4 Burst results for "tony morrison morrison"

"tony morrison morrison" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

16:08 min | 1 year ago

"tony morrison morrison" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Mary Pifer psychologist and author of the new book. Women rowing growing north navigating life currents and flourishing as we age WANNA play this clip from Nobel Prize winning writer Tony Morrison Morrison. She gave the commencement address at Wellesley College. In two thousand and four. She said that the graduates had her condolences. If their time in college had been the best eight years of their lives. She spoke about the joys of adulthood about getting older and growing up throughout your life. There is nothing believing more more satisfying more gratifying than true adulthood the adulthood that is the span of like before four you. The process of becoming one is not inevitable. It's a chief is a difficult beauty and intensely hard hard one glory. I love that Mary Pifer difficult beauty and intensely hard one glory to get. Oh she's a wonderful writer after that was. Yeah so her. Speaking to young women at Wellesley College reminded me of your wildly popular book into in Nineteen Ninety-four Reviving having affiliate where you talked about the cultural perceptions of adolescent girls and how they didn't match your experience working with Young Girls Tell me. Tell me what kind of book in these books I mean. What adolescent teen girls and women entering old age have in common well? They're both entering a portal a portal. And they're both at a point where they're poised for growth and change and they're getting very little a cultural education on how to do that properly. So one of the reasons I wrote reviving affiliate is. I was working as a therapist. I was seeing almost was full-time teenage girls in my office. And I was continually struck by how different the situation was than the cultural stories about teenage girls and their families. When I wrote that book the Cultural Story about a teenage girl who was feeling depressed or anxious or angry or misbehaving was that she was from a dysfunctional family and on the contrary with I was observing is the kind of parents who bring their daughters to a private practice therapist and are very very concerned about them tend to be pretty healthy families And what was on happening to girls was they were dealing with toxic culture and getting absolutely absolutely no good information Nor were the adults around them on how to be healthy resilient people in this life stage so so. This book is very similar. I hope it's what I would really like to see happen with this book. Jane is that it starts a whole new cultural conversation about the concept concept of aging and the potentials for growth in this life stage. You know if we don't believe in our potential to grow we're unlikely to grow and if we believe in the truth of the cultural scripts about us. We're likely to live at the scripts so for me. It's a terrible tragedy Ajeti if women if all of us aren't given opportunities to grow and develop into all we can be. The board is full of calls here. Mary let me take a couple here at the top Ellen in clearwater Florida. You're I welcome to the program with Mary. Pifer hi I wanted to make a comment. I ant about Your guest Earlier mentioning about losing friends and relatives. Once they get got to be in our seventies I have since nineteen eighty tube in a sailboat. Racer and I belong to this. Very active. sailboat Racing Club. And we AH really really encourage young people teenagers and young adults to join the club and the interaction among the generations is just absolutely lutely amazing. Because they're interested in learning how to sail and we've got many many years of experience so It it's wonderful and The other thing that I embarked on in my mid sixties was play writing so I started doing that I started directing and mm producing and that's opened up a whole new world for me. Plus a lot of new friends and a whole different mindset from sailboat racing so I think there's hope for those of us who are losing our friends to death in our seventies because there's another generation coming up behind us because we've been saying for years make longer friends It's interesting thank you. Mary peiffert brings up a really important point about this intergenerational interaction between the older and the younger what do you say about that well. I think it's great. I think it's very sad in America. How people were segregated by age? And there's there's four year olds all over the country who who could really use an older woman or older man rocking them and telling them stories and playing with them and there's lonely adults all over the country older under adults who would love to spend time with children. Twenty year olds forty year olds. I've been very lucky because I'm an activist and I'm involved in A lot of civic action in my own community and one of the more active age groups for that is people in their twenties and thirties. So I've been able to stay in good touch with younger. People and one of the things by the way about staying in good touch with younger people is staying green on top as my Margaret would say which means being a lifelong learner and being willing to for example. Start writing plays in your sixties and challenge other people around you to join join you in a group of play writing So I think your your last listener was very green on top. Love that Green on top Ellen. Thank you for the call. Here's Cathy in Wellesley. Housley Massachusetts Kathy. Welcome to the program. Oh Hi Jane Wells I. I'm so delighted to hear Mary. Phifer speak because I can thinks she says phenomenal writer. But I'd never turn to talk before and I'm a life coach for women primarily in their fifties. He's in above regarding health and wellness and put one of the Nice things about that. Area is speaking with people about Just having their own authenticity and I find that Mary Fan so real so but the other qualities this that I think are so important. are taking time to avoid fear. Say in the political climate by perhaps meditating which is so wonderful to reduce straight stress and having excellent sleep like seven to nine hours sleep. You feel like you feel great easy and Exercise and Yoga are just so important because this muscles have to they. They're not like machines. They grow stronger as with us and a lot of good self care is what I hear you. You Sang Kathy. Thank you and her first point. Mary Pie for was very important. This notion of authenticity. And you say in your book that A gift in this life stage is is authentic. You've got nothing to prove your finally comfortable in your own skin. It's a really important point. No absolutely and we stopped being afraid and move into WHO and ability. To be honest with ourselves we start giving ourselves permission to not be in any room. We don't want to be in. We grant ourselves the the power of saying no we grant ourselves the power of listening to that voice inside us that tells us what we would need and like and saying yes to that voice so there's an authenticity that comes with this life stage. I think there's a great growth. In moral imagination. We tend to be more empathic and kind signed. I also think That the other great gifts of this life stage are an enhanced capacity for bliss and that bliss comes comes in part from our awareness of our own mortality. The runway is short and we have good research to show that the shorter. You perceive your lifetime ahead of you the more likely you are to be deep for deeply grateful and joyous for that which is happening around you talk more about that enhanced capacity for bliss. That's grace yeah. Well you know. By the time we're seventy or seventy one. We've had a lot of years figuring out how to manage our expectations. How to create good days for ourselves use And we start having some more time and that time may be the first discretionary time we've had since we were children and one of the things things I really like for example by being seventy one is I pretty much spend my time doing exactly what I like to do. When I was ten years old when I was ten years old I like to swim? I like to read books. I like to be with my friends and my family and I like to be outdoors and I have more time for that and and I think one way that that bliss comes to people is they actually are not in a hurry. It's very hard to feel Bliss if you're not slowly and if you're not awake and savoring the experiences around you so for example one of the things I say in the book is Yes. It's possible to walk out of a friend's funeral and still feel a moment of bliss. When you hear the wild geese overhead and taste snowflake snowflake on your tongue? We start having this ability to find within any moment some possibility of of joy joy and bliss. And it's wonderful gift. That at least for for me and for many of my friends is coming at relatively late time in our lives so so great madeline is on the line from Brookline Massachusetts. High Madeline Aaron. Hi There James. Thank you for taking my call I am so Now I have to get this book because it's so in line. I love the name of the Program on point. She's so unpleasant. Maria's I am seventy one on a couple of weeks and When I was sixty two I guess I developed lymphoma and then after that developed crowned around and then I have now I have lupus and the way one looks at Ones challenges does make a huge difference. 'cause any one of those could knock one right off the map and I didn't I didn't fall off the map because that the analogy of rowing is just a biker and The first year that I was diagnosed with the Lymphoma I the heart of the bay ride My friends encouraged me to only we do half of it because you know came along. They were right. It was wonderful being outside on my bike. Yes I liked doing that when I was eight years. Madeline thank you so much. It's a it's a crank call and it brings up another point. You know Mary the way you look at challenges defines you you talk about this a lot in the book you know. Some women are disabled by a hangnail. Others can be hit by a truck keep smiling. I mean there's Madeleine there with lymphoma and other serious health the challenges and she plows forward. Well one of the things I say in the book is we don't have control of a great deal that happens to especially especially as we age but we have choices and the the fact that we have choices gives us a certain kind of power and Madeleine's real a good example sample of someone who's made excellent choices. Another way I say this in the book is All our lives. We keep appointments. We did not make and those things just happened to us and we have a lot of choice. Not only about how we respond to those Those appointments but we also have choices about the stories. We tell ourselves about what happens to us. And those stories can be problem. Saturated stories that make us feel sorry for ourselves and feel hopeless and miserable or they can be empowering stories they can be stories that I I have a chapter raptor in the book. Women Roy North called crafting resplendent narratives. They can give story. They can be stories that give a sense of hope and meaning and in a sort of a sense. That what we're doing and how we do it is important and will make us deeper and better people are all our lives. We keep appointments. We did not make make. That's that's really good. Patty is on the line from Buffalo. New York Hi Patty. You're on the air. Hi Jane Thanks for taking my Colin. Thank you for this wonderful thank you. I just wanted to share that. I find at least for me that as I age I spend more time stealing more powerful more certain of my extract and more certain of who I am and I spend more time occupying that space but in the moments when I don't in the moments elements when that fear creeps in. It seems to be in a much deeper space than I've ever felt before because it comes from the knowledge he's got outside. He doesn't value older women and nor does it. Is it set up to have good support systems and I'm just looking forward to spending spending my remaining time nurturing and guiding young women coming up back to Patty. Thank you very much Mary Pifer. Yeah yeah well. One of the things that happens I think in our seventies is we. We realize that the validation we get is going to come. I am from primarily three sources. One is the people who love us. Our life partners are close women. France I call women friends my emotional health insurance policy mental health insurance policy because while a lot of older women including me spend a lot of time taking care of other people. My women friends take care of me but finally the person who really ends up validating us the most is ourselves and we learned the Skills Gilles to make ourselves happy to feel ourselves Useful and actually let me put it very simply. We learned to love that crazy lost baby and ourselves and to take good care of her and to be grateful for the fact that the sun comes up every morning. And you're you're right. We become deeper and kinder to ourselves. I think that's an important point as well. Yeah yeah well partly as we accept ourselves we we have more love kindness and acceptance of other people as we realize how flawed we are. And what a mercy it is that the people around us love us not only in Insp- In spite of our flaws but partly because of him then we'd can eventually be at the point point. Where what we're sending the world? As a messages I love you. I love you even though I know that you're as flawed mixed up filled with contradictions predictions and amazing as I am and so our moral imagination. Hopefully by the time we die increases to the point that we can include all living beings in our circle of caring. What would you tell women who.

Mary Pifer Mary Jane Wells Madeline Aaron lymphoma Wellesley College Patty Ellen rowing Mary peiffert Tony Morrison Morrison Mary Pie Nobel Prize Mary Fan France Wellesley America Ajeti
"tony morrison morrison" Discussed on Slate's Live at Politics and Prose

Slate's Live at Politics and Prose

14:41 min | 2 years ago

"tony morrison morrison" Discussed on Slate's Live at Politics and Prose

"Thank thank you so much. Sorry i should have drank water before i started and i would be really really happy to take any questions that you might have. I knew i know it's a new book and i suppose no one has read it yet because came out two days ago. If at all but i'd love i'd love to answer any questions. You have okay comes a question. Oh yes there's mike's microphones. We're supposed to stand in the mikes. I'm interested in your magic's magic realism. I grew up in a country where which was very animated and animistic and when when i came to live in my own country everything all of a sudden got really logical and flat interesting so can ask where he grew up in southeast asia in the philippines means but i mean you go to chinese house. There's the red face god the kitchen. God the you know. There's there's ghosts everywhere. There's the swung. There's all sorts of place spirits and ghosts and i didn't find that here and so i wanna know how you grew up because your first book certainly had a lot of animism in it and how did you find something in the united states. Thank you so much. Thank you for that question so it's interesting because i think there's a kind of i don't wanna well. I'm going to answer that the second part of your question russian i. I think that american go sir are sort of strange in different than than ghosts in other in other places in in sort of precisely the way that you described i think that here in the mythos here there anomalous and elsewhere connections with the spirit world supernatural and divinity tends to be sort of a more everyday thing <hes> if that if that makes sense it's it's taken it's taken for granted and certainly where i grew up that was that was the case. We're really superstitious. People and <hes> and and folks will tell you that that that maybe in the balkans. Those things have changed age but i don't. I don't think that they really really have i mean certainly my household and every other household i've ever known is very super superstitious so i think i was very fortunate to come across this story and and i think that the the way that ghosts operated in the west for me was twofold first of all what i went out there. It felt wherever i went out there. It felt really really haunted. There's a lot of history. It's a very turbulent history. We're coming to terms with how turbulent that history is and i think that any that what kind of turbulence and instability whether it's whether it's geographic or political or spiritual or a psychological whatever affects the living into me felt like it would inherently affect the dead and at the time the the trend in the u._s. was was really particularly on on the in the in what was called. The atlantic states where we are was towards spiritualism. There was a lot of technology being developed and people will really believed that you could access the dead by technological means that that technology was going all we we were one step away from from the the telegraph to to the world and so i was really interested in that too and how that operated and then i stumbled on this story ori which was just full of ghosts inherently and i felt i consider myself really lucky and i was probably drawn to it. I mean i was drawn to it because it was about immigrants from the the ottoman empire and it w- it necessarily had to feature this home studying woman who was interested in learning more about <hes> but i i think that because it had these ghosts in it i was immediately drawn to it and possibly what i had been waiting for was a story rages like this one. If that makes sense thank you so <hes>. I'm interested in finding out your basis i mean where are you coming from relative to literature. Who do you read and who do you think has fed into this particular story sure that's a great question. I think for sure sure i mean my my my base is nicole boga cough and gabrielle garcia marquez songo congossongo suncoast but i read a lot of shirley jackson recently. I've i mean tony morrison morrison of course also ghosts. I would say that the the western influence has been slightly slightly more recent. I love ivan doig. I dunno of people here have read him. He's super well-known on the west coast and like not that well well known here <hes> i've discovered i hadn't heard of him until recently and he's amazing. <hes> you should start with a book called the one oh. I thought somebody was saying sorry. Yes yeah dancing dancing the rascal fair so yeah yeah. It's pretty it's pretty varied. Thank you for your question high tae day a nice to see you so you're talking about ghosts and goes haunt people visit people. I'm wondering if in your writing process your characters here's visit you unexpected at the moment you don't go to the laundromat but the grocery store wherever you may be do they any just hop over your shoulder until you where we're we're to take them. I live in new york so i have to go to the laundromat yeah. No they really really do. Thank you for that question. I think it's something it's a particular well. It's it's it's a two part question. I think they when they aren't visiting at the beginning. You know that you're in the generative phase of something. Thank there are two parts to writing for me. I recommend them highly to other. People who write the first is the generator phase when you were building scaffolding gaffes holding and the meat of something for yourself and you're getting into the story and you're learning about it and you're trying to figure out why you're there and who the characters are and then you finish a draft and you've you've decided on some things right. You've decided who the characters are. Maybe what the point of view is. Perhaps a couple of themes have have emerged that you can sort of vaguely see even though you're not really going to be able to see your your your big themes until you get to the end of the final draft and then someone else points at something and you're like oh yeah i meant to do that. Ah but once you're finished with with with the first one in the second draft you begin to make choices about your characters you start to be able to predict their reactions to certain in things and that's when they start visiting you and if they're not visiting you by then then you know. I think that that perhaps you haven't delve deeply enough into them and that's always the case for me when they start showing up. When i start to see coincidences in life that a character would react to or i start to think about you know i. I start to think about something. In real life reminds me of character. I know that i'm deep enough in into a narrative to that and then it's really coming to to to overtake everything else. In the final phase of the process you know a people here who've written novels short stories bones essays in the last stretch you don't even want to leave that world and it feels very very strange to to go out and and sort of function normally among people and then be like there's all these made up people waiting for me. I had to get back to them or i'm going to forget what i wrote last <hes> so <hes> yeah for sure come someone. You're languages so gorgeous think it's often poetic. It's a full appeal to the senses as you were just reading. Now i could see it. I could hear it. I could smell it. How much of that comes out in the first draft versus the last draft. That's a great question. I think i i'm a big believer in a maximum maximum loading up the first draft and i don't have any whoops. I don't have any problems cutting stuff out so something that i've come to learn about myself. As a writer is that i will say the same thing three or four different ways one sentence after the other and then it becomes really pleasurable and sort of surgical to come back in the second draft and try to pull that apart and say here's three ways. You've said it say it one way and make the one way you want to say it. The danger of that is that you can sort of over over massage it and move stuff around a little a bit and then the sound of it doesn't feel the flow of it isn't normal. I actually just found i had just texted my editor this terrible confession to make i found a line line in the book and i'm not gonna tell you where it is where i had accidentally in the final final final copy it put in a word thinking into myself. Why hadn't i use this word in the sentence. Before and of course it was because the word was already in the sentence just much earlier on and so now it's in there twice assume everything's ruined no bit so so it's a language is something i to sort of. Get it all down on paper for me and then as you figure out the voice of the character is in the voice of the narrative and what really really needs to what what the real sort repulsive mechanism for the for the language rather than the plot. Is you tweak it toward toward that. Thank you thank you so much. He's a great questions. You said that there weren't too many primary sources for some of this. I was just wondering how you research. We did talk about it so we're absolutely that'd be really happy to talk really talk about the research doing it for years. It's actually a just a sort of a go back to your question poet. You have a hat that says a lot of what i read while writing this book were home sitting diaries and newspapers of the time just to get a feel for the language language and then sort of tried to tweak it a little bit and try to get a little close to the time but not overly archaic so that it didn't feel like you know pirates walking off a ship in a weird movie but the the primary sources that exist for this are two diaries one of edward fitzgerald beale who was the superintendent of the expedition that took camels from a place called fort defiance in new mexico to a place called fort tejan in california along what is now route sixty six camels state route sixty six. You don't know this but now you do so. I didn't know what i it's amazing. It's just unbelievable and so i i read that diary. The diary is available. <hes> because it's a it's a military documents in the archives and he was sort of very detailed about the cameras he was doubtful about the use of the camels a a- at first because they sort of wild the mules and the soldiers didn't like them and that he came to regard them as sort of really really stupendous lee reliable and really good natured false and just just really go getters and and so as the diary progresses you can really see in it how invested he is in this to his superiors. Were supposed to sign the check for the next load of camels right so in that diary there's a lot of we didn't lose a single camel. We didn't lose a single man and it was all wonderful and there was plenty of water on the route. The other diary belonged to his <hes> assistant. A young man called may humphry stacy who's just sort of an excitable all eighteen year old who was along the ride and couldn't believe that he got to go on this wonky adventure in the west but he didn't surprisingly he didn't focus this on the camels at all and he didn't focus on the cavaliers at all he didn't see them and i found that really really fascinating and <hes> and so one of the things that i wanted to do for the book was to take moments that he details like the finding of this unbelievably large fish and end the delivery of a corn mill to this priest in the mountains and turn them into adventures that the cavaliers were also present for it just happened to be unseen in his diary and we went on my mom and i went on a on a big road trip on along all the longitude and latitudes attitudes that that were chronicled in the in the military diary and we got to see all the places where they camped <hes> one of them is the albuquerque greyhound station now him <hes> one of them is a church it's wild and but many of them are exactly as they were one hundred and sixty years ago and <hes> yeah it was it was very it was very very immersive and very exciting and also loads of newspapers that that was a long answer. I'm sorry it's my favorite questions. I answer it for a long time. Thinking.

cavaliers southeast asia philippines chinese house mike ivan doig united states new york tony morrison morrison nicole boga atlantic humphry edward fitzgerald beale shirley jackson writer editor california albuquerque greyhound station fort tejan superintendent
"tony morrison morrison" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

13:14 min | 2 years ago

"tony morrison morrison" Discussed on Fresh Air

"For you for more information visit each raid dot com slash n._p._r. We are e-trade securities l._l._c. member sipc. We're remembering raider. Toni morrison who died monday at the age of eighty eight terry gross spoke with her again in one thousand nine hundred to about her novel jazz her sixth novel and her first book since beloved jazzy said in harlem in nineteen twenty six and is about african americans who moved from the rural south to the urban north. It's also about love jealousy. Violence and aging a woman named violet finds out her husband has been having an affair with a younger woman whom he has killed at her funeral. Violet takes revenge on the corpse. Here's tony morrison morrison reading from the opening. I know that woman she's to live with a flock of birds on lenox avenue no her husband to he fell for an eighteen year old girl. One of those deep down spooky loves that made him so sad and happy he shot her just to keep the feeling going. When the woman her name is violet went to the funeral to see the girl and to cut her dead face they threw it to the floor and out of the church she ran into all that snow and when she got back to her apartment took the birds from their cages and set them out the windows to freeze or fly including the parrot that said i love you the snow she ran through with so windswept. She left no footprints in it so for time. Nobody knew exactly where on lenox avenue she lived but like me. They knew who she was who she had to be because they knew that her husband joe trace was the one who shot the girl. There was never anyone to prosecuting because nobody actually saw him. Do it and the dead girls aren't didn't want to <hes> throw money to helpless lawyers or laughing cops when she knew the expense wouldn't improve anything besides she found out that the man who killed internees cried all day and for him and for violent that is as bad as jail tony morrison reading from her her new novel jazz. You know the the woman who cuts the face of the dead woman. <hes> a character later says to to the woman who who does the cutting. I don't understand women like women with knives. Do you understand women with knives kind of crimes of passion like that not entirely early. I think part of the reason i was interested in the story and in that period was some way to figure out <hes> the impulses for you're violence as sort of notion of solution and how it plays into notions of license and freedom so it was a quest really on on my part. I'm not quite sure. I understand that kind of excess. Was there a particular crime that you wanted to understand or a particular woman with with a knife who you wanted to understand. The woman i really wanted to understand was darcus. <hes> the young girl who is based on a historical figure actually a young girl who died in harlem at party shop by her lover with a silencer and who refused used to let anybody help her because she wanted to give him time to get away and waited so long that she bled to death that was extremely provocative to me that kind of romance that probably is representative of song that young wow her acceptance of his violence the way in which a young girl or woman deals with assault under certain circumstances stances and certain ears and periods. What's the closest. You've seen to this in real life. I've never seen any other. I i mean i don't i had seen it or participated in it. I probably wouldn't be so interested in writing about it but <hes> it was sort of outside. I wanted to own personal experience that is compulsive no family legends or neighborhood legends from when you were growing up not about women about out men yes <hes> who were championed because of their endurance and their response to violence associated with them but the women even that i knew were <hes> <hes> i suppose in a manner verbally able to deflect violence. There's there's a passage in jazz about the kind of women who needed a certain kind of protection. There were those who had <hes> raises taped to do their hands. There were those who are willing to boil <hes> lie and those who are willing to put ground glass food but there is a secondary passage acids which explains what a large majority of black women did in terms of trying to protect themselves the church. The club movement the acquisition of property <hes>. I think the line goes any black woman in nineteen. Twenty six did not share some of those protective protective gestures was silent or crazy or dead tony mars and is my guest. You have the sense in your algiers of people coming to harlem. We're coming to the city and feeling more like themselves. They're more like the people they always believed. They were is the way you you put it. That's obviously something we're really interested in developing story just what what it meant physically emotionally for people move to move moved to the city <hes> you must have stories about that in your in your family history though i do yes that move from the rural areas where i think in literature sometimes we romanticize into the freedom of the countryside you know the sort of ability to commune with nature and b. ones <hes> <hes> transcendent self and there is that <hes> mythos in richard and there's an accompanying one which is the freedom of a city on the one enhanced certain kind of anonymity but more particularly for an especially for african americans it was moving into an area where there were so many of you you could see yourself in your number and there was a certain kind of protection in that as well as some license also it was. I don't know the idea of a city as being a place where there is a mix where there are many classes many kinds of the people and however eccentric you are there. Are you know at least a hundred other people who are eccentric in precisely the same way so that one has solitude solitariness individuality and community in a city. What would you sheriff us. One of your parents migration stories yes <hes> i think one of the ones that i remember best with when my mother's parents left left the south left alabama <hes> my grandmother's husband my grandfather had gone to a large city <hes> to earns some money playing the violin as a matter of fact and she was alone on their farm with these children who were very very young. I think my mother was five five and there was some danger about it was the time when a woman alone with several children was <hes> kind of target and her words were that when she noticed white boys beginning to circle that house she had to leave immediately so she sent word to her husband to my grandfather by by somebody who was on route to tell him that she would be on exchan- at x. time and that <hes> if she wanted if he wanted to see them again he should be there and so they left in the middle of the night <hes> in the middle of the night because there's always debt in that sort of share cropping situation that most most <hes> post-reconstruction black people found themselves and and <hes> went to birmingham and got on the train and as the train pulled out there was no papa and the chiltern all began to cry and a few miles outside the city he appeared hurt but he hadn't felt that he could show himself at the station and get on with them because they were escaping that cycle of debt. You know that round that you never really escape because you know the commissary of the general store you need for the feed and that takes the crops etc so it was a happy <hes> event for them and then the subsequent stops on that route to where they were headed looking for work for mines that we're asking for laborers for mills for women who could work in service is an interesting and very typical story and the ended up on the shores source of lake erie where i was born in ohio. Yes what was lorraine like when you were growing up what kind of neighborhood <hes> we're we're. We're you growing up in. It was an interesting place. I still think it's remarkable in that part of ohio and i think in a large and many of those states i never lived in a black neighborhood <hes> <hes> because what we were living in we're really just poor neighborhoods so that i grew up with all of the other immigrants who are coming to this country <hes> <hes> i'm thinking as i speak to you now the house where my mother lives <hes> at this moment and the people on the street are named her shack and golini and my mother are there any black woman named mrs ross and so on that's always been the case in that town because it was the steel town and people were coming from mexico from eastern in europe from scandinavia from everywhere as well as black people coming to these centers just after world war one and someone in some instances before in order to find work so we had a kind of town that was <hes>. I don't know all the ideals there are probably purely rhetorical existed in that little town however everybody whether they were polish people or what what they used to call slovenes in those days <hes> had their own halls churches and <hes> you know family life that was not mixed. You know you didn't exchange on those areas in those days but this one high school four junior high schools and we all went to the same school so what was the african american cultural center was at the church or was it something else the church absolutely the church part of it was sunday part of it was sunday school but a lot of it was taking taking care of each other and what i remember most is the impetus and the necessity for my mother and her friends and for all of us to take food to people who need it or to go oh clean somebody's house if they were bedridden <hes> all sorts of chores are taken for granted when people got old they didn't have a place for for them to go and if their families were indigent or couldn't take care of them that was the responsibility of the women of the church or of the neighborhood it was just a constant constant distant <hes> part of one's life. I think in the bluest eye recorded something similar that really happened which is my sister and and i would sleep in the same bed and we might wake up and there might be a child next to us. Somebody who was in difficulty or the parent was set or gone and women in the neighborhood take them in and there might be some children living with his you know two weeks or months or what have you you know kind of violation of <hes> what everybody seems to sink is important which is intimacy and privacy but at the same time it was kind of sharing of <hes> other of responsibility social responsibilities was we never no one ever talked about it and said you know you ought to be responsible member of society but everything people did was like that in your new book of literary criticism playing in the dark you write about how until recently american readers there's were assumed to be white and you wonder what that assumption has meant to the literary imagination in america. Were you when you started reading. Were you conscious of <hes> <hes> reading books in which there were <hes> few if any black characters no i was conscious of of there being a sort of disruption in some books when black people did occur and there was a kind of embarrassment.

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"tony morrison morrison" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

Pop Culture Happy Hour

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"tony morrison morrison" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

"Started. We want to acknowledge the death of writer tony morrison morrison. She died on monday. She was eight. She won the pulitzer prize. She won the nobel prize she won the presidential medal of freedom and she won the national humanities medal books like beloved soula the bluest eye and song of solomon have inspired countless young writers and thinkers documentary called tony morrison the pieces i am that's that's in theaters in some cities right now so seek that out the way things worked out this week after some discussion. We couldn't figure out a way to put together a show that would do justice to her work. In the way we thought it deserved but there's a flight of remembrances of her pros and her influence on and advocacy four other writers there are also plenty of clips avalaible where you can hear how she spoke about race and writing and life and beauty and we encourage you to spend some time with those well linked to some favourite remembrances in the newsletter so you can hear from some of the people who felt her influence most keenly she was a giant should be greatly greatly missed and what has muscles wise cracks muscles car chases muscles and too big movie stars the new film hobbs and shaw starring dwayne wayne the rock johnson and jason state the to play their characters from the fast and furious franchise spun off into a fresh adventure they jason mechanically enhanced super soldier played by idris elba to recover a deadly virus before it can melt the entire population of the planet into a series of small puddles. I'm linda holmes. We're talking about big bites and big budgets on today's pop culture happy hour from n._p._r. So don't go away support for this podcast and the following message come from net flicks presenting the highly anticipated third season of dear white people this season the characters will follow their hearts and passions shed layers of identity and take on the issues that plague them in radical new ways if last season was about uncovering the hidden truth that hold us back. This season is about shedding the beliefs that hold us back from revolution graded a by entertainment weekly volume three of their critically acclaimed..

tony morrison morrison pulitzer prize nobel prize jason idris elba writer linda holmes solomon hobbs dwayne wayne shaw johnson