23 Burst results for "tomek"

"tomek" Discussed on Talking Automotive

Talking Automotive

05:55 min | 5 months ago

"tomek" Discussed on Talking Automotive

" Hi everybody welcome to Talking Automotive my and name John is my co-host Sinclair Mark Palvestra <unk>. . Thanks John. Today we've got Michelle de Novian the chief marketing officer from rhode. Stay in the us at right. Sta are omni channel digital platform for the auto industry dealerships and michelle. Hsieh's some very powerful information with the insights that have that she saying from the covid situation change and move to more digital transactions of more importantly h transaction is different sets not just a pure one hundred percent digital plight it is interacting digital with the dealership experience and actually improving efficiencies with the sales put units unit sold per south consultant has moved from ten units units and customer satisfaction has increased significantly some very powerful information that she shares all support bossom. Very strong data is fascinating for me. Is that the sales price as <unk>. Longer linear where thousand works with one. Customer from beginning to end delivers a vehicle. He's not working with multiple customers at different touch points. And it's happening in the customers on tomek when the dealerships close very exciting think. This is the way things are going to and such. It's a really with listen for this jump into talking automatic analysis identification and implementation of profit opportunities for the automotive ak system with thirty years experience in logistics and started the out locations in five major shrines. Cities breakout fleet services is an independent. Division of prayer services offering specialty flake. That's for commercial applications ranging from simple try and taiba statements to fully bespoke service body and accessory installation with quality issued safety compliance and standardization of vehicle builds. Breakout fleet. services are a premia in one solutions provider for commercial vehicle fleet operators leasing companies and original equipment manufacturers for further information on. How breakout fleet. Services can assist in solving your commercial vehicle fit aetna aids. Please visit pre-cut dot com dadu and click on the link to flight services. John talked about <hes>. Just yesterday assist really powerful stuff that really raise the as the way we way we need to go as a as a as an industry in. That's what you guys in the adoption in the. Us is much faster than bank. This is us. He still thinking that online listings. For years cazes a good thing in a net cutting edge raisin haram do you <unk> to have the omni channel and what is on the channel that main the word is out there but that really comprehend. What does that make <hes>. I was having a conversation with a <hes>. Dealer here in the states earlier today. We're doing some research on sort of their they're buying journey for digital retailing. And it's interesting to hear how the progressive dealers have been all about. You know how do i. How do i modernize customer experience. And that seems to be where a lot of people were leading the conversation in their own organizations until covid. And then everybody's like oh wait this could be really great for productivity to hours talking hats. Never like that immediate hurt. You know that we're all responding to but it's that moment that's sort of what the omni channel steph. I think brings <unk>. Beaches what we've what would they added. That way would be spending a lot of time. Educating not to seal us but even just people who worked within the ends that would be countless thomas guys for different organizations and you'd have to read trying not retrying but just get people up to speed. This is how dealer works. You'd get inflexible. A williams were really good at bringing. Fm cj to into the auto industry but then the deal is wouldn't were liked to the principal's side. We found that we would spend all his time. Just got through. This is had the business thinks this is how consumers upright at mrs <unk>. Comes but just a reeducate but then the downside also is that there were people now games. That are so blinking into thinking. This is just how estimate and something new comes in nightcap. adjust to it with a whether it's a pivot or even just a mind move <unk>. The thought patented by should go down that road because now we've always done so therefore we must do it this way. So you <unk>. Al mission if you like without series is to it's one of enlightenment <unk>. But this one. Also you'll come as i should with with david that was an autograph mesa. Yes gotta get shell on on the shire to give your insights and your expertise because the journey that use shea is the journey that many needs to be undertaking <hes>. Oh actually i should have been undertaking five years ago. But if you're not on that right now you hear it's yeah it's it's tough. I think that. I know we talked to mike. About how the pandemic has been a bit shorter of a time period for you guys than it is here at this in the states but i think it was a forcing function for the future so that was a big wake up call. Thank for even dealers here. I don't think it's just internationally. I think in general change is hard and it's hard to contemplate in until after <unk> requirement. You know there's a lot of people that will just sort of sit

john michelle duggan today johnson one hundred percent Hsieh tomek one ten units rhode michelle emma
Integrating Omni Channel In Automotive

Talking Automotive

05:55 min | 5 months ago

Integrating Omni Channel In Automotive

"Hi everybody welcome to Talking Automotive my and name John is my co-host Sinclair Mark Palvestra . Thanks John. Today we've got Michelle de Novian the chief marketing officer from rhode. Stay in the us at right. Sta are omni channel digital platform for the auto industry dealerships and michelle. Hsieh's some very powerful information with the insights that have that she saying from the covid situation change and move to more digital transactions of more importantly h transaction is different sets not just a pure one hundred percent digital plight it is interacting digital with the dealership experience and actually improving efficiencies with the sales put units unit sold per south consultant has moved from ten units units and customer satisfaction has increased significantly some very powerful information that she shares all support bossom. Very strong data is fascinating for me. Is that the sales price as Longer linear where thousand works with one. Customer from beginning to end delivers a vehicle. He's not working with multiple customers at different touch points. And it's happening in the customers on tomek when the dealerships close very exciting think. This is the way things are going to and such. It's a really with listen for this jump into talking automatic analysis identification and implementation of profit opportunities for the automotive ak system with thirty years experience in logistics and started the out locations in five major shrines. Cities breakout fleet services is an independent. Division of prayer services offering specialty flake. That's for commercial applications ranging from simple try and taiba statements to fully bespoke service body and accessory installation with quality issued safety compliance and standardization of vehicle builds. Breakout fleet. services are a premia in one solutions provider for commercial vehicle fleet operators leasing companies and original equipment manufacturers for further information on. How breakout fleet. Services can assist in solving your commercial vehicle fit aetna aids. Please visit pre-cut dot com dadu and click on the link to flight services. John talked about Just yesterday assist really powerful stuff that really raise the as the way we way we need to go as a as a as an industry in. That's what you guys in the adoption in the. Us is much faster than bank. This is us. He still thinking that online listings. For years cazes a good thing in a net cutting edge raisin haram do you to have the omni channel and what is on the channel that main the word is out there but that really comprehend. What does that make I was having a conversation with a Dealer here in the states earlier today. We're doing some research on sort of their they're buying journey for digital retailing. And it's interesting to hear how the progressive dealers have been all about. You know how do i. How do i modernize customer experience. And that seems to be where a lot of people were leading the conversation in their own organizations until covid. And then everybody's like oh wait this could be really great for productivity to hours talking hats. Never like that immediate hurt. You know that we're all responding to but it's that moment that's sort of what the omni channel steph. I think brings Beaches what we've what would they added. That way would be spending a lot of time. Educating not to seal us but even just people who worked within the ends that would be countless thomas guys for different organizations and you'd have to read trying not retrying but just get people up to speed. This is how dealer works. You'd get inflexible. A williams were really good at bringing. Fm cj to into the auto industry but then the deal is wouldn't were liked to the principal's side. We found that we would spend all his time. Just got through. This is had the business thinks this is how consumers upright at mrs Comes but just a reeducate but then the downside also is that there were people now games. That are so blinking into thinking. This is just how estimate and something new comes in nightcap. adjust to it with a whether it's a pivot or even just a mind move The thought patented by should go down that road because now we've always done so therefore we must do it this way. So you Al mission if you like without series is to it's one of enlightenment But this one. Also you'll come as i should with with david that was an autograph mesa. Yes gotta get shell on on the shire to give your insights and your expertise because the journey that use shea is the journey that many needs to be undertaking Oh actually i should have been undertaking five years ago. But if you're not on that right now you hear it's yeah it's it's tough. I think that. I know we talked to mike. About how the pandemic has been a bit shorter of a time period for you guys than it is here at this in the states but i think it was a forcing function for the future so that was a big wake up call. Thank for even dealers here. I don't think it's just internationally. I think in general change is hard and it's hard to contemplate in until after requirement. You know there's a lot of people that will just sort of sit

Sinclair Mark Palvestra Michelle De Novian Tomek Division Of Prayer Services John Hsieh Rhode Michelle United States Aids Al Mission Williams Mesa Shea David Mike
"tomek" Discussed on Capital Allocators

Capital Allocators

06:50 min | 5 months ago

"tomek" Discussed on Capital Allocators

"Most useful thing for me was a gave me time to think. It gave me time to figure out what i wanted to do next. And i didn't know what i wanted to do but i knew that i of wanted to be in control of it. I knew i wanted to like do my own thing and have flexibility and so when i graduated all my other classmates got jobs than i was like. Well i saved up ten thousand dollars. And so i lived on that for the first six months and i was like. I'll see if i can figure out a way to make this work. I had to take freelance jobs and stuff to get by for the first like year and a half. it really wasn't until about eighteen months stood maybe two years in that. I started actually making enough to pay bills. And be like okay. This is my full-time thing. So the first two years of kind of stumbled around. But then eventually i found my footing and kind of have led me to doing what i do now. What was that path. Somebody told me early on. Try things until something comes easily. And i did. I tried a couple of different business ideas early on like one of my first ideas was as iphone app that i tried to create which he'll need to be very good at math to know that this is a bad idea. I paid like fifteen hundred dollars for a developer to make it. It was pretty terrible in total. It made seventeen dollars. That was quick loss off the bat. I'm like Eating through that ten k. I'd saved up. And then i had a couple of other ideas for different businesses and domain. Names like i bought puppy present dot com. Oh my girlfriend loves playing with puppies. I should make marketplace essentially and get a bunch of breeders on there and you could rent timeout a play with their puppy by the hour. Whatever the breeders hated the idea 'cause they were like you just want people to play with our dogs but they don't want to buy them and so anyway that didn't go anywhere so i tried a variety of things like that eventually. What i figured out is. Hey these ideas on launching. They're not going well. Because i don't have anybody to market them to like i don't have an audience and so i started writing started blogging to build an email list. Because i was like. I need to have somebody to launch this product to whatever the next thing is i do and this funny thing happened along the way which i was like. Wow actually kind of like writing and building the cemil more than i thought. I would add that advice. Try things until something comes easily. That was one of the first things. I had tried where i was like. Actually i think i'm kind of good at building an email. It seems like. I'm better at that than the other stuff that i've been trying if you talk to any of my professors english professors high school teachers. Whatever none of them were to said. Oh he'll be a writer they probably would be. Plus he was fine like i said i was the science guy so i just never really thought about it but i had to learn it along the way as i built a business and the more that i wrote the more liked it and people seem to resonate with the ideas and i was like you know what this actually kind of fun and so i started out as an entrepreneur. September of two thousand ten november of two thousand twelve was when i wrote my first article on james third dot com. So it took me kinda two years to stumble my way there and then for the next three years. I wrote a new article every monday and thursday and that was really the habit that led to the growth of the site led to the growth of the business that ultimately led to the book deal that became atomic habits so it was really a gradual evolution to get to there and then when i started writing about habits. I had this kind of imposter syndrome sort of thing. Well who am i to write about this and i had a friend. Tell me early on the way that you become. An expert is by writing about it each week. And i sort of internalized that idea and i think there is some truth to that. It's not to say that like it's not useful to go. Actually study it in some academic sense but you can become an expert by writing about something every week because once you get two or three years in psych actually turns out. There are very few people who've written one hundred articles on habits and so you learn a lot along the way and that was kind of like how i picked it up and learned it and started to integrate my thoughts. How did you do research if there really weren't that many people out there writing about emma's i like to refer to myself as idea agnostic for example. I don't only write about psychology of the. Oh find ideas. Tomek habits from biology architecture. Finance history philosophy. I think the upside of it outweighs the downside. Which is that. Knowledge is not confined to one little academic silo and the real world does not work that way. You have knowledge bleeding into different categories all the time and so you need to have a broad set of skills and ideas in order to properly understand how reality works and what you should be doing. That's a really high upside but the downside the trade off is that it's impossible for any one person to be an expert on all those topics and so the challenge. I ran into was like wolf. I want to write about this in a scientific way. If i want to write about this in a credible way. I better figure out a way to make sure that all these broad diverse ideas are accurate. And for me the best strategy. That i have so far is to essentially curate. The curator's so i try to find people who are trusted sources in each domain and then i use them as my proxy to say they're gonna act as my experts and if they say this is more or less the scientific consensus on a particular topic. I'll trust them. And i'll use that as the baseline for integrating with all these other ideas and i try to do that for each industry and then you put it all together and hopefully you get a fairly clear and accurate picture. What was your writing process like in those couple years leading up to writing the book. Well i think you need to focus on volume before intensity and what i mean by that is early on. It's kind of like in the gym view. Just rolling to the gym. The first day and try to squat. Five hundred pounds is not going to go very well but if instead you just work your way up slowly and you start with the bar and then he show up the next day and you put a little weight on it and you do that for ten years. Well then maybe you have chance of squatting five hundred pounds but you have to do volume before you do intensity and the same thing is true for creative work especially early on your career because for me. At least i didn't know my voice. I didn't know what i wanted to say. I didn't know how i wanted to say it. Or what my style was and so by writing a new article. Every monday and thursday. Got a lot of reps in and you start to gradually refine your approach. And eventually the style that i settled on it goes by different kind of a standard nonfiction style. Which is story study lesson so you start some kind of story to bring people in you back it up some piece of research and then you have a practical lesson or takeaway. There's another one that i'll use occasionally which is principal story action step so you just state right up front. This is the main thing that i believe. This is my thesis principle. Then you give a story to illustrate it and then you show them how to practically apply it but that general theme of you need to use stories to hook people in and for me at least my style writing. I want the ideas to be true and useful and clear that often means they need some kind of scientific backing and at the end of the day..

Tomek james emma
"tomek" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

02:53 min | 1 year ago

"tomek" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

"The no a harmful messaging and right back out. In can do it. Easily, in with no real signposts. It can happen no matter how old or how young we are. Some of the more poignant stories I hear from folks along the road of the work that of course which Brown. Bringing awareness to. Some of the more subtle ways that we suffer socially including suffering around what we call identity, these kind of packages in the suction leanings. People make just on looking at us they. Look Yeah So so when we think about how the again humor can so easily brought in to kind of. Subtly mark those who art might be targeted. or At first it might just be joe that dimensions and from there again often research shows how that can escalate to. These people are the. Targets in our group right. Or, dehumanizing. Will, haven't we seen that BLONDE JOKES? Po- Polish jokes whatever it is? You're absolutely right. I, I think I I couldn't be. The prisoner came up with it, but I've heard. If you WanNa know what someone really feels. Watch what they laugh at. It doesn't that feel? And so, it's so poignant night. Honestly mean this. I don't mean I really. Feel like I'm drawn to the work that I do at the intersection of like academia and mindfulness and justice work has it invites holding complexity and. And and mindfulness. Is kind of Nice if you will technology for holding complex beholding? Big Questions and not. The training support not grasping after the first answer. Like right. Because consciousness, itself is complex silences complex. And the brain is binary and the brain is is dualistic. Drained? Actually. I'm not sure what the brain. It's interesting. I did just kind of go like Oh. That's how the brain is. That's a bias that I have I. Go. My brain likes to go Asian. People are bad drivers, which is always the go-to safe example of racism. So. Forgive me my Asian friends, but that is you know what I'm saying the? Head! Rate We? We tend to think because we hear someone. Say that sort resume job. My brain does a lot of that we again. This question of how much of that is natural. Conditioned in our Tomek Luiz..

Tomek Luiz Brown
How small coincidences can make seemingly impenetrable cities feel a little more welcoming

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

04:39 min | 1 year ago

How small coincidences can make seemingly impenetrable cities feel a little more welcoming

"Week. We find solace a stiff drink and an old acquaintance in Shibuya buoy yet. Tokio and learn how small coincidences can make seemingly impenetrable cities feel a little more welcoming his Monaco's Kiara Ramona specific. Look at people. independ- give you when you tell them. It's the first time you've ever been to take you. It's the visual equivalent to here. We go again the first time you see. Everyone is wide-eyed captivated by lights. The crowd the noise the constant jingles blaring out of stations. Buildings elevators escalators shops. Trains streets to a Gagen Asian. The Japanese term for foreign. The city feels enormous and mesmerizing. It feels like a brand new world where it's easy to disappear and so it was for for me walking through the neighborhood of Chablis on my maiden voyage waiting at a street lights of the area's famous crossing surrounded by hundreds of people. Ready to step onto the Tomek Doc. The assumption for the Newbie and who has never been to take you is that this is a fast moving city of skyscrapers and almost impassable modernity but it takes a little more than string of the Shibuya crossing for a couple of hundred meters to realize that really. This isn't the whole story. It was late evening when my trusted dinner companions and I finally left the sober restaurant we were at and ventured in search of a buffer Sunday night cap on meanderings didn't initially really yield results instead leading. US Old way back to that famous crossing and just a little beyond PAS- flyover tucked behind the railway tracks. A small low built alleyway adorned with London's appeared along it where a cluster of microscopic Baaz one of the other. Some were already closed even even take your gets it Sunday evenings after all but some were still open still finding the seat. Even at that time of night was far from easy. Most of these vows does are so small. They consist only of a counter inobound cat where maximum of four zero five people can squeeze onto nicknamed Non Bay. Your coach life. Drunkards Ali this stretch of to narrow parallel streets was once almost exclusively people with middle-age salaryman from the nearby offices looking for wind down drinks before getting on the train home today number. Your coaches forty odd bars. Welcome people of all ages and of course their fair share of tourists yet. Somehow they're tom remains largely intact. If that's the case that's mainly because of the encounters and conversations that such a close setup inevitably leads needs to Shibuya is is not the only place of this kind in Tokyo or in the country. Similar streets hide and Shinjuku Ebisu. Shimbashi many have have their origins in the nineteen fifties when black markets for food popped up close to the city. Strange stations progressively Baas and casual restaurants. or It's a kayak. Yes took their place instead while earlier. On in the evening the streets sizzle with the smell of victory depends on version of meat skuas. Later at nights they become the reign of the skilled bomb and who as one man operations of indulged and entertained their small cohort of patrons Sambas. Ask for a cover charge. Many have a little room upstairs where people rigorously shoeless can hold up for the evening. We sheepishly approached an establishment that appeared to have a a few spare seats and peaked in to see who are drinking buddies for the evening would be to my disbelief sat at the counter of this tiny nameless bar in. Shibuya on Sunday night was an acquaintance lives in Bergen. Who I met in Florence and who I hadn't seen in years we sketched in the by women. Started carving ice with a knife in empathic blocks for whiskies in all six. It's hard to remember now. Little Party of five had struck up an enthusiastic friendship. Coincidences are powerful. Things they wake us up to the fact that a world that seems huge sometimes isn't that must've after all in Tokyo. It made us realize that. This city is far from an impenetrable algebra forest of shiny buildings. Take Your House Nooks House corners. It has places where people come together other an intimate and unexpected ways and they are everywhere. The bill came up to three thousand yen ahead. Waiting cash gotten a receipt said goodbye and walked off into the early morning. Chaba crossing felt a little less busy than

Shibuya Tokyo Tokio United States Tomek Doc Kiara Ramona Gagen Asian London Shinjuku Ebisu Chaba Florence Non Bay ALI Bergen TOM Sambas
Iran to breach uranium enrichment limits set by landmark nuclear deal

WBZ Midday News

00:41 sec | 2 years ago

Iran to breach uranium enrichment limits set by landmark nuclear deal

"Nine the U. when it's Tomek agency has confirmed water Ronnie and officials had already claimed that Iran exceeded the limits on uranium enrichment that was set by the twenty fifteen nuclear deal here's ABC's chief global affairs correspondent Martha Raddatz sentries already exceeded limits on how much nuclear fuel it can store but going beyond the limits of uranium enrichment is more serious putting the country back on the path to possibly building a nuclear bomb that is still a long way off but clearly run is not backing down despite threats from the U. S. in those countries still part of the agreement and this comes one year after president trump abandons the twenty fifteen nuclear deal with are

Iran ABC Donald Trump Tomek Martha Raddatz President Trump One Year
"tomek" Discussed on NutriMedical Report

NutriMedical Report

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"tomek" Discussed on NutriMedical Report

"She on the planet to whole body vibrational putting up the muscle to reduce insulin resistance improve perfusion release stem cell therapy, body, and genetically stimulate the by to release DNA activated on the genetic therapy with the sine wave curve of frequencies, given for Tomek residence cited last Pauling for minerals and amino acids, seem agency production messenger, wreck structural protein ends. I viciously for almost every illness. There's nothing like the sine wave therapy for improving body healing for exercise, but also the genetic treatments, Dr Belkin provide can help neutralize sees or Z states. Elvis, get a sonic life machines who Dr Bill Diggle at neutral, medical com. Contact us at nutraceutical com triple eight to one two eight seventy one or go to the website, netra, medical and gives a contact Dr bills available to help you get well. Fanatical. And welcome back to the neutral report. It is almost halfway through June is Monday. And we have three weeks to go and we're going to be back another sale week.

Dr Bill Diggle Dr Belkin Tomek Pauling Elvis three weeks
 Myanmar passenger jet lands safely after landing gear fails

KOA Q and A with Ed Greene

00:36 sec | 2 years ago

Myanmar passenger jet lands safely after landing gear fails

"A narrow escape Saturday after passengers and crew evacuated and mar airlines jet after an emergency landing ABC's. Julia McFarlane has more from London me on national airlines jet was forced to land without its front wheels. Scorching the runway Tomek inside the cabin the crew coaling everyone to get off the plane passages scrambling to escape the plane's landing gear malfunctioned, according to a statement from the line the pilot suckled at traffic control twice to check if its London had deployed before activating emergency procedures. None of the eighty nine people on board

Julia Mcfarlane Mar Airlines London ABC
What Happened at America's Secret Atomic City?

BrainStuff

08:30 min | 2 years ago

What Happened at America's Secret Atomic City?

"Putin. Today's episode was brought to you by the new Capital One saver card with which you can earn four percent cashback on dining and entertainment. That means four percent on checking out that new restaurant everyone's talking about and four percent on watching your team win at home. You'll also earn two percent cashback at grocery stores and one percent on all other purchases. Now when you go out you cash in what's in your wallet? Welcome to brain stuff. Production of iheartradio. Hey, brain stuff loin Vogel bomb here in September of nineteen forty two US army, Lieutenant General Leslie groves commander of the Manhattan project. Those secret US crash effort to develop the atomic bomb faced a critical decision. The project needed to produce uranium-235 an isotope of uranium who's unstable nucleus could be easily split trigger efficient chain-reaction and release enormous amount of destructive energy, but that would require a massive complex manufacturing process involving tens of thousands of workers which needed to be kept secret to thwart interference from spies and saboteurs. But the question was where those priscilla's possibly be hidden U S officials had already identified potential sites in several parts of the country, but all of them had drawbacks Shasta dam in California. For example, was too close to the Pacific coast and this Volna rebel air attack in several locations in Washington state would have required construction of long power lines to provide the massive amounts of electro. Needed for the work site in Illinois near Chicago was also out officials didn't want to be close to a big population centers since the potential health risks of the work were not clear, and it would have been easier for enemy Asians to blend in around a city. So instead groves quickly settled upon fifty two thousand acre. That's twenty one thousand Hector site in rural eastern, Tennessee later expanded slightly not only would it be inconspicuous to anyone outside of the sparsely populated area. But it was also close to hydroelectric plants operated by the Tennessee valley authority, which could supply the enormous amounts of electrically that the plans would require it was the perfect place to build both the Clinton engineer works, which would be the atomic complex and secret city to house the workers the government decided to call the secret city oakridge because it sounded quote, sufficiently bucolic and general according to an article in a nineteen sixty nine government review of the project, not long after choosing the area, the US government quietly started moving small farmers who had land on the site paying them compensation, but not telling them why then came trainloads full of construction equipment and building materials construction crews quickly erected the buildings that would comprise the nondescript we named campus as well as. Thousands of houses for scientists and workers. Many of the homes were be one flat tops, a designed fashion from prefabricated panels and roofing to save construction time building the secret industrial facilities and housing for workers cost around one point three two billion dollars. That's about eighteen point five billion in today's money that amounted to sixty percent of the Manhattan, project's total budget over the next few years oakridge grew into a community of seventy five thousand people. We spoke with de Ray Smith, a retired historian for the UAE twelve national security complex who also is the historian for these city of Oak Ridge and a columnist for the Oak Ridge or a local newspaper Smith explained people came from all over the world. Many of the scientists were Hungarians a lot came out of Germany and Great Britain. He explains that others were recruited for the Clinton engineering works by big US companies working on the Manhattan project who scoured campuses if US colleges and universities for bright students with needed science and technical skills. For example, a young chemist named Bill Wilcox who was approached by an Eastman Kodak recruiter in nineteen forty-three later recalled that he was only told that the job was some sort of secret war work. He said I asked where I'd be working. He wouldn't say it was secret. I asked what sort of work. I'd be doing. He wouldn't say it was secret Wilcox eventually ended up at the Clinton engineer works. According to Smith, those who turned down jobs might end up being drafted into a special engineering detachment of the US army. And sent to Tennessee anyway. Those atomic workers arrived at a place shrouded in secrecy, locals knew something mysterious was going on at the site. But only those who are part of the mission were allowed inside past. The guarded gates on the access roads, the atomic facilities themselves were surrounded by digital security. The work itself was highly compartmentalized. So that most people knew only about the small portion of the effort that they themselves were working on. And only a select few new. The overarching mission was to help make the atomic bomb access to buildings other than the one you were working in was highly restricted to keep information from getting out oakridge became a self contained community with most everything that its workers needed secret city had stores movie houses, a high school a Bank, a three hundred bed hospital, tennis and handball courts and even its own Symphony Orchestra led by a Manhattan project. Scientists people who live there tended victory gardens raised families, and led what was pretty much normal American existence. That is except for the secrecy that surrounded them in their work. A billboard reminded workers. Let's keep our traps shut. They knew they had to be cautious. Not to say anything about their jobs to anyone even their own spouses, a young scientists told one of the first reporters tried about the subject when Louis Feldstein would sit around the dinner table, and the strain was terrible. But it was all in the difficult effort of producing uranium-235. There's only a tiny amount of the stuff zero point seven percent in uranium or most of which is uranium two thirty eight which doesn't fit in as easily and above such as little boy. The one dropped on Hiroshima required. One hundred and forty one pounds. That's sixty four kilograms of uranium-235. You have to separate a lot of material to get that much to thirty five to solve that problem. The Clinton engineer works y twelve plant used special devices called Cal trans which utilized the electromagnetic separation process developed by Nobel winning physicist Ernest Lawrence, the university of California, Berkeley, the Cal trans used heat and powerful magnets to separate the two isotopes and then to collect just the uranium-235 isotope because it's so much lighter in weight together. Enough uranium-235 for the projects purposes, the y twelve facility employed twenty two thousand workers to run one thousand one hundred fifty two Kalua trans literally around the clock. Meanwhile, another part of the works. The x ten graphite reactor. Used neutrons emitted from uranium-235 to convert uranium two, thirty eight into an isotope of a different element. Plutonium two thirty nine another easily fissionable material suitable for making Tomek bombs as myth explains after x ten demonstrated that the process could work the actual plutonium used to make Fatman the bomb dropped on Nagasaki was produced in the b reactor at the Hanford engineer works near Richmond, Washington. Finally on August. Sixth nineteen Forty-five the world witnessed the results of the secret cities. Labor's when the United States dropped an atomic bomb containing uranium-235 produced there on the Japanese city of Hiroshima the Knoxville, Tennessee, new sentinels front page headline proudly proclaimed atomic super bomb made it oakridge strikes Japan that wasn't completely correct though, the uranium-235 came from Tennessee parts, the bomb were made it three different plants. So that none of them would have the complete design the destruction at Hiroshima and Nagasaki was horrific, and it was a or perhaps the turning point of the war. After the war. The various parts of the once secret, Tennessee, atomic complex were split up part eventually was reborn as the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which helped pioneer the field of nuclear medicine present isotopes for use intriguing cancer and as diagnostic tools in addition to doing cutting edge research areas ranging from nanotechnology to wireless, charging of electric vehicles and other portion became the twelve national security complex, which produced components for tens of thousands of thermonuclear weapons in the us arsenal during the Cold War and leader helped disassemble US and former Soviet nuclear weapons third part is now the site of the east Tennessee technology park, though, there's no evidence that German or Japanese spies ever managed to infiltrate the Clinton engineer works. A Soviet spy named George co Ville did manage to get a job there. And apparently passed along information about the atomic work to the Soviets in two thousand seven he was honored posthumously with a hero of the Russian federation medal. The nation's highest honor I Russian President

United States Manhattan Engineer Tennessee Oakridge Hiroshima Ray Smith Bill Wilcox Clinton Nagasaki Capital One Tennessee Valley Authority Washington Us Army Lieutenant General Leslie Grov Putin. Oak Ridge Illinois Pacific Eastman Kodak
"tomek" Discussed on Serious Inquiries Only

Serious Inquiries Only

04:48 min | 2 years ago

"tomek" Discussed on Serious Inquiries Only

"Joining me back on the show after what has been too much time. Filtering how you doing, sir? Doing good show. Now the world hasn't ended since we last spoke. So does that mean your entire career is bogus? Is that? On this short answer is. Yes. No. I mean fortunately yacht. The the apocalypse hasn't yet occurred. But you know, we're kind of sleepwalking a bit closer to the precipice of the boats. They Tomek scientists doomsday clock remains at two minutes before midnight or doom. So that's pretty ominous sign we've got a lot to talk about today. We've got a little a minor feud to talk about we got. Of course, your your work that you've done over the years, you're newest book, morality, foresight and human flourishing, but you know, on the on the topic you bring up that doomsday clock that used to be. I'm not an expert on this or by any means. But like I feel like that used to mainly be like oh nuclear winter. You know, that's we're all going to the risk that we all knew each other. Right. And nowadays, I feel like where's that rank like nuclear war to me? I don't know. I feel like is there a certain point where climate change we get so bad on climate change in not doing anything about it that that kind of. Of robs you of the opportunity for the robot. Apocalypse? And what point does climate change is kind of make your work a little less interesting where you're like. Oh, no. There could be robot wars there could be this. There could be famine there could be a Super Bowl Kano. And it's like, none of it's just climate change. That's gonna that's gonna get us. Well, I I think all of those risks are pretty significant it's helpful to distinguish between the existing risks and the emerging risks. So AI would would fall into the latter category. But climate change. It's actually kind of interesting to juxtapose it with like nuclear conflict. Initially, the the big concerns the sort of apocalyptic worries had to do with radioactive fallout. And then it was kind of in the nineteen eighties. Number of computer bottles that were that attempted to figure out what might happen if there was a nuclear bomb dropped on a city and the result was a huge conflagration or a firestorm. That's put you know was hot enough to launch all sorts of soot into the stratosphere, which is above the weather. So it ends up getting launched in there and diffuses around the whole world, and then could block out incoming solar radiation, which would cause agricultural failures. So like that event is kind of a it could unfold somewhat rapidly res- climate change is this like slow motion catastrophe. We're sort of in the midst of it, but you know, already, of course, I mean, anybody who reads the news understands at this point that it's it's connected to like, the extraordinary heatwaves in Australia right now the. You know, half our country's frozen to death right now. We got that going. Yeah. The unstable holder vortex. You know, there's even a study outs from I think twenty fifteen that linked climate change in a very plausible manner with the with the Syrian civil war that started twenty seven and which also gave rise to ISIS. So there's already seen be facts. But because this is slow motion, you know, multi Decatur phenomenon by twenty one hundred. Really see really profound alterations to condition on earth. But I think all of these threats are or a big deal, and certainly wouldn't things I worry most about with respect to climate change is property as a threat multiplier. Right. So I think mean the term that I am used as like a context rinks risk because it's sort of frames our entire existential predicament on earth, and I just kind of makes everything worse. It's a little bit harder to when when their social pool and political instability. It's going to be harder to properly regulates, you know, synthetic biology to design safe AI systems so coma. Change is. I think I have written before that it should be perhaps the number one priority, and that's not because I think that it's going to cause human extinction. I think that's unlikely although entirely possible. But I think it's just going to exacerbate everything. Yeah. That's interesting. I mean that's occurring that you think it might not cause human extinction. I'm worried that you know, a again, not not my area of expertise..

AI Australia two minutes
"tomek" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"tomek" Discussed on Amanpour

"There may be a little bit of a human thumbprint on this coming down. That is still discussion that we've warmed the world that were warming the world that this affects us that's not an discussion anymore, but how that affects where the storms go, and how strong the wind is into Congo today is area of great and fascinating research. Yeah. And I guess an area of no discussion anymore is also the wild extremes watching wild extreme extremes. Now, right. We've got we've got this massive cold deeper than it has been in some places ever in recent memory and on the other side of the world. We've got massive heat. I mean, Australia is literally so bad. That Tomek is melting. I mean fruit bats, dropping dead out of the sky wild horses dying on the ground. Yeah. So we have made heatwaves much more likely. A when conditions are right to rain or snow, warmer air has more water. So it can make more floods every if you have a hairdryer it has a heating element in it to dry your hair faster. I don't have enough left to worry about. But people do this warmer air can dry faster. And so you end up with more drought as well as more flood. So some of these extremes really do have a human fingerprint on it. So it's not just raising the temperature. It's also bringing other things what we do know is that there are places that are so cold that when you make them a little bit warmer there is it changes the the traditional way of life. You can't do what you used to do. But you might in a warmer world have a bigger Konami for most of the world for almost all the world's people heat is more of a problem than cold. And as you. Warm. The temperature at tends to give you a smaller economy. So fascinating. And we saw these horrible pictures of of dead horses in Australia, but I wanna place. I mean, it's gone viral today. It is a father and son. I believe in in Wisconsin. They threw boiling water into the ad and washed it freeze almost instantly. We're just gonna play that. I don't know whether you've seen this. But it's been going around..

Australia Tomek Congo Konami Wisconsin
"tomek" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"tomek" Discussed on WTVN

"News Radio six ten WTVN Tomek doll, baby. You know it. The Mark laser show along with sees. Let me ask you. Josh would you ever consider eating a meal at an all nude restaurant? No. I mean, all nude like naked like naked n e k I t neck and no nothing. Yeah. That that's a really good way to give me to lose my appetite a bunch of naked people saying around. Oh my God. No, first of all had no idea, these places exist. Apparently, there is an all nude restaurant. It's in Paris and it shutting down which I go. Oh, well, look at that surprising really people didn't want go eat with bare. Butt cheeks are exposed. The restaurant is called oh, Nash arou- and props for the name bad. Anyway, it opened in November of two thousand seventeen lasted a year believe it or not. What would you do? I would've guessed it would've lasted shorter NATs. That's not bad. Exactly. That's what I'm saying props to them. They made it that far. But an all new to restaurant. I was like what? And then I saw Paris. Thank you know, if there's a place where that actually has a chance it's probably there. Yeah. That's true. I lost Vegas for that matter to the top of the one of those casino hotels right now. I I don't know. I would like if you want to go to an all new restaurant just hit up the strip club with the all you can eat buffet. I mean, that's all right there. That's that's that's naked eaten. Yeah. Well, anyway, they are they're shutting it down. And they're giving him some notice. So you can get your final nude eating in. I I guess they're going to give them a few days in February there actually shutting down. Here's the thing that I thought was kinda weird you strip down you check in your clothes. But guess what the the the weight and the kitchen staff they have to have clothes on there. Some law about you can't be new touch. And food or something. That actually makes sense to you're right. That's probably some sort of a code, vile. Although I don't know how they do it in Paris. I am not participating in any naked foodie. Friday's don't even ask you see you knew exactly where I was going. And this Friday, we're that. Whereas all right. Josh taken our collective. We're going Facebook live west ever. They're like, we don't know how you did it, but you had minus five views you somehow with below.

Paris Josh WTVN Tomek Facebook Nash arou
North Korean Leader Kim Jong Un Kicks Off New Year With Address And A Warning To U.S.

NPR's World Story of the Day

04:56 min | 2 years ago

North Korean Leader Kim Jong Un Kicks Off New Year With Address And A Warning To U.S.

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from e-verify, delivering the technology to help employers verify work eligibility for new employees evolving to support the needs of your workforce at either five dot gov slash go. Let's go higher sitting in a leather chair and wood paneled room North Korea's leader kicked off the new year with an address to his nation and a warning to the US Kim Jong Hoon said he's willing to meet with President Trump a second time but threatened that if international sanctions against North Korea continue they'll have no choice, but to take a new path NPR's Anthony Kuhn joins us now from Seoul to talk about. What this could mean an Anthony since President Trump met Kim Jong UN in Singapore for that historic summit last year in June the nuclear issue has been somewhat stalled. So can you tell us what new information you heard in Kim speech, actually, most of the speech was not about the nuclear issues for a domestic audience news about the economy, but he did repeat his pledge. To denuclearize and mend fences with the US. Now, let's hear when of the more optimistic. Upbeat parts of his speech, you only to millions or to handle has is our party republics unchanging position on my unwavering will he said to establish a new relationship between the K and the US that meets the demands of the new century and to establish a permanent stable peace regime on the Korean peninsula and move towards completing nuclearization by DPRK, he meant the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, which is it's formal name analysts point out that there was actually something significant in elsewhere in the speech, he said that North Korea would stop building Tomek bombs basically cap his country's nuclear program. But as you mentioned, there was also this warning that if the US tries to sanction North Korea into submission or just runs out their patients, then all bets are off in. There could be a return to confrontation. You mentioned a warning did Kim provide any specific. Fix of what he wants from President Trump. I think it's pretty clear that he mostly just wants the meeting at this point. And we know this because North Korea has refused to engage in working level talks with the US, particularly Mike Pompeo and US special on voi- Steve begin have basically been shutout so analysts believe that North Korea is betting everything on a second summit with Trump where they will try to manipulate him into making more concessions and the North Korea's point has been pretty consistent in past months. They say look since the summit we have dismantled some of our nuclear and missile testing facilities. And now we expect the US to reciprocate by providing security guarantees in easing. Sanctions the US wants to to start off as a first move by providing an inventory of all its nuclear assets. But North Korea refuses to do that. What about the relationship with South Korea of the two leaders met? I think about three times in the past year did Kim Jong say anything about South Korean speech. Yes, he talked about continuing the line relations with South Korea. Now at times, the US's seem nervous that this sort of inter-korean reproche mos- getting out too far ahead of the nuclear issue. But lately, they seem to have had a change of heart. They seem to have decided that it doesn't really cost them anything at this point. There's only so far they can go with those sanctions still in place, and they hope that this will just improve the atmosphere and maybe make talks a little bit easier. And that is why the US gave its blessing to last week's groundbreaking on a project to connect railways between the two Koreas and the US says it will try to ensure that the sanctions that are in place. Do not prevent US aid groups from delivering humanitarian assistance to the north. It's intr-. I understand Kim talked about an end to US-South Korean joint military exercises. And at the same time the US and South Korea failed to meet a deadline to remove funding agreement for US forces in South Korea. Right. So there's this little dispute going on between the US and South Korea. How does that affect this conversation? Well, these the two sides were supposed to come up with a new agreement before the old one expired last night, but the US reportedly want South Korea to increase its contribution by fifty percent in Seoul says no the Trump administration wants all US allies to pay more in it's focusing on South Korea. I the South Koreans are also somewhat unnerved by the resignation of Defense Secretary, Mattis applause. He was a consistent advocate for the for the alliance. It's not clear that the US congress would allow any sort of pull out of US troops. But any sign that the US commitment to the defense of South Korea is wavering has. All very concerned. That's NPR's. Anthony Kuhn in Seoul. Thank

United States North Korea South Korea President Trump Us Congress Kim Jong Un KIM Kim Jong Democratic People's Republic O Seoul Anthony Kuhn Kim Jong Hoon NPR Singapore Dprk Mike Pompeo
"tomek" Discussed on No Such Thing As A Fish

No Such Thing As A Fish

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"tomek" Discussed on No Such Thing As A Fish

"Other stupid creative ways advertising, Domino's this year advertised in pot holes. So this is the thing where they've now a sideline in fixing potholes on roads cross America. And you cannot see requests that they come and fix your pothole. If you're in America, and I think it's an advertising campaign, otherwise it is really good guys. But. Cool cool paving for pizza, and they partner with various local administrations and say, hey, have you got any Paul's need doing, and they send out their pizza delivery guys who do a sideline in Tomek filling and they fill in the polls. And then they fill in the hole with Domino's pizza. Very long lasting. Wow. That's quite good. Logo on the road. But everyone gets flat road. So everyone's a winner from the other pizza manufacturers. Yeah. Papa John is furious. Justification was that potholes damage pieces. So that she saving the pieces because on the way they'll bumped up and down. They actually a go pro inside a pizza books. Traumatic journey. They have to go through to make it to their destination. Wow. Okay. I've see advertises on fire hydrants, they do this. I think a couple of years ago, they'll pay people to let them fix their fire hydrants if that broken they did this Indianapolis, so they paid I think five thousand dollars can we fix your fire hydrant and the town was like. Yeah. Great. And then they put some KFC advertising on top of it. Fill up the with chicken. But then all the finest smells delicious. Burning to a Chris or the delicious melon pants around. Stop the coast start about. Hi, guys. It's just to let you know this week. We are sponsored by blue apron..

Domino America Papa John Tomek partner Indianapolis Chris Paul five thousand dollars
"tomek" Discussed on The Astrology Podcast

The Astrology Podcast

02:48 min | 2 years ago

"tomek" Discussed on The Astrology Podcast

"Which under other circumstances? I might have counted as an adventure. Sure. And in order to go on my Australian adventure, which will be like a fun. Good adventure. Right. Yes. Have you had a like a mercury retrograde annoying snafu like that Kelly before where you had to just like push through? But eventually things came together without being completely wrecked. Yeah. Absolutely. That's probably my mice common. Type of macrey retrograde experience is way the shit hits the fan, and you've gotta put all these extra logistical effort in to make something happen. That originally saying it was going to be smooth. Just like what Austin saying I mean, I've had flights way you sit on the Tomek for an hour and a half instead of pushing back from the gate, you still get way you're trying to guard, but it takes either Longa or more it to do it. So and the end result. This is one. Thing that I took a lot about with Mickey retrograde on social media when people emailing me tearing the hair out thinking the sky's falling in like chicken little mercury retrograde. It's not terminal thing. It usually won't prevent what you're trying to do. It just makes it that much hotter and put six hopes in your way, and as long as you're prepared, and you flexible enough to deal with whatever those hopes might be Austin, you had to juggle things around you had to fly to another state when you weren't planning it. But you said I'm going to show up and do this and you rival to negotiate with homeys and get get it dumb. Whatever is long as there's a way. I'll do it. Yeah. Whatever whatever the whatever the path is. And sometimes it makes you do there's a do over where you have to do it a second time where you would have. Ideally, just wanted to just do it once and be done with it. But sometimes that process of doing it a second time, that's not really relevant in Austin's instance. But can get us. I I I submitted a birth. A second. Right. Yeah. I had literally had to give them my picture again. I had to give them my birth certificate again. I do everything again. Yeah. Do over. But I'm saying that sometimes the second duo of her can be better than what you would have done during the first time. And I've learned that sometimes there's like those rare Mark there's those murky retrograde instances where there's like a point to it. And you come out of it, perhaps stronger having persevered and having pushed through to the other side where the process of having to do it a second time, sometimes makes whatever you do better because you put more thought into it. And because you've had the experience of doing at once already like, you know, a typical mercury might be like writing a paper like an article or something, and then losing it and having to write the whole thing over again, and it's like a pain, and it's a process you have to go through you still have to push through. But then may because you wrote it twice sometimes the second versions of coming out better. I'm sorry..

Austin homeys Tomek Kelly Mickey
"tomek" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

03:52 min | 3 years ago

"tomek" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"County. We have. Arouna. Thank you so much for joining me today to talk about radiation. He'd welcome. Thank you for having me. This is an interesting interesting concept because it's something that I think is one of the main concerns I would. I would almost assume whenever people talk about, well, what do we need to be worried about? Whenever we go out into space radiation, it's just always one of those things that comes up, but I'm going to start with the question of why is radiation such a concern? What are we have to be worried about? He a an, the real. The pretty significant thing there is that it the type of radiation you're going to encounter in space is different than the types of radiation. We can't are here on earth in space. You're exposed to the thing called h z e radiation. So that stands for highs e, which is Tomek mass and high e. which is energy. So these these heavy ions, they have a lot of mass of a lot of. Energy in in that way. They are very different from gamma rays or x rays that we're gonna see on earth. There densely ionizing, which means that as a move along their target volume, they have the ability to cause a lot of damage within this one core track, and they also have these little offshoots from the core track called delta rays. So the delta rates can also go off to neighboring cells volumes in cause additional damage. So for something sensitive DNA where one hit can be a point of failure, right one hit can cause a mutation that can propagate into further damage taken propagate into cancer. When what is the point of failure? And you have a lot of complex damage, you can't repair. It becomes a big problem and you're talking about the human body, right? You're talking about when the when this heavy this this space form of radiation hits a living organism. Exactly. The other differences that in space, there's the type of dose rate that is in space. Different. It's a lot of chronic exposure ever presence, but at low doses. Whereas on earth, you get single x Ray or c. t. scan, you know, it's a single fifteen minutes Bolger or on our exposure, and then you're done until the next time. Yes. When I go to the dentist and they do that snapshot is really just a quick second. Exactly. Yeah. But this long form and that's why you know when I was when I go to the dentist, they put on this lead vest, right? And then they shoot me with radiation and the and the dental hygiene is going around the corner, you know? She's yeah. A part of it. So you know, even just that little bit, everyone's like real and and I think it is important to note that on earth, we have radiation protection standards. So likewise, we have radiation protection standards for any ashrams we send into space. Hard thing would be controlling an end Mon and keeping those standards with a such, a persistent cresent of it. That's going to be pretty challenging. The monitoring of it is actually fairly straightforward. Now it wasn't always like that, but now that we've developed newer technologies, newer dough senators, things that measure the radiation things like the MSL rod tool on curiosity Rover went from here to Mars, and on its way there it took radiation. It took measurements of the radiation environment. So now we have a really good idea of what's happening from here to Mars and on the surface of Mars. So a lot of the data were compiling and keeping track of. So we understand what the space radiation environments can be..

Tomek Bolger Ray fifteen minutes
"tomek" Discussed on Radiolab

Radiolab

03:06 min | 3 years ago

"tomek" Discussed on Radiolab

"Had two x chromosomes who would develop as a female him tomek female and if you had a y chromosome x y you develop as an anatomic meal boy that was the thinking so you see roger but then that idea got more complicated yeah when did you intersect with this story the summer of nineteen seventy pages at mit first year of medical school and the tna revolution been bringing you news of the world around us was just beginning now we have news of the credible world inside us he was involved in what he describes the precursor to the human genome project what would become the genome project working with a group of senior scientists who were envisioning maps of the genome of man we'll know the complete set of instructions which may people began to look back at some exceptional human individuals who had not been understood previously that saliva test women maria had a set of x and y chromosomes who had an x and y chromosome like most men women usually have a pair of exits and they were also looking at men altogether meal anatomy penis testes but whose chromosomes appeared to be those typical of female xx and for page and other scientists they're like oh there must be something more happening here than just like the chromosome there must be something deeper going on here should we might actually be on the trail of the secret so scientists across the world start looking at these people's chromosomes and what we found was that the few x y females were actually missing a little bit of the y chromosome with these x y women a little bit of the why wasn't there and the bit of the y that the x y females were missing was the same bid that was present in the xx meals meaning being somehow a little bit of the why chromosome had gotten onto one of the x's of these ex ex males and show who's becoming very clear that this must be the bit that matters and around nineteen ninety of the news this day scientists say they've made a major discovery scientists in britain announced they've found this one gene on the why chromosome the genetic trigger on the y chromosome that determines whether baby will be voi or a girl what they found is that of the two hundred odd genes on the y chromosome there was this one single gene that acted as the switch the master switch the grand master switch which determines the child sex so it's not x and y as a whole it's one tiny piece.

britain roger
"tomek" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"tomek" Discussed on WSB-AM

"They can go back and have a legitimate nuclear weapons development program in about ten years and that's not the security that the world needs the second is they they they have not the agreement gives the international tomek energy authority the right to inspect facilities all over iran iran hasn't let those inspectors go onto their military sites which are where they would be cheating if they're cheating and i worry that they are that is joe lieberman democrat who wants the iran deal fall by the wayside for us to pull out on may twelfth what is in basseterre dennis ross feel he's experiences anybody in this business he's at the william davidson distinguished fellow at the washington institute for near east policy and it co founded the united against nuclear iran ambassador welcome back always could be with you i actually really important happy birthday on real quick on this do you agree with joe lieberman well i agree that there needs to be changes i am worried that if we simply walk away from the deal we walk away alone our greatest leverage against iran is when we're united and we have a collective international response to isolating them if we're the ones who walkway alone then it's going to become much more problematic to do that but i do think the revelations that really came from the israeli intelligence gives us an important lever to go back to the europeans and say look clearly they they did not come clean on what their program was they committed in the deal never to seek acquire develop nuclear weapons they also committed in the deal in section t not to have computer modeling not have to do this the simulations not to be doing anything that would be related to weaponization clearly by keeping those files moving then keeping them secret they were not giving up the the weapons options so that certainly creates a justification i think also to at a minimum extend the sunset the sunset provision that would have limited the respect from starting in twenty thirty and ambassador i want you to you would max thornberry saturday with me a lot of sense yesterday and this might be an option here's the.

dennis ross william davidson washington institute joe lieberman iran ten years
"tomek" Discussed on GSMC Football Podcast

GSMC Football Podcast

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"tomek" Discussed on GSMC Football Podcast

"Definitely lower little lower profile over there for being able lugs coach coming over plate being the gators coach in gainesville where i mean you don't even get a chance to prove yourself jim mcelwain coming in after that scandal there in florida had to come in as kind of interim head coach kept kept on as the head coach and wasn't able to really do much of than other than kindness pot along through the east and the he got ousted quickly i mean it was the boosters i mean the thing about those kind of schools dissolve at the boosters and it's all about the fact that if you can't you can't make make those guys happy they're not going to keep you around very long all right that's pretty much it out of campus i mean we go back to the whole deal with these nfl jaffa make it even do we even more prospect profiles talk about probably do that i mean friday if somebody's guys are still on the board a lot of these guys are not going to get picked in the first round so probably talk about that on friday but i mean we can't wait becoming end of the show here we cannot wait till cannot wait till tomorrow night in dallas the coverage will be all over like i said it's on fox samba cast nfl network will be on fox obviously if you have nfl network you watch it on there if you like the guys with a tomek shea and mel kiper junior.

gainesville jim mcelwain florida fox tomek shea interim head nfl dallas mel kiper
"tomek" Discussed on WSRQ Talk Radio

WSRQ Talk Radio

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"tomek" Discussed on WSRQ Talk Radio

"Well we last left off we were talking to somebody who wanted to ask about time dilation and quantum communication well let's try to break it down first of all einstein says that if you go faster and faster in a rocket time slows down in that rocket this is not science fiction we measure this in fact we put two clocks one clock on an airplane that clock is a tomek lii corps correlated with a clock on the earth when the airplane takes off bingo the clock on the airplane pete slower than the clock on the planet earth so time is not absolute one second on the earth is not one second on an airplane is not one second in outer space so every time you go in an airplane believe it or not you're experiencing time dilation now the question that was as though is even more sophisticated and that is quantum communication if you take two electrons and they vibrate together so that touching each other and then you separate them an umbilical cord emerges between them and they have in some sense knowledge of each other's state so if you would analyze the first electron and it is spinning up then you know that on the other side of the universe wherever that other electron is it spinning down the to cancel out because originally you had no spin at all now believe it or not this affect travels instantly faster than the speed of light einstein hated this idea in fact einstein conceived of the experiment precisely the show that quantum mechanics is crazy that quantum mechanics allows you to go faster than the speed of light well this experiment has been done you get two electrons photons get them to vibrate together separate them measure one then instantly faster than the speed of light you know the.

einstein one second
"tomek" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

KMET 1490-AM

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"tomek" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

"Well we last left off we were talking to somebody who wanted to ask about time dilation and quantum communication well let's try to break it down personal einstein says that if you go faster and faster in a rocket time slows down in that rocket this is not science fiction we measure this in fact we put two clocks one clock on an airplane that clock is a tomek ly correlated with a clock on the earth when the airplane takes off bingo the clock on the airplane pete slower than the clock on the planet earth so time is not absolute one second on the earth is not one second on an airplane is not one second in outer space so every time you go in an airplane believe it or not you're experiencing time dilation now the question that was as though is even more sophisticated and and that is quantum communication if you take two electrons and they vibrate together so the touching each other and then you separate them an umbilical cord emerges between them and they have in some sense knowledge of each other's state so if you would analyze the first electron and it is spinning up then you know that on the other side of the universe wherever that other electron is it spinning down the to cancel out because originally you had no spin at all now believe it or not this affect travels instantly faster than the speed of light einstein hated this idea in fact i signed conceived of the experiment precisely the show the quantum mechanics is crazy that quantum mechanics allows you to go faster than the speed of light well this experiment has been done you get to electrons or two photons get them to vibrate together separate them measure one then instantly faster than the speed of light you know the.

einstein one second two photons
"tomek" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

03:03 min | 3 years ago

"tomek" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Owlry by now you've probably heard that the us has an immigration lottery yes that's right a ridiculous immigration lottery the recent terror attack of new york well you've guessed it he came in through the lottery after his name was pulled out of a hat randomly like a sweepstakes winner a my friends at the federation for american immigration reform or bear think that's our problem and here's another problem it's called chain migration chain migration means every new immigration bringing a bunch of additional folks name migration means we the people don't get to choose who are how many people come in each year why because chain machine crowd the rest better ideas and changi gratien and the lottery reduce immigration let's bring in not based on who they know but what they know a system and chain migration begin common sense the find out more go to fair us dot org that's f a i r u s dot org love of country becomes outlawed in this country one well well we just let them dryness ought to jail since seized on march and slim's slim's reasons right narrowing the skies still yourself shall muster but this it's really quite good do you know this is the ice exactly gam hip aren't i uh let's take a couple 'cause uh pending but tomek falls marilyn sirius satellite go how are you doing work very well thank you owlry don't just lose to the combat were catching every other word turn your head but the phone a little bit see if that how okay her bracco head that sounds better go ahead i say it means you're meat unlike the people in power are zero after a year of having this new administration they still feel like they're opt breathing undercover and like what they're doing is an obvious to people now i understand that not everybody listened to uh patriot radio and mark woman and all the others what's at and they i know it's stupid i i know i showed if you were just pay me of my statement i would go out used for people less than but anyway that you don't need so i had my motherinlaw she's the best at it i love your motherinlaw okay said the point is they're sell a field why with every good news that comes out like i'm listening.

us new york tomek changi gratien
"tomek" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"tomek" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"From last friday at an event hosted by politico cspan radion but we drive vadsoe middle class in fact states is the different income level because the cost to saw sweet drive the family creditors up as well we really target the approximate property tax deduction in the end result atmosphere is that we are showing it families him high tax states are getting tax cuts ya up about income level because a combination of policies and that's why i think members from those states have now taken a second look at what are achieving some still meet in in here's asset of infants with some house office to this simple request we want our family be better off after tax reform than poor let's a pretty fair request so do we so that's so macarthur says he wants it bumped up to twelve thousand five hundred is that on the table bringing ideas that is an idea that you've on mm hmm bringing ideas we're we're here to solve it another thing tomek arthur whose appears to be enjoying this debate us in front of the health it said you dropped a bomb on him i'm sure you've heard this quarter ready when you change the mortgage interest deduction bility from a million to five hundred thousand which was a unveiled to members in the meeting yesterday and on capitol hill talk about that and what would your decision your thinking by people from new york and new jersey and there's not many republicans from new york new jersey but it seems like there's a hundred with all the girls they have to say hey listen it doesn't take a lock in a place like new york to half a million dollar home in a place like you know a lot of other place across the country w pretty far off thanks so talk about your decision your thoughts by that yes so i i don't think that was in new approach necessarily i think he's been if you knew they have so i think that's been part of discussions on reform on mortgage interest for awhile simple catch truly trying to drive that deduction to that middle class at halfmillion dollar mortgage i think covers ninety percent plus.

tomek arthur new york property tax macarthur capitol hill million dollar ninety percent