35 Burst results for "thirty years"

Time To Re-Think Linear Personal Financial Planning

Trent365

03:04 min | 3 d ago

Time To Re-Think Linear Personal Financial Planning

"Life in your time and now. The interesting thing about these and I'm not a financial plan I don't pretend to be but I've certainly spoken with a few of them over the time and it strikes me that the conversations are always tend to assume that you have a linear progression in your career and in your life which doesn't happen, and of course, right now, there's a lot of people who are getting stressed out about the fact that that linear progression in terms of the earning capacity has stopped because of either lost their job or taking significant celery cats and they're worried about whether they're going to have enough to live on in retirement little league through the next next year or so I guess. But the thing to me is that careers are almost never linear more I mean my parents generation you worked at a company, you kind of work your way up and most of them stayed within the same company, my generation, most people I know have had at least one Korea change over their working lives. Now I'm fifty. And I think the next generation, they probably going to have two or three career changes and so this current. Pandemic this current crisis and financial crisis that a lot of of finding themselves in. In a way, we almost should have planned for we should have already been planning for a couple of dips now, career progression. Now financial progression if you like our financial capacity to earn and to save and if we had done that right now, we'd be sitting back saying, okay. Well, this is one of those dips that I talked about gone from one career path to another career path of accepted that I'm going to take A. Pay Cut initially. So I'm not stressed out about that. I've got to make an in place to defer home loans and collins and that kind of stuff because I planned for deep but I think where we go wrong financial planning is that we don't we don't factor in the dips and I think the dips are not only smart financially i. think then necessary personally I mean right now at this age after thirty years in the workforce. The idea taking a year or two off and then coming back refreshed sounds like a perfect idea taking a sabbatical. Financial Planning and personal financial planning thousand allow for that. We assume a linear progression and life is not linear up. So for those of you in your fifties like me or even a bit later, maybe it's a little bit light to start changing your personal financial planning in a big way. But for those you in your twenties and thirties have I, you think about what this this current crisis has alluded you to the fact that they may be whether they're. Formed by necessity like now or a personal preference on assessing to change career path and plan for the deeps plan for the fact that you'll personal financial plan will not be a linear progression. Just the thought already that is it for today Ado. Thank you for your time and I will be back again tomorrow.

Collins Korea
Time To Re-Think Linear Personal Financial Planning

Inside the Spa Business | Spa

03:19 min | 3 d ago

Time To Re-Think Linear Personal Financial Planning

"Most of us are familiar with these three basic stages of life school work retirement you spend the first twenty years of your life plus a mind is getting an education. You spend the next forty, forty five years going to work, and then you spend another twenty years plus minus in retirement hoping like hell that you've saved enough money to have a quality of life in your time and now. The interesting thing about these and I'm not a financial plan I don't pretend to be but I've certainly spoken with a few of them over the time and it strikes me that the conversations are always tend to assume that you have a linear progression in your career and in your life which doesn't happen, and of course, right now, there's a lot of people who are getting stressed out about the fact that that linear progression in terms of the earning capacity has stopped because of either lost their job or taking significant celery cats and they're worried about whether they're going to have enough to live on in retirement little lived through the next next year or so I guess. But the thing to me is that careers are almost never linear anymore. I mean my parents generation you worked at a company, you kind of work your way up and most of them stayed within the same company, my generation most people I know have had at least one Korea change over their working lives now I'm fifty. And I think the next generation, they probably going to have two or three career changes and so this current. Pandemic this current crisis and financial crisis that a lot of of finding themselves in. In a way we almost should have planned for we should have already been planning for a couple of dips. You now career progression now financial progression if you like our financial capacity to earn and to save, and if we had done that right now, we'd be sitting back saying, okay. Well, this is one of those dips that I talked about gone from one career path to another career path of accepted that I'm going to take a bit. Of A pay cut initially. So I'm not stressed out about that I've got to make an in place to defer home loans and collins and that kind of stuff because I planned for deep but I think where we go wrong financial planning is that we don't we don't factor in the dips and I think the dips are not only smart financially I think then necessary personally I mean right now at this age after thirty years in the workforce. The idea taking a year or two off, and then coming back refreshed sounds like a perfect idea taking a sabbatical. Financial Planning and personal financial planning thousand allow for that. We assume a linear progression and life is not linear up. So for those of you in your fifties like me or even a bit later, maybe it's a little bit light to start changing your personal financial planning in a big way. But for those you in your twenties and thirties have I, you think about what this this current crisis has alluded you to the fact that they may be whether they're. Formed by necessity like now or a personal preference on assessing to change career path and plan for the deeps plan for the fact that you'll personal financial plan will not be a linear progression.

Collins Korea
A broken system, a broken city: Beirut

The Economist: The Intelligence

09:33 min | 3 d ago

A broken system, a broken city: Beirut

"In Beirut yesterday countless people began the painful work of fixing homes devastated by a massive explosion on Tuesday. One woman who'd mlk posted a video of her mother-in-law playing the piano as others swept up broken glass. The music is bittersweet, the city is reeling. The moment of the blast no one was quite sure what had happened there was a deep bass sound for seven or eight seconds there was a rumbling. and. We thought it was a localized explosion, maybe a gas main that had blown up across the street or a car bomb in the neighborhood. Greg Carlstrom is our Middle East correspondent. I A cafe. everyone, of course, left the cafe and started making their way home and it was only on the way back down towards the three Indian towards the ports that I started to realize the scale of the damage. There was, of course, broken glass everywhere carpeting, all of the streets all at the sidewalks pass through an intersection where there were several women sitting in the median holding cloth scraps of fabric bleeding from the head they'd obviously been hit by glass. And every building that you pass by not only the windows blown out but the aluminum window frames blown off. So. You realize that this was not a localized incident, but rather something that had affected the entire city center. The blast was felt as far away as Cyprus it registered as an earthquake in Jordan. It had come from the port of Beirut or something had set off an explosion of staggering size sending up a white mushroom cloud then a vast bloom of orange smoke. Yesterday the government placed a number of court officials under house arrest and again investigation. Declared a two weeks state of emergency. Residents are still coming to grips with the shock of the blast. Felt like it went inside us like a best our soul the way. I saw something bright and I lost my hearing for few seconds. An explosion just went out. The human toll of the explosion has been catastrophic the death toll officially more than one hundred so far, and that number continues to grow as rescue workers find victims who were buried in the rubble more than five thousand people injured by the blast and many of them had to go into a hospital system that was already stretched thin. We've had a spike in corona virus cases in Lebanon over the past few weeks, some hospitals themselves were damaged by the explosion hospital Saint George Hospital across the street from where I live. was so badly damaged that it had to halt operations and when I went by the hospital, you saw patients some of them still wearing their hospital gowns with intravenous lines in their arms bloodied from flying debris and shrapnel for nurses were killed. Fifteen patients on respirators died when the machines failed the other immediate impact is according to officials in Lebanon about three hundred thousand people were left homeless by the explosion. About five percent of the population of the entire country and what do we know so far about what caused the explosion? It seems to be the result of unbelievable negligence even on the scale of the perennially negligent Lebanese government back in two thousand thirteen customs officials in Lebanon confiscated the cargo of a Russian ownership that was traveling to Mozambique. The cargo was two, thousand, seven, hundred, fifty tons of ammonium nitrate, which is highly explosive chemical that is used mostly to make either fertilizers or explosives from mining and quarrying and other industrial uses. So this material was confiscated, it was put in a warehouse at the port and for six or seven years it just south there there was some talk of maybe exporting the stuff for giving it to the army to use but this required approval from the Lebanese judiciary that approval never came you've had officials at the ports and with insecurity agencies who warned this was tantamount to keeping a giant bomb on the doorstep of the country's capital. Those warnings went unheeded and of course, tragically on Tuesday it all exploded but I mean what kind of government would ignore warnings about tons and tons and tons of explosive material just sitting in a city centre the Lebanese government would it's almost par for the course for Lebanon's political class. This is the government that for more than a decade could not agree on a budget. This is the government that for almost thirty years allowed the same central banker to run the Central Bank Lubin, and to run effectively state-sanctioned Ponzi scheme to defend the currency peg it's a country that created a political and economic model that was totally unsustainable. Invested hardly at all in basic services even in good times, Lebanon can't provide twenty four hour electricity routinely struggles to pick up the trash piles up in the streets. It is a perennially negligent government and this is of course, a catastrophic example of that but it's of a piece with the behavior of this government over the past thirty years. So this is a population economy that was suffering quite a bit even before the blast it was the country has been slipping into a profound economic crisis since October the the currency. Lebanese. Pound which for decades has been pegged to the dollar. Began to break away from that since October? It's lost about eighty percent of its value on the black market which has contributed to runaway inflation in a country that imports almost everything from food and fuel to consumer goods. So, inflation running around eighty percent right now and for food around two hundred percent prices have become astronomical this summer we've had fuel shortages that have caused blackouts in Beirut normally three hours a day stretch as long as twenty hours a day this summer and the backup generators that people rely on to provide electricity when the state cannot those are either burning out from overuse or running out of fuel just one crisis after another point. which has led to widespread poverty in the country the the official figures the government thinks around half the country is now below the poverty line that could rise as high as seventy five percent. By the end of the year, there's been a spike in petty crime driven simply desperation. There was one man who was caught on TV robbing a pharmacy for diapers another man who robbed someone at knifepoint on the streets and a once busy part of town, and then came back to apologize for doing it and said, he he needed the money to his family. So it sounds a a years long problem has gotten really quite a lot worse very recently mean why hasn't the government been able to sort of keep things from getting so much worse? The current government was installed in January meant to be a technocratic government that would tackle this economic crisis and negotiate a rescue agreement with the IMF but. Six or seven months later it's made almost no progress. The negotiations with the IMF have really stalled at this point they've had about twenty rounds of talks. But is not even really negotiating with the IMF yet it's still negotiating with itself. You have the cabinet on one side. And the parliament on the other backed up by the banking sector. which are having this very arcane dispute about the scale of the losses in Lebanon's financial sector about how bankrupt the country is effectively. And so you have this surreal situation where instead of Lebanon negotiating with the IMF Lebanon is negotiating with Lebanon. The Fund has told Lebanon that talks are not going to advance unless there's an agreement on the size of the losses or if the cabinet pushes through a few meaningful reform of capital controls, law changes to the electricity sector things like that. Neither of these things have happened and there are increasing calls for the government to step down. Do you think that's the way forward I? Mean, what do you think should be done here to to bring Lebanon back to? A functional state though the problem is if this government steps down what replaces this government and a lot of the pressure on the government right now is is coming from the traditional powerbrokers in Lebanon the sectarian X. warlords who have divvied up power in this country for decades since the end of the civil war in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, this power sharing agreement they have it was designed to keep the peace and prevent a return to conflict after the war. But it's been captured by the. Hands up power based on sect, which runs a massive patronage network The World Bank estimates that it costs the country about nine percent of its GDP each year but if it were to step down without broader changes to the country's political system in this power, sharing system would simply be replaced by the same cast of characters who have ruined the country over the past thirty years. But that power sharing system was was there to to keep the peace to prevent a return to civil war, and that was the argument for years for decades when people in Lebanon would complain about the corruption and. The negligence and the inefficiency of their government, the response would be well at least this is better than a return to the bad old days even before what happened on. Tuesday even before the explosion though that argument was beginning to lose its weights with a lot of people here you have a younger generation of Lebanese who don't have the same memory of course of the civil war that their parents or their grandparents had, and so as the country slipped further and further into crisis over the past year, people have been more willing to to break away from this system than they were before. And I think the argument that well, there could be violence if the power-sharing system was stripped away after what happened on Tuesday after half of Beirut was destroyed by the incompetence of this government I think that argument is not going to carry with a lot of people.

Lebanon Beirut IMF Lebanese Government Middle East Greg Carlstrom Saint George Hospital Cyprus Central Bank Lubin Ponzi Scheme Army Jordan Mozambique Official
7 Habits of Successful People That Will Make You Feel Unstoppable in 2020 by Brian Tracy

Optimal Living Daily

04:45 min | 3 d ago

7 Habits of Successful People That Will Make You Feel Unstoppable in 2020 by Brian Tracy

"Seven. Habits of successful people Dow Make You feel unstoppable and twenty twenty by Brian Tracy of Brian. Tracy DOT COM. Many. People wonder how they can become highly successful not realizing that they hold within them everything they need to achieve all of the success they desire. Successful. People are where they are today because of their habits habits determined ninety five percent over prisons behavior everything that you are today and everything that you will ever accomplish is determined by the quality of the habits that you form. By creating good habits and adopting positive behavior, you too can become successful and live a prosperous life. These seven success habits are good predictors of greatness. For thousands of years in human life has been studied by great thinkers and philosophers. I've personally studied the subject for more than thirty years would I found is that the very best people have developed good habits I've identified seven valuable habits you need to develop if you want to perform at your very maximum in everything you do. Number one their goal oriented. The. FIRST HABIT IS BECOME goal oriented. You need to be habitual goal setter and dedicate yourself to working from clear written goals. Every day of your life forming daily habits. All highly successful people are intensely goal oriented. They know exactly what they want to have it written down they have written plans to accomplish it and they both review and work on their plans. As a daily routine. I suggest you learn how to use the eighty twenty rule to officially work toward achieving your goals. Number two their results driven. The second habit of highly successful people is being results driven. This is made up of two practices. The first practice is the practice of continuously learning so that you become better at what you do. The second practice is that of time management, this means setting very clear priorities on what you do and then concentrating single-mindedly on the most valuable use of your time. All. Really successful people are intensely result oriented. Number three, they are action oriented. The third major habit you need to develop is that of continually taking action. This is really the most important habit for material. Success is the ability to get on with the job and get it done fast is your ability to develop and maintain a sense of urgency and a bias for Action Fast Tempo in whatever you do is essential to your success. He need to overcome procrastination push aside your fears and launch one hundred percent toward the achievement of your most important goals. The combination of goal orientation result orientation, and Oriental in. Themselves will virtually assure great success. I highly suggest you learn to use smart goals to list achievable targets that you can measure and track. Number Four. There people oriented. The fourth having you need is people. is where you put relationships in the center of your life. This is your decision to cultivate within yourself the habits of patience, kindness, compassion, and understanding virtually all of your happiness in life will come from your ability to get along well with other people. The good news is that you can become a wonderful human being in your relationships with others when you decide to as Aristotle said, the only way that you can learn any habit is by practicing it on a regular basis. The more you practice being a truly excellent person in your relationships with others the more you will internalize those qualities actually become that person. Focusing on being more pleasant with the people in your life is a great technique to promote a positive thinking lifestyle. Number five, they are health conscious. The Fifth Abbot highly successful people develop is health consciousness. This means that you must studiously watch your diet and always eat the right in the right portions you must exercise on a regular basis, continue using every muscle in joint of your body to keep it limber and fit. Finally only, you must have good habits of rest and recreation though unable you in combination with Diet and exercise to live out your years in a healthy state. Remember your health is the most important single thing you have, and it is completely subject to the habit you developed with regard to the way you live. Number. Six, they are honest. The. Six habit is out of honesty and integrity. In the final analysis that character develop as he goes through life is more important than virtually anything else honesty means that you practice the reality principle in everything you do your completely objective with yourself and with the world around you

Brian Tracy Fifth Abbot Aristotle
Should You Offer a Lifetime Deal?

The $100 MBA Show

06:05 min | 3 d ago

Should You Offer a Lifetime Deal?

"WanNa. Start today's than by explaining why businesses consider offering lifetime deals. The bottom line is, is that lifetime he is often generate a large lump sum of revenue of cash. It's a cash grab really they might partner with a deal signed with large affiliates or they offer it to their list, and because such an incredible deal, it's a lifetime deal. They'll get lots of sales at the start people see this as a way. To Fund, their business at the star. So that's kind of the motivation behind lifetime deals outside of that. It also gives you new users, new customers, people to give you feedback the star and people that are invested. That's really the positives and and there's not really much outside of that. That's positive. Just being frank but for many people, that's a lot. You know making a lot of money at the start to fund the business. Can, really help them and really propel the business to avaiable full-time option for them and allow them to make some hires and scale quickly the issue is that most products and services have a running cost. So even if you say for example, sell a lifetime deal for a thousand dollars per customer yes. You'll earn a thousand dollars, but each customer will have a cost for each subsequent year to come. Agree. Thirty forty, fifty, sixty years for long as that person is alive right and some of us don't really do the math and that leads me to my I tip. You got to do the math. How much does it cost you per customer per year and a lot of people are like well, I sell my product it's course it's a forum it's something that really has a minimal cost on my end. And that's pretty much it. No you gotta dig deeper. You have cost Phantom costs that you're not counting like how much it cost you per customer for your web hosting to host your community to host your APP how much that cost on a monthly basis divided by the number of customers is cost more per customer. It's not a once in done kind of thing, the more traffic you have the more you have to pay what about customer support the more customers you have the more support staff you need the more time take from them you need. To factor that in, are there any other costs whether it's your time or money that's involved every time you have a customer, break it down because you might find out yes. This might be a very small amount per customer in it's worth to offer the lifetime deal but often more times than not when we do the math, you're like, wow, we start to break-even after five years and after five years we're losing money. Then after ten years, we're really losing money. So this really is a red flag that you can raise before you offer a lifetime deal. My next tip is you have to make sure that if you're going to offer a lifetime deal, you don't offer a deal or a plan or a product that they will not outgrow. The play of the lifetime deal is to give them something that is valuable, but is just to get them started. The point here is that get them onto your platform onto your product. And therefore get used to it. Love it enjoy it. But at some point, they're going to outgrow whether they need more contacts in your APP or the want to get access to more training. Basically, we're talking about here is you want to offer them the basic of basic plans. It's still valuable. It's still something that you would charge a monthly or annual basis for normally but. You, WanNa push them towards upgrading anytime. You're running a lifetime plan you should aim for seventy percent of the people that by will upgrade out of the lifetime plan. So lifetime is something that's basically temporary this takes a bit planning the six a bit of a branding and package INC when it comes to offering this lifetime deal so don't rush into a lifetime deal if. You're not ready. Make sure you're crafting the right one. So you know that people will be graduating to different plants off the lifetime. The third thing I want to mention is often in my experience lifetime customers in general, not all of them of course, but in general will tend to be difficult customers to deal with what you mean by that well, people that don't invest much. Will actually cost you more time and more headaches people that actually pay you a lot of money. They do the work that get the most out of it and they're professional they get it. They understand the onus is on them to make it happen. But those who pay the minimum and Gopher lifetime deals people that maybe don't really take action but they will complain about every little thing if they have the opportunity of course, I'm speaking in. Generalities of course, there are lifetime deal customers that are hard working that are serious about their business and they are great and they're not headaches. But if we're talking about a percentage or a majority of the users, higher paying customers are lower maintenance customers that's just the facts of business. So I want to give you some direct advice. If you do the math, you have a graduation plan a plan to get them to upgrade out a lifetime. And everything pans out and it's very, very minimal cost on you. Even if you stretch out of twenty thirty years of this customer being active, then go for the lifetime plan if not avoided if you can even if it means growing slower if you're still looking for that cash grab, my advice is limit the number of lifetime members whether it's one hundred or two hundred people Max and then you. Close it. This will create scarcity and it will also allow you to say, Hey, this is the amount of money I will get from this lifetime offer I can work with us the influx of cash I need, and from there you're only dealing with a minimal number of customers that are dealing with the lifetime planet you have to pay for for the longevity of your business in for their

Partner Frank Gopher Package Inc
75 years after Hiroshima, they're still feeling its impact.

Between The Lines

09:42 min | 3 d ago

75 years after Hiroshima, they're still feeling its impact.

"This bomb has this frank for twenty thousand tons of TNT. Harnessing, the basic power of the universe. What I fifteen I am on August six, nine, hundred, forty, five, the US Air Force dropped the little boy uranium fission bomb on central hero. Shema. Making it the first city ever to be destroyed by a nuclear bomb. On August nine Nagy became the second when the bomb exploded around thirty percent of Hiroshima's population that were killed instantly many more died in the months and years to come. Now, the bombs brought to an end to world war two but the wool was horrified at the human cost. Russia has since become a byword for nuclear holocaust forever linked to the words never again. Now, this week marks the seventy fifth anniversary of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki joining me to reflect on the legacy of those events. Tashi. Tauch. She is assistant professor at Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service and the author of political fallout, nuclear weapons testing, and the making of Global Environmental Crosses. Welcome. Tasha. Thanks for having me and Michael Gordon Professor of history at Princeton University and Co. it is a of a new book called the age of Russia. Welcome. Welcome. It's very good to be here. Now, Michael the fear of the nuclear age is the period after World War Two when the US dropped the bomb. The fee was that the nuclear weapons would become a common part of conventional warfare but in the seventy five years since he Russia and Nagasaki, there's not been a single bomb dropped in a conflict. Question is this because deterrence works or have we just been lucky I would say we've mostly been lucky It's quite rare that there are conflicts between nuclear-armed nations. The major example is the nineteen sixty, nine border conflict between the People's Republic of China and the Soviet Union. So there haven't been many occasions for things to escalate, and there's a strong incentive in those cases to de-escalate. There have however been very close near accidents whether missile just that needing on its own or people launching almost launching in fear of an attack and there. Have Been Plenty of conventional wars that could have escalated that way. So by and large, we've been lucky but we've been abetted by the fact that there has been an ambient taboo that has grown over the years against nuclear first use although that is rarely the policy of any nuclear power. Okay. Now from an Australian perspective, Tic- Japan was seen as an aggressor in the war, the war crimes but also as a victim because of the destruction wrought by the nuclear bombs have is the wool remit in Japan now aggressor and victim. Tarshi. Many pass through consider themselves as victims thinking that Japanese were misled by the government inter- Disastrous Wall Conquest. In this view here stands at the as the ultimate symbol of Japanese victim. But today is victim narrative faces two competing accounts. One is to recognize Japan's acts of wartime aggression, including tweeting massacres, forced labor, and sexual violence. If we see hero Shimmer from this perspective, it takes on a whole different meaning not. Not as a national tragedy, but rather as international event. killed not only the Japanese residents but also many colonial subjects and allied. POW's who are present in the city at the time of the Tom Bombing. The other interpretation that has also gained for Japan is to see the wartime conduct Japan as an act of self defense. This This lesion is narrative recaps here. As the ultimate proof of Western aggression. So fitting the predation of Japan's Joel Roles as. Aggressor and victim during the war will gain the upper hand in the future will depend on how sweet society around the world comes together and develops a shared understanding of the complex legacies or Corna reason on the war in the Asia Pacific region and back to the United States markle. There's a popular conception that Washington had to drop the bomb that it was the only way. To win the war, of course, the war in Europe come to an end in May of forty five. This is early August two, forty five is that true I mean what? What President Truman's options? So. This is a great question and it's one with a lot of confusion around it. Functionally. The only way the only government that had any power to end the war was the Japanese government which was in a position to surrender and the question was when would that happen would have happened later or earlier by summer nineteen, forty, five, it was already clear that the war was militarily lost. President Truman and the US government in general had basically fixed options of what they could do to try and encourage the Japanese government to take that move. There's only two that people usually talk about dropping the atomic bomb or invading the home islands of Japan. Both of those were on the table also having the Soviet Union inducing them to enter the wars of belligerent which happened on August eighth increasing the intensity of firebombing tightening the blockade of foodstuffs into the home islands. and modifying the terms of unconditional surrender to allow Japan to keep the emperor. The interesting thing is all six of those happen Truman pursued all sex and the war ended. It's unclear which ones were determinative. But the point is there wasn't like we had one option or nothing else. The US had plenty of options and exercised actually all of them. On the one level target for the bombs was obviously Japan on another level. Real target was the Soviet Union. How did the Kremlin of you? He Russia Mirror Negga? Second Markle. So. Really, the question here is a small set of people within the Kremlin stolen and his closest advisers and you that there was an atomic bomb project going on in the United States for years they've found that out from spies from Britain from spies in the United States, and they had their own uranium enrichment and bomb development program that was going on at I would say a medium scale What happens after the destruction of Hiroshima is I in absented himself for a few days he went into a depression and didn't. React to any of his advisors and then immediately massively escalated the Soviet development of their own atomic bomb. So they were both caught by surprise and not caught by surprise. It's true that the Americans didn't always think about the Soviet Union as a factor in any decision related to how the war was going to end but they also very strongly, we understood that the key issue was trying to get this the Japanese government to surrender faster because the faster they surrendered the less impact. The Soviet entry in the war would have to how the end game would play out in Asia, my guest, Michael Gordon, and Tashi Hitachi, and we're reflecting on the seventy fifth anniversary of Hiroshima. Tashi. One, hundred fifty thousand atomic bomb survivors still living in Japan. In fact, as a guest of Japan's Ministry of Foreign. Affairs this would have been in September twenty, sixteen I met one of one of the survivors now they're all in education and public law has plied an important part in shaping Japan's post-war Pacifism. Now, as generation dies out, is the role of pessimism in Japanese politics is that diminishing especially in the face of Rausing China Toshi? I don't think the passing of the atomic bomb survivors will diminish the strengths of pacifism in any short-term. The correctly memory of human magazine Japan has been fairly robust and the taken deep roots in popular culture. I can think of a good example that is Japanese animated wartime drama film released just four years ago in two thousand, sixteen cold in this corner of the world. This picture accounts of the wartime life in here she was a smash hit in the box office. Be, atomic bomb survivors will also active in passing down lessons from the world's first nuclear war to the next generation. The city's over here streaming nagy training. Many Japanese Ron Tears as storytellers who share the testimonies are waging victims and a second generation survivors are spearheading efforts for peace unjustice. Well, that brings me to today and really in the last that he is the end of the call was thirty years ago the US. And the Soviets on Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty non stop this was President Bush senior and Gorbachev in Russia in the inside at Union. Then just as it was collapsing now, both agree to significantly reduce their nuclear stockpiles and of course, the updated treaty between Moscow and Washington that expose I. Think it's February Knicks Jeez. So that's just a few days after the next president is warning Michael Do you think it will be resigned. I think that's entirely dependent on the results of the election. Joe. Biden has indicated that he would refine the treaty The trump administration has had many opportunities to re-sign the treaty, but they have not taken advantage of those opportunities yet. Russia's indicated that they're very interested in extending

Japan United States Soviet Union Hiroshima Michael Gordon Russia Japanese Government President Truman Nagasaki Us Air Force Tic- Japan Washington Nagy President Bush
Flying Circus Airshow - Not Cancelled

Uncontrolled Airspace: General Aviation Podcast

04:06 min | 4 d ago

Flying Circus Airshow - Not Cancelled

"In the twenty twenty pandemic cancellation of the week. We have the The Flying Circus as I think it's canceled right David. You put this on the list. Yeah. They cancelled it. Why is you put this on the list because they were doing their fiftieth season starting says there they were to reopen last Saturday the twelfth. Yeah. Okay. Okay. So it's not a canceled See we're coming out the far side of this. You gotta read the fine print do I don't This is Virginia which is not. I don't like. So for starters here. So let's go back a couple of steps here. What is the Flying Circus here? Show I. Don't know if I've ever heard of this never heard flying circus. It built in. Virginia. It's been going on forever. Charlie fifty years or something like that. They were supposed to start their fiftieth season this past weekend It's a Sunday. Afternoon tradition. Their. Suburban D. and it's a real barnstorming show. Circa the nineteen thirties. With by planes and wing walkers and aerobatics and. Drunk drunken farmer. act. In. Shirt. It all that stuff. That's an act. Drunken farmers and act. Man All right. All Right Santa, Claus will will straighten out later on in the year. This sounds very reminiscent of the What's the one in upstate new? York rhinebeck writing rhinebeck sounds. Now. You know I lived in DC area thirty years and I knew Bilton was out there i. knew the show was there. I never went and I I know I know it's just it's crazy. We'll have to put it on our post covid activities list to. Go and failed to record an episode while we're there last time we did. Okay. Yeah that was a city. In seven years that I was working out, of DC, area only went twice. And both times that was with fringe of mind from the FAA. who were like man? We're going to built in this week and then we're going to go to this party. It did so and so's place man to come out for this and it's like. On a Sunday with a nothing better to do it was an automatic Ohio yeah. Yeah. So I mean it sounds like now now let's see. So wh- and I miss took this when I started out by saying it was canceled it Sir surely according to this has not been canceled. Is Literally what they say on their home pages. We are currently putting in place additional safety and social distancing. To help ensure the health and safety of guests staff like so many things are adjusting how they. How they space the crowd out how space parking and all this stuff and You know it's just. Common sense like. Wearing a mask when you go out in public. Yup. Yup So. what was it like David? Went some time ago. But what was it like? A just like the the description says I mean we got treated to an afternoon of of flying clowns and wing walkers and A. Drunken farmer routine as some really Nice era. So typically in the older airplanes and. And it was. Fortunately, one of those Nice Sunny Days It wasn't oppressively hot for the Potomac Basin and we just. We just had a great time we drug out the folding chairs and set a long flight line and You know in whooped and cheered and oh my gosh. Did you see that with the rest of the crowd and it was a it was a good crowd that

Faa. The Flying Circus Virginia David Potomac Basin Bilton Charlie Claus Ohio York WH
One nation, under gods? Indias divisive temple

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:55 min | 4 d ago

One nation, under gods? Indias divisive temple

"Off. Today India's Prime Minister Narendra. Modi. Traveled to the northeastern city of yoga which was hung with saffron flags and more than one hundred, thousand jobs. He came to lay the first stone of temple to Rahm incarnation of the Hindu God vishnu with believed was born in the city. This isn't the standard fare of a politician pressing the flesh for a photo op. It fulfils a promise Mr Moody made as a young politician to return to iota only when construction on a new temple began. Key. Speech at the dedication broadcast into the whole country he said the temple would be a symbol of unity that the weight of centuries and today. Agreement nation. Idea A symbol of unity. It is not the weight of centuries as Mr Moody and his BJP party see it goes back to the founding of a mosque on the site that was razed to the ground nearly thirty years ago. When we're talking about a Yoda today, we're talking about a very specific place just a couple of acres off the center of town where there was a great big mosque built in the sixteenth century and destroyed by Hindu activists in nineteen ninety-two. Alex. TREBEK's is the economists India correspondent based in Delhi the site of that former mosque is what's under contention? It's been the most controversial. Acre. In all of India. Ever since and the question is whether or not Hindus may bill the temple to Rahm right there and so how did things progressive since nineteen ninety two when the the mosque was destroyed how does that end up as a temple concentration today? It's been a terribly. Tortuous story through the courts after decades of legal stasis and very bizarre humiliation the supreme. Court. Last November, few months after Narendra Modi Wins, wapping reelection decides that the most crucial part of the ground ought to be given to the Hindus go ahead and build the temple that you've been clamoring for these decades. The court noted that the demolition of the mosque illegal in sort of compensation that no one appreciated very much allocated several acres of idle land outside the town to Muslims. In effect, the court just gave the Hindus white they had wanted and I mean the Hindu nationalists, the very groups that had clamored for the destruction of the mosque and eighty is a ninety S. And so what precisely is happening today then so today is the last of three days of the ceremony. Put. In which people most notably the prime minister are doing various prayers, offering ritual sacrifices, and so on. Around the site itself most spectacularly in the middle of all the Prime Minister Narendra. Modi ritually lifted into place the forty kilograms silver brick, which serves as temples foundation stone. Now it's consecrated and all its left is to keep on raising money and build the actual structure itself and what's the reaction been from Muslims about this this contentious building. You know in a way Muslims and everyone cares about civil rights and the secular foundation of India knows what to say no. One's happy about it. firebrand Muslim leader in Parliament Assadi. Noisy has criticized the prime minister going to a religious event and it's indeed striking that the prime minister should be there on the temple grounds with a bunch of priests and Politicos all mixed in as if they were a single class, it's shocking if you've been sleeping under a rock as India's changed in recent years and in fact, I was Struck that there have been no mass protests by Muslim groups either after the Supreme Court's decision last November nor today it doesn't mean they're happy about it. But at this point, the thing to protest, we talked a lot about Narendra Modi's brand of Hindu nationalism I. Guess This is kind of a pinnacle. Then for his aims I mean what? What does this mean for him and his party it is a pinnacle of sorts but I think it's more important to look at this as the end of a long first stage of Hindu nationalism. Movement. In India. We're looking at something more like a capstone than a foundation stone and at the same time this date August fifth was chosen for quite obvious reason. It's the first anniversary of this government very bold move to strip the state of jump in Kashmir India's only Muslim state a year ago of its status as a state and rule it directly from Delhi that was one of the main three goals that the Hindu nationalist movement had till. Now now, the third of those goals creating a uniform civil code that would bind. Muslim family law into line with Hindu and secular family law governs most of the rest of India is a less inspiring goal and it's been half accomplished. Already what Mr Moody is going to need in future is another another series of rallying cries like build the temple and where he's GonNa find them it's just not obvious at this point. So today's ceremony is is not a cause for for great triumph. This is this is not the the the end of this long road for the Jay he's hindu-nationalist goals and therefore mission accomplished. This is a triumph. Yes. By all rights Mr, Modi a good one to be taking the victory lap for his party is ideologically movement but that's also very backwards looking Mr Moody was elected with a terrific share of the parliamentary seats in two thousand fourteen in the first place. Because of these hindu-nationalist goals which attracted the devotion of his base, but because Indians were eager for change for economic development and good technocratic governance of a sort that he seemed specially poised to offer, there are various reforms for which he and his government can claim credit over the past six years. But there are many many more disappointments and in particular over the past two years say before the covid nineteen pandemic and then much much worse since it's begun, India's facing an economic crisis, it's every indicator is worse than they've been in a generation. So there's GonNa be a very strongly felt need. A week the opposition to come up with some way of rallying the country some nationalistic theme or series of themes to distract from the sort of impasse in India finds itself had economically this Hindu. Nationalist ideology offers no guidance towards what India's trade policy ought to be say or how environmental law to be fixed or scrapped. They've got a steady ideology, but it's not tacked onto any particular policies at this point i. think that the government we have in place right now strong government but in dark turbulent times is going to be almost desperate to find something to replace the impetus with. Altogether, though these changes that have already gone through, do you think it chips away at the basis of modern India's government? The the idea that religion shouldn't be a part of it. Yeah I think that India as we know it maybe as an idea we almost to retire Mahatma? Gandhi. Still on on every currency note but this is not Ghandi's India anymore you might almost say that the the anti-secularist of one it's now very ordinary to see symbols of state power mixed with. Symbols of sectarian dominance over the hindu-majority expressing itself often revanchist terms, which is why this template a Yoda really does. Alex thanks very much for joining US Jason. Thanks very much.

India Narendra Modi Mr Moody Prime Minister Narendra Prime Minister Rahm Secular Foundation Of India Alex BJP Parliament Assadi Wapping Trebek Gandhi Delhi Supreme Court JAY
Longevity Secrets Of The Himalayan Yogis With Aditya Jaykumar Iyer

My Seven Chakras

05:05 min | 4 d ago

Longevity Secrets Of The Himalayan Yogis With Aditya Jaykumar Iyer

"If you're on the part of spirituality, you've probably come across the Book Autobiography for Yogi and Other Yogurt books. They talk about these mystical Himalayan yogis would live for a hundred and ten honored and twenty, one, hundred, thirty years or even beyond that what are the secrets? How are they able to live deal such an ordeal and more importantly power they were retain their youthful glow in the air vigour and energy. Even at such an orphanage are all those stories just mitts and rumors are is there some truth to what they're saying today I'm going to attempt to tell you at least one secret that might be key to living longer and I'm going to tell you how you can apply these secrets. Into your life to live longer once I've action tribe Asia here, host and founder of my seven chuckers my seven chuck dot com the place where we help you expedience healing awakening and abundance. While what are you? It has been right. So many changes corona wireless masks, social distancing staying at home, and of course, the implications of all of this on our mental health, our jobs, our relationships, and the entire word and this phase. Has Allowed a lot of us to really go inwards and find out what we're truly passionate about and how we can align with our life's book, and for me this is really affirm to me that Mike Calling lies in helping you heal yourself Gombe yo mind and relax your diabetes and I've been meaning to do more of these solo episodes but you know what? I just don't WanNA create episodes for the sake of it. Which is why I took the time to go inwards, get more clarity and alignment on exactly. I'm here to do and be a sponge and really dive into the stories into the practices dealt out experimented on myself and research all of the stuff that will help you my friend lead a better quality life and I feel that I'm ready to share because I have honestly missed connecting one with you. I do the interviews but this thing that we have here. That especial so I appreciate you listening and I want to do more of this but the question for today's what is the longevity secret of the Himalayan. Yoga. So to attempt to answer this question, let's I stand the a lifestyle. Most of these Yogis were live high up in the mountains inside kids where there was record and with less oxygen at that elevation what would they eat? They would mostly various and fruits and food available out in nature, and they would have bath in the cool cool waters of the rivers Gord explosion, and of course, they will also do. Yoga. And they would also do. Dancing practices to align themselves to purify their energy and to connect with the universe. But have you noticed something about people living high up in the mountains whether it's mountains in Tibet or Himalayas are Switzerland or the Andes? These people they seem happy. This seem youthful they seem radiant. They seem fit. So can there be something about the oxygen. Our lack of oxygen there might be factor in this three words action tribe brief. Intermittent hype boxer I'm going to explain more but hold onto these words. Brief intermittent hypoc show you somewhere in the nineteen thirties. Russian scientists discovered that when you reduce the desired level of oxygen in your blood for a brief period of time that are many positive outcomes outcome such as increased level of haemoglobin production. Production of nitric oxide, which defends the body and especially the tissues against oxidative damage and prevents erectile dysfunction in men, and also another benefit is the increase assocation of stem cells which have the unique capacity to differentiate into worship. Any kind of cell in your body, which has major implications for healing and longevity. So these Russian scientists discover amazing benefits of brief intimate hype box. Here I know it's a lawful, but they were busy trying to replicate this in their elite athletes and perform us, and they will literally Dick these high-performance athletes on helicopters to high altitudes where there is less oxygen they created these hypo Barak. Chambers to systematically reduce oxygen levels and gas mixtures that contained ten percent oxygen, even less than that to induce intimated HYPOC boxy conditions in the body.

Mike Calling Yogi Gord Explosion Hypoc Founder Asia Andes Chambers Switzerland Himalayas
Indian Prime Minister Lays Cornerstone For Controversial Hindu Temple

NPR's World Story of the Day

01:09 min | 4 d ago

Indian Prime Minister Lays Cornerstone For Controversial Hindu Temple

"India's prime minister made a rare pandemic era trip out of the capital. Today he went to a northern Indian town called Iot. Ah It's where Hindu extremists tore down a sixteen th century mosque nearly thirty years ago now. Hindus are building their own temple on that very spot and the prime minister laid the cornerstone NPR's India correspondent Lorne Fair housing from iota in the past and his following the news there today and joins us now. Hi, Laurin. Hi, good morning. Good Morning. So can you just put what happened today in the context of this place in its history? Yeah. So I not as old quarter is. This beautiful Warren of multicolored alleyways, housing, small temples, and Hindu faithful believe one of their gods Rahm was born there. But actually it's one of the most sensitive places in all of India for hindu-muslim tensions and that's because there used to be this huge triple domed mosque right in the middle of town it was built in the sixteenth century but in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, two, Hindu extremists, tore it down riots spread across India and thousands of mostly Muslims were killed. He knew nationalists have long wanted to build a temple on those ruins and today they started doing

India Prime Minister IOT Lorne Fair Laurin NPR
Motherhood in a Pandemic with Tanya Moodie

Scummy Mummies

04:37 min | 5 d ago

Motherhood in a Pandemic with Tanya Moodie

"Tennis about your family my mom and Dad. Both. In Ottawa in Canada, that's where I was boon. and my step dad as well. He's glorious. He's been my mom now for like thirty years. So he's very much a family and and then my brothers in Toronto he's an actress well, producer director and a creator and his what's in my brother's named Andrew and his wife's name is Tanna spelt the same way wow. So are they to ten meetings? There are two Chinese, and my partner's name is Andrew. Hang on. Boo. Hello. About two nieces over there in Toronto and then so my family here I've got a twelve year old girl named willow. And that's it. Excellent. Your twelve yard is just started year seven. Finishing. Because you've, you've got one on the way. Yes. I have just got a daughter in your six and we just had like the zoom. Deputy head. Of School and so we are just entering the kind of whole mine change. Our Periods come. Online David. It's really. Out of biggest the yeah I am too bracing myself because all the whole thing like she's been fairly hippie south London local primary school. Uniforms and all sorts of serious. Big. Thing. How's your first year being I mean it's been weird obviously and yes in a cupboard but. I have to say I'm one of the lucky parents in that. If she was a younger, I would have had to be dealing with homeschooling in an active way what I mean six actually the curriculum in your six is very hard for them. Obviously, it's straightforward because led up to it but if you're going to ask I mean I can't even do kind of long division. Wants me to help with something and I'm like. Well this is how I did today in nineteen. Seventy. Spending. Here's a calculator. By hand. And then it would have had to be way more hands on. Whereas the seven will I have found? It could just be a terrible ma'am. I do admit that. It could just be because I'm a very bad person but I basically done nothing. That sounds Dreamy I've done nothing. She's been in her room. Doing actual classes they have to sign in on zoom every morning at eight thirty, eight, forty, five. Yeah they do the full schedule of classes on say wow. And she has breaks they even do pe. She's got two room. She got my Yoga Mat. She's the whole Shebang but from home. And we still have the report cards and everything. So she's kept up. Wow and I just stood back and you can just like stop smoking the garden having been. Doing. I kissing by the garden shared. A room like she's. If you tips for the transition surviving the transition well I think I had to make sure I didn't get. Involved or helicopter around her social life because for me when I realized, it was that the most important thing is that socially she feels anchored. Yeah. All this concern about. This class that class her grades teaching did it, and actually at that stage is entirely secondary. It's about her making friends because that's the only thing for my daughter that she was concerned about. Her nerves came from. Will I make any friends because you didn't know anybody at hunters to to you know what I mean. And so I got on board with her to just focus on that and not be don't talk about. Other stuff. Parents would that we would get on the kiss in a twist about. The sleepless night. Yeah it's my business. So she'd be like, Oh, I want make Koshi. Will up he? Didn't. Give, confidence in the of the first day meeting and she went to school in the first week with a stinking cold. So she was a bit kind of glassy-eyed anyway she's patient zero. I think. It's nice. To know where we'd have. Yeah. So actually that was a bit of it ended up being a bit of an openness to meet some people could be sputtering away and go to are you? Okay she went no, I'm dying apparently made them laugh. You Bronte sisters.

Andrew Toronto Tennis Ottawa Partner Canada Deputy Head London Producer Director
Denise Welch ON Dealing With Depression

Mentally Yours

06:14 min | 6 d ago

Denise Welch ON Dealing With Depression

"I'm sorry it's nice to help. You mentioned the this is really A massive massive looks women find so I'm really trying to to stand out. out. So, how have you been doing during lockdown pandemic in general at Grand Canyon because by by depression is depressive illness so it tends to be endogenous it as much as it doesn't it's not reacted. So I know that there are many people during the lockdown have discovered. Being out of control of them mental health I. in fact, such would have been a been okay I mean I've been overwhelmed and I have been sad and I've spent days in cheese as we all have but not not as part of a depression because depression, there's two schools of people as people who really want the world to stop taking over again, nobody knows people who found such solace in lockdown that they get straightened things are moving moving with his two schools. I'm kind of a bit of a halfway house, but generally I am I've tried very much to. Err on the side of positivity I've tried to be perspective police at loose women is what they call me and try to look for the good news about this virus when we can help build little China because this too many Corona Karen that cooling out bang just want to dwell on all of the bad signs in order to statistics don't seem to want us to move forward. So I tried to just having a little bit of perspective on it. So generally I've been very long winded willfully wave say I've okay. Woeful is very much welcomed. So do not. How you feeling with kind of the end of lockdown in there you said you're kind of in between the nerves and the feeling. Okay about it. It's kind of difficult to remain positive because if you if you have to read the mainstream media which all of us being in the media we do, and because of loose women particularly, we have a very at never been noticed. In eighteen years. But I have in the last few weeks because we have corona virus and we have the black lives matter to huge arenas and. been difficult at after at Jojoy Day as as as middle class white woman sitting on a panel not knowing. How terrified to know what to say trying to take guidance from all black colleagues you know, and so that's been that's been hard to navigate, and also I will not go to the table at least women and to talk about the virus without back by science. So but that's also difficult because you have the Oxford model and the imperial model as to, for example, who are completely different I kind of night before science was sort of social wrong thing that if it was the virus whole, the scientists would. Be on what it was and where it was going to go. So as I say they call me perspective police and I try desperately to remain positive and my view is things like the second wave if there is going to be a second way, let's prepare for let's deal with it but let's not ruin some of joys about coming out of not down by by we don't know that there's going to be one you know. Today hearing and I will share. But you know there's such positive news about the about the vaccine coming out. But also you have to look for this news you have to look for the stats that moment that may be slight outbreaks going on. In infection, but the mortality rate is the lowest that we've had in July for years. So again, it's balancing it all and just trying to remain optimistic. Can we talk a bit about your ambient unwelcome visitor now? Housing depression being. During the kind of positive promoting it and also to the rising event how's it have? You managed that his Araya to? Attack No it has the it has been right. So the book was spooned at Shall We say by an me documenting an episode of depression real time last September. And like I said before my depression in the May. Not Always. But in the main is endogenous, it's organic. So it is depressive illness. And M. so as a result of that I, never know when it's coming. So an example to people who don't know about about about it as opposed to when we feel depressed went something circumstantially, it's made you settle or grief-stricken, which is horrible and depression is not persistent sadness which are often read whenever you look for description of depression it will stay position sadness and I want to say that sadnesses something that we that we feel when something makes us sad. Like happiness you know it's not a striving for happiness. Happiness is something we should feel when something makes us happy. But depression depresses every single emotion. So you can't feel happiness sadness lovejoy greed nothing nothing nothing nothing. So I went to my sister's feeling terrible the morning eyewear crop and visit mine welcome visit to is definitely that and impulsively having talked about this for thirty years I picked up my phone and I recorded three day episode of Depression in. Real. Time. It wasn't until I was well again about four days later. And that that I realized the impact digit hat I hadn't realized because I hadn't been well enough. My phone goes away unlike missing my phone rings and it'd been on news at ten million and a half people viewed it on the comments ladies would just. Heartbreaking you know people who completely felt that they been heard for the first time in that I was describing what they feel like people who showed them to that family who suddenly seemed to have an understanding of what gone through people who had never been empathetic to people with depression because they thought it was a what is she going to be depressed about not understanding the illness

Depression Depressive Illness China Grand Canyon Jojoy Day
Jared Young Explains Why Kindness, Honesty, & Integrity Are His Top Priorities

Dose of Leadership

06:19 min | 6 d ago

Jared Young Explains Why Kindness, Honesty, & Integrity Are His Top Priorities

"Jared Welcome to the show welcome a dose of leadership. Thanks to be here. Well I'm excited to learn more about employer advantage and really your leadership philosophy. It seems like I'm. Looking at your background man you've you've done a lot of things and now you're the president of employer advantage. Traveling the world working in various branches of government learning multiple language Arabic is that right to get that right you understand. Yeah, Eric my Undergrad is an Arabic. Wow. Well let's start. Let's talk a little bit about how we got to employ advantage. What was the kind of as you're going through school and working what was your dream at the time? I can tell you my dream was not to end up in. Joplin. Missouri. But I know my I guess my my dream candidate evolved. By the time I got through law school I knew I didn't want to be a lawyer and so I had to figure out. What I wanted to do. So I went into corporate law for a little while I was looking for a chance to pivot to the business side of things because I decided that's what I was really interested in. and. Had A a cousin in DC where I was working Who have happened to have a father-in-law that was? Had founded a business along time ago and was looking for some help some young blood to get into the business to. Start with. A succession plan. and. He learned me out to the Midwest and. I guess we haven't looked back. So how long has that been? How long have you been in Missouri five years five years so prior to that, you were working in various branches of government and you're doing it was many. as an attorney as a lot. What was it doing what we doing government? So I worked before law, SCHOOL In the private sector actually in the healthcare it sector but then during law school and after I actually thought. I thought government was what I wanted to go into. That's actually part of the reason I studied Arabic in my Undergrad as well. It's thought government was around I wanted to go but as I got more experience in government i. realized. I didn't think that was going to be for me. and. Why was that? Would you see there that just turned you off to it I think. I worked with a lot of great people and saw a lot of really interesting things but. The the kind of lockstep. Advancement structure of most of the government. Offices wasn't very appealing to me I I saw people that had been there for thirty years and it seemed like if you wanted to get anywhere, you had to be there for thirty years and there's no getting anywhere without putting in your thirty years. there. There's also the factory you know have a pretty large family. We're expecting our child next month and I knew if I was going to support a family of that size. It's Government salary. Yea. I I know I understand the attraction in the allure. I thought about going into government to at one time when I was laid off from American you know. In the lure was kind of a the security, the job security, everything else and. I got to say a lot of consulting work with the government I've been out of the marine, corps and doing this. And it's such a challenge because what I found is that there's There's just this kind of embracing of mediocrity and it's nothing against the people within it. It's just it's it's a culture of mediocrity. I think and I don't know what your thoughts are on that. Again, I don't into government bashing session but well, exactly I that's I. think that's probably what I was trying to say with trying to dance around and be a little diplomatic but I I totally agree I and I think you're right I don't think it's any individual person just as. Houses that it's the it's the whole system is just too big. It's too bureaucratic right and an end. To. It's that too big to fail mentality. They all know that that they're going to have a job they don't have the pressure of trying to turn a profit to kind of motivate them but. I don't know if they're they're tons of fantastic. Working in government and I I admire the work that they do. But with a lot of great intentions, you're right in the. Same reasons that just wasn't for me I needed to be around a little more Spontaneity. In the the fact that if Wanted Faster Pass towards performance in the object objectives that just seemed like it was applaud you know what I mean like a slow applaud. Yeah. Yup totally get it. Very. Cool. So I'm curious to before we start talking about your roles a president here. What live in Jordan for four months? What was what year was that and what was that like? In two, thousand, nine It was awesome. Just incredible experience. You know as part of my. Undergraduate studies studying the Middle East Arabic So I got to go there and really just immersed myself in Jordanian culture. In my Arabic study I had just gotten married the year before. So my wife and I join me and she actually celebrate our first anniversary in Jordan. Wow and just an amazing cultural experience you know when you visit somewhere as a tourist. You see some cool things but you don't really get a good feel for what people really like where the country's really liked but when you live there for a while. We were able to go to church there and and just make friends interact with people in their everyday lives. It was just awesome to. Be Part of a culture this. So completely different from ours you're live two years in Sweden, but Sweden in so many ways this is just a lot like America so it wasn't kind of a full foreign experience, but Jordan was definitely full foreign experience and There were definitely parts of it that weren't as fun. You know there's water rationing. There s he had you know. Limit, your showers and and and just be really careful with your water and we had bedbugs. there. Definitely. Reasons. That we were happy to go home but man, I wouldn't trade the experience for anything such memories of time that

Jordan Missouri Government President Trump School Jared Midwest Sweden Eric Joplin Attorney America
John S. Couch: The Art of Creative Rebellion

Leadership and Loyalty

04:27 min | Last week

John S. Couch: The Art of Creative Rebellion

"And Gentlemen, please put your hands together and help me welcome my friend. That's that's an infection. You'd see you too. Thanks for joining us. Really appreciate it. Our say the beginning of the show this is a question I ask everybody because we live in this age of influences although I think that's a terrible title but nonetheless. I'm one of the things I always want to know is who is someone who we might not know or even consider who has been a major influence on you and on your leadership. Well there's The usual suspects that people talk about whether it's talking about Peter. Drucker. From a management perspective and two usual kind of business school books approach to but in reality for me a lot of. My corporate influences have been really nontraditional. So. There is a book called the art spirit by an artist named Robert. Henry from the Ash can school in eighteen. Ten. Nineteen twenty really early times who interestingly enough he He kind of broke down in enlightened my thinking about creativity along time ago and interesting enough I find a lot of the things that that influenced me over time. Or less the business books no less the how books in really more books that were philosophical. So a one level Robert Henry's take on creativity. Of starting with what you have in once you are in working from there was incredibly important. I would say from a strategic perspective when I was a teenager a book called the Book of five rings by Miyamoto Musashi, which is the the book that the probably considered to be the greatest summarize Japan wrote in the sixteenth century about strategy literally ten days before he died. And it's kind of the sun, Suu, art of War for Japan, but it's much center. And actually was adopted by the Harvard Business School. Thirty years ago as required reading and in that book it talked about. How humans are essentially broken down and Thomas elements of wind fire and water in the void. And talked about how you lead teams and so a lot of ways was interesting for me is the fact that this summary. Talked about the fact that human beings are multi variant the metaphor for him. Was the idea that when you're actually pulling together people, you don't try to make one-size-fits-all actually aknowledged what people's capabilities in what their? Lack of talents and whether great talents are without judgment. So the analogy was you're building a house and some would is used to support the house and it's very maybe gnarly and but stick it strong and you hide it behind the walls and you have been near would which is very thin and grab for a beautiful and you put that towards the front and you know the metaphor goes on you know with the idea human beings are the same way and that you wouldn't expect a beautiful. Veneer Wall to be a supporting column of would within the House in the same way to the metaphor goes when you're when you're hiring people and when you're actually trying to build a culture that you hire and you don't thank will this person needs to conform into this particular role that I'm trying to fulfill but you actually look at them and say, well, the role trying to fill is one part of the overall capabilities at this person. On Larry. And if you're. Smart about it, I think what you do you use the Job Description at you're putting out in the world is a way to attract talent. But if you do it correctly, the job itself is just one part of the overall capability of the person. You can actually almost van Diagram Denise between the business and within Russell needs are the personnel are, and if you can kind of do that crossover where they intersect, you can actually unlock two to three x the capabilities of that person. So probably long winded answer to your question, but does two books were interesting of a huge influence to me?

Robert Henry Drucker Harvard Business School Miyamoto Musashi Japan SUU Peter Russell Thomas Larry
Ludwig van Beethoven

Classics for Kids

04:59 min | Last week

Ludwig van Beethoven

"Kids. Ludwig van Beethoven was born in Bonn Germany in seventeen seventy Beethoven's father was a singer who worked as a court musician in Bonn but he wasn't very reliable. So by the time Beethoven was a teenager, he was supporting his family as a court musician. Beethoven. Played Violin Viola and most of all keyboard instruments. The prince who employed Beethoven sent him on a trip to Vienna, which was the center of musical activity in Vienna Beethoven played for Mozart who was so impressed that he said to his friends, keep an eye on him. Someday he'll give the world something to talk about. Once, he'd had a taste of Vienna. There was no keeping Beethoven in Bonn he moved to the Anna where he intended to study with. Mozart but by then Mozart had died. So Beethoven studied with Haydn instead. Heiden was a pretty easy going person while Beethoven was Moody and Intense. So their student teacher partnership didn't last very long just long enough for some of what Haydn was good ad like string quartets to rub off on Beethoven. Beethoven quickly became known all over Vienna as a wonderful musician at first he was mostly famous for his skill as a pianist. But when Beethoven was just thirty years old he realized he would have to give up his career as a concert pianist because he was going death. After a while Beethoven couldn't hear an extra well enough to stay together with it when they played and eventually he couldn't even hear himself play his own piano. But Beethoven, was such a genius that even though he couldn't here with his ears, he could still hear music in his head so he kept right on composing. Aw. In Beethoven's Day, composers were considered servants but Beethoven refuse to be treated like a servant by his patrons members of the nobility who paid him for his work. He knew he was unique and said so as he wrote to one of his patrons, there are and will be thousands of princes. Is One Beethoven. Beethoven wrote nine glorious symphonies more about those and his piano music in coming weeks. He also wrote Chamber Music Ballets Religious Music Songs, and one opera Beethoven wasn't afraid to change his music when he didn't think it worked this is one of four tries to get the overture to his opera just. Between the French revolution and Napoleon's Wars Beethoven lived through a lot of political changes. In fact, He created a revolution of his own, a musical one. Beethoven took the graceful elegant forms that Mozart and Haydn had used and change them into something powerful and passionate.

Ludwig Van Beethoven Mozart Vienna Haydn Bonn Bonn Germany Heiden Anna
The 'Seductive Lure' of Authoritarianism

The Book Review

06:35 min | Last week

The 'Seductive Lure' of Authoritarianism

"And Applebaum joins us. Now from London, she is the author of the Pulitzer Prize Winning Gulag History and her new book is called twilight of democracy, the seductive lure of authoritarianism and thank you so much for being here. Thanks for having me, I want to start with a very basic language question because people are throwing around a lot of terms, these days, authoritarianism, dictatorship, demagoguery, autocracy, fascism, and sort of get to an understanding of what we exactly mean and what you need. Europe by authoritarianism. Book is about democracies really and it's about people and political movements in democracies who become dissatisfied with their own political systems and seek to change radically. And I. Agree with you that it's hard to sometimes describe what it is that they want to go towards whether it's a one party state or a liberal democracy or A. Not necessarily dictatorship. In which there's less openness and less competition, and so you know my book is about that. It's about the disappointment that some people feel with democracy and the draw towards more authoritarianism more centralized, less competitive, less open political systems. You're not so much concerned in this book with the specifics of the autocrats of our time, the Erdo ones and Putin's, and Orban's so much as you are with the people who vote for them side with them enable them. Why did you decide to look at it from that angle, but actually it's explicitly. None of book about voters I mean I think the reason why people vote for populist or authoritarian parties are various and I you know that sort of separate subject but you're right. It is a book about journalists spin doctors, intellectuals, and the people who sometimes help create these movements who create the ideas behind them, and then sometimes sell those ideas to the general public. Poorly I read about the because those are people I know not all of them are my close friends, but some of them are people have run into. The World I know and I thought it would be useful therefore for me to try and explain them in an an understand what happened to them over the last twenty years I wanted aired Juan because. About journalists and intellectuals he someone who and I think we could say this. About Putin von and others as well. These are people who have suppressed. The Press Ltd journalists closed down newspapers imprisoned writers who are the people on the other side who are the two of these other journalists and intellectuals who are supporting someone like Oregon. For example, in Turkey, will some of them are people who have become convinced. There's only one form of Turkish patriotism and that it's a nationalist form of patriotism and that anybody who has a different vision of Turkey vision of Turkey this integrated with Europe or a Turkey that secular those people are traders to. The country and their voices don't deserve to be heard. Some of the will have other motives. Some of them will be opportunists. Some of them will see the chance of if you get on the Government's bandwagon and you get on state media than its way to make a career, some of the will like the proximity to power. There's a range of reasons actually that's one of the themes of the book is, is the various different kinds of attractions that these kinds of movements have for people like that. So I'm probably betraying a little bit of my prejudice. As journalists and someone in the book world that the pamphleteer is the bloggers, the spin-doctors, the producer of TV programs in creators of memes. These are people that I can easily see supporting some of these autocrats I. Guess I'm interested in what circumstances in which countries it's writers intellectuals and and what's behind that I mean look they've always been nationalist intellectuals and intellectuals WHO and writers who supported dictatorships. well, into the twentieth century one of the themes of the book one of the kind of threads that I run through it is an analysis that was written in the first half of the twentieth century by French writer Julien Benda called it was called the clerks, the treason of the intellectuals, and it's a book about intellectuals who align themselves politically and who abandoned their search for truth or their object Tivi in order to be part of political movement. So this urge to do that and to be to play a political role or to be the voice sir to provide the ideas for movement is I mean I think it's as old as writing, public speaking itself. Talk about how you've seen that in Poland where you normally spend most of your time. So the book actually the idea for the book came from my reflections about the history of Poland. Over the last thirty years in especially some of the people who I felt aligned with in the nine hundred ninety s there was a kind of center right anticommunist movement that was I mean it wasn't ever cohesive, but it was the people within it certainly spoke to one another in the nineties who all had a similar vision of Poland and who all hoped for Poland it would be part of Europe and part of NATO and would be. Some kind of democracy. And connected world. Some of those people now have acquired a very different vision of Poland and they. Hope to pull, it becomes kind of Catholic nationalist one party state. They've been part of or supporters of a government that has cracked down on independent media and may be doing. So further that uses openly homophobic and anti Semitic slogans in its election campaigns and that I think worse of all really has sought to pack the courts in order to remove the independence of judges and the transformation of those people is one of the subjects of the. First part of the book, and again I think their motives are various I mean some of them are personal. They personally didn't like the political system that emerged in the nineties and two thousands and they they are. They didn't fight until they had a personal role in it. Some people felt police losing something they. They developed a stellar sometimes mythical nostalgia for some other version of the country that they preferred may have existed sometime in the past. Poland's cases to pre-communist past you know some of them felt that Poland was losing its identity as emergency urban there multiple reasons but the the overall impulse is one that I think Americans should be aware of too because the you know the attraction of authoritarianism, the attraction of the one party state or the attraction of liberalism I think can be felt in lots of countries including our own

Poland Europe Turkey Government Putin Pulitzer Prize Applebaum London Oregon Julien Benda Press Ltd Orban Juan Producer Writer Nato
Delivering on the Promise of Safer, Smarter Surgery with Timothy Lant

Outcomes Rocket

05:24 min | Last week

Delivering on the Promise of Safer, Smarter Surgery with Timothy Lant

"Welcome back to the outcomes rocket. Sal Marquez here and thank you for tuning in. Again I have the privilege of hosting Tim Lance today. He's the president and Chief Operating Officer at Care Syntax before that Tim was also the Senior Vice President and general manager at Sentry Data, systems, and previous to that managing. Director of supply chain. Academy, he's had multiple leadership roles across the healthcare. Industry and today he gonNA be talking to us more about health technology and what they're doing to impact global healthcare markets with their work at Care Syntax Tim such a pleasure to have you here with us today. Thank you. It's great to be here. I appreciate you having me. Absolutely. So before we get into the work that you guys do at Care Syntax me a little. Bit about you and what inspires your work in healthcare. Yeah happy to so you know for me it's a it's been an interesting journey into healthcare. I think a lot of people get into healthcare sometimes because their parents are involved in was no exception to that. So my mother is a clinician she was in healthcare for thirty years and I learned from a very. Early, age how important it was to have a well-functioning high quality, affordable healthcare system in any community that I also got to see how complex it was for my mom both as a clinician as administrator and healthcare I watched a lot of challenges that she faced and so I promised myself that I would never work healthcare and graduated from college I immediately started working in healthcare. And You know I think today you know almost twenty years later now right would. Kinda keeps. ME excited and getting up every morning. Excited about what we're doing is you I experienced firsthand during my time spent several years with with your on healthcare and I worked in the frontline. Saw You know I'm not a clinician but I worked side by side with doctors and nurses and social workers and case managers to try to improve communication and coordination and clinical care inside seen firsthand how complex it is and how difficult it is. But critical it is to you know to our communities into our societies and in some ways I. think it's a it's a little bit how I feel about golf right as you can have A. kind of a a tough rounding Gulf. But you have that one magical shot met keeps coming back for more in healthcare little bit that same way. I think we tend to fixate sometimes on all the problems and healthcare. But then you are on the front lines and you watch how you can save a life writer keep a family together bring somebody back from the brink of death and I think there's no greater thing that that I'd want to spend my time doing than than trying to increase the number of great shots that we have in our healthcare system. So love at your those those winds that keep you in the game for the long haul. And so I, appreciate you sharing that. Plenty of like I'm not GonNa get a nail care you graduate. You're, in. Healthcare. I there's something about something magnetic about the purposeful kind of impact. You could have in health care and I and I share that with yeah and I think a lot of listeners share that with us Tim, and so tell us about care syntax and what you guys are doing add value to the healthcare ecosystem. Yes. So I think care syntax is we're very focused on. Surgery and on the or which I think in some respects especially in the US a little bit is oftentimes I don't WanNa say overlooked. But when we think about population health and a lot of the trends in the last ten years and we tend to hear a lot about chronic disease management and end of life care in these kinds of things and we're very. Focused on surgery, which you know if you take a step back, you know it's a, it's not the majority of cases in our healthcare system, but it is certainly the majority of revenue in the healthcare system for most hospitals comes out of the or and it's also a place where from a quality standpoint you know a lot of quality problems can begin. In the or you know if those surgeries aren't optimal. So this is where we've chosen to focus and you know in our vision as a business is to really enable caregivers to save lives on specifically for us. Kind of Our big vision is millions of lives around the world you know to be saved through use of our technology by by those. Caregivers at the frontline. So that's really really where we're focused and the think You always think about adding value to the ecosystem I, like to look at it in a couple of ways but I think the thing that makes us really unique that we've you know we've chosen to look holistically at the healthcare ecosystem and within that world of of the or. And try to look at stakeholder alignment. So you have kind of your clinical stakeholders, financial stakeholders, stakeholders, and operations, and supply chain, and then obviously the patient. So we really try to look with our technology at how we can bring those key stakeholders together right and drive convergence there, and then we do the same thing around the process side. So looking at kind of that end end process of what it takes to deliver a high quality safe. Surgery and so you've got you know operational components, throughput capacity management logistics supplies, and then you've got quality and safety, and then you have all the analytics learning and Research and development that comes on the back end in that sort of trust creates a continuous cycle. Then that's really where we look to add the most business value is by bringing those stakeholders together and by creating value, not just one small facet but looking at how can create. Value

Tim Lance President And Chief Operating Senior Vice President And Gene Sal Marquez Sentry Data Director United States Golf Administrator Writer
"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

03:07 min | Last week

"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

"It's part of why <Speech_Female> it can be difficult <Speech_Female> even now to <Speech_Female> get your hands on <Speech_Female> the Nintendo <SpeakerChange> switch console. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> A core part <Speech_Female> of the appeal is <Speech_Female> that the game allows <Speech_Female> players to <Speech_Female> be together <Speech_Music_Female> virtually in <Speech_Music_Female> real time. <Speech_Female> That's <Speech_Music_Female> what made the production possible. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> While they recorded <Speech_Female> the music separately. <Speech_Female> All of <Speech_Female> the performers were <Speech_Female> able to act out <Speech_Female> their roles through <Speech_Female> the game <Speech_Music_Female> as their <SpeakerChange> own <Speech_Music_Female> animal crossing avatars. <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> Watched the opera <Speech_Music_Female> and <Speech_Female> you hear it <Speech_Female> it sounds like these people <Speech_Female> are in the same room <Speech_Female> and there's no visual <Speech_Female> reminder telling <Speech_Female> you that they're not. <Speech_Music_Female> So <Speech_Female> it feels like <Speech_Female> this is <Speech_Female> performance that happened <Speech_Female> together <Speech_Female> when you see the <Speech_Female> squares on Zoom, <Speech_Female> you <Speech_Music_Female> know that they're not together. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> the best part of <Speech_Female> life theater is <Speech_Female> experiencing something. <Speech_Female> I think <SpeakerChange> together <Speech_Female> that's <Silence> Pellegrino again <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> before <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> the pandemic do <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> a Donnie productions <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> was planning <Speech_Music_Female> three in person <Speech_Music_Female> operas in received <Speech_Female> grants to help <Speech_Female> them employ about <Silence> forty singers. <Speech_Female> Now, <Speech_Female> the future <Speech_Female> for any in person productions <Speech_Music_Female> is uncertain <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> says <Speech_Music_Female> being ten. It's <Speech_Female> been like <Speech_Female> a uniquely devastating <Speech_Female> experience <Speech_Female> and that singing <Speech_Music_Female> is like one of the <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> most dangerous <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> like things you <Speech_Female> can do <Speech_Female> and it's kind <Speech_Female> of like <SpeakerChange> put <Speech_Female> the whole industry <Speech_Female> in chaos. <Speech_Female> Baynton, is among <Speech_Female> many in the industry <Speech_Female> experimenting <Speech_Female> with how <Speech_Female> to perform and connect <Speech_Music_Female> with audiences <Speech_Female> remotely <Speech_Female> the traditional <Speech_Female> way to do it <Speech_Female> is great <Speech_Female> but like <Speech_Female> these other kind of <Speech_Female> new, maybe weird <Speech_Female> ways of doing it <Speech_Music_Female> are also <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> exciting I. Think <Speech_Female> it doesn't. <Speech_Female> It's nice to <Speech_Female> be able to look. It doesn't <Speech_Female> have to be this like one <Speech_Female> way that everyone <Silence> kind of thinks of it. <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> And as pelegrina <Speech_Music_Female> points. <Speech_Female> Cartoons and opera <Speech_Music_Female> have been intertwined <Speech_Music_Female> for decades. <Speech_Music_Female> It pops <Speech_Female> up episodes <Speech_Female> of the ninety show. Hey, <Speech_Female> Arnold in spongebob <Speech_Female> squarepants <Speech_Female> and of course, <Speech_Music_Female> looney <SpeakerChange> tunes <Speech_Music_Female> and Bugs Bunny. <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> I feel like if you ask <Speech_Female> anyone, they're going to know <Speech_Female> the right of the <Speech_Female> Valkyrie theme. <Speech_Female> They might not know <Speech_Music_Female> the name, but they'll know <Speech_Music_Female> what it is in their head. <Speech_Music_Female> So I don't <Speech_Music_Female> think this is totally <Speech_Music_Female> out <Speech_Music_Female> of left <SpeakerChange> field. <Speech_Music_Female> That <Speech_Female> being said I think <Speech_Female> the video game is just <Speech_Female> like the next generation <Speech_Female> of that <SpeakerChange> kind of <Speech_Music_Female> cartoon. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> They <Speech_Female> hope that this approach <Speech_Female> to opera, we'll draw <Speech_Music_Female> nontraditional <Speech_Music_Female> audiences. <Speech_Female> Pelegrina <Speech_Female> says they have also received <Speech_Female> positive responses <Speech_Music_Female> from opera, <Speech_Music_Male> lovers. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> Benton said the most <Speech_Female> powerful thing about <Speech_Music_Female> the project was <Speech_Music_Female> performing <SpeakerChange> again <Speech_Music_Female> with other people, <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> I. Think we all felt kind <Speech_Female> of emotional <Speech_Female> like watching it for the <Speech_Female> first time and hearing <Speech_Female> all of our voices <Speech_Female> together <Speech_Female> and we were like, oh my gosh, <Speech_Female> like it sounds <Speech_Female> like we're together even <Speech_Female> though <SpeakerChange> we <Speech_Music_Female> were apart. <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female>

Nintendo Pellegrino Benton Arnold
Create Your Business Space Doing the Opposite -  MicroFamous  Matt Johnson - burst 13

A New Direction

03:12 min | Last week

Create Your Business Space Doing the Opposite - MicroFamous Matt Johnson - burst 13

"But. You talk about several things when it comes to shrinking a battlefield. First of all, it's creating niche. If we've talked about at at at length already and then creating that person combining, we've talked a little bit about we can exhibit combined existing niches that can make them more focused and define niche. You also talk about reframing a reposition, but the one element that I really loved that you do is opposition. When it comes to shrinking the battlefield. So. Talk to us about. Using opposition as a way to shrink our battle because I found this fascinating. Yeah and I love this example. I'm really pumped that you asked about that one because there's a bunch of a bunch of ways to create a niche or combining reframing all this stuff, and they're all there on the book, and that's awesome. But the one that's one of my favorites to talk about is doing the opposite, right. So how do you shrink the battlefield? If you'RE GONNA choose to focus on a certain group of people or a specialized segment of your market or something like that? Like how do you? How do you choose the right one? Well there's a great example from Jackie Chan Right Jackie. Chan. Is this martial arts you know really really famous and martial arts, but he is very different from everybody else like if you grew up a Bruce Lee fan like he did. Bruce Lee was the legend of the icon like he will never be surpassed. And how do you grow up as young martial artists? In China, how do you grow up Bruce Lee Shadow and expect to make anything of yourself in that community and in that that line of work? So Jackie Chan looked at that problem and instead of getting discouraged, he looked at it gwent. How can I do the opposite of what Bruce Lee does. Okay. Well, Bruce. Lee. Is Like A mazing. Super Fast, invincible. Well, what if I did the opposite and I was more vulnerable immuno even and showed myself getting her like did my own stunts and like showed showed the real thing happening Bruce Lee's films are pretty straightforward. Right What if we did something comedic? What if we did something that was almost slapstick? So he starts asking themselves these kind of questions. Just how can I do the opposite of the person who is the dominant name or the dominant brand in my space ends up coming up with his own blend in crates, his own genre. Basically of this kind of con- comedic martial arts. I don't even know what you'd necessarily call it But he invents his own fighting style that goes along with that expands into movies, ends up being like one of the highest paid actors of all time. One of the biggest stars in the world. And it all started by doing the opposite. And we can do the same thing right whether you are the florist whether you are a brick and mortar. Business owner whether your real estate agent whether you're coach consultant, which is the world that Iran and more taking what you know think about you know again, contrasting with Gary v like if you're in that space and you WANNA teach people how to market their business. Good luck. Just going on being another Gary v because you end up just being overshadowed by him and delivering the same message to the same people. got. Gary. V. So what are they? What are they need you for? But if you go out and you do the opposite, it gives you a chance to cut through with a message that actually speaks really really deeply to a smaller group of people and plus fun like figuring out how do the opposite you end up coming up with some really fun and interesting combinations. He may end up creating a niche that you dominate for the next thirty years. It's really

Bruce Lee Bruce Lee Shadow Jackie Chan Bruce Gary China Business Owner Iran Consultant
"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

05:28 min | Last week

"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

"Plane and little, and she has to do with all of that in addition to being a woman in a time when women had little to no autonomy. So she has quite a lot to overcome and Jane is resilient in the face of all that adversity. I think the resilience that I'm most moved by in the book is Jane's Moral Resilience like she would quite literally rather be starving and homeless and act outside her own values or sacrificed her independence and I think it was amazing as a young person and as you know a woman in my early thirties now to be. To have this example of someone who's committed to her own spirituality and morality in a way that honors her own passions and desires without robbing her of equity. And then quickly the second down endorsed that yet. It's so so good. And there are lots of great film adaptations as well. The. Second Book I WanNa recommend is full disclosure. By Cameron. Garrett which is a young adult novel that focuses on an HIV positive teenager whose navigating high school and all the normal things that teenagers deal with like making and keeping friends falling in love and just developing as a person and the protagonist is the black adopted daughter of two gay men, both of whom are also people of Color it's primarily a story of the resilience of HIV positive people but it also touches on the resilience of Queer folks and Black and Brown people So if there is a young person in your life that you want to. Share. Some of those important stories with full disclosure is a great book for them. Those are great recommendations and Nick I know you have station eleven on your list which really struck me I loved it. I read it a few years ago in it felt more like fiction than than I think it would feel now. Is the wonderful scary thing about that book because you know in the middle of the pandemic why not go back to a book that is about a Pandemic and flu that decimates the population. What I loved about the book was that it begins with Shakespeare, which is how I want of course, all of my pandemic post apocalyptic books to begin In this case, it's King Lear and one of the stars dies onstage, and that's how the story begins and then we flash forward twenty years out to this pandemic has literally killed most of the population that we have a traveling troupe Called the traveling symphony that is itinerant and age wander around the Great Lakes region and they are artists doing the only thing that they know how to do how precent though Emily Saint John Mandell was in her book to describe some of the things that are happening today is uncanny loved about it though is that at the.

Jane Pandemic King Lear Great Lakes Nick Emily Saint John Mandell HIV Cameron Garrett flu
"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

03:23 min | Last week

"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

"Which of course is? Frightening on so many. Different levels. But that when they call you, a terrorist is just an amazing book really a resilient writer, the other. is they can't close all by Larry who was a terrific young journalist and this book stemmed after Michael Brown was killed. You know yet another young African American man who was murdered on this time, of course, by the police. So those are two books that are high on the list, but maybe weren't as popular as you know between the world in me or how to be an anti-racist, which also, of course, are wonderful wonderful books. I'd love to get your reaction to one that has really stayed with me books about ten years old now. But in this space, it's called the warmth of other suns by Isabel. Wilkerson and it's about the great migration. I think it was published in two thousand ten and tracks a number of families migrating from the south to the north over a forty year period and tells incredible stories of what people left, what people came to how they built their families, and for me was just a deep education in a piece of our history in America that I was just not taught in school at all. I don't I'm sorry. You're familiar with the fact that I got dead silence for both. I'm GonNa have to carry the torch on that one alone. I was having the the the microphone over but no the. Book came out. It was a huge huge seller. That's one bit. In all the bookstore associated with has continue to sell incredibly well, and like you say it was a piece of history that for me I also was unacquainted with and to see that Modern Day migration you say, going south to north and what had to be left behind and what they faced on that journey north. Yes you know just just incredible Wilkerson is just wonderful. Yeah and I would absolutely cosign I think that a lot of times what we're taught in schools about black history is really like all around the civil rights movement and it's like black people don't exist like much before or after nine hundred and sixty five. So it is nice to tell these other stories. So Camille to come back to you because I want to shift into fiction. Now, sometimes would a fiction book can do is give us a chance to escape but also either validate our reality or give us a way to make sense of it or maybe in this case with stories of resilience overcoming role modeling, what it means to truly tough it out you've been talking with us about little women in the past. I know you admired that book are there other fiction books that came to mind for you on this subject? Yeah. There are a couple. The first is an Oldie but a Goodie Jane, Eyre, by Charlotte Bronte Now, if you haven't read this book since you were forced to in high school I, we encourage you to crack it open again. I began my relationship with this book as I think an eighth grader and it has become over the years my favorite book of all time I mean Jane Eyre is kind of Proto feminist novel she describes herself as poor. Obscure..

Jane Eyre Wilkerson America writer Charlotte Bronte Michael Brown Camille Larry
"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

03:11 min | Last week

"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

"You're going yes. Sorry. We have a delay. Of course we're all three different places due to the virus that we're talking about right now go ahead and add your point there. Normally. As far as you want some concrete data right now Massachusetts we have over thirty two thousand people that are living in nursing homes right in his estimated that at least ten, thousand of those people could be living in their own homes with the proper supports. So the onset decision on ninety nine ruled that unjustified segregation of people with disabilities in five discriminate because it violates the ADA and we all know to stable housing is one of the key determinants of health. Right. But if you look at it in this pandemic, ask for the Kobe nineteen, the highest death tolls over forty percent are amongst people living and working in nursing homes that's over forty five thousand people that have expired. Nationwide, in over fifty three, hundred people here in Massachusetts alone and folks that disabilities are definitely represented amongst those underlying medical conditions. So you know if you want to talk about again real intraday it integration, we have to be able to move folks out of nursing homes where they're more at risk out of these institutional facilities and move into the community where they can live independently access the American dream live, it fully, you know folks need some supports personal care attendants supported living do a variety of them, but the key for our state really is a lack of affordable and accessible housing. All right. So we have about two minutes left and I want to ask you both just briefly from each of you. If there were an ad a two point. Oh, law to come forward today what would be key provisions you'd WanNa see. Good question well, I'd say I think some key points for progress into the future. You know I think that that policy change and legislation and laws can change infrastructure and we've seen some impact there but but but laws don't necessarily change culture, and so I think when we think to the future of what could have the biggest impact we still have a lot of work to do as it relates to reducing or cultural bias and stigma around disability. Disability is something that impacts frankly nearly everyone at some point in life and that when we think about inclusive services. We need to understand that it's not just for a small subset of people in our society that's actually for everyone. So I, I would probably try to tackle it from the standpoint of thinking of how how we can. We can continue to make progress as it relates to things like the built infrastructure, things like accessibility and communications, things like closed captioning and accessible websites. But how we really get at the cultural change reducing stigma around disability and understanding that it's not a lesser way of living or something that needs to be devalued but actually heart of the big life experience that we all face. You that have about a half a minute left please are good for me. I'd say education and enforcement a laws only as good as it is enforced and I think education about some of the things that we talked about..

Massachusetts Kobe WanNa
"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

04:08 min | Last week

"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

"Games in his possible. Especially when you have to put a couple of teams on the shelf, you're already talking about a condensed calendar. So there's limited time. The League has already said there. Okay. If they get to the end of the year and teams have not played an equal number of games, they'll deal with that At that point, they would just ranked teams by winning percentage versus actual numbers of wins But really in the long term, if this becomes a problem more than one team has a huge outbreak like this. I. Don't know how they make it work. Yeah once again, a bellwether right for so many other things I. Think a lot of people are watching to see if they can pull this off. All right. I, just WanNa have seen a lot of people say if a multibillion dollar organization like baseball with thousands and thousands of tests being run over the course of a few days can't handle this. How does that change our thinking about college campuses and schools and things like that? I think you're absolutely right people are watching this pretty closely. Exactly exactly and we will continue to before we let you go though I must torture you we drive around the collar teams. Now, let's talk about the socks. The sucker nobly, it's been ugly and it's an issue that we talked about last year. We talked about in the off season it's pitching. They have no pitching starters or bullpens are they don't have enough anyway they have a pretty solid lineup which is interesting and. You would think that okay they should be able to hit their way into wins and maybe they will in the long run over the course of the season. But so far you can tell that the lack of pitching has really weighed on the offense I wanNA play a cut here from zander. BOGART's WHO's known as being incredibly upbeat. He's a real leader in the clubhouse. He's a guy who's always kind of giving positive affirmation of folks in get your next time. Let's go do this. This is what he said after the loss on Monday there's stuff. You know. Obviously. It's not just like one wrong. You know as a corporate and then they just find a way to add on some more before we can kind of get some going and gets up. And you see the video that goes with that he's shoulders slumped. He is depressed and you can tell this offense is putting extra pressure on themselves knowing they don't have the pitching to hold the other team down hitting a baseball is often called. One of the hardest things to do in professional sports. That's why if you can do it three out of ten times, you're considered really good and so if you have that added pressure of now, you have to produce runs or this team will lose that really starts to weigh on you makes it even harder. All right. So Chris, we've got a little less than a minute left. So let me just ask you because that was depressing. Rays of hope to leave us with with the restive titled Towns Pro Sports Teams I do have a little bit of hope, and this is something people are kicking baseball for not doing the NBA and the NHL have created bubbles players to bring their seasons back both of which will start towards the end of the week here I think that is a at least the best hope that we have to try to get some normalcy going in the world of sports..

BOGART baseball Chris NBA NHL
"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

05:57 min | Last week

"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

"Kind of a bellwether for whether some normalcy is possible during a global pandemic, the number of New England Patriots football players opting out of the two thousand twenty NFL season due to the corona virus is now to six including star linebacker and defensive captain, Dante hightower and the red. SOX are off to a miserable start to their coronavirus shortened season jumping four of their first five games with one of their starting pitchers out due to coronavirus complications. The world is watching and not just the games to see who will win in the match up between professional sports and the coronavirus. So here to give us a read on what's happening is Radio Boston's Chris. Derek? Chris. Welcome. Back. Thanks for having me spoiler alert the news is not good on that front. Well. Yes. So let's start with football and I'm going to ask you about the Patriots players opting out the same question I've been asking. So often during this pandemic, how big a deal is this? So I'm going to answer your favorite question with probably your least favorite answer, which is it depends I think you mentioned? Were we're still in the midst of obviously of global pandemic and I don't think anybody really knows exactly what the future is going to bring. We've heard a lot of talk about a possible second wave in the fall and we're going to be seeing college students returning to campuses and a lot of places kids going back to schools in some places So I think it all of this discussion really depends on what the next few weeks in the next few months bring for us. We may not even have a football season. So with that huge caveat at the beginning of the answer. I would say on the field it is actually a pretty big deal for the Patriots, just because of the names. Of the players who have said they were opting out this year you mentioned Dante High Tower is basically the quarterback of the defense. He's the guy who's out on the field calling the plays for the defense moving guys around when they need to move. He's one of the true leaders on this team coach Belichick has made him Mr February for all of his big plays in the postseason in super bowls. you also Patrick Chung who's kind of unheralded. But I think a big contributor who never really gets the recognition he deserves for the kind of flexible. He plays on this team You've got marcus cannon who's been a pretty steady presence on the offensive line, Brennan? bolden. WHO's a special teams contributor. So you've got some pretty big name players who have said they will not be playing this year for the Patriots. And clearly players who understand what the impact is of opting out. So what are they saying about this decision about why they're doing it when they know what it's GonNa do to the team? Yeah totally, and it depends on the individual player. So in Dante hightower's case, he just had a child about a month ago and he says, he thinks it's the right move for..

Patriots Dante hightower Dante High Tower football Chris SOX Boston NFL marcus cannon Derek Belichick Patrick Chung Brennan
"thirty years" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:58 min | 1 year ago

"thirty years" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"This week's guest on the economists asks our interview show was the businesswoman Ursula burns. She made history ten years ago when she became the first black woman to run a fortune five hundred company, but progress has been slow. The second was appointed just last month. Mrs burns revealed why she's changed her mind about using quotas to achieve equality. I've been in business for almost forty years. And we have been talking about this problem where half the population. We're not anywhere near half we're not even ten percent. They're more CEO's named John than there are women. You know, you heard all of that stuff, we have been pushing against this thing for, for a long time with the belief that if we just let them alone and give them the facts that they that system will change. Don't you get it if we just kind of lay it out, and give them the survey because the? They who are giving the facts to don't believe it's urgent enough to change it. That's why say, maybe what you do is to start mandating things saying level both level of a big company. Yeah. Think board levels starts. I I think. think. I should it be half forty percent. Give me a number. That's reasonable you do the study of available people whatever the heck it is. And you start mandating companies to get you say, basically, we.

Ursula burns Mrs burns CEO John forty percent forty years ten percent ten years
"thirty years" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:34 min | 1 year ago

"thirty years" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"For both of us. I guess it was a life changing experience. And I think we both issue in particular is you book in Chinese on the Chinese language service of the BBC a lot, and it was a sense of loyalty to an audience in China, that seems like a bygone age now we often talk now of how gentlemen has been largely forgotten in China, the success of the communist party in racing suddenly, public discussion of this, but also it seems memories whole generation has grown up now has heard almost nothing about this. But then, you know I go back to Beijing. And from time to time I meet people, and they asked me, how long have you been in China? I say that it goes back to the nine thousand nine hundred and it becomes clear that I was there in nine hundred ninety nine and then suddenly, the conversation will turn to that. Question. It's clear that for those who were there for those who did experience it. It's still grips their minds just as much as it does our. Tianmen might live large in the minds of those who witnessed it. But Beijing continues to cover up the crimes and censorship efforts ramp up whenever the nursery approaches this year has been no exception. University.

China Beijing communist party BBC Tianmen
"thirty years" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

06:10 min | 1 year ago

"thirty years" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Today, marks thirty year anniversary of the Inman square crackdown. In April nineteen Eighty-nine demonstrators mainly students began together TNN square to mourn, the death of who done relatively liberal communist party leader soon. They began calling for political reform. The protests spread beyond the city and the government's patients began to wear thin, late Sunday afternoon, military headed gulped is, again, flew over the square of heavenly peace, dropping leaflets bowling on the protesters to leave yet with fists clenched, the students pledged to stay on to the Dan. In the early hours of June fourth Chinese troops rolled into Beijing firing at crowds of people who blocked their path. Hundreds if not thousands were killed. Two.

communist party TNN Beijing thirty year
"thirty years" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"thirty years" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

"Is you know, it's interesting. I mean, it's thirty years, right? And the median age of China right now is thirty eight so a significant number of Chinese were not born. One channel score was happening. And the Chinese government has been extremely successful at wiping out. Any recollection of the ideas of the movement in any recollection of actually, you know, what happened? And so there's this remarkable documentary attack man, where they show pictures of the tank man to whom you referred earlier to Beijing University students that are like what's this is the guy doing performance, art? What is this? They have no idea of those images and of the importance that those images had to their country back in the day. And so the question is if you know something wiped out, so successfully will it ever have any residents again amongst the people of China. I don't know. I think we probably will at a certain point. There has to be a reevaluation of this. But people have thought it was going to happen. A lot earlier than it has so far that hasn't happened yet. The Chinese party state has a remarkable ability to really manipulate the minds of people in China still to this day, John I wanna thank you for coming on today to talk about the thirty th anniversary of gentlemen. Thank you. Thank you for having me, Sarah. John palm. I is a former reporter for the press and the Washington Post. He's also the author of the book the beautiful country and the middle kingdom American China seventeen seventy six to the present first person is produced by Dan Ephron, edited by rob Sachs. I'm Sarah Wildman, and I'm your host. Panoply..

China Sarah Wildman John palm Chinese government Beijing University Washington Post Dan Ephron reporter rob Sachs John I thirty years
"thirty years" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"thirty years" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

"But it I their March, isn't that are pretty quiet described the early days of demonstrations in April eighty nine so relatively quickly. It begins the coalesce near tenement square. Actually, the front gates of donate high which is the communist party headquarters, which is just off the square along the gate of heavenly peace, which leads into the Forbidden City, but very boisterous. Humorous a lot of humor, which is sub into the comments party, always has had difficulty dealing with. I remember one of the ferry charismatic leaders is fellow named. War, Casey was a Wieger extraction. Just being the master behind the Bullhorn at being able to whip up a crowd, but to do. So in a in a humorous way that almost like a carnival Barker pied piper away, and it was that sense of the youth should of shaggy over the collar hair wearing a worker's clothing kind of a proletarian chic happening there. But the sensuality of the whole thing was really extrordinary. It sends like the head. He didn't exotic is it because it had become very much norm to you that it was romantic in some ways. Oh is completely romantic in. I was thirty years old. So I was still capable of of romantic the huts. But yeah, it was extreme. I mean, especially as the protests got larger. I mean, there was some points where I was in the north west of the city, which was the where the all the universities were concentrated and in a crowd that would push through. Police barriers and the fact that the police gave way it really gave you a sense that. Okay. Even the security structures here are somewhat sympathetic to the goals of the student movement and other moments of standing on pedestrian overpasses and looking at all directions along these massive boulevards north south east and west and see them being filled with nothing, but people carrying banners calling for more freedom, a better China where the people coming from as the crowds. Get larger starts out with Beijing students, but who comes in. So it's not Beijing students, and then it starts getting a lot more worker participation and then the participation of newspapers in some cases, even security services factories, white collar workers bankers. Do you get a real collection of like Beijing intelligentsia if you will and white collar representation as well? What's the request of the demonstrators? I you said they were for freedom of assembly, but does it shift. It begins to shift in may, especially after the series of very hard line at to'real 's appear in the people's daily,.

tenement square Beijing communist party Casey China thirty years
"thirty years" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

04:27 min | 1 year ago

"thirty years" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

"And so this is happening at the same time, you have the country opening up to western influences opening up to western ideas, and it was this marriage between significant discontent in the lower levels of society with on opening of minds among the elite among the student population. And that created the potential for real instability at the same time. You also had within the party different factions jockeying for positions one faction believed in faster economic reforms and more westernization another faction that really oppose that as well. So you had you had to basically all the raw materials for real problems going from ADA nine students start to gather an and lobby the ability together without being monitored by the party. How do they do that? I mean, are they watched over are there? How does that happen? So what was starting in in as early as eighty eight in fact, even earlier than that? But eighty eight was really the beginning is that people wanted to form organizations that were not under the control come his party because one of the issues in China was that the party controlled everything. And there was no such thing as a right to organize freedom of sociation was is not part of Chinese communist party platform on the students. Basically that was a main demand that the student unions would not be run by the party. And so in universities such as Beijing University ching hall university Nanjing university Fudan, which is another major university in Shanghai students began to have these natch. Organizations formed and have these specically democracies what they called salons where Chinese liberals were invited to speak about democratization process about freedom of association and other freedoms the US Bill of rights statue of liberty the history of democracy, and in the west, and this type of interaction between Chinese students and some Chinese liberals really intensified eighty nine and the trigger, of course, for the demonstrations was the death of party secretary by the name of who y'all bond who died in April of nineteen eighty nine and who was somewhat of a symbol for westernisers in China. He is a guy who basically came out against chopsticks. He said using a knife and fork was more efficient, but he also was very important in rehabilitating, hundreds of thousands of Chinese intellectuals who've been purged during the anti rightist campaign in the mid fifties. But also the culture of Lucien from nineteen sixty six nine hundred seventy six and. How did you have access to them? I mean, did you already knew people from when you were studying in China, did you have greater access? So. Ahead lived in Chinese dormitory for a year and a half. And so when I went into these dormitories, I kind of felt like I was home, and that I think subconsciously resonated with the people there. I mean, I would like sit on their beds and kinda hang out like I hung out in my own dorm room six or seven years before. So I was a little bit younger. I spoke pretty decent Chinese. And I just kinda realized that they were like my classmates earlier jet. I mean a later generation, but they were very more my classmates their rooms looked and I think more importantly smelled like the room. I lived in an engine university for unit half. If for me, it wasn't as exotic as it probably appeared to many other western correspondents who hadn't had that experience. When you say, they weren't later generation that students that you described earlier are actually plucked back out of countryside and given the chance to go to school where these students who had expected to go to school. Yeah. These were students generally speaking who had gone through high school. So this is just their life experiences significantly different from the life experience from their elders and describe the energy of these meetings, these early meetings on campus, it was just full of this sense of possibility. And a real search for a new set of values for their country. A lot of patriotism deep love of their country and deep desire in the sense of what direction are we gonna take? And anything is possible. That was the overriding sense. You got was optimism about what China could do and we're trying to go..

China Beijing University ching hall bond ADA Shanghai US secretary seven years
"thirty years" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"thirty years" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

"From foreign policy. I'm Sarah wild Mun. And this is first person this week an inside account of the TNN square massacre. Thirty years ago this month student protests rutted in Beijing posing one of the most significant threats to the rule of the communist party in China's history. The demonstrations lasted two months and grew to include a range of citizens all demanding reforms in the country. For the first time in huge numbers. The ordinary men and women of Beijing the old and the young professors and taxi drivers have joined the student protests lending, their support to what is now taking on all the appearances of a peaceful popular uprising against the oppressiveness of communist rule campaign for China's renewal in an atmosphere of freedom and democracy, the focal point of the protest was Tiananmen Square. The heart of Beijing within a few weeks the government declared martial law and then in early June the world watched in horror as Chinese military tanks rolled in the streets of Beijing on the way to Chinaman's square. They fired indiscriminately at protesters there were reports of tanks rolling over students. The noise have gun five rose from all over the center of Peking, it was unremitting. On the streets leading down to the main road to ten on men square furious. People stood in disbelief at the glow in the sky listening to the sound of shots in the midst of all this chaos was John Pomfret who covered China for these Tosi press of the time hit an advantage over his fellow foreign correspondents. He had studied in China spoke Mandarin fluently and had many contacts in student movement. He joins us today. John, thanks for joining us. Thanks for having me. So we're coming on the thirtieth anniversary of the TNN square massacre. But I want to actually start with how you came to China in the first place. How did you come? So I went to college wanting to study neuro physiology. Okay..

China Beijing John Pomfret Tiananmen Square Sarah wild Mun communist party Tosi Thirty years two months
"thirty years" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

12:27 min | 1 year ago

"thirty years" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"These thirty years, and we have a lot of difficult cases. And I'm trained in western medicine. I was never trained in any, you know, hemp oil or any of that stuff. I'm kind of a traditional vet, and I started really giving it some thoughts. When I, you know, just the barrage of clients that are asking us, and I'm just saying, I don't know much about it. And what's really nice? I was introduced the doctor walks. Log and Joe's a double board certified vet with a PHD and your Daime that made me go and after I spoke with him. He's like, no, there's really something to this. And I guess the way I'm looking at it from my standpoint, of course, I don't want to recommend things that aren't tested. So I didn't well the product that we're gonna talk about today. It's been tested really more than any other. And I'm just sick of looking at animal suffering that there's nothing I can do for them. So there's plenty of patients that have been on non steroidal or other pain medications that are getting no help including some of my own technicians pets that were old and one of my own. Own actually, and it was really my own pet. My fourteen year old lab where I'm like, I'm either going to, you know, have to stop and euthanize or or I'm going to try something different. And that's what was kinda the the switch that flipped for me. Joe I their states is kind of rolling off all these various states you can have medicinal marijuana. You can have recreational marijuana. Are there any states to your knowledge that allow veterinarians to prescribe CBD or a how do we go about it because yes, I want to give my clients the best information, but I don't know how. Yeah. Yeah. I mean, I guess that's our biggest problem right now is that when states were making laws the veterinarians, we're sort of forgotten about for whatever reason. And so this led to a lot of questions coming into the American veterinary medical association, and they NS inside the right up some guidelines and their guidelines pretty much said that until we have further evidence of any true utility. We can't make recommendations therefore, we have to stick with the idea that we should not be recommending this, and you should not be recommending this as a as a veterinarian. Therefore, you know, your license could be in jeopardy if someone were to question you or sue because they their their dog had a bad reaction for whatever reason. And so this is where it came down to the science. And that's why folks like for I got involved saying, okay? How do we set up a really good study? And the reality is is that there are a lot of different recommendations out there. And I hear some of my colleagues going where did you get your dosing from? That's like, well, we went into the literature and looked at the human dosing. We looked at the road and dosing and we use dose. That were similar to where they were seeing effects in the other species, and which is far higher than than what a lot of the other companies out there recommend it's really about. You know, this is a pharmaceutical to some degree. And and we don't know exactly how it works. I it tends to have some pretty profound effect. You were saying that there are these various forms of cannon leads that's in help products. It doesn't have the THC thing that gets you high. Is it safe to use marijuana because oftentimes people are well, you know, I'll have a little edible. And I'll just give some of that to my pet, and I don't really know how much is marijuana basically safe to use in pets. Well, we we know that we, of course, we've all seen the we'll say poison control aspect where dog gets into somebody's stash of marijuana and they come in. And they'll dogs are down and out for a long time. And that's not what we're trying to do here. All we're trying to do is is mitigate the pain without that neurologic affect and and I think, you know, the reality is is that if you're using the right strain of ham for and marijuana. Here's the right strange. You can have some profound anti inflammatory effects without the the neurologic. And you know, they're just you know, we're sort of in the infancy of trying to understand this. All reality. And from a clinical perspective, we have evidence now that it does help with arthritis pain. And so we shouldn't be ignoring it. We should be looking to at least in the states that are allowing it to start changing the laws to help it or in areas, mitigate pain because we have very few pain relievers in dog. Just real quickly. So what I would say do not use marijuana in dogs. We know it can be toxic. All the strains are different. You know, what I'm specifically saying is with caution. Of course, watch what you're using don't use marijuana. We're talking about using CBD extracts that are not going to have more than point three percent THC. You know, we don't want THC that can be bad. So we're talking about products that are low and THC but have canal annoyed that have been studied. And that's the problem. There's a lot of products you can buy right now. They've had no studying. They don't know. Whether what the doses went to give it I mean, and we have a lot to learn on the elevate product. But at least we know what the pharmacokinetics are. We know how often to give it and what dose, and you mentioned side effects. I can just give you anecdotal side effects. I've had three dogs now that have eaten entire bags of the elevate shoes. So that's sixty choose and the normal dose on a dog. Would be one to to choose twice a day. So obviously, a pretty high dose this is only three dogs, but I've had no side effects, which is nice. I'm not saying there couldn't be. I'm just saying with my experience I are three dogs, and I actually had one cat that ate half a bag of the dog chews without a. Taste very good. So not to say, you can't have problems. You know, what I'm saying is about, but I'm just saying I have had four patients now that have consumed very very high doses without any side effects that doesn't mean there couldn't be. But my feeling right now is it's probably a pretty safe product. I love it. So your clinical experience is perfect. Let's go back a little bit. Dr watch leg where you're talking about. This elevate CBD oil. I always tell people when they come in. They're looking at various nutraceutical that you go to some health food store, you see a product is he okay, vitamin C? And here's a bottle of item in c has five hundred milligrams of vitamin c per tablet in it's forty two dollars for this little teeny bottling. We get another bottle. It's go to Costco. And it says she looked bottle in it's less expensive in the same psych. Well, expensive one must be better because it's more expensive. But CBD oils aren't all made the same. Tell us about these studies that you. You did at Cornell. So that in my mind, totally elevates the study because I can trust what you're saying. Tell me tell my listeners about this study. What happened? What did you do what kind of study was it? Yeah. So our study was actually a perceivable blinded crossover design where the dogs got one oil for about four weeks. And then we cost them over after a few weeks to another oil. And we didn't know which was which are owners didn't really have any idea. What was going on in terms of the oils? So we basically randomized it and we put them on. And then we just ask the owners over time, you know, how they felt we did our own examinations. Veterinarians, and and, you know, low behold by the end of the study we got through fifteen or sixteen dogs. I was very evident that there was one oil that seemed to be superior to the other. We started looking at the data, and we have enough data there to really show that there's a cocoa statistical a factor significant effect, and that we were basically dropping pain scores and we were dropping. Or an increasing activity and these dogs, and so he decided we might as well just start writing something up for publication. We met it and edited it the surgeons conference last year and finalizing some publication revisions to get this done in the next few weeks and the journal so that everybody can see it. It'll be online access so all all owners and all veterinaries can read it and evaluated for themselves. But from our perspective, we had some some very very pronounced affects particularly dogs that were in what we'll call more severe geriatric. So right now, Dr Fred with you being in clinical practice, I presume you been using this on your own clients coming through the door is it just odds. Can it be cats can use it in other species? And here we have had the indication Dr Jill of saying, okay? It's for pain. That's fabulous. What other things have you found that it can be used for Bernardino. No veterinarians we're going to start to think about other uses. So so once again, my idea on this was I'm training, western met. I didn't know that this was even an option, and I was very hesitant to use the elevate product I used it on my own dog. That's the first dog I ever used it on. And we prob- I probably have a hundred and fifty patients on one hundred and fifty canine patients, mainly with mobility and osteoarthritis problems. That's the main reason we put them on. But I definitely played around with other things I'm not saying to do it. But I have my feeling is it would be interesting, and we're actually doing some studies right now, how will this work for dogs with anxiety, for instance, phobias thunderstorm phobias, which we have a big problem on the east coast or just, you know, fear, anxiety and stress coming into the vet hospital. I think there's some interesting things certainly we know in people especially in children, they're using it and seizures that's pretty well known. Is that something we could use it for could be. Very interesting. And then certainly in the cat that was a big thing for me. And or someone going studies Joe knows of some of them better than I do in cats because I think there's some big uses the cat cats have a lot of anxiety problems urine marking that's a big problem, and there's certainly other ones. So I my feeling is. I think we will use this for a lot of conditions. But I'm also worried that you get on the internet and look up him or cannabinoid, and everybody's using it for everything. I mean, that's the problem, especially when it hasn't been studied. So I'm like you burn a dean. I'm like Joe I want to studies. I wanna know what the doses is it safe. We have to handle the legal issues too. Clearly, I think that's gonna take care of itself. But there's a lot of issues right now. But you know, I wanna know what's the product. That's being studied what studies are they doing is it safe, and what's the dose? So I mean, that's really where we're at right now. And one thing I applaud elevate on they're willing to do the studies which most of the other. People are not you can buy a lot of products online right now. No one has any idea if there's any cannabinoid in it, some of the early studies are showing some of the other products. There isn't any cannabinoid in it so buyer, beware. And that's why you know. I listen really to what Joe's doing. I trust them. He's a researcher. He has no financial interest in any of this. So that's why I'm so interested in the elevate product. And I mean, I'm sure there'll be others. But I want proof, you know, Bernardino. I'm like you. I wonder if I'm gonna recommend and I gotta have proof. And and I think we have a long way to go. But I think with elevate we know a lot more about that product. And then the other products on the market right now. And that makes me feel good doctor Joe with we're kind of all bowing to you. And thank you so much for doing this research. I'm impressed that Cornell was amenable to having you do this because I'm sure they were a little bit. I don't know. This is kind of out there on the fringes. We're gonna get bored certifications is in sports medicine and rehabilitation, so you must be seen. So many of these cats and dogs who are having joint issues. Arthritis is you're saying you've gone through the repertoire what we have available, and it's just not seeming to work what percentage of the that. You've been testing seemed to have a positive response. I'd say eighty eighty to ninety percent we're using it in, you know, I think we see the most dramatic responses are in the those older dogs who have multi joint lane. This is people aren't exactly sure whether the dogs and enough pain to to euthanize the dog, and and they'll actually go ahead and put the dog on this and say, you know, the quality of life is just better right now. And and they decide not to euthanize that older dog. And I think that's that's where this is. This is a real go to in those cases. Now if you have a dog. What we don't know if your dog just had surgery is a is this good for surgical pain. We don't really understand.

marijuana Joe Bernardino arthritis pain CBD Costco Cornell Arthritis Dr Fred Dr Jill researcher forty two dollars ninety percent fourteen year three percent thirty years four weeks
"thirty years" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"thirty years" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"The last thirty years, and he's recognizing that at his stage of life that he needs to start moving away from that business. And so it was a construction business. And you know, he realized that he's not going to be able to use his body as much as he gets into his seventies and eighties and they'll last month we had another student again same story. He'd built a successful construction business recognized that he needed to start taking different actions and start learning. A new skill to take advantage of the assets. He had and more importantly to not be relying on trading his time for money and part of it is just you owning that and recognizing that. If you start looking at your financial habits, if you're not satisfied with your financial results you need to break. Those habits you need to start doing something different and need to start making more productive financial habits. And so not only do we have business owners that have come in. And we have folks that work in factory and just feels like feels like they they're being treated as a number, and, you know, in with the factory worker, you know, he came to us and said, you know, what I need a different approach. I need a whole different. I need to stop trading. My time for money. And unfortunately, that's what most people have been trained to do. I know for me growing up. That's what I was trained to do. How is trained to trade my time for money? But as I started to look at the world around me as I started to look at the opportunities..

thirty years
"thirty years" Discussed on Doug Loves Movies

Doug Loves Movies

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"thirty years" Discussed on Doug Loves Movies

"Thirty years. A little under three. Yeah, that's my guess. Under three years. That's your kiss. Three years give or take ten months. You three twenty. Are. Okay. The mess tres. So we got anywhere from six years to two weeks. Tom Hanks. I pretty big role and he knows you're alone. And then his second feature film, he started pretty big role in the movie. Never have heard of that knows you're alone. Never heard of never heard of classic, and I'm Scott twice. Yeah, anyone by applause because that's works on audio to one person. Popular many, and I read it. I thought I read Tom Hanks pulse here, thinks he's career didn't release started till Bessler parts. I've said in the meetings. Catch on TV like we didn't ask you anything. To the listener at home. If you look it up better on that, we'll Kapiti page by now. Do it. We on how did this get made kept on calling Stellan Skarsgard stellar skateboard because that's what auto credit to iphone. And then it was automatically changed and now on his Kapiti pages permanently locked because every time they would change it back, it would just go back to stellar skateboard. Skateboards skateboards. And now I know that and we made a shirt that's still skateboard and now I also that he has it still scars garden skateboard. Hat. And that's been get a shirt. It's like a sub podcast. Really. Scares guard good a shirt. Podcast, right. Tell you the barracks, the providence, if you will, all guards shirts. Oh my God, Jeff. I wish your laugh.

Tom Hanks Stellan Skarsgard Scott Jeff Thirty years Three years three years ten months six years two weeks
"thirty years" Discussed on This Week in Travel

This Week in Travel

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"thirty years" Discussed on This Week in Travel

"Hassle than it was yeah in that the processes easy this is the hardest concept when i teach beginner at beginner sessions at conferences it's it's the hardest six or there's a lot of people that they've had the amex business platinum for their business for thirty years and every time they book a ticket they just call up acts and say i want a first class ticket to here and they're going to say at one million points because there does redeeming points for at a cash rate of his penny or the new chase effort reserve as one point five cents in so it gets very confusing to s uh to have people understand that these cards can transfer to a certain number of airliner hotel programs and then those programs have the ability to book on their partners so you can buy hands for you chase card points to united in an united can be used to block on all of their airline partners like ethiopian that i mentioned than when so that takes a bit of time to understand that i'm i'm convinced most the chase after a reserve cardholders right now that that jumped in on it because it was the the cool thing to do our just redeeming the points at one point five cents which which which is flexible an easy and then that mean being a value to them of it it it it's they may not even be aware of the transfer the the the old go to card that a lot of people talk about is the amix s p g so the star would preferred guess card sure and the reason for that is not just because of the hotels program it's because they have all of these airline transfer partners in when you move twenty thousand of their points you get 20 you get a five thousand bonus so you have this is very flexible programme much like the chase that there were talking about now and that card has great every day earnings so that has always been for for active travelers in of the go to in the past and the annual fee as much more reasonable than than these new level ultrapremium cards that that have lounge access and all that.

thirty years