35 Burst results for "three degrees"

Police body camera video of Floyd arrest released to public

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 2 d ago

Police body camera video of Floyd arrest released to public

"I might cross your reporting police body camera video of the George Floyd arrest has been released to the public the harrowing police body camera footage of the arrest of George Floyd in Minneapolis on may twenty fifth was publicly released Monday on a judge's order confine bystanders implored officers to check Floyd's pulse after he became unresponsive Lloyd died after officer day workshop and pressed his knee against Floyd's next for nearly eight minutes chopping is charged with second degree murder third degree murder and manslaughter three other officers who were on the scene are charged with aiding and abetting all four were fired hi Mike Rossio

George Floyd Minneapolis Lloyd Third Degree Murder Mike Rossio Officer Second Degree Murder Abetting
Climate change is hastening lakeshore erosion

Climate Cast

04:00 min | 2 weeks ago

Climate change is hastening lakeshore erosion

"Climate change is making more waves and eroding the shoreline of Lake Superior more quickly. I'm NPR chief meteorologist Paul Hunter on the shores of Lake Superior this is climate. So I'm back from vacation now, working inside the lab today, but I can still hear those lake superior way of swooshing in my head for the last three summers. We've stayed at some lovely cabins near. Grand Marais each year. The Big Lake has eroded the edge of the bluff closer to our cabin and this year. The edge is only about three feet away, and it's a fifteen foot drop down to the waves below. Charlie. Walters owns the cabins hi Charlie. Doing I'm doing great. How much would you say that? Shoreline has eroded in the past couple of years well this last year has been about a foot the previous year. It was only a couple of inches, but this last season it really picked up pace. We were pretty stunned when we saw the cabin this year that we stayed in its now perch, just a couple of feet from the edge. What are your options to save that cabin and address the shoreline? To Cabin, but you'd still have the Rozhin problem. I'm told you know they'd have to build up with rock and put some type of filter Mesh screen in and back fill with some soil and. Anyway be a long process and in the range of forty thousand dollars, so Charlie if this repair does turn out to be forty thousand dollars. What does that to Your Business? What's the impact there? My wife grandmother came over from Norway and his only things since nineteen thirty two. And right now in the process of fixing up the cabins, and then paying off loans, so it's a pretty big dent. We basically have to stop everything else. We're doing Charlie Walters. Your cabins are lovely I wish you the best of luck and I hope we talk soon all right. So many Lake Superior Property owners like Charlie are now facing costly repairs from erosion damage heavier precipitation in the lake. Superior watershed is boosting water levels to near record, highs and warmer winters mean less protective lake GEIS's forming to buffer the waves that may be speeding up the erosion process. Jay Austin is a professor at the University of Minnesota Duluth and works with the Large Lakes Observatory Hi Jay here from you, Paul? So how high are water levels running on lake superior now and in the past few years. We've had a remarkable run since about. About twenty seventeen of extremely high lake levels on the order of ten to twelve inches above what we would normally be seeing at this time of year, and what's the climate change signal for higher water levels in Lake Superior is it as simple as heavier precipitation in the Lake Superior Watershed when it comes right down to it? Yes, last several years have been much wetter than we would normally see here. The other one is the fact that is suppresses surface waves, and hence protects in some sense shoreline from that sort of wave driven erosion. The long term trend is indeed towards less is and how much of a winter temperature difference between total ice and no is does there need to be to make that change unlike superior? A year, where there is significant ice on the lake, and so people are going and visiting the ice, caves and people are ice fishing, the difference between one of those years at a year with basically no ice can be due to winter air temperature differences on the order of two three degrees. Fahrenheit, so the system is extremely sensitive to these relatively small shifts in winter, climate conditions J. Austin. Thanks for making the time in good to talk with you again. Thanks for having me on.

Lake Superior Charlie Walters Lake Superior Watershed Big Lake Lake Geis Jay Austin Paul Hunter Foot Drop Grand Marais NPR Chief Meteorologist Norway Large Lakes Observatory University Of Minnesota Duluth Professor
19-Year-Old Charged In Street Race Crash That Critically Injured Pregnant Woman, Killed Baby In North Philadelphia

KYW 24 Hour News

00:36 sec | 3 weeks ago

19-Year-Old Charged In Street Race Crash That Critically Injured Pregnant Woman, Killed Baby In North Philadelphia

"Who struck a pregnant woman and killed her unborn child. That crash happened your broad and diamond streets in north Philadelphia when police say two drivers were involved in a street race or chase just before five o'clock yesterday morning. One car were ended the other and struck 27 year old Gina Campbell. I was sitting on a wall near Temple University's campus, 19 year old Justine Bayonets was charged with third degree murder of an unborn child as well as aggravated assault, driving under the influence and other counts. It's unclear whether he has we're seeing some problems, and I

Justine Bayonets Gina Campbell Third Degree Murder Temple University Philadelphia Assault
How Fast Can Lizards Evolve?

BrainStuff

03:50 min | 3 weeks ago

How Fast Can Lizards Evolve?

"We usually think of evolution as being near cosmetically slow process, and often it is after all living beings in our relationships with our environments can be really complex with dozens of genes, coming together to create the traits that help or hurt our chances of survival, but you don't have to be a germ or fruit fly or P. shoot to show change quickly. Today's episode is the strange story of a particularly swift lizard evolution. Stuff it's Christian Sager here so evolution takes time, but just how much time it takes is the issue. How long for instance did it take? Theropod dinosaurs to evolve into modern birds tens, if not hundreds of millions of years, but since the turn of the last century when American biologist Hermann bumpiest noticed that individuals sparrows in a population became larger as the result of one huge snowstorm, scientists have been observing instances of short bursts of evolutionary progress over a significantly brief period of time. definitive. Of rapid evolution are tough to come by though even in these days of advanced genetic testing, but a recent study published in the journal Science fines that over the course of just a few months green, a Noli lizards living in the area of the Mexico Texas border evolved rapid genetic tolerance to cold weather after an unusually frigid Winter Green Noli our warm weather reptiles that evolved on the Caribbean island of Cuba. They found their way to the mainland long ago, but a prolonged an extreme cold snap can really put the hurt on A. A population of no lease, the winter of twenty thirteen did just that before that year's famed polar vortex hit. However, the research team collected a no lease in August to find out just how cold one of these lizards could get before its motor function was compromised specifically, that is when it couldn't write itself. When it was knocked over, they collected no lease from five different sites across Texas and found that when gradually cooled in a chamber in the lab, the individuals from the southern most site became uncoordinated at around fifty two degrees Fahrenheit. Fahrenheit or eleven degrees Celsius, but the ones collected from the northern most site became unable to right themselves at around forty three degrees Fahrenheit or six degrees Celsius. Because the scientists already had genetic samples from the lizards in the first study when a few months later, temperatures plummeted to lowe's that hadn't been seen in fifteen years, the researchers went out and collected some of the surviving lizards from all five sites. They placed them in the same cooling chambers and found the southern. Most anomalies exhibited much more cold resistance than the ones had been. been collected back in the summer they could now stand strong in the face of forty three degrees, Fahrenheit or six degrees. Celsius aren a sequencing before and after the cold front also revealed significant differences between individuals from the southern genomic regions before and after the weather event by the way. Did you know that no lease? Living in urban areas have stinkier feet than their country cousins? Apparently, it's an evolutionary adaptation to having to cling to glass and metal now I want to be bitten by a radioactive ano- league so I can crawl wall.

Hermann Bumpiest Christian Sager Cuba Caribbean Texas Mexico Texas Lowe
From Glassblower to Software Developer using Free Coding Resources with Michael Pimentel

Learn to Code with Me

46:03 min | Last month

From Glassblower to Software Developer using Free Coding Resources with Michael Pimentel

"And we're back in today's episode. I speak with Michael, Pimentel. Michael Story is fascinating worked in the glassblowing industry specifically for film sets for nine years before he started teaching himself how to Code. And what makes him even more? Interesting is the fact that he doesn't have a college degree. Anti never went to a coding bootcamp. He is entirely self-taught. and. That is exactly what we're GONNA be talking about today. How he taught himself to code. WOW, working fulltime. How guys first job in tack and how he got more roles in the tech industry as time went on. If you tips for staying motivated while learning how to Code. This episode is for you enjoy. Hey. Michael. Thank you so much for coming on the show today. It will on six February I'm real excited to talk with you. You have like interesting. Self taught experience in. That's what I would like to dive into I. Could you share with us how you got started in software engineering? Absolutely so kind of Story kind of goes back to a few years ago when I was working for a company that made life for the film industry now working there as a manufacturer glassblowing really interesting work. Kind of working in a manufacturing type of shop warehouse, loud, working on a lay, that spun in a really hot environment I was there for a really long time and things just. Kinda didn't progress in terms of career. Wise and financially it was just really typical I live in California and California being one of the most expensive place live. It just wasn't sustainable. married and I have a child and that it just wasn't something that I could maintain so it kind of motivated me to start thinking I need to. Probably either go back to school or another another route career choice so i. can you know build to support and have a career that can provide general finance, support and everything like that, so it kind of led me to back to. My interest in computers and everything like that, so I started to do some online, searching and everything like that and it. Brought me to software development coding, you know some booming career choice that is really big right now and everything like that was like okay. Maybe I should go back to school for that, but at the time it really wasn't the best option I went acted. As a couple of glasses time, that's what I could afford at my community college, and then just got really difficult to maintain a full-time job and take one or two classes, and it got really expensive, because my wife was what was going to school in college and everything like that, so it was really difficult for us to support both less going especially you know. Not really knowing what I wanted to do. So I I did a lot of searching and I came across recode camp and recode camp. You know like when you get on their landing page. It's like learning one to code for free and always people learn this way and I was like wait three. This isn't make sense. This will usually scams off there. Start off Rian. Then you have to pay something and everything like that and you know to my surprise actually was free, and then so I started I jumped right in, and just started to go to the curriculum, and it sparked my interest and I was like. Wow, this is really cool. It's it kind of. Goes about in a way that. Gets you interested really quickly? You know with hd Mounsey assassin how you can get feedback on the webpage really quickly. Let's kind of how it started because I. Just I just couldn't go. That route was a canoe into school because it was just really expensive and I already had like a car loan, I couldn't get like student loan. It was just wasn't really practical. It's like cave. Do put myself some really extreme debt that I don't know if it's GonNa lead to something. That's GONNA pay in the end so I had to find another option and looked like learning to code on my own free resources when that resource beginning with recode camp was was the route I took. Awesome so I, want to backtrack a little bit to your. Your work before you got into coding, so you you okay? You said he was a manufacturing role. I haven't made notes that you were a glass blower which anti note that is for movies today shows. Definitely. What is it glasses? Sure okay, so a glass blower, typically like of someone like Google glass large usually someone that takes some raw material which consists of the materials, t make glass essentially depending on what what the? The. End Product is going to be different types of glass. Of course so basically you take them in you hit Heaton furnace, or with a really hot torture claim so that it becomes like in this malleable state, and then you shape it essentially so what I did there? We work on a leave, and we basically built like the light bulb globe. It's spun on a lathe and then you would really. Really hot with a hydrogen oxygen burners, two thousand degrees, and then you shape it based on certain dimensions so basically they would take that, and then we'd have a filament type that would basically you know, have some kind of chemical reaction than light up base off whatever the the fixture needed you know for the filming, so the specific light that they made there was an Hmo which is like a chemical. Name that I really don't know all the details into it, but it basically replicates the color of the sun so like if you see like on film sets, use those lights that kind of are the background that make everything look real, daytime and night-time filming. Those are the lights that we made when I worked there we're one of the few American companies still made them like with our hands, still as opposed to a machine meaning making them in a in a warehouse somewhere. But in a sense, essentially, that's what it was. We were just making them with a glassblowing. That's what I did while working there while I think nine or ten years. We Really, oh my goodness. Wow so start I'm surprised. It was that long because for people. Listening to this show were actually speaking through video so I can see you so I'm like. Wow doesn't look like he can hold a John. Young so young to have a job for that long. Then start another career. Okay? Wow, that awful. How did you get into that? Because that feels very niche, you're essentially making bulldogs. That camera crews in production crews are using on the sets of TV shows I mean. We were chatting before we recorded you live in California. I know like the entertainment industry is. In the movie industry in all of that is obviously very prominent out there is that kind of how that happened or It's interesting so actually the reason why I got into it is because my dad worked in that industry or like thirty years, and I had come out of working at John Juice and I was their. First job actually was working as a team member workup to insistent manager, and then eventually needed to make more money, because I got married at a really young so I. My dad ended up helping me getting the job there and you know I just ended up staying there for a really long time, but it's really how I got into. It was as my dad was in that industry longtime. He had connections and everything like that. Dot It. Did you go to a trade school or anything for glassblowing? No I actually just learned on the job. And still to this day is one of the most difficult things that I've ever done. Physically I for almost anything that can compare it to I think. Programming is its own challenge, but is like the hardest physical. Thing I've ever had to learn because it was like. If you don't do it right the first time, then you ruin it. So there's no going back and fixing it once. You kind of ruin it because the glass that we would work with you'd have to mix it with metals, and then once it's kind of melted to a certain point, you can't go back in extract those materials out of the glass, so it's Kinda ruined. If you don't do it, right is probably there really nerve, wracking or when I did that job. Yeah Wow, it also sounds like it could be dangerous if you're working as really like high temperatures. Absolutely I got burned really bad third degree burns I have degree burns like all my arm from it, but yeah, it was. It's definitely. Was I'm just curious. Did that have any role in your decision to look for a new job like I? Know you mentioned like the financial side, but were there other things, too? Yeah absolutely a that part being okay, so the big part, actually a aside from like the financial reasons that it just didn't pay that much. It was the work environments. It is in the Central Valley of California which in the summertime gets you know triple digits consistently and the warehouse that it is done is basically like a garage. It doesn't have an air condition. It doesn't have any of those things so the environment itself was. was just really really taxing. There's been a couple of times when I had gotten heat exhaustion, I got sent home because of it because like say it's one hundred, three, hundred ten, even outside inside that shop where you'd be working is a hundred twenty one hundred thirty degrees, and it was just unbearable is the if you've our to look back on some old twitter posts? I probably have pictures of like a thermometer in the area. And it's just like maxed out because it was just so hot, but yeah, that's that's probably WANNA be. A motivating factors to wanting to look for another job. It got to point where I was like. I need to get out of here. No matter what this job is just killing me physically, and you know a lot of other reasons you can imagine in an environment like that the people that you tend to work around kind of like really. Not The best work environment because you know on a lot of stress and you know tend not to get along very well when they're under a lot of stress is mentally and just everything that came along with that job, so it just became kind of like a hostile work environment as well so it was like a lot of. Factors that Kinda came into me like I have to get out of here you to find something else you know. Yeah well I mean that definitely makes sense. There's a few other people or one that is coming to mind that. We had on the show in a previous season. Whose name is Josh Camp? And he was a hope I. Stay this right a horse I think it's a horse fairer fairer, hope, number news right, but he would change the hooves on horses, which could also be really dangerous. Obviously, a horse kicks you and I believe it was an injury that ultimately led him to. You know look for other work in in what will link to that in the show notes for people listening now 'cause it. Was You know a few years back when we had on the show and any other episode, I believe it could have had a few where there was someone with a moron. Sick physically dangerous or physically labor job, and that's kind of what led them to to make a pretty big pivot because I can like working for you as a glass blower in those in that environment, physical Super Super Hot. It's totally different from working as a software engineer. And when you started coding, you mentioned using Free Co camp in other free resources. Were you still working fulltime as the glass blower and you are learning outside of that? Yes I was so I would I had a fulltime job there, and because of the heat I would work really really early hours I try to go in his earliest possible as three in the morning. Get off at noon or whatever it was Leonard Twelve so that time that I would get off of course I'd already so exhausted. Matt jobs so I have to go home and sleep a little bit and then. The thing with those interesting with that is. It was hard for me to be going having a fulltime job like that. Maybe some people can relate to that. You know like a maybe just a fulltime job in general is exhausting, but this job probably pushed it because of the environment itself the hostility behind it. That kind of gave me more motivation to be like you know what I'm really tired right now. And I'm not really motivated to to learn coding complete, foreign and difficult, but when I get off work the way I did time, so you know wanting to leave that place so bad that it was just that extra boost motivation for me to learn and study and just do everything I needed to do to succeed in it on just because it was just so bad. I got desperate. Really desperate I just remember that I tend to forget that, but then when I do remember I'm like wow, it helps me to be like really grateful. You know to where I am now, and it was really hard working fulltime job in learning, because I did learn while working there probably about a year and a half, maybe almost two years I was learning. And There was there were times when I would make huge progresses, but then. At the same time thinking like is this really possible? How do people get a job doing? It's like yeah. I can build a website, but there's more to it you like. Is this all I need to get a job type thing you know But Yeah! It was it was hard and I. Don't want to say like Oh yeah. It's super easy because it. Wasn't especially having to work fulltime job in it's all I could just you know. Take days off now and everything like that. I had to work. But yeah. It was difficult. So you were. Doing ice, you said for like one and a half two years where you were doing boom things at the same time. appleaday mentioned this earlier, but you. Free Co camp. Did you use any other resources or you mentioned Community College? Were you taking classes there? Yeah so additional to recode camp so the there's a lot of other things that I did that helped me so free code camp opened up at the time. I haven't camp while, but at the time had lake. Away that you would join and beat up and it was through facebook. It was like face, looking need groups or something, and it was like find a recode camp. Meet up because I. Guess they had like an umbrella. Recode camp meet ups that you can join, and you would basically type in your city in order find the nearest one that was that was organized and everything like that, so I found one in my city and it was you know a few people apartment that would meet up in so I joined that group and I reached out on their. Pre Cochem does a really good job with trying to connect people, so it's like hey, introduce yourself in post on there, so that people can no, no your journey Cetera so i. did that and I ended up meeting up with the organizers of that? Meet Up. We met at starbucks talked about you know everything on learning this and that where you and Rico camped up thing so eventually, I got more involved in that met more people that were learning as well and then now it. Kinda led to Terry member Oh the Mita. Dot Com meet up. There was also the recode. KEMP MEDIA DOT COM for our area that was attached to that facebook group. And, he was like yeah. I just started this. Meet up group, so we can kind of be more broad for people that don't have facebook. We can just Kinda grow up there and he was like you WanNa, help me with that because you know. He was maintaining full job as well, and he needed someone to Kinda. Fill in that gap where he couldn't. You know sounds like yeah. Sure I could definitely help with that, so I helped him. kind of on the organization's portion of that. meet up and like. Hey, let's try to meet. Kind of swap the weeks you know will be on a Saturday one week and then. I'll take the next every type of thing we'd be out of starbucks. And then someone posted on the meet up of feed. Like hey does a hack upon coming up, you guys should come reach out and you know I think it was free, and it was in our area, so I went to the hacker thon and myself in a couple of other people that were in that group, and then we ended up a or ended meeting a few other people at that meet up. That were real professional programmers. At the thoughts I introduced myself to them and everything like that met some really really nice. And probably the most helpful in kind person was actually the the organizer of that Agathon. When. I met him and everything like that. He gave me his contact information in and said Hey, we should get together sometime. I'm Cha and he was a professional programmer, running his own business and everything like that, so eventually I stayed in contact with him, and I met up with him, and I told him my journey and what I'm trying to do, super supportive of us all about helping people in my situation, you know like make connections, and even even help them with an internship and everything like that, and that's Kinda weird kicked off actually where it went from me trying to learn to me, actually making connections in potentially those connections leading to jobs. That was huge. Actually so this person that ran out. Pakistan also ran his on meet up. and His name was a little bit more. Mature he had a organized large meet ups and organised like a speakers where he would teach people how to get started with a new technology and all that stuff you know, so. This percent met up with them, and they're willing to like. Hey, you WANNA work on a project with. Wow real project like that's what I need to experience with a project, so I met with him or opt in some of the people that worked with him, and he ended up working with a lot of other guys that or just people in general men and women that were like kind of doing their own thing that a little bit more advanced as As programmers they're building girl websites starting their own software business in lake, a consulting and everything like that. That's where kind of took off. Is that connection? You know I to a upon met some people, and then it led to more people that we're kind of in the same boat as me, and if they are more advanced, they're willing to help me. By struggled with something and everything like that. It was really a douse like typical in me being successful. Yeah that is a great story and Other interviews I've been doing this season. We invite the guests on, and we think they have a really interesting transformation. Story is kind of like who I've been really Trying to get on the show this season and every single person that I've interviewed so far and there's been you know. Handful have all. Had this like really awesome Lake County. Component to their story and men like Kinda. Showing how supportive the tech community is in in various ways, and it sounds like you found that you know through this. Through connections through other connections with more experienced people in the field that helped catapult you forward in the they were able to help support you in various ways and maybe help if you're stuck as you said, build your first project and I think that's really cool I. Think it's really good for beginners to hear that because I know when I first started out in probably you, too. I would imagine it can be really intimidating and feel like very overwhelming, and you can feel really alone, and it's like it's almost. I haven't experienced like trying to break into other industries, but in a lot of ways I feel like even though texts seemed really intense in really hard I mean it is, but there's just such kind and helpful people like a friend, totally random side story, but she's not intact. She was trying to break into. The entertainment like film like Moodley TV shows. and. She had to work at an unpaid internship for like a year in really like claw her way up. She actually does really awesome. producing on really awesome documentaries now but. It was like really hard, very competitive very very. Very like you know and I feel like the tech community is so different from that like it's. People are Super Helpful yeah definitely. I've heard that as well. I'm not sure if it's if it's like the demand in this industry that were like trying to get into maybe people, maybe a logical gotten to it, and they kind of see you know all the hard work that. It takes. I, guess that they want to help other people as well or like coming from something like my background and everything like that. They kind of want to help people as well, but yeah, I noticed that as well as a lot of really helpful people, even before I started going through the ups and everything I joined twitter, and that's when I found like just like a free code cannot co Newbie A. PODCAST are their Hashtag in general dislike just to get help and everything like that, and when I when I reached out that way, just random people that were professionals judgment like hey. I think I'll struggling with. Like centering Adib or CSS, something something kind of silly. You know I needed help with it and some random person was like. Hey, Gimme, your hub Repo albeit with that was like. Wow, some random person that realize but more Santander worked at Microsoft or something like that and are willing to help I didn't even know this person but yeah, definitely noticed that about the industry's is a lot of willing people to help you regardless. Of Your background and everything like that. Yeah another guest I. Literally just had on the podcast said that she had so many breakthroughs. A CAITLIN for people listening to the show and in episode Caitlin. She was talking about how she had so many breakthroughs on twitter asking for help in people that she didn't even know. Offering to help her in various capacities, I feel like twitter is such a good. Well, it's funny. Because social media like every platform kind of has its own. Little like corner or whatever it could be really good for certain things and I feel like asking for help. Like in that way. Twitter is awesome because people will jump in people. It's almost like a forum, but it's not, but people are very like. Communicate unlike you know instagram or something, which is mostly about the photos and it's. It's not the same kind of. Environment just different. Anyway, it's it's interesting. Yeah so switching gears a tiny bit I would like to hear about how the new ended up getting your first full-time real position. Yeah absolutely. So it was when our meet up grew so when I met this person a friend. His name is nate a probably. Give him recognition there because east been so huge in my in my career as a friend and generally slow parental today we kind of joined are meet ups and we grew into this big. Meet Up. And it was like three hundred people. We grew to over three hundred people, and then we. He had connections with someone that was really involved in trying to grow the tech scene in the Central Valley of California. Washable, probably think though in California. It's like tech everywhere. Tech is huge, but that's really isolated towards like Silicon Valley Bay area, and when you go to the outskirts where I live, it's like farms and orchards in just really like farmland in. The outskirts of all the techie over the hill and there's all the big central. Silicon Valley everything like that, but out here it's it's completely different. There's still a lot of factories out here and everything like that, so tech isn't the big thing out here, so he was trying to person. He tried to basically bring tech out this way like hey companies. There's a talent out here as well so he was a part of that big that this big movement. That's still going on today so anyways. We ended up getting a space with his help, and he supported he. He got funding for it and we moved our meet up there. And, we were able to go reach out to the computer. Science professors ask some of the community colleges. They are able to come out. We reached out to people that talk computer science in the high schools I reach people on facebook I went out trying to like introduce myself to all these people, so we can grow all his these groups that are people better in software or coating to hey, come to this, Mita because we can all grow with the tech in the valley, so we had this large event whereas kicking off are merging of our beat ups, and we had I think. Over one hundred fifty people like almost two hundred people from professors in computer science to high school teachers in computer science to people, learning and everything like that so I went up there and I was speaking in front of it, and I was basically motivating other people that were in my position like hey. You guys? Should really you know? I was trying to leaning towards free code camp like if you guys want to learn to cope because those people that were like thinking about it, you know not really that much into it, so I kind of wanted to focus on those people because that's where they had the experience of coming from so was like. Hey, you know it's not that hard to get into it. There's some really really great resources that are free. That doesn't cost anything you know. MEET UPS like this a lot of great connections here and people willing to help you. If you're struggling every twenty five solves talking. They're all that and at that. Meet up was a few other. That worked at companies nearby when Consulting Agency the the banks have some of their software people out in the Central Valley as well and a couple of of the people that were there were friends with my friend, nate, a one that have basically helped me out and everything that always connections. He introduced me to one of guys there and he said Hey his company's hiring. I want you. I want to introduce you to Michael and this is after all is kind of getting already getting. Getting experience with building some projects and everything and my friend was like. Yeah, he knows what he's doing now. He he's employable. He's definitely has experience with building front, and back and software and everything so introduced me to a friend of his name of Josh and he worked for a company that basically did consulting for like probations, law enforcement software. They did software for E N NJ Gallo, a lot of big companies, so they're really established there around for like twenty years so I met with him. And then he was like where we're actually looking for someone. More junior developer is like Amir number. We eventually had coffee. Just Kinda. Talk and everything like that and we just hit it off. We kind of our personalities. Kind of you know He. We liked hanging out and everything like that, so that kind of started like a friendship, you know. We talked for about a year and. And you'd help you with stuff like that and I was like. Hey, and he's like our company is kind of in the middle of Lake, you know hiring, but they kinda. Put a freeze on that everything like that, so after about a year when I. When I met him, he finally called me up one day, and the funny story is that I was getting to a point. In in learning how to Code and currently working where I was almost ready to give up, because it felt like I was putting effort and then. I wasn't getting any any reward from like. If I was applying everywhere and I wouldn't get any kind of response to resume. I reached out to people to help with resume all these things. Did I did a lot? Maybe not everything that could have just because I didn't know, but I felt like I was getting any hits on my resume or If I. DID GET A call. It was like you know I didn't know how to do some kind of algorithm that I didn't learn or memorize or whatever it was, so I was getting really discouraged, almost going to be like. Maybe I do need to go to school at unity at degree. Maybe I need to just join a boot camp or or joint something that is going to make me be more appealing to employers so I was looking. and. Just kind of getting really discouraged at that time. But the funny thing is that I got a call for my friend Josh and he goes. Hey, we have this contract coming up. We need to hire a developer and I've been talking to my boss about you and we'd like to bring you on. He's like. Of course we'll interview you and everything like that and he's like. Are you interested in? He's like. Like I'm almost one hundred percent, sure they've we bring you on because you know like I know you and I know your work, and I can help you and everything like that and I was like. Are you kidding me? And when he told me that I was thrilled, I was actually really scared. Same time this is reality is like real software coding. In, part of me was going to say no like I do this. This is too much like the difference between working on side projects that you know like whatever no one's really going to care about versus working on software that people use so I. I got really scared. I even once. My wife and I was like I. Don't know if I can do this like I'm GonNa. Quit my job and I go do this and then I fail. I can't go back to that job. I can't do that, you know. This is a big decision. You know I've been here for nine years or whatever it was. So ultimately, my my wife convinced me and was like you need to do this. People don't get good things unless they take some kind of risk. Regardless, you should try you know. So I call it my friend. I told him I concerns and Josh was like you know you're just trying to scare yourself out of. It Dude so just take it from me. I'm going to be there to help you, so don't worry us to take this. Just, take it you know and I was like. Okay, let's set up the interview and everything like that and goes all right, so set the interview and. They hired me. And that was basically it I started there with no professional experience. It was all because of someone was willing to help me know again back to that. You know this industry is always really helpful people that are willing to take a chance on you and help me help you and everything, and and and of course there's a lot of challenges you know working in in actually writing real software and everything like that, but in the long run it really helped me in was just huge into getting my job, and then after that first job. Of course, my resume after that just everyone always cared to look at it. You know I I didn't have nearly as. Much difficulty looking for next role after that I think it's like once you get your first job regardless of its junior level, or whatever in in this industry it kind of goes downhill OCTA that you actually get considered. You know you'll get your resume looked at. You'll get that first interview and everything like that. Yeah Wow, so. How long did you work there at the first job? And then what what kind? You don't have to get like super detailed, but like what kind of work redoing essentially. There year, so I started off working on a back end actually of in node framework, or on the no runtime. Basically, the contract was migrating some. It's funny because I went from like barely learning it in writing mostly front end to writing some back in code and the PRI, the contract was basically taking some old enterprise services that were written in Java and then rewriting them on no gs lambda, so that that was what I was doing for like the first four months and after that contract and they moved on to another. Another project and it was more full stack. It was job script. It was using angular on the front end no on the back end and some sequel server, but I got the rightful stack of front end back in using Java javascript note and everything like that. It was really fun. 'cause I got to work on two different big projects there and I learned so much. That's where my whole stack experience kind of took off I got I got to learn so much and the people that I worked with worse huge. It was just I can't even express how thankful I am to people that I work with there and I still am friends with them. That helped me explained things a broke things down. And having been able to understand these other languages. Yeah Wow and I know you recently got a laid off due to cove in nineteen. was that from this same employer or was this another job you had gotten after leaving that company? Another story so I was there at that company for about a year, and then towards the end my wife and I found out. We're GONNA. Have Child and so I needed to. That company was great for it was actually a bump in salary than I currently made up. My Company the light, Bulb Company, but it's I still needed to. I needed to progress I needed to move on and grow my career, and financially so I started to look I started. You know I even asked my boss at the time. I was like Hey I have a child, the ways or any chance that I can move up or anything like that, and you give me feedback, and it was like yeah, definitely, in whatever amount of time so I took that and say okay, that's CREPE. should start looking in see by even get my resume considered now that experience so I started to look, and then I got hired at a start up in the bay area and Silicon Valley. And I was there for almost a year way so i. don't want I. Don't want to interrupt you, but was at working remotely or you move there. I actually had hybrid role, so I would go into the office like an hour and a half commute two days a week. And then worked from home the other days, but yeah, it was a there. I got a taste of the whole silicon valley. Feel of how software companies ran, and my skills went up even higher because of that environment, but yeah, so I was there for about a year and It was a startup that wasn't able to get another round of funding, so actually we all. They started laying people off. fortunately they didn't lay the soccer team like right away, but since we found that out, we started to look all the engineers that worked at that company, or like Oh they're not getting. Funding is a good chance. They're gonNA lay people off, so we all started looking and I got hired at the Credit Union and I. was there for about a year? or about a year exactly actually, and due to the pandemic and everything like that they started to kind of restructure, reorganize everything and effected a lot of teams, including my own team and We're a part of that layoffs will. But yeah, it was. It was kind of something that I. Could. Imagine obviously has affected a lot of people everywhere, and it feels like it's just one of those times. That no-one can have planned for, but yeah. I've been a part of that have been affected by that as well. Yes, so justice like for myself in the listeners, so you basically had three different jobs like intech at this point in each for about a year. Give or take, so you essentially now have like three years of like fulltime software engineering experience. And the most recent position that you've got furloughed related offer a Is that a credit union? And what were you doing there so? It's interesting. 'cause you've such like different experience like from like like a consulting firm to a tech startup to credit union like I imagined that the experiences at each one were quite different like the environment of in the way people work in south. Absolutely so. Go working at a credit union, it's a pretty large credit union and the way things are done there as opposed to the other companies that I worked at. Worse it significantly different so look the startup that I worked at. They were pretty large. Start up there actually around for ten years they had employed over three hundred people. The engineering team was fifty engineers people and. They operated like they were a big tech company and everything like that, so but at the same time I had the experience of being able to shift. To project same time like there's times when I was working on a mobile APP and one for one sprint I'd be working on a whole two weeks on a mobile APP, and then I'd be pivoted to work on their web APP, clients. Front end code, and then after that I'd be working on some hardware code completely different working on a proprietary algorithm that needs to be converted in red on a mobile APP. It was different stuff all the time, and it was really exciting, but also really nerve wracking because of the context, switching a lot and learning new languages at the same time. So that was I learned a lot by lot of the fast paced stuff at that start up, and then when I got to the Credit Union. There was a little bit more relaxed because those only one product that I worked on essentially. Korb, inking APP and there I had a team of eight engineers that were dedicated for this core banking APP. I got brought on as a senior engineer there, and then that that role kind of pivoted towards a lead developer. I was on that project for about four months. And then my a boss. Promoted to the lead developer of that team so essentially there was a lot different roles because for one it was one project, and it was a mobile APP. I had experience with mobile APP at the other company, but not to this extent, it was just a huge mobile APP. And the primary, the primary objective being handling with people's money was probably a significant factor to the change of of like a importance of the application that part probably. At a lot to the stress when I worked knowing that you're working on something that deals with people's money and five hundred thousand active members so that was a big learning experience. And I do. I learned a lot of new stuff learned new languages learned how to do a lot of things that you wouldn't typically do web development, but yeah, it was a lot of differences in structure, probably a lot of different departments that you have to work with before you can get approval in changing something like maybe typically and. Change some piece of code that would maybe look slightly different, because it just makes more sense while at the Credit Union. It wasn't that simple. You had to get a lot of approvals and a lot of test. Writing to make sure lingers securer in a rented to different avenues. You know which was different. Yeah, that yeah makes dealing with financial information. You know sensitive data, and all that would be quite different. I imagined so now that your you by the time episode airs, you could already be in a new job, but. Being active in your job search now. What kind of company aiming to work out? What do you want to stay in like? The financial industry are trying to go back to a startup or maybe a consulting firm that you get to work all these different projects. Yeah, what were you? What did you like the most I guess? Let's see. Probably a ideally would wouldn't stay in the financial industry just because. All the little differences in how delayed development can be due to all those hoops. You have to jump through, but probably most fun I had was. Working in consulting agency. Because working so many different things. Different projects everything like that, but a lot of them had their own pros and cons. You know in terms of like. What I would prefer probably something that is more established due to. More stability just because of everything. That's going on right now. I've heard a lot of people have lost their jobs regardless of the industry even in software I would probably prefer stability. If I could choose regardless of the industry but Yeah. It's probably it's probably more geared towards that. You know what I can find that it is more stable and everything like that. I do have a few other avenues in alert. You know companies that I'm going through right now so I am confident that something will end soon. That's probably the good part is that they're still a high demand for software engineers and everything like that, so there's a lot of good a good places that are hiring right now and everything like that. But. They do specific Yeah Yeah Gotcha so I'm. Kind of jumping around here, but I really wanted to ask this question, and it goes back to your glassblowing experience. I was wondering if there was anything from that or your position before a Jumba juice that you. Were able to transfer or in some way to you in your job, your new job as a software developer. Probably the thing that. I don't know if it helped me, but there's a few different things probably so working probably in an environment that required me to have a lot of perseverance, probably aided to my benefit, and in general and just work ethic. It helps me To be able to deal with probably stresses and deadlines Challenges in my current role because I dealt with that a lot on any. Of can can relate to that. Is You know working in a place like that or just any kind of work that requires them to give a little bit extra is required, just laken. Succeed or do well their job. It probably just helps helped with those areas in work ethic to work hard enduro ally and everything like that but also know what I want going forward, and what I don't want in a career or or next role. Also of a big part of that. Working at that company helped me in was. Probably having difficult conversations with my employer I had a lot of those at that company and it prepared me to be able to deal with those difficult situations. A lot better at all night, other roles a and what I mean, my difficult situations, probably dealing with difficult people another one being having a conversation with your superiors about compensation You know asking for what you feel like. You deserve and everything like that I've had a lot of those, and they didn't go so well at that company that I feel really confident and know how to approach those types of people or Whenever those conversations need to happen, you know. It can be difficult for a lot of people, but I think have so much experience with it that it's. It's kind of more fluid and how to do in the right way. It's aided a lot in that in in my career going forward. Yeah that makes sense and like. I, I can only imagine like the stressors you deal with being in an environment with the glassblowing like Super Hot. You said you were sent home from heat exhaustion, the stress like literally the physical danger bringing yourself. It's like working from home as a software engineer or star office in Silicon. Valley is like the stress level would be so much less like the. They compare Cinderella the stressors you're dealing with compared to maybe like the ones at the other place. Yeah, like whole other scar accord whole other thing, right? We are like running at time and there's one last question I want to ask before we wrap this out and it's just if you could share any like final advice to people listening right now. Who are just starting out? Maybe they were where you were like. You know four or five years ago. Whenever whenever you got your start. What advice would you give them? All. Let's see so I. Think for one perseverence when things feel like it's difficult, it may be difficult at first, but the more and more you do it in the more and more you practice. You'll eventually understand it some complicated things that I. That I could not have imagined when I first started of doing I'm able to thoroughly explain. They seem like almost simple. Now I think the more and more you do it. The the more natural feel, and it'll be really simple. Just just keep on doing it and things easier. also in your journey and learning. It's really important to try to reach out to people to make connections go to meet UPS ask questions. Because those are going to be the areas where where you're gonNA find a connection that can help you find that career and ultimately successful in in this career field. But those are probably the two biggest ones is. Now I know it's hard at first, but it gets easier, and it gets fun on the challenges they start to face. Get really exciting, and it's really rewarding. Ultimately you know all hard work will pay off as long as you just keep to it. And it will pay off so yeah, awesome, great advice in a great way to end this interview. Thank you so much again for coming on. Where can people find you online? Yeah absolutely. Probably a mitre twitter, a twitter handle is mit p. j are eight eight. Or my website is just a my name, my first name Michael or implemental. Dial my personal, Mitchell my last name.

Twitter California Michael Story Credit Union Josh Camp Facebook Central Valley Software Engineer Silicon Valley Mita Starbucks Hostile Work Environment Mounsey Google Pakistan End Product
From Rabbit to Crab to the Lab

Sounds of Science

06:23 min | Last month

From Rabbit to Crab to the Lab

"Today. I'm joined by foster. Jordan, the CSV of Charles Rivers Endotoxin, Europe foster has spent most of his career, working with and around South Carolina's horseshoe crabs, strange creatures, whose blood keeps US safe. He joined to discuss how his career parallels. The changing attitudes towards horseshoe crabs as well as the future of endotoxin, testing and recombinant technology. Welcome foster. Thank you join the conversation. So, let's begin with you. Can you tell me about your early experiences fishing for her? She grabs sure it was funny, you said. My. Most of my career actually I kid people because it's only job. I've ever had Your career then. I don't even I don't even have a resume so. The way I got involved with this was my. My father was an investor in a small company called in safe back in the mid eighties when I was an undergraduate student at Wofford College. And I heard him talking about it. I was studying organic chemistry, and he had partnered with the person who had originally used the test for pharmaceutical application. His name was Dr Cooper Dr James Cooper. He used it at John, Hopkins. University, he was a a radio nuclear pharmacist who is making nuclear medicines and the test at the time for bacteria. Linda toxins was called a rabbit powergen test. You took a New Zealand. Zealand White Rabbit and you deluded your product that you were testing for contamination and sailing, and he's ten meals into the ear of the rabbit. You Monitor the ravitch temperature for three hours, if the favor spike more than three degrees that was considered a failed test, and that rejected the product, but you know these new nuclear medicines. Had you know half lives of their nucleotides pads of of only twenty minutes so the? The test was was ineffective for this. These rabbit tests just sounds so inefficient. How did we get from there to using what we use today? Yeah, so be. It was really I. Forget the time it was wasn't really about replacing. The rabbit test is about five minutes Dr Cooper needed for these nuclear medicines, and and and when he did it, and he made these first crew preps, and they were, and he published that. That in nineteen, seventy two. He was actually he was actually on a grant from NIH so it wasn't something that was patentable. it was public knowledge at the time public information because it was a h grant that funded the research when he published that in nineteen seventy two I. Don't think he really thought anything of it and as the FDA solve the the value of this test replacing the the rather. Test. They also realize it would be the first time that a an animal model, but whatever be replaced with a regulated in vitro tests, so they decided to reunite the test itself, and what's interesting is even today where the only quality control tests that's actually regulated by FDA and we have the same license. Our licenses eleven ninety seven. We have the same licenses of. Of biologics manufacturer vaccine manufactured right, and we're inspected by the twice a year. All our products has to be submitted and approved by FDA. So we're extremely regulated in the space, which is also important when you think about new technologies, and how will a new technology be developed when we're so highly regulated and controlled and the amount of testing? That was necessary to just. Show equivalency to the rabbit, but long story short as the evolution into safe. When I ended up in graduate school, I ended up going to a into safe working for Dr Cooper. We were very small. I was just four of us in the lab. And you know obviously one of the main things we needed. Was Horseshoe crabs. Charleston was known for having horseshoe crabs, but two things about Charleston one is the population or or South, Carolina population is very strong in addition to the the the largest physical more shoe crab. There is the. Female one time that from tail, the whole link. The female was basically a meter. Long thing so very long right? YEP, so so they're big, so you don't have to handle nearly as many to get the quantity of blood we needed, but back in those days the crabs were were a nuisance. They were considered pass. they tore the fishermen's nets ups, especially the fishermen, and when they were bottom, dragging which was warhorse, pass laced for ill and cough. That was a byproduct that they just didn't want to deal with many times. They would just throw them up on the bank. Let and die compost them. Grind them as fertilizer the only other commercial applications for them at the time was to be used as bait, but again thinking about just the pure amount of work, and it just wasn't worth the fisherman's time to do it so again, not very well like creature that. So going back. You said you've. been working in the industry, your entire life and that is very unique, so can you? Tell me about working for for your dad and doing the early fishing long story short so when I when I left Graduate School I was given opportunity the company wasn't doing really well at the time, although the tested then mandated by the FDA to replace the rabbit, it was still a difficult competitive situation so again for us. It was tough. That's why they wanted me to come. I was one of the first ones to get you know three or four o'clock in the morning and go gathered the horseshoe crabs. From April fifteen to end of June. We bleed only when they coming up at high tides, and mainly they come up at high types after dark. Full Moon and a hot crabs. You're going to be there, okay. The southlands in thousands in early days we couldn't handle all the crabs that were coming up, so it'd be kind of surreal I can imagine a beach full of crabs. It is and we you know. We had very selective fishermen that we work with because again. They a lot of them just didn't see the value of them. It took us a long time to get the get the attention of the commercial industry. Get them to realize the value of the crab. Eventually we did I would actually drive to the docks during shrimping season If they caught him as byproducts I would just leave our car business card and say hey, call us if you catch any byproduct I'll come, pick them

Dr Cooper Dr James Cooper FDA Graduate School Europe South Carolina United States Wofford College Charleston New Zealand Jordan Linda NIH Carolina John Hopkins
From Rabbit to Crab to the Lab

Sounds of Science

04:52 min | Last month

From Rabbit to Crab to the Lab

"Today. I'm joined by foster. Jordan, the CSV of Charles Rivers Endotoxin, Europe foster has spent most of his career, working with and around South Carolina's horseshoe crabs, strange creatures, whose blood keeps US safe. He joined to discuss how his career parallels. The changing attitudes towards horseshoe crabs as well as the future of endotoxin, testing and recombinant technology. Welcome foster. Thank you join the conversation. So, let's begin with you. Can you tell me about your early experiences fishing for her? She grabs sure it was funny, you said. My. Most of my career actually I kid people because it's only job. I've ever had Your career then. I don't even I don't even have a resume so. The way I got involved with this was my. My father was an investor in a small company called in safe back in the mid eighties when I was an undergraduate student at Wofford College. And I heard him talking about it. I was studying organic chemistry, and he had partnered with the person who had originally used the test for pharmaceutical application. His name was Dr Cooper Dr James Cooper. He used it at John, Hopkins. University, he was a a radio nuclear pharmacist who is making nuclear medicines and the test at the time for bacteria. Linda toxins was called a rabbit powergen test. You took a New Zealand. Zealand White Rabbit and you deluded your product that you were testing for contamination and sailing, and he's ten meals into the ear of the rabbit. You Monitor the ravitch temperature for three hours, if the favor spike more than three degrees that was considered a failed test, and that rejected the product, but you know these new nuclear medicines. Had you know half lives of their nucleotides pads of of only twenty minutes so the? The test was was ineffective for this. These rabbit tests just sounds so inefficient. How did we get from there to using what we use today? Yeah, so be. It was really I. Forget the time it was wasn't really about replacing. The rabbit test is about five minutes Dr Cooper needed for these nuclear medicines, and and and when he did it, and he made these first crew preps, and they were, and he published that. That in nineteen, seventy two. He was actually he was actually on a grant from NIH so it wasn't something that was patentable. it was public knowledge at the time public information because it was a h grant that funded the research when he published that in nineteen seventy two I. Don't think he really thought anything of it and as the FDA solve the the value of this test replacing the the rather. Test. They also realize it would be the first time that a an animal model, but whatever be replaced with a regulated in vitro tests, so they decided to reunite the test itself, and what's interesting is even today where the only quality control tests that's actually regulated by FDA and we have the same license. Our licenses eleven ninety seven. We have the same licenses of. Of biologics manufacturer vaccine manufactured right, and we're inspected by the twice a year. All our products has to be submitted and approved by FDA. So we're extremely regulated in the space, which is also important when you think about new technologies, and how will a new technology be developed when we're so highly regulated and controlled and the amount of testing? That was necessary to just. Show equivalency to the rabbit, but long story short as the evolution into safe. When I ended up in graduate school, I ended up going to a into safe working for Dr Cooper. We were very small. I was just four of us in the lab. And you know obviously one of the main things we needed. Was Horseshoe crabs. Charleston was known for having horseshoe crabs, but two things about Charleston one is the population or or South, Carolina population is very strong in addition to the the the largest physical more shoe crab. There is the. Female one time that from tail, the whole link. The female was basically a meter. Long thing so very long right? YEP, so so they're big, so you don't have to handle nearly as many to get the quantity of blood we needed, but back in those days the crabs were were a nuisance. They were considered pass. they tore the fishermen's nets ups, especially the fishermen, and when they were bottom, dragging which was warhorse, pass laced for ill and cough. That was a byproduct that they just didn't want to deal with many times. They would just throw them up on the bank. Let and die compost them. Grind them as fertilizer the only other commercial applications for them at the time was to be used as bait, but again thinking about just the pure amount of work, and it just wasn't worth the fisherman's time to do it so again, not very well like creature

Dr Cooper Dr James Cooper Jordan FDA United States South Carolina Europe Wofford College New Zealand Charleston Linda Hopkins Carolina NIH John
Amy Cooper charged after calling police on Black bird watcher

KYW 24 Hour News

00:36 sec | Last month

Amy Cooper charged after calling police on Black bird watcher

"The white woman who was captured in a viral video on Memorial Day as she called the police on a black bird watcher in Central Park in New York City has been criminally charged. The Manhattan district attorney is charging Amy Cooper with falsely reporting an incident in the third degree. It's a misdemeanor punishable by up to a year in jail. The woman was captured in a video that went viral. She was seen calling 911. And telling an operator that an African American man in Central Park was threatening her. That man was a bird watcher, and he was trying to get her to put her dog on the leash. 57 year old Christian Cooper is on the board of the New York Audubon Society, Steve

Central Park Amy Cooper New York Audubon Society New York City Christian Cooper Manhattan Steve
Luke James: Not 'Chi' About Singing

Ask Me Another

05:24 min | Last month

Luke James: Not 'Chi' About Singing

"Everybody welcome to the show. Yeah. After new years. Twenty two hundred eighty. Downsize you getting rid of some stuff? You getting rid of stuff. That's usually my wife stuff that I want. To tell her that you're getting rid of it. Most of the time I don't most of the time what I say is. Do we need this thing? I say in a very high pitch? Yes, and does she look at and go ways? What are you doing? You know that's precious. We need that. I'm GONNA fix that. She says I'm going to fix that Oh we need this. I'm going fix that. Yeah, and then just slowly. You just move it further and further out of the room until it's in the basement, and then once everybody's forgotten about because garbage. I'm just trying to get rid of stuff in my inbox. I am trying to unsubscribe from every store and yes, you're nodding your head because you have too many emails. Can we agree that it's easier to get a divorce than unsubscribe from a mailing list Oh my God. Why is that so hard? I bought a bath mat. You from you once. You know we're not in a real relationship. Okay, but every time you're like I gotta get out of here. There's an exit interview super desperate. Why are you leasing? Why are you leaving, too? Many messages is by content relevant. Do you not recall signing up I? Recall I recall. Our special guest is singer actor model Luke. Luke James for beyond say technically I'm opening for him so technically I've opened for beyond say. And you guys by third degree have seen beyond say in a bar in Brooklyn so. Well done everybody Luke. James is very impressive, but I think the most impressive thing about him is that he looks fantastic in a bucket hat. You can't do that. Not everyone can do that if I put on a bucket hat I looked like a Combo of blossom and a sad fishermen all right. They should call bucket hats, what they are good for the really really young or very very old. People have described Luke James's music as the perfect music to make out to. You know what I like hearing when I make out. Applause. Just a slow sarcastic clap. That's it. I'm ready to French people. During this I say okay I'm ready to. And I say people because I usually have a few possibilities lined up. Just don't WANNA I don't WanNa. Cut off any up. Sometimes. Things just change, and you never know so. We have four brilliant contestants their backstage right now, determining how many self help books one needs to read before they can consider themselves helped. And one of them will be our big winner and the other three combine other book. Let's play some games, everybody. Our first contestants will play a game about cities original names I call it. Where in the world is Carmen San Miguel? I up Sarah Sand Cooler. YOU'RE A lab technician at the Columbia University Medical Center. I am all right. You recently moved your lab from Rochester to Columbia. So and you were saying you were finding really weird things. People left behind I was so. We're moving into moved into temporary lab space, which people apparently sort of took an excuse to just abandon all the stuff they didn't want which included refrigerator doors filled with human is. Humanize. So what do you do with leftover is? Call the Bio Hazardous Waste Disposal People. Yeah, and they show up and they take them away. Yes, thankfully. To well. That's good. Where are they? All right so when you ring in, we'll hear this. Your opponent is Paul Alexander from. Toronto Ontario where you are a criminal defense lawyer. That is true. Paul, you are in the Guinness Book of World Records. Yeah Okay, how why? I'm in a band and our band somehow got involved in what is now in the Guinness Book of world, records as the longest ever concert by multiple artists. Okay, so wait a second. So what did you have to fulfil well? There were eighteen and a quarter days of continuous music. Each band had a one hour set. There could be no more than five minutes between bands, and I think no more than thirty seconds between songs in a band set, and you had to go a certain number of songs before there could be a repeat. What time did your Ben? Play we got the six PM slot on the last day. That's the best. And, we're the people in the audience. Yeah, it was crammed. I mean the was the size of this stage, so it was going to be crammed even if it's not just the members of the band that sounds

Luke James Wanna Lab Technician World Records Paul Alexander Columbia University Medical Ce Carmen San Miguel Brooklyn Toronto Rochester Columbia Ontario
City attorney in central Washington warns family they could be prosecuted for creating more chalk art

News, Traffic and Weather

00:33 sec | Last month

City attorney in central Washington warns family they could be prosecuted for creating more chalk art

"City attorney and see less as a family could face up to a year in jail or be fine. No more than $5000 if they continue to draw chalk on their street in support of black lives matter. The actor My Harold Republic reports, City attorney Rob Case, warned Laura Perez, her family and her attorney in a letter that using chalk to draw on a public street constitutes third degree malicious mischief. Case argued that the family was not being singled out and would do the same to any other chalk art. Perez's lawyer argued it was a First Amendment rights

Attorney Laura Perez Rob Case My Harold Republic
"three degrees" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

The Daily Zeitgeist

07:35 min | Last month

"three degrees" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

"Turns into a frog and a frog for so much of the movie. So she starts off as a likely, the black. Yeah, and then. Chases Christ. Then she's then we'll maker for all it'll. Be Fine. They'll forget. and. Forget that they have to look at a black person is a princess. Just looking at frog frog. What a great voice! Targeting on last week about third degree racism. This concept of like when companies try do diversity initiatives. They just do it. Real half asked and don't follow through and don't treat it with any of the same attention and. intellectual firepower that they would anything having to do with prophets. And I feel like that sort of what happened to this movie like they didn't. They just really have asked it and gave it a bad release date gave it a bad title. The marketing sucked the. They made the princess a frog for half of the fucking movie. and. Yeah, it just like I I, remember the movie coming out, but I feel like it never really like hit the zeitgeist whereas. People blame the fact that Avatar came out a couple of weeks later for kind of swallowing up, but Alvin and the chipmunks the squirrel. Came out at that time, and I remember that movie like more than the Princess and the frog in terms of like being something that happened in pop culture history. I feel. It just got kind of ignored well if we're being honest about how those. Businesses Work Disney has a lot of money, and when they wanNA, promote something, the world will know about it. It has to want to promote it and if they don't. That's a decision, they there's that decision was made in. That wasn't oh. Avatar did a better job and. chipmunks either that's. All those companies they everything they do. There's a meeting in a decision. This too much money involved in all that that's on purpose. And I'm sure they the good thing is Walt Disney was just a good dude. all around. Good no evidence any other. Disney anti-semitism nothing like dude, just good dude like like. We're talking about good foundation there at Disney yeah. Just reading the Sony email hack like I just know that they've used the reception of this movie a thousand times to justify not making another Disney classic with black lead and a black filmmaker, but. They need to try that many more times like effective immediately. Oh I, can I mean in lacey can barely to networks those they they have. INC has a great way of telling you why your project or whatever just? It's just not gonNA work rate. When you're like, but it's kind of the same as that one that you already do in there. It's different it's not. Right and they have no idea. Everyone thinks that network executives. How some kind of grasp on what's popular. What smarter what people will like? No, they just fire out so much shit and hope that they get lucky, and that's all it is. That's why there's tons of shows that you've never seen or heard before that. Come and go pilots, all types of Shit movies everything and it's like they just wasted a whole bunch of money and hope to recoup a lot of that on big hit shows and blockbusters when they get lucky, but they don't know what they're doing. Nobody did there'd be three shows? Yeah. Did you guys read What's it? What's the William? Golden! Book I forget what it's called, but he. Adventures in the screen trade where he just talks about how nobody knows anything. And just like points out five examples of movies that they like wanted to shelve because they thought it was going to tank so bad when it came out and they became like. You know iconic monstrous hits. Nobody in Hollywood news any. The! Other! The same goes for SNL. Will Ferrell pitch more cowbell every episode for like three years. And they're like no, and then they finally threw it in destroyed and psychotic. Yes, you don't know that's why comedy is what it is it. That's why it takes ten or fifteen years to get really good at stand up because it takes ten or fifteen years to learn what works for you and what does. Right and they're doing all these comics disservice throwing them out there five to seven years in. There fucking him over because they've got like a funny ten minutes fifteen minutes in the rest, they're just grasping and then people like he's not funny and your ears. They just fucked him or they her. I've never understood that. 'cause I've noticed that in a lot of specials recently that I've watched like Netflix sometimes gets it right where it's like okay, we're going to get everybody fifteen or we're going to give them their height ten or sometimes even five seen where it's like okay. We know that they're going to have like the hits for the short amount of time, but then sometimes it is like a whole special like P. Davidson special where I was like I. Think Davidson's funny, but I think he got up there and did a lot of Improv. We're just like What else what else what else? We're like filming this and it's like twenty minutes of what else what else what else what else it's like. I'm sorry it's no good. It's the thing you were talking about where it's like. They throw all and once he got hot. They're like Oh, well, then have him. Do standup special because you've got a movie coming out and he's on this and you're right well. Maybe shouldn't do the standup especially because he'd been working on all the other stuff. But they're like cash in cash in, and it's hard as a performance to be like how much sure I'll talk for an hour. Comics have writers I'm like I couldn't hook boy with some some materials. Well. Peter Pete because you can't tell Pete what to do so that's what makes pete wonderful. Guys been lovely talking to you both today, a billy Wayne. Where can people find you and follow you and also? Why do you have a tiger behind you? Yesterday's guests had a tiger behind her physical. Now you have tiger behind you. What's happening? I'm just doing my Sundram. We found this at a yard sale like a life sized tiger for like twenty dollars. Toss Him You know we don't get to use it a lot, so it was just. Seems Pretty. Is this what using it entails? Because you sits there and startles me sometimes when I walk into his room where there's a cat in their. People find you follow you at. If you just Google Billy Davis any all that stuff comes up so whatever you choose to follow like I'm on twitter instagram all that And I have a cannabis podcast that we're about to start working on the second season, so there's a whole first season that you can been John. It's called grounded on local and what it is. It's not like I do my my co host is.

Disney Avatar Peter Pete Walt Disney Work Disney P. Davidson Netflix INC Google Sony twitter SNL Alvin Ferrell billy Wayne Hollywood cannabis Billy Davis
"three degrees" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

The Daily Zeitgeist

08:11 min | Last month

"three degrees" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

"All Right? Let's take one more break. We'll be right back. Embarrassing Thurston! I'm a writer, activist and comedian. I wrote a book called how to blast gave a Ted talk about white people, calling the cops on black people for no good reasons and I. Feel like we're having a moment in the US right now. You probably feel as to. When officer Derek shot and killed George, Floyd something in America broke. Where this moment goes, we can't say yet, but right now. Something big is happening involving race and in particular policing. So I'm going to try to explain it. From! The covid connection to WHO's allowed to protest to what defend the police actually means. When Mitt Romney, the man who tried to keep Barack, Obama's second term away from US joins black lives matter March. When Nascar Vans, the confederate flag when Donald Trump of all people encourages, cops not choke people. We're having a moment. You can listen to. We're having a moment on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts and wherever you get your podcast. android pack. And during the break as my microphone was falling off the. Shitty plastic table that I have at attached to because it's like literally tearing through it like it's made of paper. We're talking about how scary it is. That trump is kind of doing all of this based on instinct, and you know there are people around him who are trying to exploit it, but. You know he's. He's hard to pin down and he doesn't want anybody to have too much success from him, so he kind of does like the the Bannon's, but it's scary. How dumb he is, but how effective what he's doing like. He's still in this, even though he keeps stepping on his own deck like every. Other day if it's. In this? I think this metaphor has been. It is pro wrestling what he's really good at. Is he he gets that emotional side of like that's his base. His base is not intellectual. It is thirty percent. Pure emotional human being. That are, they're angry. And they've been taught that black people. These other poor people have kept them down. And they're rightfully. Angry. Is the confusing part I think people miss? Ray is that they're also been held at their poor. Their their health care system sucks. They don't have jobs either. But they they're being told in force fed that it's these other poor people. fucking up their dream, and when their right to be angry at the Liberals and the mainstream media to think they're just. They focus most of their rage at someone. That's a different. I have yeah. That might second record is like that's. It's easy, because we all have like negative inside of us, so I'm so dumb people. Just label that as like. Oh, WE'LL! Your skin's different. That's why I don't feel good and taught that I. mean that's it's been reinforced hasn't been taught. Yeah, it's been. It's been taught in school. It's been reinforced in media. That's the reason black face such a huge deal to us is because it was a tool that was used by white folks to demonize black people, and it spread like wildfire throughout the culture in. In you know reaffirmed these hateful. You know things that's why the stereotype of black people love watermelon that comes from a lot of freed slaves made a business made a living selling watermelon, and they started making money, and you know then why folks saw that and they're like. Wait a minute. Negroes are making money didn't success, but somehow we have to turn this into a negative so poor because they gelin secure, it's. What it is. To have nothing. If you have something, you gotTa have less than me your. Insecurity it's deep deep insecurity. So just briefly on the subject of trump. Two quick things one. He shared his video of the mccloskey's I just have a feeling that the picture of those two standing on their porch in front of their mcmansion with. A automatic and semiautomatic weapons. Like in. In their. Country Club where. I have a feeling that's going to be in history books, just because it so perfectly encapsulates like the sort of white fragility, an impotent and confused dissonant rage. That's happening that. I think is even hard to make I think. To me if you really look at that if you examine those pictures in those images, what it? Signifies more than anything else. Is. I'm trying to think the right way to word it, it's. The idea that peaceful people. Are GonNA. Come take your stuff. They're not afraid of their stuff getting taken. Even though that's what it looks like. It's the there. No systematic change is coming. If you see them pointing the way they're waving. Those and they're not holding guns correctly because they're not trained. To she does. They don't know how to use those guns. Either of this was so lamp, but that guy fingers on the trigger her fingers on the trigger. She can these. Rather, oh, shoot holden Anim- sixty. He's holding 'em six. Like. It's an m sixty in. He's Rambo. If you really watch them, they're not those people in those people. Protests are just walking by being like all right. Just these a lot of keep your guys stay on the streets. Jesus Christ look at these. They're scared. They're like. Why are you guys organized? Why are you? It's the you're supposed to be in downtown Saint Louis or e saint. Louis West Saint. Louis is are what are y'all doing that? Yeah, we're bringing it to the rich neighborhoods. You're supposed to fuck up Ferguson not no. Yeah that's what happened. That's the fear in their eyes. It's not that Oh 'cause they would love on some level if they went into their homes and fucked up some antiques, because they've that shit so over insured it would be. They'd make money on that. Yeah, they're begging for. They would love for something like that to happen. See Photo inside of the House. That's what I'm talking about. It's a museum it looks. Looks. It like in a scary way they have. Marble steps. They have these like you know like old school kind of like. WHO's the guy who paint on the ceiling I Yeah they sistine chapel as like paintings on their ceiling is the ugly ever. Harvey, said on twitter. It looked like the The part of the parking garage at the Americana is what they're inside of. Their house looks like a adopt. Yeah. No, when she said I was like Holy Shit. That's exactly, but then you start looking in. That's when people are like look at all these rich people's art. Their taste is terrible and Mike. Now it's not all that is money laundry. All that stuff is money laundry. All that is a scam. So it's all over insured and they've got. It's all overpriced and they can move..

US Barack Louis West Saint Mitt Romney Donald Trump sistine chapel Thurston writer Ted apple Country Club officer Nascar Vans America Saint Louis twitter Derek shot
"three degrees" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

The Daily Zeitgeist

07:33 min | Last month

"three degrees" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

"Is So so good at just immediately taking things and putting it back in the terms that we all understand of you know where the day understand of division. Yeah, another that not being you know America being you know we were talking about how a lot of the facemask stuff goes back to the founding of the country and the founding fathers being petulant about like no taxation on the wars that you're paying for for us. And You know I I also think the idea that there's no class. a class system in America is like our most deeply held a bullshit myth. Yes, yeah, it's the same. It can just come on up. It's the same as okay. I was having this conversational. The Robert Evans the other day is I'm reading this book about the SAS the. You know the British fighting force in. It's written by a British to British. Guys in the way that Great Britain talks about what they were doing militarily. They were very open about all the things they doing. We've never been open about that about our empire-building stuff. It's always like we're going to go. Make things better and do it now. We're going to get that oil and Britain was like Yo. We're just going to try to control that island because we want it bright and I think psychologically. That's why. It's it doesn't fuck with the British people as hard. As it does with our people because we've been lying to our soldiers in our poor people about why we're doing all this stuff. Yeah, yeah, let colonizer was a term that both Kinda took back and weaponize because we're like. Yeah, you stole everything and you continue to lie about it like a gray robbers you stole. People trick people. Manifest destiny is the biggest scam phrase I've ever heard my entire fucking life and I love it because I'm like manifest destiny today like want to show somebody's house and be like hey manifest destiny. Run Me Keys. This is my house now. Right so? But until we stop rebranding every sucked thing that we done. That's led to the systems that we're in right now. We're never going to be able to get those people, and that's exactly what you know. The government knows and relies on. That's why when the statues fall. It's important for them to make a big deal. Love it because they have to be able to tell all these folks that they've lied to that. Look at all. These black and Brown people who are destroying your history when it's like the to the victor when the spoils and it just lied about everything. And I mean the UK we knew that they were colonizers better off than we are i. mean they are in some ways, but I don't know I don't know how you stop you. Wake up and discover everybody to realize. They're not confused in Great Britain about who they are, and where their places in the system that that's what. Is Confusing. In America that comes with all this division is because no one knows their true place because it's all lied to in. It's all sand underneath everyone except for a very select few yeah. I mean I do. Definitely believe that our system was designed to hold. Black and Brown people down, but I don't think it was designed to keep everyone poor the way it is now. I think that's been hijacked in this century. Or the last century. I I think there's something to the. because. There's like with Great Britain the. Like. The system is lying to them, but everybody knows lying to them, but in America. We've been taught to lie to ourselves and I. Think there's something about that dissonance that is really. Unhealthy you know there's a study that came out late last year. That was all about how poor. Non College educated white people are seeing a decline in their. Average life expectancy, and it's like the first demographic cohort to go in the opposite direction in a century and I think there's something to like this media complex that you know Fox. News and just the modern conservative republican movement has built up. That like just isn't healthy. It's not a sustainable way to exist where you kind of you know hate yourself like. They're not stupid like that's the. That's the lie at the center of it. It's just they're being lied to end their lying to themselves, and that's really dangerous. I WANNA bring it back to. You know about life as always do. The, you're taxed. Bug's life, because they they talk about how like the grasshoppers are holding everyone down until the and realized that a lot of aunts united can really fuck the grasshoppers up, so yep. Watch watch a bugs life. It's our greatest Marxist texts. What is something that you think is overrated overrated? I think the value of investment is overrated at this point. The value of investment. Explain what you mean. I think somewhere along the line. you know there's like invest in your future in the and that's how. That's how we're all taught to build wealth in money now is is through investment. And not through actual hard work I mean they'll tell you like hard works how you make money and stuff, but then if you examine your know how you make, money is to have money already that right the only way to make money. Yes I think that whole thing that that's an overrated system. Because there's you're just no one's working anymore. And then there's no product, so we're all griff tres absolutely that that's a one hundred percent like a huge. Underlying problems like I mean I've talked before about. How a lot of the smartest people I grew up with or went to college with went into just changing other people's investments in a spreadsheet, and then like carving off a small percentage of those investments to make their own money, and then now they're betting that money and that's that's the work that's being done with Arab smartest br like our brain. Brain power as a country a is that and like you know it under the new deal under earlier in the twentieth century, like when you also just described apps by the way right, yeah apps, exactly just the same thing, but funneling our time like finding a way to waste people just a little bit of everybody's money that yes, it just a little bit. That's the same IRV it off. Yeah I think. What always keeps me frustrated about that, too. Is that I've seen over this pandemic and I've contributed to so many. Go Fund me so many bail out funds so much crowdfunding when the government should be doing these things and instead we have to keep passing the same fifty bucks to everybody you. Like to me that we have set up this this whole system where it's like you.

America Britain Great Britain Robert Evans colonizer UK Brown Fox
"three degrees" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

The Daily Zeitgeist

06:16 min | Last month

"three degrees" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

"Say officially off the top fuck. The Coke Brothers Fuck Fox. News Fuck Rush Limbaugh Fuck Pot set student fuck. Jk Rowling Tuck Sean Hannity Ben Shapiro. Let's go with that today. It's Wednesday July first twenty twenty happy July. Everyone my name's Jack O'Brien AK. Mr Bright ties. Up done that already, but maybe not. And I'm thrilled to be joined. Five wants to get my special guest. Co Host scam got US herself Lacey Mosley. Was Up is mostly Aka gambling in the Monin scam. Scams full-time when robberies on Bagel you can have robbery. When Rye breads. You can great. Got It on a metaphorical. okay. Teams. Throw heads out there. That's a Bagel bike. Right. Yeah makes. Said Bagel. Petain. Shift. Burns your mouth. Yeah it's the fourth love thermodynamics. Though when he was on a Bagel, you can have pizza anytime. except. For like? Shut up. Ask. Yeah I gave to unruly boys not was. Crammed into my mouth, by my wife. Lacey, who is that voice a voice that joined the assistant. More and more, we got A, we got A. Half of the mounts site more up here on the podcast. He is the hilarious the talented Mr Billy Wayne Dave. Hey you guys I couldn't I'm sorry. I couldn't stay quiet I was like that's not pizza rolls that. Hey you're doing correct me. Yeah, and we're doing what our listeners check. Do Yeah. I was protecting. You jumped him from the Internet is what I was doing. Scores of people being my mentions, and like hey, I know you're dealing with a lot right now, but it just to let you know you can believe fucked. BAGELS! Misplaced anger right now that I'm trying to absorb. Yeah, fuck, fuck pizza rolls. I mean we can all agree on that does burn your mouth real bed. That's like it's like almost like it was designed to destroy your taste buds. It's like hot captain. Crunch is like you know we all know. Precious tears shreds your roof, and like they do the same thing you've ever. You can never eat it at room. TEMP A hot pocket. You're always. Yeah, It's it's not edible. Temperature. Heats, a sauce congeals I. It's the preservatives they put in that it is the only way is edible is if it also hurts you? I wonder if there is an ideal way to make if you put pizza. Rolls in like a deep fryer or something or maybe not fry I'm sure those would be delicious, but like in a air friars something that like you Gorman's out there. You let us know what is the way to? Prepare Pizza role that doesn't make it like it seems like it is always inherently at three different temperatures that are designed to just destroy the inside of your face I think if you put a pizza role in a deep Fryer, a county fair just happened. That's where my southern brain. Coca Cola ice cream. Bubble gum so it's all good I hate to report. The first time I had a fried twinkie I was like man. This would stoop. Everyone's fat is this is the best thing I've ever had my. What what does Defray Cola like? Is it just the like? Basically? The fried outsides with like a Coca Cola flavor. What what is it you got it? Okay I think they freeze the coke? And then they fry it and then when you bite into it, you're just getting like you know Coca Cola Flavor and fried. The same rednecks that work at NASA putting this stuff together. Those NASA rednecks up to them. Billy Wayne. We're going to get to know you a little bit better. In a moment. I can tell listeners a few of the things we're talking about today. We're GONNA talk about the alleged McLean story. Just the worst so sad every time you look at even a video of him. It's hard not to cry. And yet I feel like it needs to be told over and over again, It's getting even more infuriating, so we're gonNA talk about that. We are going to talk about the new trump books that are coming out not by him We aren't getting sequel to the art of the deal. Unfortunately, in talk about the video. He shared the mccloskey's in Saint Louis. Just that that couple that image of them, standing on their lawn with their with their guns is just I mean. Our new? American gothic it's it's the greatest. We're GONNA talk. About Splash Mountain we we talked last week or a couple of weeks ago about how they were getting or doing a complete overhaul of it to remove the song of the South from the themes, surrounding that ride, which I didn't even know was the theme of that riot but now they're redesigning it around the princess and the frog, so we're GonNa talk about the movie, the Princess and the frog. Plenty more, but I billy way and we like to ask our guests. What is something from your searches street? That's revealing about.

Mr Billy Wayne Dave Lacey Mosley NASA Jk Rowling Jack O'Brien AK Mr Bright Sean Hannity Ben Shapiro robbery Billy Wayne Monin Splash Mountain Co Host mccloskey Gorman Saint Louis McLean
3-Year-Old Bronx Boy Burned When Illegal Fireworks Fly Through New York Bedroom Window

Brian Kilmeade

00:51 sec | Last month

3-Year-Old Bronx Boy Burned When Illegal Fireworks Fly Through New York Bedroom Window

"New York city's new legal fireworks task force has announced twelve arrests for a legal pyrotechnics New York City mayor de Blasio says it being on target I don't know what the suppliers they'll be all sorts of actions taken under cover by sting operations finding where the supply isn't cutting it off at the knees this is Sam from video at the very moment a three year old Bronx boy was struck by illegal fireworks set off in the Bronx a shell came flying through an open window hitting at a yell Rosario in his arm as he walked to his bedroom the boy's father David Rosario rushed the boy to the hospital the boys suffering second and third degree burns to his arm and he also required stitches police are looking for the person

De Blasio SAM Bronx David Rosario New York
Prosecutors: Officer had knee on Floyd for 7:46, not 8:46

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 2 months ago

Prosecutors: Officer had knee on Floyd for 7:46, not 8:46

"Hi Mike Crossey a reporting the amount of time a police officer had his knee on George Floyd's neck has been corrected eight forty six became a symbol of police brutality after prosecutors in Minnesota said that was how long officer Derek shop and had his knee on George Floyd's neck on may twenty fifth but the Associated Press began enquiring because timestamp cited in the charging documents description of the incident showed shaman had his knee on Floyd for seven minutes forty six seconds Wednesday the Hennepin county attorney's office acknowledged the one minute error in a statement the prosecutor also said the discrepancy will have no impact on the criminal case against job in and three other officers shop it is charged with second degree murder third degree murder and manslaughter the other officers are charged with aiding and abetting both second degree murder and manslaughter hi Mike Rossio

Mike Crossey Officer George Floyd Minnesota Derek Shop Associated Press Attorney Prosecutor Third Degree Murder Second Degree Murder Mike Rossio Hennepin County Abetting
Dispatcher unafraid of being 'snitch' reports Floyd arrest

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 2 months ago

Dispatcher unafraid of being 'snitch' reports Floyd arrest

"Hi my cross your reporting a dispatcher who said she was unafraid of being a snitch reported concerns about George Floyd's arrest a nine one one dispatcher in Minneapolis expressed concern after apparently watching in real time as police officers took down George Floyd on may twenty fifth I don't know you can call me if you want to but we have the cameras out for three twenty song in a recording of the call made public Monday the dispatcher called the police sergeant to report what she'd seen I got something out of the back of the squad and all of them sat on this man died after officer Derek Shaw then used his need to pin Floyd to the ground Schaben who was fired has been charged with second degree murder third degree murder and manslaughter three other officers were also fired are charged with aiding and abetting second degree murder and manslaughter hi Mike Rossio

George Floyd Minneapolis Officer Second Degree Murder Mike Rossio Derek Shaw Abetting
Dispatcher unafraid of being 'snitch' reports Floyd arrest

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 2 months ago

Dispatcher unafraid of being 'snitch' reports Floyd arrest

"Hi my cross your reporting a dispatcher who said she was unafraid of being a snitch reported concerns about George Floyd's arrest a nine one one dispatcher in Minneapolis expressed concern after apparently watching in real time as police officers took down George Floyd on may twenty fifth I don't know you can call me if you want to but we have the cameras out for three twenty song in a recording of the call made public Monday the dispatcher called the police sergeant to report what she'd seen I got something out of the back of the squad and all of them sat on this man died after officer Derek Shaw then used his need to pin Floyd to the ground Schaben who was fired has been charged with second degree murder third degree murder and manslaughter three other officers were also fired are charged with aiding and abetting second degree murder and manslaughter hi Mike Rossio

George Floyd Minneapolis Officer Second Degree Murder Mike Rossio Derek Shaw Abetting
$10,000 reward offered for identity of Atlanta Wendy's arsonist

Dana Loesch

00:39 sec | 2 months ago

$10,000 reward offered for identity of Atlanta Wendy's arsonist

"Atlanta police are releasing photos of a woman they say is responsible for starting that fire on Saturday night that destroyed the Wendy's where Rashard Brooks was shot I'll tell you more in about that just dissect wanted let you know that we have sixty three degrees right now in Peachtree street and we're going to have Atlantis was accurate and dependable forecast coming up from Brad nets now this suspect is a woman and crime stoppers of Atlanta is offering ten thousand dollars in reward money for any information that's going to lead to arrests check out our photo I. WSP radio dot com officials are also looking for any information on anybody else that might be responsible for that are sent

Rashard Brooks Atlanta Brad
Temperature spike: Earth ties record high heat May reading

Red Eye Radio

00:23 sec | 2 months ago

Temperature spike: Earth ties record high heat May reading

"Earth's temperatures spike to tie a record high for may the national oceanic and atmospheric administration said last month the global average temperature was sixty point three degrees that ties with twenty sixteen for the hottest may and a hundred and forty one years of record keeping it is also one point seven degrees higher than the twentieth century average for

AccuWeather: Less humid and mostly sunny

Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

00:30 sec | 2 months ago

AccuWeather: Less humid and mostly sunny

"Sitting becoming partly cloudy and more comfortable tonight low sixty eight in the city tomorrow plenty of sunshine warm but less humid hi eighty four degrees partly cloudy Friday night low sixty one in the city Saturday sunshine mixing with clouds high seventy six Sunday mostly cloudy with a shower thunderstorm around high seventy three degrees remaining mostly cloudy Monday with a shower too and perhaps a thunderstorm high seventy four Tuesday partly sunny with a shower thunderstorm possible high seventy

George Floyd murder suspect Derek Chauvin has bail set at $1.25m

Tony and Dwight

00:33 sec | 2 months ago

George Floyd murder suspect Derek Chauvin has bail set at $1.25m

"George Ford will be buried in Houston today after a private funeral it comes a day after the first court appearance of Derek Jarman the ex cop charged in Floyd's death in Minnesota two weeks ago ABC's Alex Perez in Minneapolis with the latest prosecutors saying the forty four year old accused of killing George Floyd jammed his knee on Floyd's knack for nearly nine minutes as he quote went limp Chauvin charged with second degree murder without intent to second degree manslaughter and third degree murder ordered held on one point two five million

George Ford Houston Derek Jarman Minnesota ABC Alex Perez Minneapolis George Floyd Chauvin Second Degree Murder Third Degree Murder
"three degrees" Discussed on Don't Keep Your Day Job

Don't Keep Your Day Job

07:12 min | 2 months ago

"three degrees" Discussed on Don't Keep Your Day Job

"What are we? GonNa, feel like during this cycle. Would we literally are cut off from one another? And then? How do we redeem that? So kids again reminded us of value belonging, but the way I belong to look in the mirror and realized that you matter that you're enough that you don't need. You don't need looks like you don't need more money. You don't eat that stuff. It's. One was the last time a first grader brushed her hair or his hair. They don't care at all. Don't brush their teeth. Let alone their hair. They belong. which frees them to reach across the aisle and recognized that they belong to? They may ask you why. Your skin color is different while your fingers are gone, but once you answer that's behind us. They don't need to build walls to constantly building bridges so long. They remind us we can return to that. 'cause you were a child. She's still inside you in the final thing is freedom. Kids are the most free people I know, but I don't mean like adult like little. You can see adults that the people who you know Kathy your most alive. Free. They. Don't worry about someone else's opinion of them that they're not settling for the way. It's always been done. They are fully liberated to live only in. Their life. It's a those are the five senses that we impact in the book in awe nothing new under the Sun. You know where those words come from this some of my favorite from scripture. But, I think we forget what has already been placed in front of us. We forget what we knew. This won't remind you of anything. You didn't know you knew it all, but you lost sight in. Here's the way you can return to wow. So powerful and so needed, and the way that you turn it around and talk about the percentage of people who felt isolated the percentage of people who felt. that. They were willing to try their hand at suicide, and this is before the coronavirus and how you're turning around to show us. What is it exposing? That was already present. Not The problem was already here and now we're actually able to maybe stop. and. Do something about it, and it's just boy way to turn that around, and it's just incredible. What is the research show about practicing these kinds of things, so one of the coolest things that the research has shown in we impact in the book and all. Four speeding. Okay like kind of weird, but I joke in my book. More poor wife is like my first patient. When I write these days or practice talks you whatever she's audience member one a so I deliver these on her, and anytime I walk with kids now like I'm going to I'm going to go force with the kids, an drives her crazy, but with forest bathing means is occasional, and this is going to be harder for some of your listeners right now. To go outside. Actually take off your shoes. When was the last time you felt? Grass felt mud. Looked up, watch clouds pass overhead, and I learned about the beauty of this I was blind kids while writing this book and my Little Girl Grace, and in are outside, were running around with her brothers. And now we lay down under a tree. The leisure blown ahead of us. The clouds were passing by, and she goes Daddy DC. Dicey when she goes, it's an airplane. Okay, I don't see an airplane in she goes. Yeah, it's an airplane hit, and then I recognize Kathy. She wasn't talking about an actual plane. She was talking about cloud. In this little girl, looking up at the heavens. Has the inspiration to rather than be bored by what's going on overhead to pause long enough to celebrate what it is to imagine. Something beautiful right in front of her. And we get bored by this stuff. We don't even look up anymore. The research on on forest bathing. It's a fancy way of saying go outside people. Leave your cell phone inside though people. Embraced the sounds listen to the birds go to a creek. Listen to water running. All this stuff has been proven to lower stress. Reducing Zaidi help with creativity allows to be more collaborative, connect others and live longer this good stuff and during this crazy season. If you are unable to go, outside can't right now go to Youtube and type in a pretty quick. In Campfire, and you'll get these sounds that will be placed in front of you, and it will do the almost the exact same thing, so during the season of challenge, one of the cool things you can do is force bait. A lot of research is on this on how it's going to affect not only the way show into the day, but what's going to happen in your following in one more point of the CBO, effect expectancy the other side of expectancies. If you think the worst is in front of you proven out. So if they tell you John this is going to hurt. It hurts. It hurts more so all research with you think it's going to be better. It's going to become better and if you think it's going to be worse, it's going to be worse I'm not telling you to be a pollyanna around the day, but I'm telling you see it through the Lens of truth because you'll see some more beautiful than the media, will i. Mean it's just fascinating, and it's so true when you say it. It's like such a simple sentence, but you set it up like. He said we don't even look anymore. We don't you're right? We don't look up. We don't. When was last time we went outside and put our feet in the mud or the grass like never so simple, and what your to your point? My daughter right now is studying of course at home and one of the things they're studying. Is the kelp forests which I never even knew about, but I'm learning it with her and there's a live cam in Monterey Bay live cam under the water, so we click on it every day in Chester, right three things that she observes and I'm telling you I know it's not as good as being in. In that water, but watching the live cam for five minutes, which is her job, and I do it with her. Now it is the most peaceful thing to watch, and so yes, you can type that in right now, and you can get a tiny little taste of what it feels like to be in nature, which is truly epic I do WanNa. Mention your incredible podcasts live inspired podcast, and you've had so many incredible on that show for Brown on the show. You've had so many people on the show who share such incredible wisdom. Tell us a little bit about the show and what it delivers. So I take my own medicine. My friends so when I tell you consider journal, Y me. I did that. Did that exercise this morning? And if I wake up to see the sunrise tomorrow, I'll do it again. Another part of the exercise is what more can I do so for a decade January's been racing around delivering messages live audiences, which is so awesome, but one of the questions that I was asking back in the glory days. What more can I do? How can I serve this audience better? And so I wrote a book? One of the ways give them the full story wrote a book called on fire, and that was really cool, and then we can as well. Well. What else can we do? What more can I do to serve? People just love them where they are created a podcast live inspired podcast. What have we brought in people way? Cooler than John. O'Leary to share their life experiences the mistakes. They made what they learn what it means for our audience how they too indeed can live inspired, so I bring up people like you Kathy will head on and have the had the honor of here in your life, store. Store in your grandparents, incredible stories bringing on people like Rene Brown and people I look up to astronauts, scientists authors over commerce ordinary seemingly people who do remarkable things in their life i. don't believe really ordinary i. think life is.

Kathy Rene Brown John Youtube CBO Grass Dicey Monterey Bay O'Leary Chester Zaidi WanNa
"three degrees" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

01:42 min | 11 months ago

"three degrees" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"But the huge huge win today at a nail biter for the twins once again rained out other got through three innings today I was a little bit surprised by the size of the crowd on a lovely day in Cleveland just twenty four thousand two hundred and fifty eight and all the fans that were in attendance on Friday night obviously welcome back to the ball park today. seventy three degrees and sunny and now on game two coming up tonight on expect a little bit bigger crowd in Cleveland. for game two of this day and night double header the night but the tremendous job by the bull pen I'll tell the offrir Rome all Rogers all getting it done and of that note on Tyler Dolphy his twentieth consecutive scoreless appearance gotten assist from role helping him get out of a bit of a jam. and Sergio Romo with CSS but once again Tyler Dolphy has been a bright spot in the bull pen for the twins is twenty of consecutive scoreless parents we got another break coming up right now it is final pitch twins win huge win maybe the win of the year to this point as they extend their lead to four and a half games. twins winner two zero in Cleveland today a one of our all state good hands play of the game in a moment. are you worried about how long it's gonna take to sell your home if it's going to sell at all don't worry call my guy Johnson. right now it Reilly auto parts pick up to five and a quarter ounce bottles of Lucas fuel injector cleaner for eight dollars clean and lubricate your fuel system while increasing miles per.

Cleveland Rogers Tyler Dolphy Sergio Romo guy Johnson. Reilly seventy three degrees eight dollars
"three degrees" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"three degrees" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"Fifty three degrees at one. Oh, three. I'm curt Lewis top stories tonight man's locked up in garland were a man was critically hurt in a hit and run this week based on a tip. Police arrested a man named McGill Castro tonight about seven o'clock on more investigation. And we were able to locate Castro in Richardson, he was picking the custody. And when he was arrested. He was also found to be possession of methamphetamine garland police. Lieutenant Pedro says they also found the blue van seen on video driving from the scene where the victim was run down Wednesday afternoon. Travis gray still in critical condition. Man's behind bars in Kaufman county tonight after leading police on quite a winding high speed chase pursuit began about ten o'clock tonight with a traffic stop in a rural part of the county. The driver sped off. He was chased by Kaufman county sheriff's deputies joined by DPS trooper speeds reaching up to one hundred miles an hour or better speeding through Rosser and up four eighty seven FM eighty-seven the chase continued to scurry back toward Rosser. Finally, the driver left the road and became stuck in the mud at that point. It was pretty much over students. Mosquito school were put on lockdown after somebody was involved in a shooting near the campus on Thursday toward the end of their school day went around two o'clock high school went on lockdown. This was in child development class. We did. This. We all got against everyone. Was scared. The actual shooting happened about a block away in a parking lot of a Bank. The gunman was the one who ran back into the high school. He was quickly caught. So is the person who was shot. He is expected to recover. LP Phillips, News Radio ten eighty KRLD. Now, KRLD, traffic and weather together. We had a little debris causing.

McGill Castro Kaufman county curt Lewis Rosser Mosquito school Lieutenant Pedro Travis gray methamphetamine Richardson Phillips Fifty three degrees
"three degrees" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"three degrees" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Forty three. Degrees that we've been fluctuating forty four degrees in the American standard heating weather center. We've got a high today of sixty three degrees. The time is eight sixteen. So everybody is I don't know. Maybe they're perfect purposefully getting it wrong about the Muller investigation, or they're forgetting what they said about the Muller investigation or their willful in their deceit that they said there was collusion repeatedly. When a they didn't know or they clearly made it up John Brennan sang, well, I thought there was more than there was well, what kind of thing is that when you're calling the president treasonous and a whole host of other things, you know, we need. Tony ninety three WIBC, and it is a montage. We have got the montage of. Well, I all the people. Gotta love that. It's okay. It's good all respect to the south park guys. Here's the montage of Trump's upon Russia..

Muller John Brennan Trump Tony Russia president sixty three degrees forty four degrees
"three degrees" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

WCBS Newsradio 880

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"three degrees" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

"Cloudy and forty three degrees in the city. We have rain here. But it is snowing north and west there, we might not get a whole lot here. But temperatures will be dropping overnight. Our chief meteorologist Craig Allen is joining us. So how much longer do we have this wintry mix, and then how cold is it get cracking already? So we have precipitation in the forecast at least until midnight or so, western suburbs. And probably till about two three AM for the eastern portions of our listening area. Now, this is how it all going to work out. It's forty three degrees in the city. We actually went up a degree as the wind comes in off the water places are into the forty to forty five degree range near the coast. We've got rain for the next several hours, but that cold air is ready to crash on east as we're watching it now on radar and all the other parameters to take a look at here and the rain snow line is still right along to eighty seven for now. So those of you traveling west on seventy eight or eighty going on up. To eighty-seven towards New York state through a you will find more and more snow. Same thing up six eighty four to the top there towards eighty four. That's where it turns into all snow, but again, the cold is pressing down the warm is up. Now, the the cold will press down. We'll have a change over to snow probably then the next one to two to three hours from west to east, and then even the city could pick up one two three the lowest amounts along the coast and as much as six for the northwest suburbs. That bitter cold guys is is looking like temperatures keep falling from the day tomorrow through tomorrow night and barely recover on Thursday. We'll have more details and some numbers on that at six o eight. All right. Craig in with an eye on the snow governor Murphy closed, New Jersey state offices early today are Peterhouse school heard from the governor has storm is not a huge snow maker. But New Jersey sounding the alarm governor Merv, he's has state government is closing early on a rolling basis. Because again, the the storm will impact different parts of the state at different times in different ways. As we think that that will ensure a smooth process for the afternoon and.

Craig Allen New Jersey governor Murphy chief meteorologist Peterhouse New York Merv forty three degrees forty five degree three hours
"three degrees" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"three degrees" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"Fifty three degrees. So at least it won't be too too cold. But we are gonna have to have those umbrellas enhanced homescan three showing us that cloud that continuing to increase, especially Philadelphia and point Southport moisture still point at this point parts of the Virginia. But as we pan out, even more we can see what that moisture is an association with there is that blizzard the snow coming down in parts of Chicago where a blizzard warning is in effect right now and under snow has been. Reported across parts of Illinois, a very powerful system that is going to be impacting us as we had into the day tomorrow and providing us though with liquid precipitation, but I think we get through our Monday morning commute pretty nicely. Although watching up where some areas of fall, I don't love this model. I think it's underestimating what's going to happen. Just a little bit. I think we're gonna see these showers move in a little bit quicker during the morning hours. And I think we're gonna see some pretty widespread rainfall activity, so I like this one o'clock in the afternoon with pockets of heavier rainfall, maybe even an embedded thunderstorms over jersey and closer to the coast four or five o'clock likely to see that rain now this particular model moving the precept out a little bit sooner than others. So I think especially for the first half of our Monday evening commute. If pre- a pretty soggy and wet go, and then we'll have to watch out for flooding conditions because of all the rain that we had yesterday and then more rain on top of that. And as we had into the second half of the evening tomorrow all that moisture moving on apple for your day planner tomorrow nine o'clock hour shower starting to develop especially off to the western round the right around lunchtime. Five o'clock hour widespread rainfall with some heavier pockets temperatures generally in the fifties. And then we dry out. And of course, drop the temperatures back as we had into Tuesday down to forty four degrees. Breezy conditions as well Wednesday. We are windy and cold thirty nine degrees sunshine on the board there. But I think we do have a chance of snow shower or snow squall north and west of the city Wednesday afternoon, then on Thursday still in the forties as a well before we gradually warm things up. Maybe by the end of next weekend. All right. No snow in that forecast. Aren't very good..

Virginia Chicago Philadelphia Southport apple Illinois Fifty three degrees thirty nine degrees forty four degrees
"three degrees" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"three degrees" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"Three degrees. And with your also sixty three the president's visit to southern California was welcomed by some and slammed by others. The president I visited a Malibu neighborhood on doom drive where some houses were destroyed by the. Wolsey fire and at one of the homes. That was spared residents inside we're using a generator to fire up the lights one man there said he felt Mr. Trump's visit was a good thing. Overall. Actually, I thought it showed some compassion. That he came to see the devastation scorched earth the wars on. And I think it altered his for his paradigm his point of view. But not everyone gathered in that kitchen sought that way, some thought the presidential. Visit was a complete disruption and hypocritical since Mr. Trump had been quick to assess blame for all the fires. I mean FEMA coming in was a great thing. And that's all I needed to see I certainly didn't need to see someone with such a cantankerous in and ignorant view, in my opinion. It's it's a dog and pony show that that frustrated a lot of us say claim that in the area the end of the block with the president actually visited one resident didn't even want him setting foot on the property in Malibu. John Baird KNX ten seventy NewsRadio earlier in the day. The president got a firsthand look at the areas destroyed by the campfire up north he toured the area with governor Jerry Brown, governor elect Gavin Newsom. He had some words for people who have been battling. The flames and the aftermath. I just want to also thank FEMA..

president Mr. Trump Malibu FEMA Gavin Newsom John Baird KNX California Jerry Brown Three degrees
"three degrees" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"three degrees" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Thirty three degrees at eight o'clock. Good evening. I'm sue Guzman. A first snow of the season is at the center of a nightmarish commute for a lot of folks. Trying to make their way home from work tonight. This first snow or snow member some are calling. It is really a hard hitting storm. And the big problem tonight is at the port authority bus terminal, which is shut down we head over now. Live to WRX Jeff McKinney for the very latest on that. Ordinarily, I do take the bus home. I take it through the Lincoln tunnel. I live right on the other side of the Hudson in west New York, New jersey, I went to the port authority tonight. And this is something I'd broken in with doing the news. This afternoon were great delays at the port authority bus terminal because buses weren't able to get from jersey back to the bus terminal show is very overcrowded people waiting for buses, except we weren't showing up by the time. I got there tonight probably about seven thirty it appeared to be totally shut down the escalators up to the upper floors were turned off people were just knowing about in the lower floors. I'm talking about thousands of people. So I made my way down here to the waterway ferry over on the west side highway thirty nine th street. I'm getting on a ferry now. I saw something here. I'd never seen before outside the ferry terminal. There was a line several hundred yards long with people just waiting to get into the building it get on a ferry. So we have unprecedented crowds here at the ferry terminal. And that's because. We had this shutdown. We're intensive purposes if already bus and by the way, there cross honoring tickets, New Jersey transit ticket if you want to thank you very much. Jeff, you know, in addition to just pedestrians coming up to a lot of snow on the roadways, which we don't typically see our major roadways. If you're in a vehicle, they are snarled throughout the Tri state area, spin out stuck vehicles. We've got this winter storm warning at snow coming down about an inch or two an hour. A lot of the roads are treacherous and barely impassable in some areas. Especially north.

New jersey Jeff McKinney sue Guzman Lincoln tunnel New York Thirty three degrees hundred yards
"three degrees" Discussed on WCBS-FM 101.1

WCBS-FM 101.1

08:30 min | 2 years ago

"three degrees" Discussed on WCBS-FM 101.1

"Eighty three degrees seventy seven in little neck queens and seventy six in little Italy and what a one point one CBS FM. Home of New York's greatest hits WCBS FM. HD one new radio dot com station Kathy So Scary Greatest hits CBS FM.

CBS FM little Italy New York Kathy Eighty three degrees
"three degrees" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

02:50 min | 2 years ago

"three degrees" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"And seventy three degrees downtown with sunshine growing frustration with the trump administration's newly increased tariffs on ally nations the senate has passed a nonbinding resolution to give congress more say about trade penalties imposed in the name of national security through spending bills a farmer upstate new york worries about china and taking retaliatory trade action by cancelling orders of soybeans from the us all plan to sell sleepiness this launch and now i have to decide what to do because the market has essentially collapsed after you decide whether to wait or sell at a loss what's the take from colorado's ag community we'll talk tariffs with a member of the cattlemen's association at nine fifty two movies in the works about the dramatic rescue of the boys soccer team the from that flooded cave in thailand director john shoe says he's gonna direct one of the films in thailand's navy and government they're cooperating in that production and yesterday's announcement comes one day after pure flix entertainment announcing it's working on its own version of that movie and finally today marks a little known anniversary in the history of the beatles that may sound like the beatles but it's not technically speaking it was sixty years ago today that the quarrymen the beatles precursor that included john lennon paul mccartney george harrison hit the studio to record that buddy holly cover and a flipside mccartney harrison original titled in spite of all the danger only one copy was ever pressed paul mccartney owns it now christopher watson abc news alpha one wealth brings us money news and pat johnson inflation alperstein planes for unemployment benefits fell more than expected in the week that ended july seven th the labor department says initial jobless claims dropped by eighteen thousand from the previous week inflation on the other hand rising at its fastest pace in six years the labor department says the consumer price index rose about one tenth of a percent in june half the rise that analysts were predicting but yearoveryear inflation is up two point nine percent right now on wall street dow's up one hundred fifty nasdaq is up sixty in the snp is up fifteen where do you wanna spend your golden years the best place to retire sounds dakota alex taylor tapper with bank radi says south dakota scored well in a number of categories financial and otherwise very low tax state it also did really well in wellbeing how people feel about themselves how they feel about the community how they feel about their personal relationships their wider social relationships if physical hell the only area south dakota didn't do well in his the weather the worst day for retirees by the way new york mostly because of the cost of living and our next money update walmart's developing technology to eavesdrop on its workers more on that at nine twenty five pat woodard koa newsradio thanks fat done up on colorado's morning news we'll get caught up with what's taking place and get an update on the frantic search for missing for collins man in rocky mountain national.

seventy three degrees nine percent sixty years six years one day
"three degrees" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

04:00 min | 2 years ago

"three degrees" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"Here's talk eleven thirty w i s and mark belling made after noon show temperatures quite a bit below average for the next few days gradually start to warm up as we get into the middle of next week with summer fest beginning for tonight mostly cloudy with isolated showers lows dropping into the mid fifty s tomorrow again mostly cloudy slight chance of showers low seventies inland upper sixties to low seventies near the lake partly sunny for sunday a little bit nicer she get into the mid seventies inland cooler at the lake monday partly sunny high seventy six tuesday mostly cloudy chance for showers and thunderstorms high seventy nine and by wednesday which is the opening for summer fest mostly cloudy with a chance for showers and thunderstorms and a high of eighty three degrees this is the story is about as perfect example of what's going on in the american popular culture and the media industry is anyone i could bring up roseanne shot off her tweet by by tweeting a bunch of comments that got increasingly vile including one that was undeniably a racial reference to a former top aide to president obama and there was a reference to ape senate we all know what it is it's not critical that go through it all again roseanne may not be conservative but she's a trump supporter people who are the left can get away with saying whatever they want we all know that now a day later samantha b referred to ivanka trump as a use of the seaward she still on the air was given an award by hollywood the night last night later roseanne lost program roseanne shows at enormous hit samantha bees is it wasn't enough to save rosette roseanne's halfway apologized halfway not apologize kind of all over the map on it but is thrown around and she's out there abc owned by disney wants no part of her show because they don't want to put up with the crap that you're going to be getting if you keep someone like roseanne on roseanne's mistake was and she's a kind of a dimbleby sort of weird anyway she's got a long history of offending people on my side which by the way never get her career in remember her hanging around with cindy sheehan halfway running for president of the united states blasting america i was at same roseanne she's able to do all of that when she offended some people on the left with admittedly offensive statement that's what did iran and she of course couldn't did not know that because roseanne's men outrageous her whole life she didn't understand that she's now on a side in which you're not allowed to be real to be outrageous this is the end for her on the other hand abc's got this show which was a very good show which i watched which was a hit but they pull the plug out it anyway abc is now announcing that the show will be back next year without roseanne they're gonna bring back as many members of the cast is they can the show will be on the schedule by the fall of next year as usual it will not be called rosanna to be called probably the connors of the connor family it will be set around all of the other members of the family but roseanne will not be there most of the other major stars will be part of it including john goodman and sara gilbert and laurie metcalf in lacey gordon who are the other major stars of the show so they're all going to be part of it all going to be going on and they say that they're going to try to deal with the individual stories involving all of these characters which the audience loves the characters and so on and how they're going to explain roseanne not being there i don't know i they gonna kill her off or they claim she's in really i don't know what the answer to that is now obviously the only person who said anything to cause this show to go off as so you could make the case this is a good thing that all the other people involved in the show can still have a job john goodman and the rest of them they didn't do anything why are they out of work all the people who work on.

mark belling eighty three degrees eleven thirty w
"three degrees" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"three degrees" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

"At forty three degrees and it will be breezy at times with a northeast wind at ten to twenty miles per hour tonight twentyfive will be the low with mainly clear skies and tomorrow partly sunny but warmer fifty nine degrees the high i'm channel thirteen meteorologist megan salwa at twelve thirty five into moines we have partly cloudy skies and thirty eight degrees on news radio ten forty whol eat it need it wanted its food fuel and fun on the big show on newsradio ten forty whol hey twelve thirty five here on the big show clock by winning house today doug along with markets andy with us as well and right now fellas matt colleagues on the telephone line with us and match one of the guys at drops his notes every once in a while from the folks there cargill in eddyville and matt we're looking at a worksheet you guys put out here about a contract to add some premium back into the corn market something we're always interested in and it kind of caught my eyes so i said i wanna talk to you for a couple of minutes about that you guys are offering a contract that actually your customers can maybe lock in a little bit of a premium going forward what's that all about what we refer to it as a premium offer it's something that's that is tied to the board of trade as well as the volatility in the market and it's a way that we can kind of bolster your cash price on either an old door current news sale in exchange for a futures offer down the road so basically i can obligate x number of bushels to you today and you're gonna give me a premium up front on it and then i might even be able to hit a premium later on then that's correct our offers further down the road are above the current market value so if those were to book then you would essentially be receiving anywhere from ten to twenty percent premium above current market prices along with the premium that goes on your initial cash sale though we're talking fifteen to twenty cents added to your initial cash sale.

megan salwa matt doug cargill thirty eight degrees forty three degrees fifty nine degrees twenty percent
"three degrees" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

The GaryVee Audio Experience

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"three degrees" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

"No he's become slower and slowmotion just nobody here russian in the nine he was targeted kinds it was a major before physically back the billy that i had him on lachlan on god eufor's i wanna see right exactly so he hit he right then again away with air we are asking who is in two years not putting the kowloon her they is under he then he had come through manual works of it so yes like as an artist if you have an engineering those studio you you can doing their machine so i gather was played in the stuff and i was came episode amvets a little magara back the are out there so all of the heroes pass now not wind gusts woah away woah legs still not back any three degrees in malaysia so on so i go play to you're nervous your who goes well what has he loves it he loves it like on wednesday this is this is love your four zero zero am i i like keyword who she was it ever get geico a life like a cash call her in seattle is her name to tear wacker so she would check an immediate she's like a dog called me a slew of accomplish because of course is yoyoed but she said it to issue i was like joe today was easy allies was waited for differently the trudeau for and on yes you book.

billy lachlan malaysia seattle wacker joe trudeau geico three degrees two years