're losing face like the Blues Shame in the community you know like 'cause like you have like an asshole kid or like a weird kid and so like your parents are super embarrassed about you and Blah Blah it's like adult. For me like I, think that was the most liberating part of growing up in the US at least as far as I can understand is that like I had a deep sense of self agency that I don't know if I would have had growing up in Vietnam. Let's say You know I see I see my aunt's like really burdened by like the sense of filial piety saying that it's always a bad thing right but but they can't let. Their miserably, my aunts, some of my aunts, not all of them but like they're, they're really like they're unhappy and they're happy because they're burdened by these you know the sense of duty in debt and you know what I'm saying that like you can't manage that they have no sense of south and they don't know how to self care I guess the line, right like the idea of like taking care of themselves and like going to counseling. Being happy content people is just like it's just not even vocabulary. It's it's A. Bummer. Yeah. Yeah. Now. Now let's back up a step. Yeah. The idea to use these classic an books as your chapter framing 's where did that come from I've never seen that before and you as you would introduce each chapter within the next book on like now, how's this going to apply? Dorian, gray right and is like, oh, my God it totally it totally works. Yeah Yeah Yeah. So it's funny I appreciate that I love liberty like like you you kind of went into it with like arms crossed. Right I love great You know I when the agent approached my agent Sarah Lovett approached me in two thousand, sixteen like the first thing she was curious about is like does he have the chops to write What's He gonNa sail does he have anything to say you say an interesting way and you know at the time I was teaching during the day I was tattooing at night I have two kids and family and Like, I'm really busy and she you know she I was kind of ghosting singer a little bit for a few months than. Kind you nice. At every month. You'd like pigmy and be like, Hey, like are you interested in writing something like I'd love just like just write whatever you want. You know like I just I'm curious and so finally after a couple of months I was like okay. I'll write a book but I'm GonNa Right at the way I to write it, and so I just thought I'm GonNa right like the sort of. The tackiest sort of like the biggest kind of flavor bomb that I can think of like they're really summed up who I was right. I'll write about like classic literature I'm GonNa write about like if you right about punk rock and. Blah Blah Blah skateboarding. All the things anti actually wrote the the prologue like pretty much exactly as it is like with with the Nori Orien- gray like that was the thing that basically got me the book deal like I wrote A. Yeah and and so I at the time I didn't have the structure of the book but I just I riffed on Dorien gray and sort of my feelings for the Vietnam. The Vietnamese kid at school and how it made me feel and why and Blah Blah Blah and and so when we When she read it, she was like, could you write your whole book this way like just to use literature framework the. Hell Hell. Yeah And so I. Just these you know I I have in my brain anyway I was like these are like my ten twelve favorite books of all time and I know why? Like you know I think when I was young like I just I leaned on books. So heavily as a way to survive and make sense of my childhood. So it was you know that was a natural fit and it was how my brain worked anyway was to kind of like refracted my life experience through the books that I read. So so that was just like a natural outgrowth of like the the weird you know kind of. Slot machine my. Stick things in. Triple Cherries kind of thing. Well. I found it fascinating how the Public Library I mean this is the nest you know where the eggs were hatched hung how did that with our listeners? How did the public library become this space of exploration and adventure and safety and all these things to this? Kid in Carlisle Pennsylvania. Yeah. I mean it started with my dad for sure. I mean my dad in Vietnam was a lawyer and when he came to the US like. You know he didn't speak the language didn't have any money I mean you got a job driving a concrete nick sir you know and then he ended up working at a tire factory for almost twenty years. Was a big fall for him just in terms of status and prestige and all that But the very first things he did was he went and got a library card and he just he couldn't believe it. He was like the Public Library he's. All of humanity's accumulated knowledge you know that I have access to for free. So we went to the library all the time, and then as a high school were. High. Got You know I got a job at the library and so anytime, my dad needed to do anything like that was. Fixing the car like fixing the drier. That's right. Yeah and you would just go to the library, check out like a repair manual go home, and then like break it three times and then fix it on the fourth try. So this is this is before youtube videos of how to do that. Yeah. My Dad was like I think refugees early the original like diy yeah. Sort of like ethos. Until, like any time I needed to learn about anything like punk rock like the first time I heard about learned about punk rock I was like I'm going to go the library like read. Rolling Stones History of rock and roll like about what Punk Rock Butts very funny. So that was that was my exposure to learning about anything was like, I like look it up. You know because there wasn't the Internet obviously in the eighty S. Yeah and didn't. Yeah. Didn't you have a a? Was it an English teacher that that really pushed you encourage.

Public Library Vietnam US Asian culture Mike Kid Nori Orien- gray youtube Sarah Lovett Dorian pigmy Dorien gray Carlisle Pennsylvania
"tran" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

05:40 min | 11 months ago

"tran" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"You know I I sort of pitched mytalk to the Audi- of the executive committee and they. Sort of shockingly were like, yeah, that sounds really interesting and so during the preparation and rehearsals or the tax talk, they had this refrain that they kept using. They're like this is the talk of your life. This is the talk of your life you know like and I think they are saying that to make sure that the speakers who are preparing took it really seriously you know but but I took it one step further and I thought well, you know this is the only platform of I'm ever going. To have to talk about my experience, the talk of my life as it were I'm going for like I'm swinging for the fences and I'm GonNa, take all of the sort of compartmentalized parts of my life that have made me who I am and I'm just GonNa try and talk about all of it and twelve minutes like it sounds really. Yeah. So I was like, okay eighties culture check John Hughes check low I love of languages you know like Star Wars punk rock like being a refugee like the whole thing. And I just thought. Well, if I'M GONNA, fail like you know like fail boldly gum. Yeah. Yeah and so song for the fences and and the response to the tax talk was just incredible intellect people really excited about it and like it got picked up by NPR and then like four years later. Until after that I was it was the first time that I'd ever publicly talked about my experience at all. You know for a long time I was like who can I swear on your podcast? The daily. Okay so you know for a long time I was like you know who the fuck wants to hear my story like it's so weird felt. So it didn't sound like anyone else's stories. I just like nobody's interested but you know without response was like Oh shit like I. Guess People want to hear more of this and so I started doing like live storytelling things in Portland you know kind of like moths style thing. Yeah. Yeah. Did a couple of those and then and then a literary agent saw my Ted Talk in two thousand sixteen and she approached me she just kinda cold called me. Like you you have an interesting story and you have like an interesting way to tell it are you interested in writing a book and I was like, yeah sure. Why not you know adventure starts with? No, right? Yeah. I love that I love that. Though. Yeah. That's that was the genesis of it. Really well, you know give NPR another plug for you how even heard about you and your book is we have a longtime listener who's actually european-american and he heard your interview on NPR and he immediately message me is it I I just heard this Guy Phuc Tran and his book, and he's just finished reading your book by the way and I really think you should get them on and I'm like. All right. We're open to suggestions. Sure. Yeah and so I, I just want to give him a shout-out, but it's all these little. It's yeah. It's all these little media exposures. Because otherwise, how how do people find out about what you've done? Yeah and and I I want us all also say like I think. Some of it's just dumb luck. You know like I think you know like I think. I think in the in America especially, and I, think also like an Asian families like like we really WanNa talk all success up to hard work right effort like yeah, and it's really get it like it's also like this. Delicious. It's a myth right because like sometimes like it's luck too and sometimes things don't break though the way that you want them to break and also in a name like. that. I, think it's a part of the dangerous of that myth is then people who aren't successful. We can also blame them right and the. You didn't work hard enough and it's the I know what sometimes they're just it just doesn't break your way in so I you know as much as I wanNA take full. One hundred percent credit for what what little success I've had with the book and all that stuff like I'm also just like in the right place at the right time and I'm lucky and I just happen to have a story that people wanna hear 'cause I think like ten fifteen years ago like who WanNa do new memoir Like yeah. But now there's so many people don't trail-blazing like you know via is incredible trailblazer for AETNA. ME's an Asian American writers than just. Like. Mean even in Star Wars like the fact that there's like a trend in the cast of Star Wars. Let's going you're. Standing. I'm standing on the shoulders of giants for sure. Yeah. You will. I'll say two quick things about luck versus effort. At the first real quick thing is that even as luck broke your way, if you didn't have the chops, you couldn't have delivered and and you are you are definitely a wonderful writer, a very authentic in your voicing, and again, we'll get into it a little bit later just the way you structured the book I don't know if that was your editor that's all coming from you. It's genius. Okay. So so you know you can have luck, but then you don't have. And it's just like nothing. Yeah no absolutely I totally agree. I. Totally. Agree. You person at the right time. Yeah right and now the second thing I'd say is, yeah, I I would I've taught graduate school on Asian American stuff and so I got into some of the confusion thinking and I don't know how much you're where this but you know without getting too long diatribe. Confucius hundreds of years before they use this, he was really upset at this strict hierarchical kind of rigid system culture in China. So he developed this these layers of tests that anyone could take and you know you just have to study for and if. You past the first level then you get the study for and pass may be the second level. So you can rise all the way up to high government official..

NPR Audi John Hughes Portland AETNA executive committee China Phuc Tran America official writer editor
"tran" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

07:05 min | 11 months ago

"tran" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"Libraries, schools, senior centers, and so much more We have so much to lose if people do not participate in the census because we really need to show that people are here to make sure that we get the resources that we deserve. Amen to all of that will thank you so much for putting in this big plug for this folks. We cover all the states. We we represent a lot of different people and families neighbors. Let's do our part. Let show everyone that everyone counts everyone matters and everyone's GonNa fill out the census. Thank you so much June. So Much Ken. Breath. Man. My guest this week is Phuc Tran and he is a classical languages teacher and a tattoo artist living in Portland McCain. Vietnamese immigrants and a recently published author of his memoirs Saigon a misfits memoir of great books, Punk Rock, and the fight to fit in welcome to the. Hey thanks so much for having me can such a delight to be here? Well, I'm going to begin this. Conversation by just kind of making your ego explode. I'm GonNa read a couple of. Really positive reviews that are found online about your recently published book. So the first one you know maybe he's a little bit of a biased person, but he's a friend of hers Vietnam New in Pulitzer Prize winning author, of fiction. He says the United States was already a better country because Phuc Tran refused to change his name. Then he went even further and changing this country by giving us this bald funny and Profane. Memoir a portrait of a young punk refugee and of Harland, America itself, each of them as defiant and compelling as the other and then the other one I want to read is by Sarah Corbett. WHO's the coauthor of New York Times bestselling house in the sky she says I started. Reading this book and couldn't stop and that's true for me to Phuc Tran has written the great American nerd Punk, Boyhood memoir a story this rollicking and laugh out loud funny while also offering a piercingly profound, the race, the challenges of assimilation and the inherently defiant act of growing up ernest ops observant and diamond sharp. This is new voice of unmistakable talent I'll follow this writer anywhere. So you're going to have yeah, you'RE GONNA have to get a restraining order of this corporate here. You. Just say that. I don't read very many memoirs and So I don't I don't necessarily know this genre that well. But the way that you framed years using favorite kind of classic books per chapter and like where's he going with this right and and you know I'm third generation so my parents were born here. And just reading through your book seeing through the Lens of a first generation kid. Growing up in Pennsylvania. Carlisle. Pennsylvania you know it actually kind of brought me back to have empathy that I never had before for the first generation immigrant Asian kids it would drop into our schools because I was already. So assimilated I didn't have an Asian name, all that kind of stuff and I mean you you you laid a heavy guilt trip on man. I'm sorry. I love that you know expanding empathy rate like that's so yeah. I'm I'm delighted to hear that not the guilt trip part but the. Connecting with a story that is that on the surface I think you know people you know like like the joke about like us sitting at a coffee shop, right. People might look at us and he's like Oh look just like to like. Asian dudes is like I haven't coffee. But like it sounds like our stories might actually be as different as they could be or maybe more different than they are similar. In the sense that kind of. kind of rumors reverse osmosis for me. Because, because I was Raised by American born parents who also had experienced discrimination. From their immigrant parents and themselves growing up. I was seeing kind of backwards through the Mir that that it's like Oh. This is why there was so much emphasis in my family about not having an accent about not having to go to Chinese school on Saturdays right and a and about why how probably if we had any real overt prejudice in my growing up family, it wasn't against blacks or Latin necks. White people it was against Immigrant Asians because they outed us. Wow. Does that make sense? Only I mean that's like I mean like in the opening of my book talk about like how about Wong the new, Vietnamese kid like and how it key that made me feel that was the first trigger for me right and it's like, Oh, I know what that's like did you ever read? ABC American born Chinese by Jean Magnon. No okay. have it. He's won all these awards. He's a graphic novel artist and he has written this book that actually many middle schools actually have made required reaching now. and. It's all about what we're talking about and he's been a guest on the podcast. So you can kind of go back a couple years and we talk about this because. Basically he he himself in? It's his own growing up story as this American born. Taiwanese kid and he thinks he's pulling off his his vision of himself that he's projecting is this blonde haired Blue Eyed Kid And then this alter ego shows up named Chinky. Role. Just. Yeah. So just when he's thinking like I am so assimilated, I'm so. Chinky whispering in his ear with his buck teeth riding this slanted is like Oh you know fool nobody right and it is like I was thinking of his graphic novel as I was reading to your memoir is like I'm so glad these stories are being told, Yeah that's amazing. While I know that sounds riveting I love the check that out. Yeah. Now, tell us what triggered the writing of this memoir. So in two thousand, twelve, I gave I was invited to give a text talk and You. Know they a friend of mine nominated me TO GIVE A. Talk at a locally organized tax event in Maine and..

Phuc Tran Pennsylvania Pulitzer Prize New York Times Saigon United States Maine ABC writer Jean Magnon America Sarah Corbett McCain Portland Wong
"tran" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

04:13 min | 11 months ago

"tran" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"Because of all the things that are happening because they're so much advocacy taking place for a community. To ensure that we can have an accurate dentists count and really pushing for the October thirty first line However, we don't we don't know if it's going to land there on September thirtieth. So really the messaging we want to put out to our communities is to complete the Senate today. Yeah, like don't delay any longer. It's it's already do and it's and it's pretty simple Can you talk a little bit about just step by step? How can people access the census What's involved in taking it? Sewn and so forth. Sure There are three ways for people to respond to the census, and there are only nine questions It takes less than ten minutes to complete and the three ways that people can respond to the census are online at my twenty, two thousand census dot Gov or by phone at eight, four, four, three, three, zero, twenty, twenty that's for the English line. There are actually different language lines available where people can complete the census in language by phone as well as on the website. Or if people have received paper questionnaire, they can also complete the census by mail. And do you know how many languages the census is available in? Oh Gosh I wanNA say by phone it's like fourteen languages well Yeah but there are also in language resources on the Census Website for language guides in fifty nine languages. Yeah incentives cannot be responded to online in all those languages. There are language guides, available where it will show like what the what the questions are, and the responses are in fifty nine different languages. Now. Gene since many of our listeners are English speakers it. By lingual but. I'm guessing that. They probably have relatives maybe parents aunts uncles who are. English is their second language? Can you recommend? They might do some simple things they might do to help their non-english. Speaking relatives fill out the census in a timely fashion. Share, well I. of course, we want everyone to encourage their their family members and neighbors and friends to complete the census, and we also want people to know that there are in languages resources available. Through local community based organizations, but we also have an affiliate website call. It's the actress is Countess in twenty twenty dot org. And there we have resources on the census like since one a one-sentence fact sheets. information about enumerators. With a sentence means our community. In in several different languages, we have them in. Nineteen different Asian languages as well as there's a link that links it to the native Hawaiian Pacific islander resources as well and We also have their the the the fact sheets available in. Pacific islander languages. And finally, can you just say something how filling out the twenty twenty cents is is not politico or partisan in any way? It it is not is not meant to be political. It is really for our communities to be counted to get the resources that all our communities need to thrive As we discussed earliest census data determined so much for the next ten years It is about like political representation and power meaning, Ceasing Hall in Congress and votes in the electoral. College. But really the sentence is about people resources and the community and what we need to keep our families and communities.

Senate Hawaiian Pacific Congress
Why You Should Fill Out Your 2020 Census Today

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

06:19 min | 11 months ago

Why You Should Fill Out Your 2020 Census Today

"Are Introducing this week is not me telling a story but it's actually A really important issue that we wanted to bring to your attention and to help me do that I have asian-american advancing justices. Demographic Research. Program director. That's a mouthful. June Lim, who's WHO's here to talk about the census. So thanks for being here to do this and for our listeners sake especially those who have yet to fill out the census, they have relatives who haven't filled it out. Why is this census of particular great concern for us. Right. Now, what we see is is a very unfortunate because what we have seen as the administration's attempt to politicize the census s suppress participation ultimately really to shift political representation away from places with large immigrant communities, such as the Asian, American and Native Hawaiian Civic Islander Communities and other communities of color, and Water considered hard to count communities. and what we really want people to know is that regardless of political affiliation or ethnicity everyone needs to be deeply troubled by these attempts to undermine and risk misrepresent data from the census. And the reason is, is that we have so much to lose if people do not participate in the census. Yeah. I mean some states can lose congressional seats I was also reading that there's over a billion dollars in federal funding to over one hundred programs for the next ten years, there's writing on census twenty twenty. It's actually one point five trillion dollars federal funding. Okay. Okay. Okay. I was little off on my decimal point. Wow So, this seems this seems June to fit right in line with our current president and his administration Zena phobic anti immigrant position on. So many policies. Yes. Unfortunately, there's been a lot of anti-immigrant sentiment and fear mongering. In Administration's policies and also like we're really seeing it. Affecting. People's participation in the census. And we understand that because of this for many immigrants both documented and undocumented, there are significant fears about participating in the census. But. We need everyone to know that the constitution mandates that every person living in the United States should be counted in the census regardless of Citizenship Status and that privacy is of utmost importance and that there are strict laws in place to make sure that information is kept confidential. So. That's really important to emphasize right that I think the trump administration is these seeds a fear that yeah. If you fill it out and you're undocumented in particular, like can come get you and that's completely not true. Exactly. There isn't even a question about citizenship status on the census or immigration on the senses. So there is no way using the census data that received from the twenty twenty cents is that that information could be received and regardless of that any information that is like that is received by the census. It doesn't actually leave the census it only can be. Used for statistical this tickle purposes and in like more of a like for statistical purposes in an aggregate form and never by an individual responses. And the Census Bureau They've done something to the due day to right I mean this this. This is one of the reasons why we're doing this special announcement here an encouragement for people to hurry up and fill it out. Can you talk a little bit about what's what's happened? Yeah sure and there's been some new happening since then as well it's it's that ultimately because of everything happening with the pandemic this Census Bureau had to pause some of its. So, the census deadline was actually Extended until October thirty first to make sure that there was enough time for for people to self respond. But also to make sure that the the non response follow up period, which is when enumerators go door to door to take the responses of people who have not yet completed the census can be done in a fair and thorough manner and also taking in mind safety However, that was shortened to be it was to be rushed than leader change to be moved up to. September. Thirtieth. however, right now, there actually was a I think it was A. Temporary. Almost like a restraining order against a restraining order. That's exactly. that. Judge actually did. Accept that. So it is right now there's there's they're actually having a hearing. To See. What the date is going to be, and for now, the Census Bureau has to continue with its operations as planned and that being not necessarily what the short deadline but we we see how that could cause some confusion in the in the community. So really what we want to do is to urge everyone to fill out the census to day job. Because I, it's like we're not sure what the deadline is now because of all the things that are happening because they're so much advocacy taking place for a community. To ensure that we can have an accurate dentists count and really pushing for the October thirty first line However, we don't we don't know if it's going to land there on September thirtieth. So really the messaging we want to put out to our communities is to complete the Senate today.

Census Bureau Native Hawaiian Civic Islander June Lim Program Director United States President Trump Senate Water
"tran" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

07:30 min | 11 months ago

"tran" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"We think it's really important. uh-huh specially for API. Christians to to understand. that. The Biden campaign is very much attuned to ADP is in committed to being are advocates and I I, just excited to have the opportunity to co moderate this particular town hall and so please Hope, you'll put it on your calendar and We'll see you in a virtual way on Thursday September seventeenth. Before we get into my conversation with a few trend, I really want to Commend to you the twenty, two, thousand Census and emphasize just how crucial it is for all of us especially all of us. Americans of color to fill out the census from what I've been reading people of. Color especially, immigrants are really lagging behind I think a lot of them are being triggered by the The seeds of fear that the trump administration had been sewing, and so before we get into our guests and conversation I promise I to just have a conversation beforehand. With. June. Them who is working hard to make sure that as many API Americans fill out this census as possible. So here's my conversation with June and then you'll get to hear my conversation with Phuc. Are Introducing this week is not me telling a story but it's actually A really important issue that we wanted to bring to your attention and to help me do that I have asian-american advancing justices. Demographic Research. Program director. That's a mouthful. June Lim, who's WHO's here to talk about the census. So thanks for being here to do this and for our listeners sake especially those who have yet to fill out the census, they have relatives who haven't filled it out. Why is this census of particular great concern for us. Right. Now, what we see is is a very unfortunate because what we have seen as the administration's attempt to politicize the census s suppress participation ultimately really to shift political representation away from places with large immigrant communities, such as the Asian, American and Native Hawaiian Civic Islander Communities and other communities of color, and Water considered hard to count communities. and what we really want people to know is that regardless of political affiliation or ethnicity everyone needs to be deeply troubled by these attempts to undermine and risk misrepresent data from the census. And the reason is, is that we have so much to lose if people do not participate in the census. Yeah. I mean some states can lose congressional seats I was also reading that there's over a billion dollars in federal funding to over one hundred programs for the next ten years, there's writing on census twenty twenty. It's actually one point five trillion dollars federal funding. Okay. Okay. Okay. I was little off on my decimal point. Wow So, this seems this seems June to fit right in line with our current president and his administration Zena phobic anti immigrant position on. So many policies. Yes. Unfortunately, there's been a lot of anti-immigrant sentiment and fear mongering. In Administration's policies and also like we're really seeing it. Affecting. People's participation in the census. And we understand that because of this for many immigrants both documented and undocumented, there are significant fears about participating in the census. But. We need everyone to know that the constitution mandates that every person living in the United States should be counted in the census regardless of Citizenship Status and that privacy is of utmost importance and that there are strict laws in place to make sure that information is kept confidential. So. That's really important to emphasize right that I think the trump administration is these seeds a fear that yeah. If you fill it out and you're undocumented in particular, like can come get you and that's completely not true. Exactly. There isn't even a question about citizenship status on the census or immigration on the senses. So there is no way using the census data that received from the twenty twenty cents is that that information could be received and regardless of that any information that is like that is received by the census. It doesn't actually leave the census it only can be. Used for statistical this tickle purposes and in like more of a like for statistical purposes in an aggregate form and never by an individual responses. And the Census Bureau They've done something to the due day to right I mean this this. This is one of the reasons why we're doing this special announcement here an encouragement for people to hurry up and fill it out. Can you talk a little bit about what's what's happened? Yeah sure and there's been some new happening since then as well it's it's that ultimately because of everything happening with the pandemic this Census Bureau had to pause some of its. So, the census deadline was actually Extended until October thirty first to make sure that there was enough time for for people to self respond. But also to make sure that the the non response follow up period, which is when enumerators go door to door to take the responses of people who have not yet completed the census can be done in a fair and thorough manner and also taking in mind safety However, that was shortened to be it was to be rushed than leader change to be moved up to. however, right now, there actually was a I think it was A. Temporary. Almost like a restraining order against a restraining order. That's exactly. that. Judge actually did. Accept that. So it is right now there's there's they're actually having a hearing. To See. What the date is going to be, and for now, the Census Bureau has to continue with its operations as planned and that being not necessarily what the short deadline but we we see how that could cause some confusion in the in the community. So really what we want to do is to urge everyone to fill out the census to day job. Because I, it's like we're not sure what the deadline.

Census Bureau Native Hawaiian Civic Islander June Lim ADP Biden Phuc United States Program director president Water
"tran" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

02:16 min | 11 months ago

"tran" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"Classical languages teacher what an interesting combination right Phuc tron I really enjoyed reading his book Saigon It's really. A. Very unique and honest look back at what it was like to grow up as a be American immigrant kid surrounded by mostly white folks in a little town that was definitely not on the left or right coast His style of writing is just engaging th the stories that he tells and even all the drama that is tied up in. His embrace of his name or not it. Just it just GonNa, keep you turned into pages and getting all the way to the end I I really found even though he's younger than I am I grew up in a different time. I, just found a lot to resonate with as A CHINESE-AMERICAN A kid growing up in Sacramento and so after this introduction, I really am excited for you to listen in on our conversation. if you go to our facebook page, you'll see. That on. September seventeenth at five, pm Pacific Time in APM East Coast Time I will be co moderating. A Christian for mental health professionals, townhall and It's It's a really important issue. I'm part of this group that has been putting on these biweekly town halls This particular one is zeroing in on the various mental health issues that the different API communities have and really excited to bring together a panel of folks to address that and both both to heighten our awareness of what these issues are but also to hear how the Democrats and in particular. Candidate Biden are are aware these issues and what they're doing to address them. So just really commend you to tune into that if you'd like to RSVP for the event..

Biden facebook Sacramento
Lollapalooza promoter to pay Chicago Park District $750K for canceled festival

Roe Conn

00:28 sec | 1 year ago

Lollapalooza promoter to pay Chicago Park District $750K for canceled festival

"There's a glimmer of good news for Chicago when it comes to Lollapalooza WGN steeper Tran has nothing compared to the economic impact the city would have retired the festival being held but festival promoters will pay the Chicago park district at least something for the canceled fast the contract requires promoters C. three to pay seven hundred fifty thousand dollars if the festival is canceled because of a force majeure and a pandemic is one of those Stieber trend WGN

Chicago WGN Chicago Park District
May the Fourth Be with You

Innovation Now

01:26 min | 1 year ago

May the Fourth Be with You

"Watching films aboard the International Space Station is one way for the crew to bond and decompress and guess which film just became an astronaut favorite innovation now occasionally NASA is share some of the latest film releases with astronauts on the International Space Station to enjoy at their leisure. Imagine watching your favorite science fiction movie while literally floating in microgravity recently astronauts on station had the opportunity to watch star wars the rise of skywalker while two of the actors from the film got to visit Mission Control at NASA Johnson Space Center Kelly Marie Tran and Naomi. Aki are used to inhabiting galaxies. Far Far Away at least on screen but they spent the day learning about NASA's plans for exploring places a little closer to home. The pair got a chance to train like real astronauts and posed for pictures with some of NASA's robotic explorers while learning about the optimist program whether your favorite is the rise of skywalker or return of the Jedi take a cue from the astronauts and watch a movie today and for all you star wars fans out there may the fourth be with you for innovation. Now I'm Jennifer. Pulley innovation now is produced by the National Institute of Aerospace through with NASA.

Nasa International Space Station Nasa Johnson Space Center Kelly Marie Tran National Institute Of Aerospac AKI Naomi
"tran" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:48 min | 2 years ago

"tran" Discussed on WTVN

"Kathy TRAN is one of many members of the Virginia house, a delegates the Virginia house delegates. Oh my goodness. Where so much of our history was. So much of our history. And so much now of our decline. Kathy tran. Is a member of the house had delegates never heard her before. At a hearing this week, she introduced her Bill her Bill provides for abortion during labor. During labor. During birth. Ask yourself. Well, how do you actually conduct that abortion? See we use this word abortion aboard. Because it's so. It just doesn't get the character of what's taking place. Does that describe it properly? It's so dehumanizing. If somebody kills a pregnant dog, they don't talk about. Well, you know, the puppies would have been take talk about the puppies. Right. Same people often who talk about puppies and kittens refused. The call human babies babies when they're in the womb. Most states under the criminal codes. You kill a pregnant mother. That's two counts of murder. And yet they call it a choice. How do they get away with this moral incoherence? But you would think we could at least agree. That when the babies in the birth canal. When the baby is in the birth canal. That that baby is a human being. Now, most of us know that that babe is a human being period. But you would think everybody would agree, right? That during labor that during the birth process. It's not a mother's choice. It's not a mother's choice in consultation with her doctor. It's God's choice that's up baby. That's a baby. What kind of animals have we become? How have we.

Kathy TRAN Virginia murder
"tran" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

02:58 min | 2 years ago

"tran" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Kathy TRAN is one of many members of the Virginia house, a delegates the Virginia house at delegates. Oh my goodness. Where so much of our history was. So much of our history. And so much now of our decline. Kathy tran. Is a member of the house had delegates never heard of it before. Had a hearing this week. She introduced her Bill her Bill provides for abortion during labor. Going labor. Going birth. Ask yourself. Well, how do you actually conduct that abortion? See we use this word abortion abort. Because it's so. Just doesn't get the character of what's taking place. Does that describe it properly? It's so dehumanizing. If somebody kills a pregnant dog, they don't talk about. Well, you know, the puppies would have been take talk about the puppies. Right. Saint people often who talk about puppies and kittens refused to call human babies babies when they're in the womb. Most states under the criminal codes. You kill a pregnant mother. That's two counts of murder. And yet they call it a choice. How do they get away with this moral incoherence? But you would think we could at least agree. That when the babies in the birth canal. When the baby is in the birth canal. That that baby is a human being. Now, most of us know that that is a human being period. But you would think everybody would agree, right? That during labor that during the birth process. It's not a mother's choice. It's not a mother's choice in consultation with her doctor. It's God's choice that's up baby. That's a baby. What kind of animals have we become? How have we become? Where does this end? And here's the proposal..

Kathy TRAN murder
"tran" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:57 min | 2 years ago

"tran" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Kathy TRAN is one of many members of the Virginia house of delegates the Virginia house delegates. Oh my goodness. Where so much of our history was. So much of our history. And so much now of our decline. Kathy tran. Is a member of the house had delegates never heard of it before. At a hearing this week, she introduced her Bill her Bill provides for abortion during labor. During labor. Doing birth. Ask yourself. Well, how do you actually conduct that abortion? See we use this word abortion abort. Because it's so. Just doesn't get the character of what's taking place. Does that describe it properly? It's so dehumanizing. If somebody kills a pregnant dog, they don't talk about. Well, you know, the puppies would have been they talk about the puppies, right? Saint people often talk about puppies and kittens refuse to call human babies babies when they're in the womb. Most states under their criminal codes. You kill a pregnant mother. That's two counts of murder. And yet they call it a choice. How do they get away with this Marl incoherence? But you would think we could at least agree. That when the baby is in the birth canal. When the baby is in the birth canal. That that baby is a human being. Now, most of us know that that baby is a human being period. But you would think everybody would agree, right? That during labor that during the birth process. It's not a mother's choice. It's not a mother's choice in consultation with her doctor. It's God's choice. That's a baby. That's a baby. What kind of animals have we become? How have we become? Where does this end? And here's the.

Kathy TRAN Virginia murder
"tran" Discussed on The Myth Of The 20th Century

The Myth Of The 20th Century

01:58 min | 4 years ago

"tran" Discussed on The Myth Of The 20th Century

"While a lot of these financial systems were written i think and this time for this one for tran was babe cobalt started to come into effect that i could be lol yeah i could be wrong on the history of that but i know that there were a lot of security issues early on and a lot of banks seem do operas assumption that uh just because you put everything under computer somewhere didn't mean that someone wound so tryon rob your bank digitally people it was sort of a high trust mentality in the early days bank robberies in happen for a long time and uh y'all were driving here is just different ways of spinning at reinventing the wheel a at high speed the my question is let okay so people have made known certain sorts of the operations more efficient through the use of computers and networks but what does it matter well let's you blake sas it let's who exploited what was previously slack in the system for good or ill so you can do things like cash flow management um there was a lot more tricky back the day see you no longer need to house odd is much just like actual liquid cash of the oval on in order to do your day to day business because you know like orders are coming in electronic lien you see them immediately on the same thing with your revenues semi in every time a cash register rings up white you can be updating a database so you know you know exactly where you're going to be a by the end of the day um and so you know you can like not have those assets tied up providing liquidity on instinet others us as predicted that the market.

financial systems tran cobalt cash flow