35 Burst results for "tim ferriss"

Books Ive Loved  Neil Strauss

The Tim Ferriss Show

04:48 min | 2 weeks ago

Books Ive Loved Neil Strauss

"Hello Boys and girls ladies and Germs Tim Ferriss. Welcome to another upset of the Tim Ferriss show where it is usually my job to sit down with world class performers of all different types, startup founders, investors, chess champions, Olympic, athletes you name it to tease out the habits that you can apply in your own lives. This episode however is an experiment in part of short form series that I'm doing simply called books I've loved I've invited some amazing pass guests close. Friends and new faces to share their favorite books describe their favorite books, the books that have influenced them, change them, transform them for the better and I. Hope You pick up one or two mentors in the form of books from this new series and apply the lessons in your own life. I had a lot of fun putting this together inviting these people to participate and have learned so so much myself. I hope that is also the case for you. Please enjoy. Thanks for having me back to talk about some of my favorite books and I wanted to do something different today, which is I wanted to recommend some books that I've never recommended before on this podcast and that I haven't heard other people recommending things that people may not know about I wanNA turn people onto some new staff. That's like so central to me. So My Criteria were, what are the books where I've underlined the most amount of things some of these books that I'm going to recommend I literally have underlining or marks on every single page. A have kind of involved system. I use to mark books depending on the residents of the idea and different things going on in the book. The second thing is brought together these books sort of. Encompass like. The body of. What I think right now, the kinds of things that I write about and posted on instagram and teach in coach and have had so much value in my life and change them, and I'm going to walk you into them from. Let's say the simplest book to the most complex from one that's just so easy to read to one. It's almost like a textbook safer into these the beginning and see how far along you get I. Love All of these. They're really great on the path to understand yourself and who you are and the obstacles again, your way and where he's self sabotage in your relationships and. Real. Freedom. The first author is Sherry Huber and I wanted to tell you about her past but I looked it up online and I can't find anything there. So I don't know if it's public but as a child Sherry, probably faced one of the worst traumas a young person can ever. Go through and only survived it. She became a Buddhist monk. Ever met in my life I. Think She's one of the most. Centered. Wise. Powerful presences I've ever been around there's just something about her that. I can my I would like to get to one day. I really would she writes tons of books I'd love to read every one. And her books very simply written just still to pure wisdom almost like a wise mentor is giving you the advice. There aren't like supporting arguments and footnotes in research studies is just like the wisdom from high on the mountain. It's also unique font where part of the story and the power and the impact of the words is done through the font and style of writing changing as well. The illustrations by June shaver or could be shiver. The illustrator in the book so really. Looked through all her books read anything but I'll share with you the two that have had the biggest impact on me. Actually to read but I would want to read the rest. But I started with fear Book and fear book is so powerful because so many of us. Have a certain area where fear and doubt and uncertainty get in our way, and the book walks you through the of of of how to embrace them and move beyond them, and often it's very counterintuitive. But so true I highly recommend this for dealing with it and want to read you one quote from it. I WANNA read a couple of quotes from it. And her basic idea is that moving toward your fears and getting past them is the path to freedom and I love this part. And her books by the way very short hundred, fifty pages at most. She writes if you no longer believe what fear tells you you will live and it will not. That is a point on a spiritual journey that almost nobody gets past when the terror arises. When it gets backed into a corner and a matter of its survival years almost nobody has the required combination of courage desperation willingness to stand up to it.

Sherry Huber Tim Ferriss
interview with Maurice Ashley

The Tim Ferriss Show

05:19 min | 2 weeks ago

interview with Maurice Ashley

"Hello Boys and girls, ladies and germs. This is Tim Ferriss. Welcome to another episode of the Tim Ferriss Show where it is my job as always to deconstruct world class performers to tease out the habits routines, influences, favorite books, and so on. The you can apply to your own life. My guest today is a friend Maurice Ashley. Maurice Ashley is incredibly impressive human being on so many levels and we get to really dig into a number of facets of his life story and lessons learned Maurice Ashley is the first African American international grandmaster in the annals of the game of chess, and he is translated his love to others as a three time national championship coach published author Espn commentator iphone APP designer puzzle inventor, and Motivational Speaker in recognition for his immense contribution to the Game Maurice was inducted into the US chess hall of fame in. Two. Thousand Sixteen his book chess for success subtitle using an old game to build new strengths in children and teens shows the many benefits of chess particularly for at. Risk youth his tax talk working backward to solve problems has more than a million views. He's also appeared with me in the Brazilian Jujitsu episode, which has some chests of the Tim Ferriss Experiment TV series way back in the day joined by our mutual friend, Josh Wade Skin Maurice is very well known for providing dynamic live tournament coverage of world class chess competitions, and matches his high energy unapologetic and irreverent commentary combines Brooklyn Street smarts, which we talk about quite a bit with professional espn style sports analysis his covered every class of elite event including the World Chess. Championships the US chess championship, the grand chess tour and the legendary man versus machine matches between Garry Kasparov whereas Kasparov. and IBM's deep blue traveling the world as a spokesperson for the many character-building effects of chess where he's consulted with universities schools chess clubs executive in celebrities on chest principles and strategies can be applied to improve business practices and accelerate personal growth. You can find him online Maurice, Ashley Dot Com on twitter at Ashley and on Facebook Grandmaster Maurice. On instagram Maurice, Ashley Chess Without further ADO. Please enjoy this wide-ranging conversation with none other than Maurice Ashley. Maurice Welcome to the show. Thanks for having me I've been looking forward to this and hoping to have you on the show for so many years now, and we've had many different points of connection. But of course, it began with our mutual friend and also popular PODCAST Gas Josh. Wait, skin who is known you for a very long time. Indeed, he has a quote in fact that is Impreza praise of your book chess for success and it goes as follows Maurice Ashley. Has Been like a brother to me since I was twelve years old I know the man I know the competitor I know the artist no, the teacher there's a lot of train for us to cover a lot of Nixon crannies to explore but I thought we would begin with Maurice the Jamaican and I was hoping you could describe for us your beginnings and we could start with the with the genesis while yes I was born in Jamaica. Island. Not the area of Quaid's and I grew up there. I was there until I was twelve years old before I came to this country. But probably, the most significantly got happened for me in. Jamaica. Was the fact that my mother left Jamaica to come to the United. States, when I was two years old, my brother was ten. My sister was seven months old and. Opportunity to come to the US, she couldn't bring all of us at the same time. Cheech only bring herself. And her leaving was really quite an event in our lives. My father wasn't with us but living with us at the time. So we grew with our grandmother. and My mother would send. down. Stuff supplies to Jamaica Whether v Foodstuffs Flour and rice she sent him in a barrel and she said, well, she said notebooks in armor sending like a softball and a glove, and of course Jamaica. Nobody played softball baseball nothing. So I threw the glove to the site, not knowing what to do with it and use the softball as a soccer ball. Got Pretty warned down already quickly a really turn into a softball very quickly to that. But. We just being raised by my grandmother she was a teacher by training. And so she would teach us so much as young people. So we were really well prepared educationally because of my grandmother and she was sixty four years old at the time of my mother left the imagined a sixty, four year old having had seven children for own. Now suddenly taking on the care of her daughter's children at that age when thinking about maybe slowing down and retiring enjoying herself. But for the next year, she took care of us and I was really a hugely significant part of growing up living there. Until finally my mother got the resources in the paperwork through green and finally bring us to the United States.

Maurice Ashley Grandmaster Maurice Jamaica Chess Maurice Welcome United States Tim Ferriss Softball World Chess Garry Kasparov Quaid Espn Facebook IBM Motivational Speaker Josh Wade
7 Myths & Mistakes To Avoid When Launching Your New Podcast in 2020

The Podcast Domination Show | Grow your audience, make money and have fun doing it

04:35 min | Last month

7 Myths & Mistakes To Avoid When Launching Your New Podcast in 2020

"What's going on welcome back or welcome to the show for the first time? I'm musty as your host, you'd help you. Launch and grow a successful podcast helps you grow your business. Build your personal brand and become more successful and better known whether your goal is more impact or income or all of the above. This is the show for you. When you want to use a podcast to do just that now today. We're GONNA. Be talking about something that trips up a lot of entrepreneurs and business owners when they start their podcasts, and is why it becomes such a chore, and then they eventually fail and give up and to be. Debbie. Downer or someone who's really negative, but I'm going to share with you today. Seven myths slash pitfalls about launching your podcasts at I've coached a lot of people through have helped a lot of clients through and I've seen this happen over and over again even if you're a year into the podcasting game or your year to growing your podcast, and you're like my shows is. Is kind of idle like it's. It's not growing anymore. I'm not getting any leads from it. I'm not getting any new customers from it I'm not getting anything from his just another thing for me to do on my to do this. Well are some flaws are some things you're doing? That are causing you to think like that could help you reshift. Reposition your exact your mindset. Mindset around this in this training Oh this episode so before get into this one. Definitely just circle back had a share something. That's for me kind of illustrated. This point in in real life got a client who's done amazing job for their their podcast. They're up to about twenty thousand downloads month. They're doing great. They get all of media the interviews they are able to reach big. Big Equal, but they often compare themselves to people who have been doing undoing podcasting eight nine ten years, and they're only about a year or two in the game, and that's a big issue that really is that truly is one of the biggest things you can was taken over one I would say is, is this and this? Is this whole conversation that we had with? This client recently was all about this. It's about comparing your niche. PODCASTS was show. That's much much much broader. Here's the deal. If you have a niche podcast meaning, you're talking to a very specific market, and you compare yourself to Joe Rogan or a very much a bunch of punch broader podcast that has reached because they bring on guys like ee. Lan Muss. It's hard to compare really look at your podcast success. Getting to twenty thousand dollars for most people is is isn't hard or sorry is easy and the fact that they've done in less than a lesson. Two years is pretty remarkable so especially in this world now. Now, maybe in two, thousand, sixteen, two, thousand, fifteen much easier, nowadays, not so much a lot more competition out there, so I'm happy for them, but they're comparing themselves to a lot of people have been doing this for eight nine years I mean. If you've been doing this for eight nine years, you should expect to have a way bigger show especially consistently the way they're who they're comparing themselves to. If you go back and look at those shows a near year twos I. Bet you. They weren't doing the numbers they're doing now and they're still doing the same numbers. They probably wouldn't be doing for this long. I can guarantee. GUARANTEE THAT SO NUMBER ONE! Don't compare your niche podcast. Show to someone who's doing something much broader Joe Rogan Tim Ferriss you name it like those those guys are in a broader market. They have experienced They were mainstream before they got into podcasting so yesterday some anomalies. There's Louis Houses who've been doing this for years again. That's START OUT PODCASTING, but no, it's time it takes time trees on grover night. Why would you podcast overnight? So that's number. One number two is comparing your launch to somebody who's way bigger than you so listen. If you have a small audience, you can expect to demand hundred thousands of downloads. Downloads out the gate. I've only seen. That's probably a handful of times where someone is able to do that and every single time it's it's from somebody who already has a large of a name in their in their space. They may not be like Oprah, Winfrey big, but they have the in their space carved out a name for themselves. So if you're coming in doesn't have a name for themselves. You can expect your podcast. Be This game changer? It's a reflection of you, your podcasts and your content of reflection of you, so a big mistake. People make is comparing their launch to someone WHO's ten times bigger than them. You're trying to go into battle with someone who has way more firepower than you compare your launch or or that you're more of your podcasts. That is a mistake. Big Big mistake that I see people

Downer Joe Rogan Joe Rogan Tim Ferriss Lan Muss Debbie Grover Night Louis Houses Oprah Winfrey
Rana el Kaliouby  AI, Emotional Intelligence, and the Journey of Finding Oneself (

The Tim Ferriss Show

13:33 min | 4 months ago

Rana el Kaliouby AI, Emotional Intelligence, and the Journey of Finding Oneself (

"And I'll keep this short going to jump straight to the guest. My guest today is a pioneer in emotion. Ai will define what that means. Ron L. CALL UB PhD. Who's also co founder and CEO of Affect Tiba and author of the new book girl coded subtitle a scientists quest reclaim our humanity by bringing emotional intelligence technology. A passionate advocate for humanizing technology ethics and diversity. Ron has been recognized on fortunes forty under forty list and as one of Forbes top fifty women in Tech Ron is a world economic forum young global leader and Co hosted a PBS Nova series called wonders. And she's also appeared on and appears in the youtube original series the age of a hosted by Robert Downey Junior Rahall PhD from the University of Cambridge. And a post. Doc It's doctorate from. It can find her on Lincoln Kelly. Ub TWITTER AT K. L. O. U. B. Y. by the way instagram at Rana Website Ron L. DOT COM Rana. Welcome to the show. Thank you for having me. I'm excited I'm excited to have you on and if so much to cover and I thought I would begin with a question that will hopefully open up a whole different doors. A whole different set of doors. I think is the proper English expression that could potentially walk through. And it's related to a book. This is affective computing crime if. I'm getting any of the pronunciation wrong by. Rosalind Picard A. R. D. How did this book come into your life so I am concerned? I grew up in Cairo and around the Middle East. But at the time this is like nine thousand nine hundred ninety eight. I had just graduated from computer science from the American University in Cairo and my career plan at the time was to become faculty like wanted to teach and so. I knew teach had to do my master's in it was all very calculated and so I was looking for a thesis topic and my fiance at the time went on Amazon and he said Oh. You know there's this really interesting book by this. Mit professor called. Rosalind Picard Called Affect of computing and. We ordered it through Amazon. It took about three months to shift to Cairo. It got held and customs for reasons. I don't really understand but eventually I got hold of the book and I read it and I you know. I think it's safe to say that it changed my life because so so the thesis in the book is that computers need to understand human emotions just the way people do and I read the book and I was fascinated by this idea and it you know I made that my research topic and it became my obsession and it just really changed the trajectory of my life. What besides the thesis in the book had such an impact on your was it just that that world view that perspective or was there more to the book or more to the author. Yeah a great question. Soon let's talk about the author. I so rise is one of the few and I mean this was true back then. It's still true today. She's one of the few kind of female you know. Computer Science Machine Learning engineers professors in the space. And you know I kind of learned about her over the years I've eventually actually. She ended up being my co-founder many years later. But there's a story around that but but essentially I was just fascinated by her and she you know she's a mom she's three boys. I just thought she was like a Rockstar. So that was kind of one part of it but just the way she wrote the book and how she you know. I'm very expressive as a human being and I just really like. I think emotions really matter and are in the way we communicate. Non Verbally is very important and it struck me that when we think of technology that piece of how we communicate is completely missing and I was like. Oh yeah like it seems so obvious so I just got fascinated by the thesis. I got fascinated by the implications. Like what happens when technology becomes kind of clued into how we that's going to open up a whole new world of possibilities and I was intrigued by that. So let's travel back to that point in time you were with your then fiance and this book is ordered at the time. You're planning on becoming a teacher professor. Why were you on that track? To begin with I mean was it. Take us back to Egypt at that time were there. Many women striving to be faculty members in similar departments. I'm assuming computer science or or perhaps it was a different department. Maybe could tell us more. Yes so I went to the American University in Cairo and I study computer. Sciences an Undergrad. At the time most of the faculty were were guys except for one female faculty Dr Hulda Husni which became my role model and my mentor. And I just wanted to be like like she was awesome. She was you know. Very smart. Very approachable very fashionable. And I was like Ooh I like that and and I just wanted to be like her and so devised a plan also geek. I'm a geek and I'm proud of it so I I kind of devised a plan. I was like okay. I'll graduate top of my class which I did and then I was like okay. I'll go get a masters and PhD abroad. Because that's what you do and then come back and I'll join joined the faculty and so at the time because I was getting married to my fiance and he had a company based in Cairo coming to the. Us was not an option because it was way too far so he was like a let you go study in the UK. Because it's close enough so I applied to Cambridge and got in. That was kind of the impetus for going abroad and doing this. Like focusing on this research. So when did you then end up going to the? Us was that a difficult conversation with your family or your then-fiancee walk us through how that happened because it doesn't sound like that would have been just a hop skip and a jump to second conversation so walk us through that experience. Yes okay so then. I moved to Cambridge Right Cambridge University in the UK not not Cambridge Massachusetts and I will Cambridge Cambridge original Cambridge And we got married so basically I got married and got the scholarship to go study at Cambridge and my house. So He's now my husband right. Well he's my ex now but at the time he was my husband he was very supportive. He was like you gotta go. This is your dream. I'll support you will have a long distance relationship now. My family. My parents and his parents were horrified. They were like what you can't do that so so I do like to give him credit for for for making this happen and being supportive so I ended up in Cambridge and he was in Cairo and we did that for five years and towards the end of my PhD Ros Picard was visiting Cambridge UK. To give a talk there. And I ended up meeting her in person and we totally hit it off and she said why. Don't you come work with me at MIT as a post doc and I was like Oh my God. This is like a dream come true. I've been following you like forever and this is why you know like I told her my story. And then I caveat it I said that just you know I've I've been married for the last five years and have had a long distance relationship so I have to go back to Cairo otherwise and I actually really said that. I said otherwise in Islam because I'm Muslim my husband can marry up to four women and if I don't show up eventually he'll just like Mary more women so I said half jokingly right so she was like that's fine just like commute from Cairo and I commuted from Cairo Boston for a good a good three or four hundred years going back and forth between MIT and Cairo. How often did you go back and forth. Or how often did he go back to Cairo? Maybe is a better. What else get so. Initially I would spend a couple of months in Cairo and then go spend like a few weeks and Boston and then I would move with my kids to Boston over the summer so summer break we just all go there and so initially. That was okay. So this was between two thousand and six to two thousand and nine was okay Things began to kind of really follow parts when I decided to start the company so we started to get a lot of interest in technology and displaying. It they really encourage you to spin outright. So in two thousand nine united started affect. Eva and I was literally spending two weeks in Cairo in Boston. Two weeks or two weeks in Boston. It was insane and that was when like just goes out of balance everything was out of bounds unless tough it was tough and and and you know. I'm divorced now. Imagine how that didn't go very well. It was just it was I think. In retrospect it was not a very healthy lifestyle. And I I. I wouldn't want to be in that place again. I wouldn't want others to be in that. I talked publicly about that time yet. Let's let's hop around chronologically a little bit. We're GONNA come back of course to starting the company and that decision but for people who don't have any real firsthand exposure to the Middle East much less. Egypt for instance What was it like growing up in in Egypt and based on at least some of my reading you for instance wore a hit job for quite some time. We're not talking short period of time. Maybe you could also speak to that. Yeah yeah and it sounds like you've spent some time in the you've you've you've been to Jordan. It's time in Jordan of spent some time in a few places in the Middle East but not in Egypt never met each and when I was we chatted a little bit before start recording only have a few words here and there in Arabic but it's Levin Arabic right. It's it's what what you'd run across in Jordan or or the Lebanon and I remember though having many people recommend that I not study the sort of standard Arabic textbook Arabic but that I study Egyptian Arabic because all of the as they put all the entertainment and movies that I might WanNa consume would-be an Egyptian Arabic. Needless to say I didn't get that far but I haven't spent any time in Egypt. Well your Arabic spreading goods and you're right about Egyptian accent. That's kind of the most common but but I think the key thing is like there's no one Middle East. There's no one form. I grew up in a family. That's kind of an interesting way quite conservative but also quite liberal so my parents were very pro education. They scientist the They put all their money towards our schooling and they made a point during the summers that we travel abroad and experienced kind other cultures. And I think that's why like I was so comfortable moving from one country to another and ending up in the United States. Your parents do certain interject. But what is your parents do professionally okay. So my parents met. So my dad taught computer programming in the seventies and my mom was probably the first female programmer in the Middle East. He attended his class and he hit on her and they ended up getting married so so I guess I should give them a little bit of credit for ending up. Being a computer signed sub. Sure they had something to do with that. That's so so they both. My mom was a computer programmer at the Bank of National Bank of Kuwait. So we were in Kuwait for a while and my dad is. He's always worked in technology and culturally. What was it like where you grew up Or or within the family. You said that they were for instance on one hand very lesser with the right a cosmopolitan. Perhaps in their perspective and Dr Related to education and and what what were the other ingredients in the household there was there's definitely like clear gender role so even though my mom worked her entire life. it was always. She was not allowed to ever talk about her job post. You know she would leave work at three. Pm Be home like whatever for pm when we got back from school and that was it. She was never allowed to take a conference call at home. The evening never allowed to travel for work and I didn't realize that until I was an adult like I just assumed this was the way it was but it did hamper her career progression and it was this implicit understanding. That's does your. Oh this is my role and we all stick in our lane so that was interesting We were for example. I have two younger sisters.

Cairo Middle East Egypt United States Cambridge Ros Picard Boston University Of Cambridge Cambridge Right Cambridge Univ American University Professor Ron L. UK Youtube Jordan Robert Downey Cambridge Cambridge Rosalind Picard A. R. D. Lincoln Kelly
"Your Next Big Idea" Week

Feedback with EarBuds

04:16 min | 5 months ago

"Your Next Big Idea" Week

"This week's theme is your next big idea. The curator is Daniel Brooks. Here's why Daniel chose this theme. He says hi. My Name's Daniel Brooks nine. The host of the unlocking creativity podcast theme. I've chosen is. You're next big idea. The reason I've chosen this is quite simply running away from changing our whole lives. These podcasts are going to help inspire you to go in and discover yours. Here are the PODCASTS and episodes chosen by Daniel. Monday's episode comes from the Tim. Ferriss show and is called Eric Schmidt lessons from trillion dollar coach. It's one hundred and four minutes. Long Eric. Schmidt is a technical advisor and board member to Alphabet Inc where he advises its leaders on technology business and policy issues. Eric joined Google in two thousand one and helped grow the company from a Silicon Valley startup to a global leader. In Technology. Tuesday's episode comes from design matters with Debbie millman and is called Lisa Khandan. It's thirty six minutes long in this episode. A conversation with artist and illustrator. Liikanen about getting started creatively. Wednesday's episode comes from creative. Boom ranking on big regrets being different and discovering life begins at fifty. It's fifty eight minutes long. Rankin is the British photographer publisher and film director renowned for his portraits of Bowie and Bjork and for being co founder of dazed and confused. We chatted to the fearless man behind the lens about his career. And we're surprised to hear him open up about his childhood. His father his regrets and mistakes. This is an honest delve into the heart and mind of one of the biggest names. In photography Thursday's episode comes from Happy Place and is called. Joe Wicks it's forty nine minutes long in this episode. The body coach himself turns up at ferns door to discuss being a father of two meeting. Your work goals and being named Gq worst-dressed of the year Friday's episode comes from unlocking creativity. And is called. Darren Brown the creative mind. It sixty two minutes long about this podcast. Daniel says creativity is the power that allows us to imagine a world. That isn't our world yet to consider what doesn't yet exist and make it exist. Welcome to the PODCAST. That will help you make that happen. Those are the podcast recommendations chosen by Daniel. For this week's the your next big idea. Listen in and let us know what you think you can find these episodes and listen to them as a playlist on Pod chaser just had to pod Chaser DOT COM and type in your next big idea into the search bar and the playlists will be right there for your enjoyment joined the discussion of this week's theme by using the Hashtag creativity. This is usually the section of the show where we bring you podcast news since the news is so filled with corona virus and Kobe nineteen lately. There's honestly not that much podcast industry news instead skype. Pillsbury who writes inside podcasting the newsletter? We usually read our stories from is asking for your participation she writes. I'm determined to keep this community connected so while we live through this bizarre moment in history. I'll publish reader submitted issues of the newsletter. I need your help to get this done. Please send me any or all of the following one episodes or podcast that have brought you. Joy provided relief over the past. Few weeks sky will share them in her newsletter and may eventually start a Google spreadsheet where people can add browse information at their leisure. Please include a link to the show and explain why it has been helpful to you during this time two stories about how the pandemic has impacted or not your work as a creator. Feel free to mention your show in the context of your story. Three stories about how the corona virus has impacted your ability to listen to podcasts or your interest in them four requests for help with your podcast need an editor a guest. Anything else. Five any ideas you have for future reader submitted issue you can send sky any and all of your suggestions return on twitter at sky. Pillsbury that's S. K. Y. E. P. L. L. S. B. U. R. Y. You can also reach her by email at sky at inside dot com. We'll be back next week with podcast. News and PODCASTS. That are keeping US happy during the Super Weird time.

Daniel Brooks Eric Schmidt Pillsbury Google United States Debbie Millman Darren Brown Happy Place Twitter Gq Worst-Dressed Joe Wicks Ferriss Editor Skype Kobe Rankin Lisa Khandan Alphabet Inc Advisor
Ryan Holiday  turning the tables, it's okay to walk away from something you're good at because you can always come back

The Tim Ferriss Show

02:44 min | 6 months ago

Ryan Holiday turning the tables, it's okay to walk away from something you're good at because you can always come back

"Am very very accepting of the fact that there are many things I don't know and there are many things I take for granted and there are many things that I don't see therefore I tr- I spend a lot of my time developing experiments. And that's that's my constant framework like how can I be sure that I know ex? Yeah which relates to two thousand fifteen walking away from investing so I was like all right if I look at the track record of these various companies not only my portfolio but others for the biggest winds taking for looking at a shop by Uber et Cetera. Taking seven twelve years to come to fruition. And your final. Tally is not known. Until you've liquidated all of your holdings effectively. It's a little more complicated than that. But but not by much so even though on paper and also in exits it would. I could convince myself that I am good at this and people tell me. I'm good at this. That remains to be seen right and so I stopped and the larger assumption. Just because you're good at something does not mean you have to keep doing it for the rest of your life. Yeah there are many things. I'm good at that. I shouldn't do it all and It's think it's it's challenging for anyone myself included to shift gears if you if you're good at something being rewarded for something and yet you have this creeping dread that you don't want to do it that that that is a challenging situation for. I think just about anyone and certainly has been challenging for me but the the the parachute right the the safety net is realizing that for almost anything you can leave and come back almost anything and I'm sure there are exceptions. But if we're talking about businesses and professional capacities and careers if you are really good. That's a big as the ultimate leverage. That's diet is that is a huge hurdle that you need to be able to pass but if you are really good and dedicated to your craft or crafts could be a combination of of unusual crafts. Right right you might be a quant also really get a writing and then you a newsletter surely could be an unusual combination of traits like Warren Buffett and public speaking writer Jeff Basis and writing Entrepreneurship Cetera. You can always come back right right. It's so I try to keep that in mind and making a lot of my

Warren Buffett Jeff Basis Writer
The Minimum Effective Dose of Product Management

All The Responsibility Podcast

08:50 min | 7 months ago

The Minimum Effective Dose of Product Management

"The minimum affected dose is a concept that comes from a book by Tim. FERRISS called the four hour body. Now you might know Tim Ferriss. He's most well known at this point for his podcast but of of course he's written several bestselling books at least four or five. The first one was called the four hour workweek great book. It's very inspiring. Although most people it turns out in reality can't really have four hour workweeks much as we would like. He followed that with the four hour body. A really good and interesting book focused on fitness and health more your personal well-being thing whereas the four hour workweek was focused on your income and lifestyle. Both books can kind of change the way you think about things. Like in common entrepreneurship fitness and health in the four hour body. One of his most important concepts are one that I took away. That was very important is what he calls the minimum effective dose. What's the smallest amount of work? Mark Treatment Activity. You need to do to get most of the benefit for example. If you want to build muscle you can vote a lot of time to like a bodybuilders regime and eventually get your body to an amazing state but it turns out that to get kind of an eighty percent of a bodybuilder state you become very strong you become very fit. Your body changes shape shape in a noticeable way. But you aren't ready to compete. It turns out to take a much much less punishing less time consuming and less rigid regime. Then the bodybuilder has to go through like it's a lot less so applying the same idea to product management. We want to think about so. This is kind of a thought experiment as much as anything. How much do we really need? In terms of structures are in terms of activities to be able to make some effective changes as as product managers in other words. What's the minimum you can do to get the effect that you want? Or as I mentioned I like to think of it in terms of how much do I have to do to get eighty percent of the of of the total effect that I could get and sometimes eighty percent is enough versus perfection. What's the least you can do for the most effect so I came up with this idea idea? I'm not sure. He invented it from medicine and sports physiology and I mentioned the idea of the eighty percents bodybuilding. It also happens with things like medications and supplements if you take a certain dose. You get the effect if you take any more. The effect doesn't change. You've already gotten the full effect in some cases. Maybe there's a problem you know for example. If you think about vitamin D you can go out in the sun for fifteen minutes a day or into the daylight for fifteen minutes a day and your skin will make enough vitamin D for You. I mean unless yes. You have a serious condition related to Vitamin D. That's the rule of thumb if you live in a temperate climate if you go out in the sun for longer than that. There's no reason not to accept it's not going to help you get more Vitamin Vitamin D. Your body has made much vitamin D as it needs in fifteen minutes now you can also overdose on Vitamin D. You can't do that by going out in the sun but you can do it by taking supplements supplements and that's the flip side of this minimum effective dose idea. You have either the eighty percent idea what. What is the minimum I need to do? Or what is the amount actively I need to do to get to the eighty percent result. And you also this other idea of more is not better. I can do a certain amount and I get really everything. I'm going to get from the treatment. So let's now apply this idea of the minimum effective dose to product management. Since that's why we're here and there's a few good examples. I think actually some of the practices that were starting to do. An Agile and other areas of software product development are kind of examples of the minimum effective dose for example you can maybe think of stack ranking your feature backlog as kind of a way to implement the minimum effective effective dose of features. I need to think about right now constantly. Paying attention to your whole backlog. All the time is kind of like doing that bodybuilders workout. The hard one. Even if you have no plans to go into bodybuilding. It's kind of a huge waste of time and so the minimum effective dose is. Let me focus on the features that I can deliver the next month month or the next quarter and I'll forget about all the features just aren't GonNa make it and I'm going to remove those from my cognitive load and that's a way to achieve uh-huh minimum effective dose of features another good example against something that's becoming more and more common. Nowadays in in software companies are two things that are related to roadmaps roadmaps. The first one is the idea of the now next later roadmap where you talk in some level of detail about what you're planning to deliver right away. That's that's the now portion us much deal you use much less detail about items that are in the near term but not coming immediately. And then maybe bullet points points are tweets about the ideas and themes that you're looking at for later so that's the now next later roadmap. I'll put a link in the show notes to an article about about the now next leader roadmap concept and how to build one a related innovation and roadmaps is the theme based Roadmap instead of going into great detail about the features are delivering. We'll all the attendant risks that entails and unintended expectation setting you focus on the themes of the work you're planning to deliver and often these. The ideas are used in conjunction the now next later roadmap and the theme based roadmap the less risky an upcoming feature is which usually means. You're nearly ready to deliver it the more detail you can provide and for things where there's a lot more rescue provide a lot less detail you'd think about things just in terms of themes also linked to an article that I wrote wrote about roadmaps it. You might find interesting. That kind of goes more into some of these ideas but I also have another sort of richer and longer example apple of how to think about the minimum effective dose of product management and. So let's go on a little boat trip and you'll see why say that in a minute so first of all a reminder I talk about a framework for thinking thinking about product management overall. Our job is product managers is to find invalidate market problems. Drive the creation of solutions to those problems and help take. The solutions is to market that encompasses really the full life cycle of successful products. There's somebody out there that needs some problem solved or some opportunity enabled we can create some technology. That will help them do that. And then we have to make sure that those people can find out that we have the solution and that our solution is a a better alternative than there a better choice than their other alternatives. So I also have another little saying that I've sometimes said there's always product management and what I mean by. That is that we're always building something and there might have been a well-considered decision on what to build or someone might just said. Hey this would be cool to build an all build it now. I really think that in one sense. Product management is at root level. The Art of making a good decision about what to build in fact. I don't think anybody would disagree. Disagree with that so the idea that you're going to build something. Somebody's going to make a decision or not. Make a decision and something's going to build anyway. That's sort of the the background of this phrase. There's always product management because there's always something being built and did somebody make a good decision about it or not so. Let's tie this all together so consider a small startup company so small that it doesn't have a product manager on staff because it's not big enough which means one of the founders is making these decisions or something like ah a metaphor that kind of like especially for a startup is that you have a boat and it's got a big engine. which is the team in a lot of startups? It's all DEV team. You know. There's very little other people very few people in the organization. So it's like a boat with a big engine and if you turn that big engine on the boats going to go forward. It's going to go. Oh somewhere. The problem is if there's nobody standing at the Tiller at the steering wheel the boat my go around in circles or a my crashed into some rocks or Michael out to sea never to see land again without someone at the Tiller. It's probably not gonNA take anyone to a destination that's desirable there has to be somebody who's done some amount of steering in order for the boat to be an effective way to get where we WANNA go. Okay so let's move back to. Let's move back. To actual product. Companies software startups startups and other kinds of startups are kind of the same thing. There's always going to be some amount of product management. That's the person at the Tiller making sure that you're generally going the right direction but when in a little start up you have to think about. What's the minimum amount of product management? You really have to do. And so that's what we're GONNA talk about. Well if you go back to my model you have to be working on solving a market problem. You're creating a solution with your developers but if you're solving a problem that nobody cares about that's not gonna be very successful in the end and that's why you need to at least have done this piece of will let me find a market problem and make sure that somebody will pay for a solution to that.

Tim Ferriss Product Manager Tiller Product Development Apple Michael
The Product Management System of Record

All The Responsibility Podcast

09:57 min | 8 months ago

The Product Management System of Record

"Today's episode number three thirty three is a blast from the past. I I started this podcast back in November two thousand fourteen and this is actually the second episode. It's on the topic of the product management system of record and kind of how to cobble one together with a wicky and is from way back there in November two thousand fourteen. You're probably haven't heard it because it's only been available on the secret. Product Manager Handbook site but not in the regular all the responsibility feed. I did change. PODCAST feeds the next year. Now I mentioned at the beginning of small product conference. I was speaking king at the weekend. After a record the episode and at that conference I presented my idea about a product management system of record and the little prototype that I mentioned that I built in confluence more importantly at that conference Hubert Palin who was in the process of starting product board at that time now at the time and still today I consider product board to be the closest assist application in the market to what I would consider a product management system of record as I describe in the episode so it was really great timing now product board is obviously not baling wire and chewing gum. which is what I describe using in the episode but I'm afraid most project management organizations don't even have the version I describe in this episode? Let alone on product board. Now I have two interviews with Hubert Palin from back in two thousand fifteen put links into the show notes to those. I think you'll find the ideas about the product management system system of record as a concept. Hold up pretty well five years later even if the way I suggest building. One is slightly obsolete given that product board and some other applications are in the market thou I'm GonNa Talk Today about what I've been calling the product management system of record partly. This is because it's been top of mind for me lately but also next week as I speak this I'll be giving a workshop on the product like management system of record on building. One out of what I call Baling Wire and chewing gum at the product summit in San Francisco there will be a link to this workshop shop and the rest of the product summit in the show notes now product managers. We create products shirt. That's in our name but but don't forget the rest of the process that we go through to be successful. Those products need to solve an urgent pervasive market problem for a defined group of customers who who are willing to pay for the solution and when we create that solution we need to get it to market. We need to have the salespeople in the marketing people know what to say to the market market so that people will know that they wanted and will buy it so to do that. There's a bunch of activities that we do as product managers we talked to customers. We innovate around what we hear from the market. We validate those findings of new market problems. And we define product plans to create the solutions to those problems we specify features we guide the creation of the solutions and we work with sales and marketing to get the solutions to market. However we don't have a system of record for any of those activities except for potentially stuff around features if we're using a bug tracking system or requirements management system? But all the rest of it. We don't have a system of record for example. If I or you go out to a customer customer to do some market research what happens. Well we'll talk to the customer will interview them. We'll take some notes might be in word or on paper in evernote when we come back from the customer. We'll tell everybody had visited the customer. That's awesome. I'm I might send out a copy of my notes There might be some snippets of information in there and the notes that that seem important so I might highlight those maybe even pull them into another document where I might look at them later in the future. Hopefully some of that conversation when will float up in my brain when I'm talking to another customer or after I've talked talked to several customers and I'll start to see that there's a market problem that I can do some innovation around around. That's all what happens today. What doesn't happen today? Usually is that the interview notes become an enterprise asset. No the words they become accessible to everyone and valuable to everyone and the key snippets of information. Those things that I highlighted the tidbits. They don't become an enterprise asset either which it means that other people can't make use of them now. This is just one example of a lot of activities where we PM's do something important but there's no official place to put the outcome of the the activity and I can name dozens of these things that we do where we create something that you certainly could imagine as an enterprise asset but it's not stored in that way. So what would we better well. Let's get back to the customer interview example. I'd like to be able to easily compare the snippets. I learned today with what I learned last week last month last year and of course maybe I can do that with a lot of work based on my old notes but also like to be able to compare what I learned today with what you learned yesterday or last month last year or what some product manager. WHO's no longer even with? The company learned last year or last month. The reason I'd like to do this is that one of the ways you discover. Mark problems is not by talking to individual customers but by talking to multiple customers and seeing how the things that they talk about start to overlap. I'd also like a way to show. How the snippets I gathered last year are turning into features this month? This is really valuable. For talking to developers for example it turns out to be very very compelling for developers and motivating just as it is for US product managers to understand how what they're working on is driven by the needs of a customer summer and by helping a customer have a better life in some way. Now of course whenever I talk about my snippets also mean your snippets and all the other snippets from the Enterprise Prize. And I'd really like to see just in general be able to go back to all the things we've learned from customers at any time and rifle through them to see if new insights pop up. That happens pens all the time. If you have a prepared mind or a system of record where all that information is stored now as I mentioned. There really aren't tools out there that can support this today. At least not in so many words so my goal in the workshop that I mentioned earlier over time is to come up with some ways to you take what we already do in other words. We're already doing a lot of manual work to capture this information and figure out. What's the minimum amount more manual work? We can do to make it a lot more value valuable in the way that I described so I have some criteria for the kind of manual work that I'm willing to do first of all there has to be too much of it. It has to save me from repeating myself and I'll talk about that later in the context particularly of sales materials. But but basically it means I don't have to do the same thing over and over again There's a lot of benefit in the resulting information. I Want I want my manual work to give me a lot of benefit in return for doing doing the manual work. And ideally there's benefit and actually doing the manual work. It's another opportunity opportunity to have insights for example. One of the things I'm going to describe is capturing these snippets that I talked about earlier which we may already be highlighting but I'm talking about highlighting them than copying them but by doing thing this interaction with these snippets. I'm probably expanding my brain in terms of coming up and being able to see more easily problems at the customers having so the real question is what's the maximum payoff. I can get for the minimum additional amount of manual work. If you're familiar with Tim Ferriss and his forearms body book he talks talks about the minimum effective dose. So what's the minimum effective dose of manual work. That will get you a really good payoff. But it won't be that much work and you can think of this manual work. Also as kind of a concierge version of the ultimate product management repository which vendors may create as based based on maybe these conversations that we're having today now all quickly run through a basic outline of my vision of a system of record that's built out of Baling Wire and chewing gum. In fact it's really built from a wicky and I've been working a little bit with confluence as my system of record and I'll tell you about how I'm sort of setting that up. I'm calling it a system of record but that might be a little too grand for some of you. You can also call it a product management repository but the key point is it's capturing data that we already create but in a way that makes it more usable more valuable more multiple of the way that I've divided up are SORTA at the front end of the process in other words the finding market problem part of the process and the back end the go to market part of the process so the components for the front end of the process or the finding market problem pro part of the process. Are things like customers. I'm GonNa have a page in my confluence at LaSalle the customers customers. I've talked to and for each of those customers. Going to be a page and link to that page the interviews awesome and then linked to each of those interviews is going to be the snippets that I've gotten out of those interviews and I've got a particular way of doing this. It's a little bit of a manual process. You go through the interview. You highlight the snippet. That seems interesting interesting. You copy that into another page. Just all the snippets from all the customers. And it's a that's essentially a table that table of snippets Has the snippet it has. The customer has the date it may actually have multiple customers. Because what might happen is as you go through. You might start to see. Oh I've I've heard the same thing for multiple people people. That's actually one of the things you're aiming for.

Product Manager Hubert Palin Enterprise Prize San Francisco Tim Ferriss Official Lasalle
U.S. Podcast Ad Revenues Hit Historic $479 Million in 2018

podnews

04:20 min | 1 year ago

U.S. Podcast Ad Revenues Hit Historic $479 Million in 2018

"Podcasting made four hundred seventy nine million dollars in US and revenue last year. That's according to the bay, and PW WC, and it's an increase of fifty three percent year on year. It's estimated as well that the industry will be making over one billion dollars by twenty twenty one for comparison be. I a Kelsey estimate US terrestrial commercial radio to of earned fourteen point two billion in two thousand eighteen Sirius XM satellite radio earner further five point eight as predicted apple will create a brand new apple podcasts app for MAC OS, which will come in version, ten point one five of the operating system called Catalina. However, I tunes will continue as you know, it on windows machines, the new app, also clearly displays chapter points, which is nice apple also announced that podcast progress will be sink. Between devices and the availability of full text transcript. Search as well. Google ready offers both of those features that his Craig federici, the VP of software engineering and announcing it in the main, keynote. Our tension to podcast. It brings a dedicated podcast listening experience to the MAC and features all the great features you use to in Iowa's like, listen now, we can see new episodes and keep track of your listening across all of your devices, and it has a great new feature and it has to do with search, you know, sometimes you hear about something on the radio. Maybe our new podcast, something on the news. And you think I want to hear more about that? But you're not sure what show was on, or even that it appeared in the title will, now we use machine learning to index the contents of the spoken content of podcast. So now you can search that content and buying the podcast with just a few clicks in the app. It's great. Also from Apple's WW DC in the next version of IRS on the iphone and ipod touch apple podcasts will be on the front screen right next to one of the most used apps in the world, the app store, notes vox media's Zack Kahn, in a tweet. He says this will help first time listeners, discover podcasts and they also announced that watch OS the operating system on the apple watch will be capable of operating without an attached phone, and we'll also have access to a new streaming API Daniel j Lewis notes that this could be great for podcast consumption with only an apple watch in other news as we reported yesterday Tim Ferriss has made a decision to ditch the ads and just take donations for his podcast. Is that a wise, move, mayor valley any does the maths to take a look? I TV the UK commercial television company has signed a two year agreement for its podcasts to be placed in the global player. Radio and podcast app from global the UK commercial radio company. I TV have also signed with globals Dax advertising, platform target spot isn't to deal with signal the integration with the signal identity platform. The company says, in Abel's targets spot to precisely target the right listener, the right moment on the rights device shortly in the right spot golden age of podcasting, cliche news, now, as being t publishes an opinion piece from a costs Austrailia, and New Zealand boss, Henrik Isaacson, who predicts the next chapter in Austrailia, and podcast market. W also interviews, Edison research is Tom Webster on podcasting, route to mass media and event for you a podcast festival in Lisbon in Portugal. It's called poed and he's today's English, and it's on the ninth of November three new podcasts to tell you about this week the history of standup returns for new season today. Let. Of love in World War. Two is a true story from the second World War brought to life to Mark the seventy fifth anniversary of the d day landings this week written by Anna priest land and the podcast from the us national association of broadcasters. This week has a special guest editor that's me twenty two minute rump round the world in terms of podcasting.

Apple United States Tom Webster Iowa Twenty Twenty Google Austrailia Mayor Valley Craig Federici UK Vp Of Software Engineering Vox Media Tim Ferriss Editor Lisbon
Apple to kill iTunes: why it makes no difference for podcasters

podnews

02:36 min | 1 year ago

Apple to kill iTunes: why it makes no difference for podcasters

"Has been widely reported over the weekends to be killing issues. What does it mean for podcasting, nothing because you're an apple podcasts, not on, I tunes. So what else will announce at W w well, apple podcasts, went on the web, in April this year, but there's no front page for this experience here. But there is an unusual era. Is it moving to the web fully this week with a proper front page had a method of subscribing, his more wilder speculation in the apple podcasts page code as mention of requires subscription for episodes, and price equals free. Now is this a paid for subscription service or just apple using a modified version of a web schemer, it's probably the latter put who knows our editor me wrote podcasting, what apple should do next in March recommending apple at paid subscription services and Android app and proper robust API? Is I wonder how many of those ideas will materialize in other news, the Tim Ferriss show is trying in you experiment? No aunts, no sponsors, just a donation model. A blog posts explains why we linked to it from our show notes, and our newsletter today, podcast brunch club like book club. But for podcasts published, it's June listening list. The theme is understanding China and the playlist includes four episodes, that get into the country's history economy and culture, the London international awards, a long running advertising awards have added podcasting as a separate competition this year and podcast, one have revealed their spring two thousand nineteen slate. It's a Monday, so it's opinion day it's time for a podcast creation, tool from apple says website, nine to five MAC, it's now time, they say for apple to simplify the podcast creation experience. Nick Hilton writes about his first year running a podcast production company, and he notes that the market is shaping up. Be much less indie, much less counter, cultural much less innovative going forward. Good in podcasts, a new podcast from labour, spin doctor, Alastair Campbell football feminism and everything in between his comedian daughter. Grace Campbell is also a co host. The very important podcast is a branded podcast from air freshener air, wick, featuring both hosts and guests sitting on the toilet classy, how to build a dating app is a new podcast from a company building their own dating app and Molly of Denali is a new action packed adventure for kids rooted in native storytelling.

Apple Alastair Campbell Tim Ferriss Grace Campbell Nick Hilton China Editor London
3 Simple Ways to Create Magnetic Content

The Podcast Domination Show | Grow your audience, make money and have fun doing it

04:43 min | 1 year ago

3 Simple Ways to Create Magnetic Content

"A voicemail Email, just to get aid, click leads if you're trying to coach am be it's novelty people love. Novelties what our cognitive biases we always will be intrigued and engaged by novelties using your Email scripts, you can use your podcast, titles, all kinds of stuff, always works. Number two, is case study. So if I did a podcast called how I text my income in seven days. Here's how or how tax income in seven days, everybody would listen to that they wanna know so case studies on what you've done maybe if. You're a fitness professional how I drop to twelve percent body fats in seven days, or seventeen days. Thirty days how I lost sixty six pounds in forty five days case studies on yourself what you're doing what you're what you're up to different experiments running, like if you'll get Tim Ferriss he did this initial blew up. But so Patrick so Tim Ferriss this, his whole blog, blew up the whole time is doing the far workweek before, our body for our chef if you look at all of those revokes their big because their case studies on what he's testing himself. He was a human Guinea pig. He crushed it. I love his blog by the way. So case studies yourselves number two. On how you can get very viral content. It's always going to live your audience, grin, and is not hard. It's not easy to do this shit, but it works. And the last way, you can always create continents, can engage and connect with people is listed. So very simple. Seven ways Greer podcast fast or seven ways to get hundred thousand downloads, ten days, these simple, but very enticing benefit rich titles in, in hooks work. They flout work whether you like them or not. They work if you use them in your show, you will get more download you will get more engagement, people will be cured curious as to what you're doing, and they will this show. So use a model run through against we had some people jump on your relate. Number one is three things you can use three frameworks. You can use to always get more downloads. Always grow your show. One is using listener voicemail, listener mail, or emails, so reading off the question, you're getting in is novelty, people love that people always always go for that number two, using case studies, whether that your own personal case studies or your own are many clients or friends, or whoever you can use a case study. I would like how

Tim Ferriss Greer Patrick Seven Days Sixty Six Pounds Forty Five Days Seventeen Days Twelve Percent Thirty Days Ten Days
Your Ignorance Is Their Power

Inside the Spa Business | Spa

02:20 min | 1 year ago

Your Ignorance Is Their Power

"That was a quote, I saw Tim Ferriss has Instagram account. The of the day he took a photo of it as some graffiti in New York City, and I think it's valuable perspective in today's world. Because in this day of information, there's really no excuse for you, not to have at least enough information such that, your ignorance does not become a liability and put that in some kind of context over the last week or so I reckon of probably had three or four people now reach out to me for advice on various technology things. Now, I don't know much about technology, even though some people think that I do and these questions about building website or running Facebook Gad's or basically doing SEO, and the interesting thing was they had already spent the money they already gone out hired a consultant and basically going in blind. They didn't know what they will being sold. And when I looked at what they'd been. Sold that kind of being sold. A bit of be is to be perfectly honest. I don't know about these things. But I know enough to know when I'm being lied to. I think and that was my point to them. There's really no excuse for you, not to learn how to run Facebook ads. It doesn't cost you much to go and have a play. Do it yourself doesn't mean that you have to go on and do that continually doesn't mean that you need to learn the craft because it is a craft just like and just like running filters and all these things you need to learn the technology and learn the craft. And so I'm not suggesting you take your time to learn how to build a website or to learn how to run ads but learn enough. So that you know, when someone's lying to you or someone's trying to sell you something you don't want, and that's what these people had not done. And so I think when it comes to technology specially those of us who are little bit older didn't grow up with his technology. Where always I think to Kane to sort of say, well, it's technology. I don't quite understand. I get. Facebook heads. It's so easy. These days to at least know enough to not have your ignorance bi-liability. And so in a day of information do not use that as an excuse get the information just enough to know when you're being taken for ride just the thought already that's today. Thanks for tuning

Facebook Tim Ferriss New York City Instagram Consultant Kane
How to Pitch a Podcaster (or Anyone)

Daily Sales Tips

05:28 min | 1 year ago

How to Pitch a Podcaster (or Anyone)

"Is Andrew assise. And this is how to pitch a podcast her really this works for anybody. But particularly this is very very effective method that you can use to get on anybody's podcast, especially those that don't have gigantic followings, so this will necessarily we're really be Tim Ferriss is in Joe Rogan's of the world. But the people just in notch below that this will work perfect for them. So the first recommendation is listened to their podcast know what they're interested in. Because you don't wanna be pitching something that they're not interested in. So what I suggest doing his listen to their trailer episode listened to their first episode because those episodes are when they are showing their true south, and then listen to their most recent episode because things that may have been true when they started years ago may not necessarily be true anymore. So be sure to keep notes on the things that are similar across the episodes. And Embiid sure to hit on those when you're pitching. So doing homework is a huge huge part of it. Because you wanna be able to connect the dots. To know exactly what they are looking for. And then touch on why you are xactly what they're looking for. So the notes that I take things on I pay attention to what books. They like what motifs they live by. It's something like the Jim Rohn year, the average of the five people you surround yourself with most things like that are really important because they're subtle little points that sub consciously if someone says that to me, I automatically hear it. And think hey, they have a similar mindset to me. This person is the kind of person that I like in the I want to have on the shell. So you wanna try to find commonalities and not just fabricated once but genuine similarities to their message and the message that you deliver. So then because a lot of these people will be getting contacted by others the way that you wanna kinda go above and beyond. And I found this to be very very successful. Find them on social media and find out which one most people have one that they prefer over. Another. So find them on Facebook on Lincoln on Instagram on Twitter, follow them on all of them at the massive friend. And then when you see the things that they're posting start sharing those posts across all platforms. They are going to see your name, especially if they're not huge huge name. It gets hundreds thousands of shares each time. They only get a handful of shares. They're gonna see that you are sharing their content. So you're providing value to them in your reaching out to your audience on their behalf people like that Bill take notice to you doing that. So share their posts like their posts add them as a friend when you can make a introduction to them. Send them a message. Not everybody gets sent messages a lot of times people just think. Oh, well, they're they're too big. They don't even want to hear from me. And that may be true send it anyway. Go get a little bleep in see your name again. Subscribe to their Email list. And then when you get that urge automated message try replying to it some people, it's a no reply, and they don't check it. Most people though, do check it. And when you get a reply to your message, and it's just a thank you. Hey, you provide value just want to introduce myself. I'm into these topics as well feel free to reach out. I've literally send a link for people to be on my own podcast through that. Exact method had them book themselves on the show people that I thought were way out of my league. They just did it right there. I made it easy for them. They didn't have to go out of their way. They didn't have to research. I know that these people don't know, why am, but I'm still giving them the opportunity to get their message out on my platform, and my platform is very niche d- and so reach out to people that specifically target. Niche because I am providing the value that they want to have. And they know that I can reach people that they haven't reached yet and vice versa. So we start that relationship. And then what I've discovered is a lot of times. I have a guest on my podcast, and then they will happy on. There's so not everybody has on cast. Not everybody has that opportunity. But find something where you can help them know their pain points. No the things that they may be running into. So as podcast. I know having a great gas that has poor audio quality is an absolute killer. They can still be providing value and have a great message. But it's just that little detail that it's just a wish they weren't doing it on a cell phone that would make it that much better. And I show them that you're not going to run into that issue. With me, I'm comfortable in front of a camera uncomfortable on the microphone, you're not gonna get the person's as os sorry. Sorry, I'm nervous, but they get into the flow. It's already

Embiid Tim Ferriss Andrew Assise Jim Rohn Joe Rogan Facebook Twitter Bill Lincoln
Research Who You're Pitching to

Daily Sales Tips

04:33 min | 1 year ago

Research Who You're Pitching to

"Today's tip comes from Andrew with cease. Andrew is a serial entrepreneur known for forming. Rush tech support in twenty fourteen in his living room since then the company has grown to over ten million in sales with dozens of employees and multiple locations. He hosts his own podcast self made and sober where he interviews entrepreneurs who have struggled with addiction in the past and are in long term recovery in that show. He dissect the habits and routines of successful people and find ways to grow personally and professionally he also helps a Spiring entrepreneurs grow and scale their businesses with his coaching company self-made coaching here. He is with today's tip. This is Andrew Lewis season. My sales tip of the day is do research on who you are going to be pitching to it happens. So. Often that as a business owner people will come to say hullo, sir. I would like to introduce you to this product out of that of that. And I know that they haven't taken any time to learn anything about me, and my particular situation, and it's so much easier to sell to somebody if you understand their demographic, and they're psychographic so because it's important to do research. And if anyone who's listening to this is interested in selling me, something what I would strongly recommend. You do is go on my personal Facebook page. Go on my linked in page. And learn about me, I've had people come to me and say, hey, Andrew such and such and such and such. Let's go get a drink. But if they had even done an ounce of research, they would see that I have been sober since two thousand thirteen and that I have. I've a podcast featuring sober entrepreneurs. So if someone hasn't done the research on things that do and don't work with me, then I'm not going to give them the time of day because right off the rip. They've rubbed me the wrong way, and it's not so much on a moral high horse. It's just something that I I with and if someone is trying to sell me on an idea, and they come to me and say something along the lines of, hey, Andrew, such and such and such and such did you hear this on Gary v the other day, and I say, oh, you're into Gary Vannatter check. And they go on and talk about the value that he brings to other people. That's an easier way to sell me than it is to just come in and list the features of your product, but if you can build enough reporter and show that you actually are taking an interest in me people by. People. It's not the product. It's not the benefits people are willing to even give up on some quality and features if they like the person that they're doing business with so be sure that when you're speaking to somebody that, you know, exactly the things that they're interested in and do your homework. It makes building reports so much easier and makes getting the sale and starting that relationship so much easier, and it doesn't have to be this ninja sales mind trick. But just finding commonalities someone wouldn't have to come to me and pretend to be sober. I could probably spot it out pretty quick that they were lying, and they would lose my respect in that sense. But if you look through my interests in see, oh, hey, you like, Tim Ferriss. So do I we could talk about his book things like that get the ball rolling. Find commonalities. It makes the selling process that much easier, and it'll disarm the person. So that they can tell you exactly what it is that they're looking for and that you can help solve their problem. The other day, I was on a sales call with a woman, and she had said, I don't like my previous IT person because he bills me every time we call him. And I said well, great news. We have a monthly plan unlimited usage sold the end. I didn't have to tell her anything about the products benefits. Anything like that? I just listened to what she wanted. Did my homework, and it was easy to close

Andrew Lewis Gary Vannatter Andrew Spiring Facebook Tim Ferriss Business Owner Reporter
Human Nature Sometimes Demands Change

Inside the Spa Business | Spa

02:52 min | 1 year ago

Human Nature Sometimes Demands Change

"Traveling my dietary week, he's actually not only pretty healthy. But also pretty consistent. I tend to eat the same thing every day. And in that sense. I guess I kinda subscribe to the theory put forward by Tim Ferriss in his book the four hour body where he basically says that most people even though they talk about variety in diet. We'll tend to pretty much the same things with the same sorts of things. And that's certainly true me then one day last week though I woke up and decided I don't want my normal breakfast. And of course, as my nature. I started thinking about wonder why that easy. I mean, nothing really changed in the last forty eight hours that would suggest that I needed to have something different. And as I thought about it. I realized that this probably to play first of all it's the stimulant for change the fact that I didn't wanna make the effort because it actually quite a bit more effort for me to cook my healthy breakfast, white for the war. The Boyle Boyle my. Votes crush nuts that kind of stuff as opposed to maybe destroying some cocoa pops into a bowl and putting some milk on or even worse picking up some pretty unhealthy food. Probably from the shell petrol station on the way to work. So one motivational one dynamic for the change. I think is the lack of effort I didn't wanna make the F at that day, and the other motivation is sometimes you want a different outcome. Sometimes you want something that actually tastes different. Sometimes you, you know, you wanna wear jeans and a t-shirt to work instead of your uniform or your suit because you just wanna feel different. You don't wanna shave today because you don't want that outcome. You want a different feeling, and I think as businesses it's important to understand that dynamic those two dynamic sometimes people wanted to change not necessarily because of anything that you've done wrong. You know, as businesses I think, we always want people to use their products and serves as forever and ever. But at some point, the even your most loyal customers, they probably. I don't want to change, and that doesn't necessarily mean that you've done anything wrong. It might just mean that it's now the time for change. And I think maybe the only way to mitigate against that. As a business is to some somehow structure in the ability for change and variety, you certainly variety. But definitely even maybe change in your product will business owes. And of course, that runs kind of counter intuitive to the idea of building a brand through consistency. But let's face it. If that's what human nature dictates. That's what it is. And sometimes they're gonna come back because they just needed to experience something a little bit different sometimes they want, but it doesn't necessarily mean that there's anything wrong with your business, you'll productivity service. So I think understanding those dynamics of human nature when it comes to change override eighty is probably useful thing to keep in the back of your mind when you're looking at customer churn, for example, already that is it for today. Thank you for

Tim Ferriss Stimulant Forty Eight Hours Four Hour One Day Milk
Listen to more Sales Podcasts

Daily Sales Tips

02:05 min | 1 year ago

Listen to more Sales Podcasts

"My tip for you today is to listen to more sales podcasts. Obviously, I'm a big fan of the medium as the host of two different sales focused shows. But I also listened to a lot of other shows as well, not all of them are sales-oriented some are related to my industry and other interests I have, but for me, it's mostly about being able to make productive use of those times where my body might be busy. But my brain is free. And that's usually when I'm in the car or working out, although my pillow Tyne is pretty all consuming. So a little less volume working out these days. I'm also what's called a pod faster. I listened to almost everything sped up to somewhere between one point eight and two times the normal speed, which means I can consume eighty to a hundred percent more content in the same amount of time. Now, some people think I'm crazy when they hear this. But if you work your way up you'll hardly notice, and I find it allows me to f- if forces me to focus that much harder on what I'm listening to and not trail off. Now, you shouldn't have to subject yourself to a bunch of chipmunks while doing this a good apple allow you to speed things up without making the pitch higher. I typically listen with an app called pocket casts that allows you to speed things up intense. So you can start with one point one time speed or one point two times speed. I bet you'll barely notice. And then add ten percent each week for a few weeks, and you'll be zipping along like me, according to my stats in pocket casts, and I'll share this screen shot on the tips page at daily sales dot tips forward slash fifty. I've saved over twenty eight days of time doing this. It's not all just speeding things up either this app also allows me to skip intros. So when I listened to the. Tim Ferriss show. For example. I have it set to skip the first four minutes where he sticks all of his hands. So with that little hack, you should have more bandwidth to listen to more

BrainStuff Classics: Why Does Gasoline Smell So Good?

BrainStuff

04:41 min | 1 year ago

BrainStuff Classics: Why Does Gasoline Smell So Good?

"I'm Jeff Rosenthal. Co-founder of summit a thought leadership community ideas festival, and I have a new podcast called art of the hustle. We'll be breaking down how the world's most fascinating successful. People have hustled their way to the top hearing their wisdom and understanding their ways of seeing with guests like Ireland Hamilton and Tim Ferriss, new episodes drop every Wednesday. So subscribe now on apple podcasts or listen on the iheartradio app or anywhere else. You find podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff, I'm Lauren Vogel bomb. And today's episode is a classic from our erstwhile host Christian Seder. This one was a script in our old YouTube days, and we found that it was one of our most controversial why does gasoline smell so good for those of you thinking what gasoline smells gross, just believe us for some folks it smells delicious. Either. Gang. I'm Christian Sager and had you ever been to the gas station before filling up your jalopy when suddenly your nostril hairs twins with an aromatic burning sensation it's like the wise sages of Leonard Skinner once saying ooh that smell. Can't you smell that smell? I'm talking about gasoline people. Why does it smell so good? While the first answer is pretty simple actually gasoline or petrol as our friends across the pond like to call. It contains a chemical hydrocarbon called benzine used to boost its octane rating and benzene naturally has a sweet scent to it that our noses are especially sensitive to in fact, it evaporates so quickly that you'd smell benzine instantly. If you just put some in a dish in the same room, you're in it is so pungent we can get a whiff of it. If there's only one to five parts per million in the air, we breathe and benzenes not just in gasoline. We use it in plastics pesticides and detergents. It's also in a lot of mass. Produced toys. So it's possible. You're associating the smell of gasoline with that new toys smell from your childhood, but don't let it's odor. Get. It's enchanting hooks in you too far because Skinner also had it, right? When they sang that smell, the smell of death surrounds you. That's right. The smell of benzene can be fork. But it's also toxic. If you inhale large amounts of it it actually attacks your nervous system. Luckily, it's so pungent that we have plenty of warning before hazardous exposure. That's why it can start to make you nauseous or give you a headache after awhile and the consequences of sniffing too, much benzine and gasoline are not pretty inhalant abuse leads to loss of consciousness, seizures liver injury and distress within your heart and lungs keep going after that and you're looking at neurological impairment and straight up brain damage, the EPA OSHA and who also categorized benzene as a carcinogen the cancers. It's associated with the most are leukemia and. Mm foam and get this. There's possibly another less dangerous reason why we like the smell of gasoline so much. A study published in two thousand nine issue of addiction research in theory indicates that gasoline smells better to us when we're hungry. It found that people rate the smell of gasoline as being more pleasant and intense the longer it had been since they'd last eaten more research is obviously required. But there seems to be a link between our degree of hunger and our odor perception of gasoline. Maybe that's why gas stations make such a killing on selling junk food. Today's episode was written by Christian and produced by Tyler clang for more on this and lots of other topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. Hebron's listeners today. I wanted to tell you about the new podcast the brink in which hosts aerial Casten and Jonathan Strickland shared the stories of entrepreneurs who took a bold step without really, knowing if solid ground would be on the other side, tune into learn how Walt Disney bet his company and his house on the world's first feature length cartoon, and how a refugee from Vietnam turned a door to door business into a chili sauce empire every week. The brink will bring you news stories of the trials and triumphs of people who didn't let adversity stop their dreams because sometimes things just don't go your way. But what really matters are the choices you make when the odds are against you. You can listen and subscribe to the brink on apple podcasts iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Leonard Skinner Apple Jeff Rosenthal Iheartradio Tim Ferriss Co-Founder Christian Seder Ireland Hamilton Youtube Lauren Vogel Christian Sager Leukemia Walt Disney Hebron Epa Osha Tyler Clang Casten
Is the Earth Humming to Us?

BrainStuff

05:47 min | 1 year ago

Is the Earth Humming to Us?

"Hey listeners in lieu of an ad today. I wanted to tell you about a new podcast art of the hustle that breaks down how the world's most fascinating and successful. People got to where they are. It's hosted by Jeff Rosenthal, one of the brains behind summit the world's preeminent festival. Celebrating ideas every show. He grills one guest on how they hustled their way to the top people like Tim Ferriss who believes that being an introvert like he is can make you a savvy entrepreneur tune into art of the hustle a brand new show from iheartradio. And we work new episodes drop every Wednesday, so listening subscribe at apple podcasts on the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren Bogle bomb here, think of a parked truck. But the engine running that's the sound some people have compared to the mysterious non-stop noise, which is emanating from this our home planet, we've been aware of this phenomenon for decades now, and while the source of the commotion remains unknown the scientists who study at have made an important breakthrough. They finally recorded it in the nineteenth century geologists began to suspect that the earth might be producing a constant hum one which rings out even in the absence of earthquakes and seismic events. They also reasoned that the noise must be too quiet for our human eardrums to hear the official name for this drone is permanent free oscillations until somewhat recently its existence was only theoretical a team led by seismologist Hugo Benny off did try to detect the signal in nineteen Fifty-nine, but their efforts failed because at the time science did not yet possess any instruments that were sensitive enough to pick up the hump. Theory became fact, with the advance of technology in nineteen Ninety-seven, scientists at the show us station, a Japanese research base in eastern Antarctica, a were finally able to prove that permanent free oscillate really do exist. The good news was announced a year later when the show team published their findings since then numerous other teams have observed the same noise now for the first time ever, the earth's ham has been recorded easing seismic equipment on the ocean floor. This is a big deal because every previous study, which has documented the noise did so with land based instruments these she was a hard one prize for Martha dean and her team. She's a geophysicist with the Paris institute of earth physics under her leadership, the international team reviewed data collected over an eleven month period from fifty seven seismometers stations on the floor of the Indian Ocean. And that was just the first step next. The researchers eliminated all forms of audio interference such as water currents and technical glitches from the recordings made a. Two of the stations with the deletion of this extra noise. Dean and her colleagues could finally isolate the hump they were looking for a why was it so important to record the operations with submerged seismometers as dean told us in an E mail these instruments will broaden our perspective in a way that terrestrial tools. Never could. She said ocean bottom seismometers can cover much larger areas than land based ones for the ocean covers seventy percent of our planet. She added that we can better understand the phenomena by studying the hump signal at places far from land or islands. Maybe one day. We'll even be able to pinpoint its source. You see nobody knows exactly how the HAMAs is being made a few different hypotheses have been put forth some GIO, physicists think. It's generated by the ceaseless pounding of ocean waves onto continental slopes. Others believed that it could be the product of atmosphere turbulence and global wind patterns. But if that second explanation is true, we'd expect the rumblings amplitude that. It's loudness to vary from season to season. Previous studies have claimed that this is happening yet. The new research says otherwise dean's group confirmed that the hums pitch rises and falls with its maximum volume heading frequency of four point five Mila hurts that's about ten thousand times softer than the faintest noises. Our ears contest. However, according to the team's findings the amplitude changes don't correlate with seasonality thus dean and her colleagues argue that atmosphere issues alone cannot account for the existence of these permanent free oscillations. They also think that their research could open the door for future research on the earth's interior geologists use a process called tomography to map out the inside of our world. A think of it as a large scale. MRI scan dean explains scientists invert the recordings of seismic waves to decipher the makeup of various layers and structures within the planet going forward ocean bottom seismometers like those used in her reason study. Should give tomography more data to work with? Hopefully, we'll soon have a better idea of what lies beneath our feet. Today's episode was written by Mark and Chini and produced by Tyler clang for more on this and lots of other earthshaking, topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. Hey listeners in lieu of an ad today. I wanted to tell you about a new podcast art of the hustle that breaks down how the world's most fascinating and successful. People got to where they are. It's hosted by Jeff Rosenthal, one of the brains behind summit the world's preeminent festival. Celebrating ideas every show. He grills one guest on how they hustled their way to the top people like Tim Ferriss who believes that being an introvert like he is can make you a savvy entrepreneur tune into art of the hustle a brand new show from iheartradio. And we work new episodes drop every Wednesday, so listening subscribe at apple podcasts

Martha Dean Jeff Rosenthal Tim Ferriss Iheartradio Apple Indian Ocean Lauren Bogle Hamas Paris Institute Of Earth Physi Hugo Benny Geophysicist Official Mila Tyler Clang Mark Seventy Percent Eleven Month One Day
"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Podcast that explains that all of this information is information. I want to be really clear about this particular issue. We talk a lot about these things we talk about a few other things as well. And I think even for the listener who doesn't find this. Topic to be particularly interesting one thing that we talk about at the very end of the podcast that I'd been meaning to ask him for awhile. And certainly I get asked a lot is what are the things that you still incorporate in your daily routine him has written so eloquently about this stuff and has caught aside so many ways to find these minimum effective doses. To optimize everything he's doing that. I think people wonder, hey, which of the things that have really stood the test of time. And so I actually found that last part of the podcast to be especially interesting. Even for me, though, I knew these things, and I can see all the things that Tim does day in and day out. But this sort of have him say, look if I had to pick five these would be the five Tim can be found all over the place. But I think the best places to see him are on his blog, which is Tim dot blog. You can follow him at t- ferris. That's F E R S on Twitter, and you find him at Tim Ferriss on Facebook and Instagram. I hope you enjoy this first episode half as much as I enjoyed recording it, and there will be lots more of these to follow. So with all of that said, please welcome Tim Ferriss. Hey, Tim, Peter. Thank you for having me anonymous weekend. My pleasure. It's been a good weekend could view to. Yeah. What I can't believe is in the relatively short period of time. You have lived here you've become essentially, the unofficial mayor of us. I like to get involved and to explore all the various nooks and crannies of any city that I live in and after seventeen years in the bay area. I felt like I'd left almost no stone unturned have many, dear friends or still there. But many of them have traveled outside and one of the places that was an annual migration was south by south west here in Austin and had wanted to move here. Right after college gotten to know it year by year with increasingly longer stays in the city before and after the festival self and now Thome couldn't be happier. Feel like every place. We went in the last three days. Everybody knew the owner of the restaurant would know you and the coffee shop, and I don't think I've drank more coffee and Chico in short period of time three days coffee, topa, Chico..

Tim Tim Ferriss Tim dot Chico Thome Twitter t- ferris Facebook Austin three days seventeen years
"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

02:28 min | 1 year ago

"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Slash Tim and enter Tim Ferriss in the how did you hear about us section? Check it out. Hello, boys and girls, this is Tim Ferriss. And welcome to another episode of the Tim Ferriss show. This episode is a special episode. I have two people seated right around me, and we are going to delve into what thousands, maybe tens or hundreds of thousands of you ask for which are case studies related to perhaps what some of you might recognize as muses or start up businesses. Very often bootstrapped not necessarily the venture backed variety. And we have like I mentioned to people who will be joining me. We have I the lane PO felt silent D P O F E L D T who is a journalist and the author of the million dollar one person business. Thank you so much for being here. It's my pleasure attempt. Thank you, and Elaine, and I have got to know each other over the last few years as she has profiled many people who have started businesses in many different contacts. It's a fair number of them have been readers of or somehow inspired by tactically philosophically by the four hour workweek, which is how we why suppose we I connected ages ago when the first book came out, so this this goes back some distance it goes back ten years. In fact, I was carrying you earlier that when I worked at fortune, small business magazine, one of my duties was as the book editor, and I received a lot of submissions for books to excerpt and your book was the only one I ever excerpted because a lot of the other business books were not up to snuff. And that was how we initially connected. So it's been an I so much appreciate that. Because back in the day, of course, with an initial print run of whatever was ten thousand copies twelve thousand copies. It didn't even have national distribution. So the the fledgling hatchlings as were really, really. A sensitive time that could have been an inflection point which ended up being or it could have been crickets. So I appreciate the early support. And then we also have with us today on Walden. Alan welcome to the show. Thanks for having me. And we are going to be delving into your story and Alan was introduced to me by lane and Allen is the founder of spy guy, one word capital S capital..

Tim Ferriss Alan small business magazine Elaine editor founder Allen million dollar four hour ten years
"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Log forward slash Friday. Listen to this podcast, very likely that you'd dig it a lot and you can, of course easily subscribe any time. So easy peasy again, that's Tim dot blog forward slash Friday, and thanks for checking it out. If the spirit moves ya. Hello, you sexy little munchkins. This is Tim Ferriss. Welcome to another episode of the Tim Ferriss show where I deconstruct world class performers, whether they are billionaire investors, celebrities like Arnold Schwarzenegger musicians or for instance, chess prodigies. And this episode is. A much awaited much requested follow up to my second podcasts. The number two of the Tim Ferriss show with Josh wait skin who's a close friend of mine. He was the basis for the book and the movie searching for Bobby Fischer. He is considered a chess prodigy, but I don't think that word prodigy applies to him very well because it's not a mutation. He doesn't have alien genetics. He has perfected instead learning strategies and frameworks that can be applied to anything including some of his other loves like Brazilian jujitsu in which he's a black belt under the fe- Marcelo Garcia considered the Michael Jordan of the sport, and oftentimes called the best grappler ever walked the planet or Taichi push, for instance, in which Josh became a world champion. These days, he spends a lot of his time coaching other top performers in the world, whether Mark Messier Cal Ripken or top performing hedge fund managers and Josh very complementary approaches. He tends to focus on getting people from say ninety nine to top ninety nine point nine nine. Nine percent, but we have very complementary purchase. A lot of overlap, and I initially met Josh through his book, the art of learning and loved it so much that we made an audiobook.

Tim Ferriss Josh Tim dot Bobby Fischer Arnold Schwarzenegger Marcelo Garcia Cal Ripken Mark Messier Michael Jordan Nine percent
"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Hello ladies and gentlemen and welcome to another episode of the tim ferriss show this is tim ferriss speaking and i should clarify that this episode is an addition of the tim ferriss radio hour where i share the patterns and themes of world class performers that identified after more than three hundred guests on the podcast this particular episode is going to explore success what does that mean what's slippery dangerous term and the particular guests i selected for this episode i would say represent not only achievement but also appreciation and a well rounded version of what i consider to be a successful human being and by any objective measure certainly financially or otherwise i've interviewed some of the more successful people on the planet and then the next hour we will revisit specific conversations that discussed the tips disciplines habits and mindsets perhaps most importantly that separate world class performers who reach their goals from those who fall short this episode includes wisdom from derek sievers i learned this the hard way at my last company because we had a quarter million customers so when i'd send out an email to everyone if any sentence was at all unclear in any way i'd get fifty thousand confused replies from people we also talked to tony robbins you've got the best you've got to be an owner not a consumer the way to do that frankly we all know but very few people do and that you take a percentage lock it down you never see it's automated and you put aside for vestment and that just occurs you'll hear from good friend chris sokha venture capital it's totally unfair people gave me their money i draw management fiat so they pay me to take their money and invest for them legendary investor revalue i think three things make up successful life by large i you have dacia goals big dreams and we can't talk success without including sir richard branson one.

richard branson tim ferriss tony robbins chris sokha
"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"Sarily look kinda like ski boots but without the foot portion and they hook you upside down so you can take them really anywhere you wanna go to get this deal which is a savings of over one hundred forty eight dollars it's very specific so maybe it's forty nine you have to go to teeter dot com forward slash tim that's teeter dot com forward slash tim t e t e r you'll see free shipping sixty day money back guarantee end free return so why not try to remember you can only get the teeter inversion table with bonus successor is and a free pair of gravity boots by going to teeter dot com forward slash tim so if you're thinking yourself what the hell is this thing he's talking about i can't even vision that my head well take a look at the photos go to teeter dot com forward slash tim hello boys and girls and welcome to another upset of the tim ferriss show this is tim ferriss and each never episode is typically my job to deconstruct world class performers and longform interviews whether they come from the worlds of military entertainment sports investing business or otherwise this episode is going to be a special intervention slash helping hand as much for me as anyone else from the outside looking in the last two to four weeks have been disaster after disaster for me i had a very unexpected and sad death in the family several large business deals that were in process for six plus months fell apart at the last minute and the list just goes on and on and on i may in fact have to sue someone for breach of contract which i'm always luth to do and it's been high stress it has been high stress and the question is how does.

tim ferriss one hundred forty eight dollar four weeks sixty day
"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Sarily look kinda like ski boots but without the foot portion and they hook you upside down so you can take them really anywhere you wanna go to get this deal which is a savings of over one hundred forty eight dollars it's very specific so maybe it's forty nine you have to go to teeter dot com forward slash tim that's teeter dot com forward slash tim t e t e r you'll see free shipping sixty day money back guarantee end free return so why not try to remember you can only get the teeter inversion table with bonus successor is and a free pair of gravity boots by going to teeter dot com forward slash tim so if you're thinking yourself what the hell is this thing he's talking about i can't even vision that my head well take a look at the photos go to teeter dot com forward slash tim hello boys and girls and welcome to another upset of the tim ferriss show this is tim ferriss and each never episode is typically my job to deconstruct world class performers and longform interviews whether they come from the worlds of military entertainment sports investing business or otherwise this episode is going to be a special intervention slash helping hand as much for me as anyone else from the outside looking in the last two to four weeks have been disaster after disaster for me i had a very unexpected and sad death in the family several large business deals that were in process for six plus months fell apart at the last minute and the list just goes on and on and on i may in fact have to sue someone for breach of contract which i'm always luth to do and it's been high stress it has been high stress and the question is how does.

tim ferriss one hundred forty eight dollar four weeks sixty day
"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"Classes and you can compete with your friends which is also fun kevin i'm coming after you but we usually just use classes on demand i really like that wilpers and his i in high intensity training sessions that are shorter like twenty minutes and i think kevin's favorite is alex and everyone seems to have their favorite instructor or you can select by music duration and so on each on bike includes a twenty two inch hd touchscreen performance tracking metrics i think that along with the real time leaderboard of the main reasons that this caught my attention when cycling never had caught my attention before it's really pretty stunning with they've done with user interface to keep your attention the belt drive is quiet and it's smaller than you'd expect so it can fit in a living room or office i actually have it in a large closet believe it or not and it fits with no problem support on is offering all of you guys listeners of the tim ferriss show a special offer and it is actually special visit one peleton that's o n e p e l o t o n one peleton dot com and enter the code tim all caps tiem at checkout to receive one hundred dollars off excess re's with your peleton bike purchase now you might say accessories wait i don't need fancy towels or whatever other supplemental bits and pieces nope the shoes you need you need the clip in shoes and those are in the accessory category so this one hundred dollars off is a very legit one hundred dollars off so if you want to get in your workouts if you want a convenient and really entertaining way to do highdensity interval training or anything else or you just want to get a fantastic gift for someone checkout pillet on one peleton dot com and enter the code tim again that's oh e p l o t o n dot com and enter the code tim checkout to receive one hundred dollars off any excess re's including the shoes.

wilpers kevin instructor alex tim ferriss one hundred dollars twenty two inch twenty minutes
"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Classes and you can compete with your friends which is also fun kevin i'm coming after you but we usually just use classes on demand i really like that wilpers and his i in high intensity training sessions that are shorter like twenty minutes and i think kevin's favorite is alex and everyone seems to have their favorite instructor or you can select by music duration and so on each on bike includes a twenty two inch hd touchscreen performance tracking metrics i think that along with the real time leaderboard of the main reasons that this caught my attention when cycling never had caught my attention before it's really pretty stunning with they've done with user interface to keep your attention the belt drive is quiet and it's smaller than you'd expect so it can fit in a living room or office i actually have it in a large closet believe it or not and it fits with no problem support on is offering all of you guys listeners of the tim ferriss show a special offer and it is actually special visit one peleton that's o n e p e l o t o n one peleton dot com and enter the code tim all caps tiem at checkout to receive one hundred dollars off excess re's with your peleton bike purchase now you might say accessories wait i don't need fancy towels or whatever other supplemental bits and pieces nope the shoes you need you need the clip in shoes and those are in the accessory category so this one hundred dollars off is a very legit one hundred dollars off so if you want to get in your workouts if you want a convenient and really entertaining way to do highdensity interval training or anything else or you just want to get a fantastic gift for someone checkout pillet on one peleton dot com and enter the code tim again that's oh e p l o t o n dot com and enter the code tim checkout to receive one hundred dollars off any excess re's including the shoes.

wilpers kevin instructor alex tim ferriss one hundred dollars twenty two inch twenty minutes
"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Classes and you can compete with your friends which is also fun kevin i'm coming after you but we usually just use classes on demand i really like that wilpers and his i in high intensity training sessions that are shorter like twenty minutes and i think kevin's favorite is alex and everyone seems to have their favorite instructor or you can select by music duration and so on each on bike includes a twenty two inch hd touchscreen performance tracking metrics i think that along with the real time leaderboard or the main reasons that this caught my attention when cycling never had caught my attention before it's really pretty stunning with they've done with the user interface to keep your attention the belt drive is quiet and it's smaller than you would expect so it can fit in a living room or office i actually have it in a large closet believe it or not and it fits with no problem to peleton is offering all of you guys listeners of the tim ferriss show a special offer and it is actually special visit one peleton that's o n e p e l o t o n one peleton dot com and enter the code tim all caps tiem at checkout to receive one hundred dollars off excess re's with your peleton bike purchase now you might say accessories wait i don't need fancy towels or whatever other supplemental bits and pieces nope this shoes you need you need the clip in shoes and those are in the accessory category so this hundred dollars off is a very legit one hundred dollars off so if you want to get in your workouts if you want a convenient and really entertaining way to do highdensity interval training or anything else or you just want to get a fantastic gift for someone checkout pillet on one peleton dot com and enter the code tim again that's oh e p l o t o n dot com and enter the code tim checkout to receive one hundred dollars off any accessories including the shoes.

wilpers kevin instructor alex tim ferriss one hundred dollars hundred dollars twenty two inch twenty minutes
"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"Like we're gonna have very little tracking a lot of work but just go to first book com forward slash tim and tried out because it is a very good product and i think you will find simplifies your life enjoy hello ladies and germs this is tim ferriss and welcome to another upset of the tim ferriss show where it is my job to tease out distill share the habits routines life lessons belief systems and so on of worldclass performers from all different demands this episode features entrepreneur and supermodel carly kloss that's two ks can find her on instagram and elsewhere at carly kloss k a r l i e k l o s s crawley was discovered at a local charity fashion show at age thirteen and by this point i think she's been on forty five fifty covers something like that carly fashion career quickly took off and she's walked for top designers including oscar de la renta christian dior alexander mcqueen for sachi among others she's also starred in many major campaigns including dita's or the us depending on where you're listening to this donna karen dull chain 'gabon dior calvin klein caroliina harare from getting that right shown my stripes here and serov sqi among many many others but i wanted to have carly on this show not just because of her modeling career of course which i think it's discounted because thousands tens of thousands of women or girls come into the world of modeling in very few make it to the top very few last a long time in very very few still are able to translate to other things outside of modeling carly's passion for technology led her to take code in classes learning to program inspired by codings endless possibilities she then launched code with clausi k o d code with classy a nonprofit that empowers young women to learn to code and become leaders and tech which in two thousand eighteen will expand to fifty camps in twenty five cities and may go well beyond that time magazine has recognized carly for her entrepreneurship and philanthropic work on its time one hundred list.

tim ferriss sachi time magazine carly kloss dita donna karen
"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Like we're gonna have very little tracking a lot of work but just go to first book com forward slash tim and tried out because it is a very good product and i think you will find simplifies your life enjoy hello ladies and germs this is tim ferriss and welcome to another upset of the tim ferriss show where it is my job to tease out distill share the habits routines life lessons belief systems and so on of worldclass performers from all different demands this episode features entrepreneur and supermodel carly kloss that's two ks can find her on instagram and elsewhere at carly kloss k a r l i e k l o s s crawley was discovered at a local charity fashion show at age thirteen and by this point i think she's been on forty five fifty covers something like that carly fashion career quickly took off and she's walked for top designers including oscar de la renta christian dior alexander mcqueen for sachi among others she's also starred in many major campaigns including dita's or the us depending on where you're listening to this donna karen dull chain 'gabon dior calvin klein caroliina harare from getting that right shown my stripes here and serov sqi among many many others but i wanted to have carly on this show not just because of her modeling career of course which i think it's discounted because thousands tens of thousands of women or girls come into the world of modeling in very few make it to the top very few last a long time in very very few still are able to translate to other things outside of modeling carly's passion for technology led her to take code in classes learning to program inspired by codings endless possibilities she then launched code with clausi k o d code with classy a nonprofit that empowers young women to learn to code and become leaders and tech which in two thousand eighteen will expand to fifty camps in twenty five cities and may go well beyond that time magazine has recognized carly for her entrepreneurship and philanthropic work on its time one hundred list.

tim ferriss sachi time magazine carly kloss dita donna karen
"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Classes and you can compete with your friends which is also fun kevin i'm coming after you but we usually just use classes on demand i really like that wilpers and his i in high intensity training sessions that are shorter like twenty minutes and i think kevin's favorite is alex and everyone seems to have their favorite instructor or you can select by music duration and so on each on by includes a twenty two inch hd touchscreen performance tracking metrics i think that along with the real time leaderboard or the main reasons that this caught my attention when cycling never had caught my attention before it's really pretty stunning what they've done with the user interface to keep your attention the belt drive is quiet and it's smaller than you'd expect so it can fit in a living room or an office i actually have it in a large closet believe it or not and it fits with no problem support on is offering all of you guys listeners of the tim ferriss show a special offer and it is actually special visit one peleton that's oh n e p l o t o n one peleton dot com and enter the code tim all caps tiem at checkout to receive one hundred dollars off excess re's with your peleton bike purchase now you might say accessories wait i don't need fancy towels or whatever other supplemental bits and pieces nope the shoes you need you need the clip in shoes and those are in the accessory category so this one hundred dollars off is a very legit one hundred dollars off so if you want to get in your workouts if you want a convenient and really entertaining way to do heinsohn interval training or anything else or you just want to get a fantastic gift for someone checkout billiton one peleton dot com and enter the code tim again that's o n e p l o t o n dot com and enter the code tim at checkout to receive one hundred dollars off any accessories including the shoes.

wilpers kevin instructor alex tim ferriss one hundred dollars twenty two inch twenty minutes
"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

04:45 min | 2 years ago

"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"Hello boys and girls ladies and germs this is tim ferriss and welcome to another episode of the tim ferriss show where is my job every episode to deconstruct world class performers people who are excellent if not the best at what they do in many many many different fields in that scratchiness is tim ferriss coming off of antibiotics because i had some little gremlins inside me that i brought back from the amazon that's a separate story in any case my job deconstructed many fields and this particular episode we have a wonderful guest jack cornfield also calls jack quote one of the greatest spiritual teachers of our time and quote jack trained as a buddhist monk in the monastery of thailand india and burma shortly thereafter becoming one of the key teachers to introduce buddhist mindfulness practice to the west he is taught meditation internationally since nineteen seventy four that's before i was even a glimmer in my papas is so it's been teaching for a very very long time and he has had a profound indirect impact directly on my life some thrilled to finally have him on the podcast to share our shared history his incredible stories and the practical tactics and very detailed techniques that you can use and we dig into all of that you can also say hi to him on the internet at jack cornfield on twitter check it out jack's history just a little bit once been too much time on it jack coup founded the insight meditation psyche embar massachusetts with fellow meditation teachers sharon salzberg who's also been on this podcast and joseph goldstein and later the spirit rock center in whitaker california which is where i did my first silent retreat and we talk about that he holds a phd in clinical psychology which is important to me and comes into this conversation because he's a very very diverse toolkit for dealing with many different types of personal challenges issues questions and so on and as a father husband and activist his books have been translated into twenty languages and sold more than a million copies he is prolific his books include and i pulled some of you for your favorites a wise heart that's number one a lamp in the darkness a path with heart after the ecstasy the laundry one of my favorite book titled small time and his most recent book no time like the present subtitle finding freedom love enjoy right where you are he is quite possibly the most purely compassionate human being i've ever interacted with and compassion isn't a word that us very much but jack is unique and i'm thrilled to give you a window into his story and his teachings with further do please enjoy this wideranging conversation with jack cornfield jack welcome to the show oh thank you tim pleasure to reconnect i have wanted to have you on the show for some time now and you've had certainly a tremendous impact on my life both three writing and through firsthand in person interaction which i think we'll touch upon but i i wanted to ask you a complete non sequitur from that which is something that our mutual friend adam gazali suggested i ask you about and adam for people who don't know him is an incredible phd md neuroscientist based at ucsf and he suggested that i asked you about hanggliding and i have no idea why he suggested that but i'm gonna start there and if it doesn't go anywhere we can we can change direction but i figured we would just start with that and then we're going to rewind the clock but why why did he suggest i ask you about hanggliding well it started many years ago when i cross country with a friend who had a hang glider and we would stop periodically and go off different ills and it was fantastic and then i wanted to do paragliding and started to learn it now because everything is developed paragliding slot you know is a lot more official you need a license which i don't have but one of my favorite things is to tandem paraglider and go off the top of places like grundel walled in in switzerland where you can take the ski lift up to nine thousand feet and then jump off and flowed silently like you're a bird among the clouds the birds actually do come by sometimes like checkout what's this big bird flying up here you can catch thermals and go way up above.

tim ferriss nine thousand feet
"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Like randy very little tracking that's a lot of work but just go to first books dot com forward slash tim and try it out because it is a very good product and i think you will find it simplifies your life enjoy hello boys and girls ladies and germs this is tim ferriss and welcome to another episode of the tim ferriss show where it is my job every episode to deconstruct world class performers people who are excellent if not the best at what they do in many many many different fields and that scratching this is tim ferriss coming off of antibiotics because i had some little gremlins inside me that i brought back from the amazon that's a separate story in any case my job deconstructed another that many fields and this particular episode we have a wonderful guest jack cornfield al's walker calls jack quote one of the greatest spiritual teachers of our time and quote jack trade as a buddhist monk in the monsters of thailand india and burma shortly thereafter becoming one of the key teachers to introduce buddhist my from this practice to the west he is taught meditation internationally since 1974 that's before i was even a glimmer in my poppas i so it's been teaching for a very very long time and he has had a profound and direct impact directly on my life some thrilled to finally have him on the podcast to share our shared history his incredible stories and the practical tactics and very detailed techniques that you can use and we dig into.

tim ferriss amazon jack trade india burma randy thailand
"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Like randy very little tracking that's a lot of work but just go to first books dot com forward slash tim and try it out because it is a very good product and i think you will find it simplifies your life enjoy a little boys and girls ladies and germs this is tim ferriss and thank you for joining me once again as always it is my job to deconstruct world class performers from every field imaginable to tease out the habits routines and so on that you can use this episode is a very special one it was such a treat and you will realise why once we get into it but it was recorded live at the art honey theater in los angeles in front of a soldout crowds of thank you to everyone who came this was for life talks l a and the guest was from within the pages of tribal mentors terry crews you may have heard of terry cruise before twitter instagram at terry crews facebook real terry crews terry crews dot com ted cruz as an actor and former nfl player los angeles rams san diego chargers washington redskins and philadelphia eagles his wideranging credits include the original viral old spice commercials television series such as the newsroom arrested development and everybody hates chris in films including white chicks very underrated film i think it's fantastic the expendable franchise bridesmaids and the longest yard he now stars on the golden globe award winning fox sitcom brooklyn nine nine in two thousand fourteen tear released his auto bio manhood subtitle had to be a better man or just live with one and we start in some really unusual places in this conversation and it takes us a little bit of time to warm up as it very very often does but stick around because this conversation really really delivered and with terry you just have to give him the ball and let them run with it and that applies metaphorically in so many different capacities but i really hope you enjoy this conversation if you enjoy even half as much as i did you will love it it was that much fun and i remember for hours afterwards i went out to have wind and dinner with a view friends and i just said.

tim ferriss art honey theater los angeles chris brooklyn randy forward slash terry twitter ted cruz nfl washington philadelphia
"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Mr tim ferriss can't talk to himself because he is in a a silent retreat where he's remaining in complete silence for i think ten days and it's not just silence it's actually also notebooks snow computers no phones obviously it's just pure silence alone with your thoughts not exactly board i would want to do but sounds kind of crazy and sounds like something tim ferriss would do but in the meantime like i said i am here to guest host this show which is awesome i appreciate that opportunity and thanks to tim ferriss for giving me that opportunity now a little bit about my background first if you want to know about me one of the best places to find out about mias actually on this podcast as well tim ferriss episode number one hundred and seven and that was released in september of two thousand fifteen and i was the first time i was ever interviewed really for anything and i had been in the seal team's for twenty years i've never done any interview i never had any social media did have a website i really didn't exist in the public eye at all and so my background is that i grew up in a small new england town i enlist in the navy after high school i went through boot camp i went to seal training i spent some time at seal team one in the nineties and eventually i picked up for a commissioning program which meant i was going to become an officer in the seal team's and move into a leadership position and eventually once i did that.

Mr tim ferriss social media navy boot camp officer twenty years ten days
"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Hello ladies and germs welcome back to the tim ferriss show this is tim ferriss and if you've listeners podcast before you know it is my job to tease out the habits routines tactics and breakfasts or lack thereof of worldclass performers i really dig into the nittygritty of what you can apply and this episode is a special episode of the tim ferriss radio our normally i speak with one guest in long interviews but the tim ferriss radio our is the matic so i will look at say meditation or i will look at failure or i will look at how people handle a specific problem or opportunity and then poll highlights from my conversations with multiple guests in this particular episode and went in search of morning routines morning routines are very important to me for a lot of reasons now routine may sound boring but encourage you to keep in mind the quote of wh auden which is quote routine in intelligent man should be person of course is a sign of ambition now why would that be the case and we're gonna come back to why that is the case when i get to my own personal example but first let me give you an idea of who are going to chat with in this episode i talked to jaakko willink a legend in these special operations world and former us navy seal commander he's also blackbelt and brazilian geagea to was more than two hundred pounds and new sixty plus strict pull hops here's jaakko when i wake up in the morning i'm thinking about the enemy what can i do to be ready for that moment which is coming then bestselling authors seth godin discusses the importance that diet plays in the structure of his day well if there is a laptop.

tim ferriss us commander seth godin two hundred pounds