35 Burst results for "thirty years"

Art Show (MM #3734)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 5 hrs ago

Art Show (MM #3734)

"The Maison with Kevin Nation. I'm sure if I look back at my life, there are a lot of things I've done over the course of say just even the last decade that if you'd asked me my twenties, if I would ever do that sometime in the future, I would have laughed and said, there's no way one thing in particular because I'm doing it. Tonight is going to an art show. One of my least favorite classes in both high school and college was often depreciation. Yet, I'd become a huge fan of art. Now, with that said, I've seen all the classics. I've been to the major art museums in Chicago, in New York, and Washington DC. And they were fine, but I like quirky or stuff off more unique stuff. I can just go stand and stare at art for hours at a time, and it's not the fancy kind of art, it's not the hybrid kind of art. That's what they made a study back in high school and college. I love going to art shows Tonight. Show from one of my favorite local artist who's been doing it for twenty years, in this town who's also respectable businessman. He does street art as a hobby now. I can't wait to go see it. But if you told me twenty years ago, thirty years ago, I was going to an art show, I would have laughed dead.

Kevin Nation Washington Dc Chicago New York
Art Show (MM #3734)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 5 hrs ago

Art Show (MM #3734)

"The Maison with Kevin Nation. I'm sure if I look back at my life, there are a lot of things I've done over the course of say just even the last decade that if you'd asked me my twenties, if I would ever do that sometime in the future, I would have laughed and said, there's no way one thing in particular because I'm doing it. Tonight is going to an art show. One of my least favorite classes in both high school and college was often depreciation. Yet, I'd become a huge fan of art. Now, with that said, I've seen all the classics. I've been to the major art museums in Chicago, in New York, and Washington DC. And they were fine, but I like quirky or stuff off more unique stuff. I can just go stand and stare at art for hours at a time, and it's not the fancy kind of art, it's not the hybrid kind of art. That's what they made a study back in high school and college. I love going to art shows Tonight. Show from one of my favorite local artist who's been doing it for twenty years, in this town who's also respectable businessman. He does street art as a hobby now. I can't wait to go see it. But if you told me twenty years ago, thirty years ago, I was going to an art show, I would have laughed dead.

Kevin Nation Washington Dc Chicago New York
Kimberly Crinshaw on Intersectionality

Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

02:04 min | 3 d ago

Kimberly Crinshaw on Intersectionality

"I'm just going to dive right in with how intersection analogy can help us understand why we're not done now. There's a lot of nonsense circulating around about what intersection analogy is particularly from. Its critics. they say it's a religion is an identity politics on steroids. My new favorite. It's an assault on straight white men. You know what i think about that now. All of these ideas about what intersection now. The is completely off. The mark when intersection alley is is a prism. It's a framework. It's a template for seeing and telling different kinds of stories about what happens in our workplaces what happens in society and to whom it happens now. Some part of why. We're not done is predicated on what we haven't been able to see what what's not remembered. The stories that are not told so intersection training wheels to get us to where we need to go. It's glasses high index glasses to help a see the things we need to see now in all honesty when i fashioned the term some thirty years ago i thought of it as remedial education for judges who didn't get to see didn't seem to understand what was happening to black women. They didn't seem to understand that. Black women can experienced race discrimination in a different way than black men do or they didn't understand black women can experience gender discrimination in a different way than white women did image. A graph reach story was a person who understood that problem claiming that she experienced discrimination as a black woman but earlier and the court seem to agree the since the employer hired black people and they hired women even though the black people that they hired were all men and the women they hired. We're all white. That couldn't prove discrimination.

S6 E12 - This is how to get (financially) healthy

Courage to Fight Again

19:24 min | 4 d ago

S6 E12 - This is how to get (financially) healthy

"Your housing your food your transportation and then medical and absolute necessities so if you have prescriptions or you've had doctor's appointments or you absolutely have to have daycare because you don't have family or friends that can watch and you have to pay for daycare. Those are absolute necessities. Everything else is extra fluff lifestyle spending. So when you're going through and figuring everything out these four things need to be taken care of welcome to another episode of the we serve now. What podcast the show. Where i do my best to answer the questions veterans and their families are already asking so you can make your post military life your best life. My name is aaron perkins. I'm a us army combat veteran husband to a beautiful wife. Daddy to amazing kiddos. I'm the author of the resolve book and that is a step by step guide. That takes you the veteran through a process of rediscovering. Your life's purpose. After you left the military. And i gotta tell you i have so been looking forward to today's episode because my special guest is here to talk about something that matters to every single one of us is topic money. My guest today is quite boss. Marco is a twelve year navy veteran who deployed in support of operation enduring freedom. He got out got his bachelor of science. Degree started a side gig as a financial coach in two thousand sixteen while working in the nonprofit industry in didn't take marco long to realize that he was struggling with a lot of the same financial issues as the people. He was trying to help so in an attempt to fix his own struggles. Marco applied business cash flow principles to his own finances with an eighteen months. He added nearly one hundred thousand dollars to his net worth and his skills are skills that anyone can use. Marco now has his own financial consulting business. Called live like others. can't marco. it is so good to have you on the show today. Welcome to we serve now. What a thanks for having me on. It's pleasure to be here to serve all the rest of the veterans. They're listening absolutely man absolutely. Been looking forward to have you on the show. So what just take a few minutes and introduce yourself. Tell us a little bit of your back story how you got here. Well you covered a lot of it which was great but like it said so. I served twelve years of military. And when i got out i had a mountain of debt. I think it was like sixty thousand dollars in debt. When i left active duty was going to school got my bachelor business management and when moved down to florida a job. They're kinda help me pay down some more of The debt that ended up having once i got back from afghanistan. 'cause so side note. I went to afghan volunteer to to afghanistan to pay off my consumer debt and paid off the debt and then had a ton of money when i got back and did some investments that were really great but the problem was is. I didn't change my spending habits and some other habits. That i had that were really ingrained so i ended up building up that data again and was down in florida before i moved back home to ohio i ended up with like it probably about another twenty grand worth of debt when i moved back home and i was like said twenty twenty sixteen. I started looking at my personal finances. I got married in two thousand fifteen and after a year of trying to manage to all that we finally got everything into really like one pot start applying the business finance principles to my own personal finances and when i first started i was negative. Twenty five thousand dollars in my net worth so because all everything and i still wanna own twenty five thousand dollars so when i started applying some of those principles and turned it around and it was like oh my gosh in eighteen months be able to get to seventy five thousand and net worth. It was not so. I started taking some of those same principles and teaching some people. I knew some friends. And it's like okay. I really got something here but was really interesting. Is that these same principles basic math principles but these are the same things that have teaching the low income. People that for the nonprofit that i was working at so is really crazy that. There's so much parallel. The only difference is that my mistakes were spectacular because there is a larger amount of income to work with so it's it's really interesting the mindset that we don't teach so i that's what it was like. Okay there's a group of people working in the nonprofit world and the rule low income side of things. There's a whole support system around that but there's very few supports for this this middle class. The wealthy know how to do it. The low income have a ton of support. And when you're trying to make that transition to from low income or even the lower middle-class into an upper middle class even making that transition if you don't have some the fundamentals You're never gonna make it or it's gonna take forever by the time you retire like oh okay now i get. It would have been great thirty years ago. Sure so that's why i got into. That's what i got into being a coach. Cool man all right. So so the first question i have for you is it. It's a simple one. But i think it's one of those things that needs to be addressed because a lot of us find ourselves in a situation where we think that our finances are kind of like a bygone conclusion. You know i grew up in poverty. You know song going to stay in poverty. And so i don't even think about i. Just go through the motions. I you know. I get the car loan. I get credit cards. I get in debt. You know i do all these sayings in. I'm not really focused on my financial health right so when it comes to finances why should i even care. How big of a deal is it. Well i would have to say just starting out. It's actually perfect timing because this last year taught all of us. I mean how many people lost their jobs or were furloughed or laid off and maybe two never even get them back. It can come at any time. And if you're not prepared for it is what a lot of people don't realize is that when they signed their name for alone they're trading future time for something right now and it takes a special type of person to be an entrepreneur to be to be able to go out and create wealth but the majority of americans work for their money as opposed to creating their money. If that makes sense and there's nothing wrong with that. There's nothing wrong going to work and and working a nine to five job you can be in everyday millionaire working a nine to five job you can. It's entirely possible but it's just. It's really crazy that when when wrenches thrown into it that we lose traction so fast if thing was like bank rate. It's on the ads that you've been running for me so it's six hundred ten. Ten people don't budget seven ten barely budget. An eight out of ten are living paycheck to paycheck. It's it's crazy as stupid number. Eighty percent of the people in the us are living paycheck to paycheck. That's nuts. That really is so eight out of ten people living paycheck to paycheck. Just you know if if you miss a paycheck or like you just mentioned you lose your job because of whatever reason pandemic or anything else. It's a huge impact. Not just. I don't know how i'm gonna pay bills for the next couple of weeks but it can like really really set you back. I think it's a perfect setup to talk about. What you just mentioned budgeting a little bit right. A lot of people don't budget so let's say for example. I know what a budget is. You know i've heard the term of. I've seen it on the news talk about but i've never tried it for me and for my family. Can you give us an insight into that. Like where do you even get started. Well sure an you can do a search on the internet for how i do a budget and almost all of them are going to give you the first piece of bad advice that you will ever hear when it comes to budgeting track your expenses for the next month. No you don't have to track your expenses for the next month. You know why because what you do. This month is the exact same thing he did last month. Just pull your bank statements. Look at your bank statements. That will is a great snapshot of your personal financial behavior and what your lifestyle choices are and when you take a look at that then you've got you've got gotta place all of those into a it or as we'll talk a little bit here a of a wall for foundation. There are four things that you have to take care of everything else is fluff and you can create whatever whatever other buckets you wine or i mean flake from an accounting. Were coming perspective. These are lineups okay. So you've got you've got your income and your expenses and then your expenses or all of your line break it down and then it breaks down even further when you file your taxes so every category that you make is a line item but there's four that are super important. Four and a lot of the times people tried to budget everything and they say okay budget down every last dollar and even the even the dollars that you're gonna put into savings if you don't have a good foundation to take care of the basic things that you need to have. It doesn't matter what you put into savings. It doesn't matter what what you spend on clothes. It doesn't excuse me it doesn't matter what what extra expenses and entertainment things that you wanna do. You've got to have these four things. Take care of i and what's interesting about them. Is it lines up. Perfectly with maslow's hierarchy and i'll leave it at that for further on all right so talk to us a little bit more about the four walls right. You mentioned the four walls and you know unite chatted about these a little bit before we go kind of hit the record button here as we were preparing for the show but that i'd never heard that term before the four walls. Can you explain like what those four walls are shirt. A quick back story on on the four walls. Is that if you do any personal financial searching on the internet. You're probably gonna come across the name. Dave ramsey dave ramsey. Oh yes some guy of phenomenal mindset really. Is there some things. Because i'm a business guy. There's some things that i can't entirely subscribe to because for me personally. There is some good debt. Because i'm a business guy. I used other people's money to make more money for my business. So that i can go ahead and potentially hire somebody in sure. Grow the economy that right right so for me. There is some good data. But from dave ramsey's perspective. There's no debt is good so the four walls are the four basic things that you need to survive. And when i say talking about maslow's hierarchy the bottom two levels of maslow's hierarchy pyramid are psychological and safety and that deals with food shelter and essentially money and i clued transportation in that because you need transportation get to and from work sir so the four walls are actually order. I it's it's your housing your food your transportation and then i. I don't like saying catch off for this last one but medical and other absolute necessities. So if you have prescriptions or you've had doctor's appointments or you absolutely have to have daycare 'cause you don't have family or friends that can watch and you have to pay for daycare. Those are absolute necessities. Everything else is extra fluff lifestyle. Spending this is still considered lifestyle spending as well but this is your baseline lifestyle. So when you're going through and figuring everything out these four things need to be taken care of and as you're going through the math and figure out okay. I'm not bringing in enough to cover the us basic four things. you're living to lavishly. You have played into the game of catching up with the joneses. You're trying to find too many influencers and live like them and showcase to the world. What all the amount of debt that you're bringing on is essentially what you're showcasing. You're not living the good life you're actually living a really crappy life. So that's kind of the premise of the four walls. And it when. I didn't really know that term when i first started doing my own budgeting but i realize kay. I've got regular monthly expenses that i always have to pay out have to pay my mortgage. I always have to pay the insurance. I always have to put gas in my car. Food on the table and a couple of medications and and some clothes. Those are the things that always spend money on every single month. What's fantastic about that is because it is you have the ability to look back over the last twelve months and really identify what your lifestyle is just by those expenses alone. Yeah that's that's interesting and it's it's definitely a a i won't say it's that different but it's definitely different than like you said what a lot of folks are gonna find when they do that. Google search for when they do that duck go search right on the internet of. Hey how do. I do a budget you know. What are the first things. I i should consider and and using hierarchy of needs and for those who are familiar with it. This basically just a pyramid that that stacks from bottom to top the needs. Every person has basic needs like markos already talked about psychological needs and then tops off. Self-fulfilment needs achieving your full potential including creative activities. And things like that. But with the four walls i know. They're all critical right but is one more important than the other. Is that the all really really for lack of a better term foundational for your financial health. They all are foundational. But dave will argue. And i kinda back this little bit. Is that if you have a choice between spending money on your electric bill and spending money on food you buy food and you can work with the company to to keep your electricity on food. Would probably the be the highest priority. Next would be your housing so everything that's involved with your housing your mortgage your mortgage. Iran's your utilities and then transportation would be third because there are things that you can do if you're spending too much on transportation. There's things that you can do to to lower those expenses but we can get into that little bit and then obviously medical. Now it's it'd be a toss up then if you've got to take medications or you need food a well. Okay then yeah but but at the same time. If the majority americans being healthy and not needing a whole lot of medications food would be the top priority so food station and then the other necessities sure sure so that so that kind of helps me prioritize as far as you know if i do find myself in a situation like I don't know what i'm going to you know. I only have so much money this month. And i can't pay whatever this one bill. Is you know kind of helps me. Prioritize food housing transportation medical. You know and then if it's more detailed it's down to the really really fine details of a few dollars here versus a few dollars here then. I think that's something you really just sit down like. If it's if it's you by yourself you just make the best decision right an absolutely. If it's you with your family you know you sit down with your spouse and or with your partner and you you talk about it like what do we want to do this month to make ends meet well and and i would say to that the amount of people who actually don't realize where their money's going is phenomenal so he say eighty percents living paycheck to paycheck. I would say one hundred percent of that. Eighty percent have no idea whether money's going and they don't realize that they probably have enough coming in to cover these four walls and then some that the problem comes is when they make all of the additional lifestyle choices and then they're like oh. I don't have enough money for food while it's because they just bought a thousand dollar iphone. So i mean like i know that's really rudimentary example. Because most people are buying their phones on the month to month plan that they put on that they tacked onto your bill which side note really crazy. I was trying to buy a new phone for my wife. No cellphone store will let me pay full price outright for the phone. They forced me to put it onto a monthly plan. Really i is crazy not i was like. I've got nine hundred dollars. That i'm gonna pay you right now and they don't want it. They want it on the monthly plan. So what's funny is so my family. We are an android family. Okay we've always been. We've never gotten into the iphones. You know my daughter. She's a teenager now. So she's kind of leading me toward the iphone but we've always been an android family and for the past few years. I have bought all of our phones directly from samsung. I don't know if you can do that with apple or not if it has to be carrier specific and you have to do over a month to month plan but if i go to samsung dot com. I can just buy that phone outright. I couldn't yeah. I basically i swipe my card more or less you know and you type in my numbers. He and then a couple of days i get new phone on my on my doorstep and so have to remember that for my wife because she's a samsung guy. I'm an iphone. Yeah for sure and so we when we started doing that. We've been with our with our carrier for. I don't know five six seven years now and so we're not really planning on leaving and going to another carrier. But i do get the unlocked phones just in case i need to right and so and so it is really nice to just be able to swipe their credit card and be like. Hey here you go. Here's all the money up front. I don't have to worry about that That money coming out every month right so off that sidetrack for second sorry about that it was just. It was really crazy when i was trying to do that. I couldn't believe that is crazy for phone. So why things that. When when i sit down with somebody and i'm going through this. Is that a lot of people. Don't realize all of the essentially the line items within each of these categories so under housing. There's a couple of lines you've got your mortgage or your rent which includes particularly if you have a mortgage. It also

Marco Aaron Perkins Dave Ramsey Maslow Afghanistan Florida Us Army Navy Ohio United States Markos KAY
From Frying Chicken to Working at Google With Danny Thompson

Learn to Code with Me

02:06 min | 4 d ago

From Frying Chicken to Working at Google With Danny Thompson

"Hey danny thanks so much for coming on the show. Thanks for having me. I'm so excited to be here. And i'm a big fan of the podcast. I've been listening to for a couple years now so very excited to be here. Oh well thank you so much. Of course. I gave you a longer introduction before were chatting but could you just tell us a bit about your story and what was happening in your life before. He started learning to code absolutely. I was the reason why i got into. Tech was because of a rapper. This robber invested several million dollars into a tech company. And this kind of blew my mind because at this point of my life i was thirty years old working in a gas station frying chicken and i found myself at a foregone in a road at this point and i said if i go right i'm gonna be in this gas station until the day i die or if i go left to make a change and i don't know what it is just got to do something different. This time that i saw this interview. And he's being asked and he's like why did you spend several million dollars into a tech company and he said i'm learning how to cope now. This blew my mind. Because i never knew someone from my kind of background could ever learn how to cook. My perception at the time was coating was for the in the scientists of the world never for an average individual so he's learning how to code and i'm like why is he learning. Obviously he's not learning how to code because he wants to become a developer and the reasoning was not that he's going to become a developer. And give this million dollar rocker right but it was. Why wouldn't you wanna know how the thing that you touch. Ninety percent out of your day how it operates like why is the extent of our knowledge when it comes to a computer opening a browser opening up youtube dot com and watch some kathy heels and so he starts learning how to code and sorta why and i said i wanna know more like. Why does my laptop cost two thousand dollars. Why does my smartphone cost fifteen hundred bucks. And i started how to and it was never with the idea of. I'm going to become a developer. That came way down the road. It was more long idea of. I'm gonna make a website and it's going to be the best website in the world and it's going to have all the stuff in everyone's gonna want to check it out. But i'm just going to make a website and just have something on there

Danny Youtube
Harry and Meghan Announce Birth of Second Baby, Lilibet Diana

Juicy Scoop with Heather McDonald

02:15 min | 4 d ago

Harry and Meghan Announce Birth of Second Baby, Lilibet Diana

"Harry and again had their baby girl and they named her little bit lily bit diana now i think having a middle name be. Diana was not a big surprise. I think a lot of people predicted that. Somehow someone did put out little bit a while ago and i don't know where i saw it but it was definitely before they announced that that was the name and then a juicy scooper wrote to me and said. Do you think it's a little bit of diana is maybe you're like heather. This is in every paper. But i'm just saying. I just got it and i thought a little bit of diana. She's a little bit of diana. Anyway congrats to all the young mothers running around montecito. that wanna be friends or go to the same preschool. Once you become friends with megan taylor. She's got an invitation. Here at juicy scoop okay joe joe see well as a big weekend in la. There were a three day. Gay pride festival going on. I think it ended up at the coliseum but every day were parties and on june fourth. Police unfortunately were called to joe. Joe's was house responding to a medical emergency. Apparently thirty year old man had odid according to tmz and the information they got from their paramedics. Hopefully he is okay. But the question was was a thirty year. Old guy doing at joe's house believe she's only nineteen or maybe she is thirty. I don't even know like ponytail is still going strong and i just hope that in just being authentic selves. She is able to take that pony. A lot of people are concerned about her hairline. There was a conversation about it on my facebook group to see scoop obsessed other people weighing in that. They were prima ballerina. They were really sharp hotel for long time and it did affect their hair line long-term so there is a lot of concern of when she's just going to release that ponytail and just like let herself be

Diana Megan Taylor Joe Joe Montecito Harry Heather JOE TMZ LA Facebook
State Seeks 30 Years for Chauvin; Defense Wants Time Served

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | Last week

State Seeks 30 Years for Chauvin; Defense Wants Time Served

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting the state seeks thirty years for the former police officer convicted of murder in the death of George Floyd according to court documents filed Wednesday prosecutors are seeking a thirty year prison sentence for former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin who was convicted of murder in the death of George Floyd but defense attorney Eric Nelson is asking that shall then be sentenced to probation and the time already served Sheldon was convicted in April of second degree unintentional murder third degree murder and second degree manslaughter for pressing his knee on Floyd's neck for about nine and a half minutes as Floyd said he couldn't breathe under Minnesota law he will be sentenced on only the most serious conviction second degree manslaughter chauvinist Gadgil to be sentenced on June twenty fifth hi Mike Rossio

George Floyd Mike Rossi Derek Chauvin Eric Nelson Minneapolis Floyd Sheldon Minnesota Gadgil Mike Rossio
Interview With David Smith, Chief Technology Officer

Risky Business with the Coverage Queens

02:06 min | Last week

Interview With David Smith, Chief Technology Officer

"David welcome. Hi david oh me on the show. Monday and it's already seventy reporter back and forth as a new seatbelt on pulling it on rave for cooking. Great that's so great will welcome and i. There's so much that we're going to cover obviously with your position in what you're doing a we have been talking about that as we started. Risky business And you your title chief. Technology officer keeps coming up. And i didn't even know that that that position existed and clearly. This is something now districts everywhere have you and probably have many To deal with this New life that we have of kids using technology so cher cher little bit how high got started. And and what your what your connection is with tustin and and you've got a very busy office. It looks incredible Let me just say this. Your first show You talked about Bless you thirty years of industry and staff either years news industry in a gun sight because that's mine member which means on talking to grow shorts which is really nice right. We all started when we were ten right enter. It was a little different for that for me. But i'll speak for myself by i've been in. It all of my life from the astara and seventy seven with a field trip to hide the nfl him with technology I spent the first twenty years of my career in the private sector Just enjoying my. For conform number large companies on the structure departments everything from finance vacuums. You support is designed applications support and design and everything i worked for some video game companies coming up which may need king on the rotten's for as my kids are

Cher Cher David Tustin NFL
Naked Mole Rats: The Key to Slowing Human Aging?

Kottke Ride Home

01:54 min | 2 weeks ago

Naked Mole Rats: The Key to Slowing Human Aging?

"Rodents only live a few years. Maybe six at the most for some of the common ones. That's comparative biologist. Russia buffet stein was stunned in the late nineties. When the naked mole rats that she'd been studying just wouldn't die. She was working with some that. Were more than fifteen years old and one naked mole rat who she first met while doing doctoral work in the eighties. A pink and wrinkly dude named joe. He is now thirty nine years old and officially the oldest living naked mole rat on record. He's barely aged at all in nearly four decades and there is every expectation that he'll make it to the big four. Oh thanks to the work of buffon's stein and increasing number of scientists studying naked mole rats and various capacities. We now know that the creatures have an astonishing lifespan of around thirty years. Joe is an anomaly of the anomalies. Of course anyone who's read. Harry potter knows what's going on here. Joe is clearly a shape shifting wizard who faked his own death after joining a colton murdering his best friend. so he's been hiding out as a naked mole rat for the past few decades. I'm onto you joe. But magical explanations aside naked mole rats. It turns out are fascinating. In addition to living exceptionally long. Lives for rodents naked mole. Rats unlike other mammals aren't susceptible to many diseases like arthritis cancer and alzheimer's they can also withstand long periods without oxygen and are impervious to pain from acid. There is so much about naked mole. Rats that is absolutely wild and researchers still trying to figure out the reason for a lot of it but we're starting to get more information because a lot more players have entered the ring in recent years due to the naked mole rats relative lack of aging and low occurrence of age associated disease. They've become a hot subject of study for cancer. Researchers and anyone interested in

Buffet Stein JOE Russia Arthritis Cancer Colton Harry Potter Alzheimer Associated Disease Cancer
Karine Jean-Pierre Makes History Giving White House Briefing

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 2 weeks ago

Karine Jean-Pierre Makes History Giving White House Briefing

"It was a historic day in the White House briefing room okay good to see everyone it was a routine daily briefing and at the same time a bit of history it's a real honor to be standing out to just be standing here today Kareem John Pierre became the first openly gay woman to deliver the White House briefing and the first black woman to do it in thirty years clearly the president believes in in representation matters John P. error is seen as a potential successor to Jen Psaki who say she only intends to serve as press secretary for about a year Sager mag ani Washington

Kareem John Pierre White House John P. Error Jen Psaki Ani Washington
Former Sen. John Warner Dies at 94, Married Elizabeth Taylor

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 2 weeks ago

Former Sen. John Warner Dies at 94, Married Elizabeth Taylor

"Former GOP senator John Warner has died at ninety four after a life of war politics and Hollywood Warner served in the military during both World War two and the Korean War before becoming navy secretary and eventually the Senate armed services committee's chair known for his blunt questioning of generals like David Petraeus does that make America safer so I I don't know actually it from four stars to movie stars Warner was also married to Elizabeth Taylor she died nearly thirty years after their divorce thank you for all the heartfelt condolences that you've expressed for this iconic figure Warner's long time chief of staff says he died of heart failure yesterday with his wife and daughter at his side Sager mag ani Washington

Senate Armed Services Committe John Warner Warner GOP David Petraeus Hollywood Navy Elizabeth Taylor America Heart Failure Ani Washington
Manhattan DA Convenes Grand Jury in Trump Investigation

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

02:06 min | 2 weeks ago

Manhattan DA Convenes Grand Jury in Trump Investigation

"Washington post first to report that the manhattan district attorney as convened a grand jury. That is quote expected to decide whether to indict trump executives at his company or the business itself should prosecutors present the panel with criminal charges the report continues to say the move indicates that manhattan district attorney cyrus vance investigation of the former president and his business has reached an advanced stage after more than two years. It suggests to advance believes he has found evidence of a crime if not by trump then by someone potentially close to him or by his company district attorney. Vance has been looking at trump's business practices before he was president. Vance fought all the way to the supreme court to get the former president's tax returns days ends. New york's attorney general letitia. James is also conducting a civil investigation into trump. she recently joined forces with vance's office and the criminal inquiry. These investigations are believed to be largely stemming from cases involving trump's former lawyer and fixer. Michael cohen will eventually of course famously turned on his boss after pleading guilty to making hush money payoffs for trump and lying to congress his latest. This latest investigation appears to hinge on longtime trump organization. Cfo alan weisselberg. Who has been under pressure from the manhattan. Da one of the post reporters who broke tonight story described wisel berg's importance to this case. He's almost the human equivalent of trump's taxes. He's the guy through which almost all of trump's financial transactions big and small have passed through for thirty years so he would be a valuable asset if you thought there was a financial crime to no one surprise. Trump tonight responded to the washington post story with a lengthy statement calling the da's investigation. And we quote here a continuation of the greatest witch hunt in american history purely political and an affront to the almost seventy five million voters who supported me in the presidential

Manhattan Cyrus Vance Vance Donald Trump Washington Post Letitia Cfo Alan Weisselberg Michael Cohen Wisel Berg Supreme Court James New York Congress
Interview With Novelist, Min Jin Lee

Asian Enough

01:50 min | 2 weeks ago

Interview With Novelist, Min Jin Lee

"Thank you so much for joining us mention out. It's a pleasure to be here. Tracy and jen and Yes i do have a lotta side hustles. I don't know he do it. And the pandemic even very like on your hustle and very productive seems. Well i'm fifty two. And i'm the sole provider for my family so in a way. I think that i have my priorities. And also i'm a writer. The which means that i'm a freelancer. That's what it is so you kind of have to keep your game on. Well i think for me. This is the biggest question for all writers but why novels i feel like that's one of the hardest storytelling ways that is out there. It started out with a corporate lawyer. Just wine apples while. I'm a big reader so that is really the reason why i wanted to write a novel and has really for me very very difficult. I've only produced two in about thirty years. So i've had to have all these side hustles to basically pay for these things. Because i never wrote a book before on contract and that's really important to share because a lot of people think that you have an idea you contact the publisher and say hey. I want to write a book and it just doesn't work that way. So i wrote it on spec and of course in the film industry guys no i wrote the entire thing and i presented it to somebody and said hey can i get one representation. I'd even have an agent. When i wrote my first book and it took me about eleven years of this kind of beating my head against the wall. Why did i choose novels. Because i think novels can create an incredible world. That's really difficult to do any other media. So that's why i did it but for me. It was a very long struggle. I've met young very talented writers who can just pop out. And i think that's awesome. That was not me.

JEN Tracy
Causal Models in Practice at Lyft With Sean Taylor

The TWIML AI Podcast

01:38 min | 2 weeks ago

Causal Models in Practice at Lyft With Sean Taylor

"Shown. Welcome to the podcast. Thanks sam happy to be here. I'm super excited to chat with you. It's been a long time in the works and really looking forward to our conversation. I like to get these interviews. Started by having you share a bit about your background and introduce yourself to our community. How'd you get started working in data science yet thrilled to be here. Always fun to like reminisce about how you ended up where you got. Sometimes when i think about the journey to being data scientist it goes all the way back to like college working on real estate research. The professor to work with a pen and getting into geospatial data there. There's a long process since then. And probably the most pivotal thing was working. In grad school on arch gal experimentation. Markle program was studying is studying to be a social scientists. Study helped people influence their friends online. Really around this era of big data and people getting really interested in the dupin hive running. Large-scale experiments and. I got very lucky and got an internship at facebook thirty year. Old internist is folks this sort of like that movie the interns and i got a great sediments whereas facebook denied goals and anytime box were awesome and taught me everything i needed to know about being data scientist at facebook and then decided to stick around stay so it was a disa- facebook for about seven years and then about two years ago switched over to lift where i started working on marketplace experimentation and other stuff that lifted very different set of problems in the facebook you can trace that journey all the way back twenty years if you want to or maybe just ten but it's still ending up to be a lot of time with this feeling

Facebook SAM
The death of the universe -- and what it means for life | Katie Mack [TEST]

TED Talks Daily

07:39 min | 2 weeks ago

The death of the universe -- and what it means for life | Katie Mack [TEST]

"Hi neil degrasse. Tyson here guest hosting today on ted talks daily. Here's a talk from a ted fellow and fellow. Astrophysicist katie mac. She's a thought leader. Who's trying to make sense out of the complicated and theoretical issues related to the future of the universe. Wait wait actually. Her specialty is the end of the universe. That's where she's coming from or at least that's where she's going or that's where she's going to take us. Check it out. hello then. i'm chris hansen. The guy lucky enough to run ted now host a podcast called the ted interview and this on the show. I talked to someone really special name. The woman i'm married to jacqueline nova grads. She's been thirty years. Learning how to use the tools of business to tackle global poverty. We got drawn into capitalism raised to the rank of religion. And now we have an opportunity to have a very different conversation. Find the tudent. Few wherever you listen to costs. I showed people all around dc antiquites. My guests engaged. I liked his sprinkle in a fun. Factor to next off dupont circle. Also here's a lifestyle tip for you. Try apple pay. You can now just tap with your phone or watch to get on the bus or train all over the dc area at your smart trip to the apple wallet than just tap to ride apple. Pay on iphone now. Arriving on metro. Support for ted talks. Daily comes from odu dues suite of business. Apps has everything you need to run a company. Think of your smartphone with all your apps right at your fingertips odu is just like that for business but instead of an app to order takeout or tell you the weather you have sales inventory accounting and more union the department we've got it covered and they're all connected joined the six million users who stopped wasting time and started getting stuff done go to odu dot com slash ted to start a free trial that's od show dot com slash ted. I the universe. The vastness the mystery the astonishing beauty of the stars. I love everything about it. And i devoted my life to studying it from adam's two galaxies from beginning to end but lately i've gotten stuck on that last bit the fact that the universe is dying. I know this may come as a shock. I mean it's the universe it's everything it's supposed to be eternal right but it isn't. We know the universe had a beginning and everything that begins and the start of the story is familiar one. In the beginning there was light. We know that because we can see it. Directly the cosmos today is filled with low energy background radiation leftover from a time when the whole universe was an all encompassing inferno in its first three hundred and eighty thousand years space or dark. it was thick. With a churning humming plasma it was hot and dense it was loud but it was also expanding over time the fire dissipated and space cooled clouds of gas pulled together by their own gravity form stars and galaxies and planets and us and one day astronomers using a microwave receiver detected a bit of static coming from every direction the sky the leftover radiation from that promote. He'll fire we can know map out the cosmos to the farthest reaches of the observable universe. We can see distant galaxies whose light has taken billions of years to reach us so by looking at them. We're looking deep into the past. We can watch how the expansion of the universe has slowed down since that hot early phase. Thirteen point eight billion years ago we can see collisions of entire galaxies. And watch the star formation the result from the sudden conflagration of all that cosmic hydrogen and we can see that these collisions are happening. Less and less. The expansion of the universe isn't slowing down anymore. A few billion years ago. It started speeding up. Distant galaxies are getting farther apart faster and faster star formation has slowed in fact we can calculate exactly how much and when we do we find something shocking of all the stars that have ever been born or that ever will be around ninety percent have already come into being from now until the end of time the universes were he'll just that last ten percent the end of the universe is coming. There are few ways that could happen but the most likely is called the heat death and in agonizing slow languishing of the cosmos stars. Burn out leaves smoldering ash. Galaxies become increasingly isolated in their own dimples of light particles decay even black holes evaporate into the void. Of course we still have some time. The heat is so far in the future. We hardly have words to describe it long. Past a billion years when the sun expands and boils off the oceans of the earth long past one hundred billion years we lose the ability to see distant galaxies and that faint trace of big bang light long after we are left alone in the darkness watching the milky way. Fade it's okay to be sad about it even if it is trillions of years in the future. No one wants to think about something. They love coming to an end as disconnected as it may be us here now. It is somehow more profound than personal death. We have strategies for accepting the ability of that. After all we tell ourselves something of us will live on. Maybe it will be our great works. Maybe it will be our children carrying on our genetic material or perhaps our basic outlook on life. Maybe it will be some idea worth spreading humanity might venture out into the stars and evolve and change but something of us will survive but the universe ends at some point. We have no legacy. There will come a time when in a very real sense our existence will not have mattered. The slate will be wiped clean completely. Why should we spend our lives seeking answers to the ultimate question of reality. If eventually there will be no one left to tell. Why build a sandcastle when you can see that the tide is coming in. I've asked a dozen other cosmologists. And they all had different answers to some. The death of the cosmos seems right. It's freeing to know that we are temporary. I very much like our glibness one told me to others. The question itself motivates the search for some alternative theory. There must be some way to carry on the slow fade to black. Just cannot be our story ends. One found comfort in the possibility of the multi vers. It's not all about us. He said personally. I feel lucky our cosmos existed for billions of years before us and it will carry on long after. We are gone

TED Neil Degrasse Katie Mac Jacqueline Nova Apple Chris Hansen ODU Tyson Adam
Delving Into the Mind of the BTK Serial Killer With Dr. Katherine Ramsland

My Favorite Murder with Karen Kilgariff and Georgia Hardstark

02:24 min | 2 weeks ago

Delving Into the Mind of the BTK Serial Killer With Dr. Katherine Ramsland

"Katherine ram slant. I'm a professor of forensic psychology and the author of confessions of a serial killer. What i call guided. Dennis rader the t k. Serial killer. Dr ramsland had unprecedented access to one of the most notorious serial killers in american history. She's a real life minehunter. She spent years working with dennis rader to figure out his psyche. Why he became a killer. It wasn't just dennis rader talking about himself in any which way he wanted. It was me guiding him toward the end of benefit in criminal justice psychology and law enforcement so that whatever we were doing would end up providing insights and also The proceeds benefit the victims families before we get started. Let me tell you. The story of dennis rader raider killed ten people in kansas over thirty years before he was finally caught. Bt k. stands for bind torture. Kill one of the things that was so frightening about raider is that he seemed relatively normal. This is from her book through jailhouse visits telephone calls and written correspondence. Catherine rams lynn worked with raider himself to analyze the layers of his psyche using his drawings. Letters interviews and raiders unique coats. She presents in meticulous detail. The childhood roots and development of one man's motivation to stalk torture and kill. Dennis rader grew up an all american boy in kansas into the heart of america with religious values and and intact family etc and yet he developed the idea that he wanted to be famous. He got attachments to Serial killers he read about as a teenager. Intrude detective magazines and girls made him feel uncomfortable and off balance so he began to put those things together. As a way to keep women under control was to be and to become famous was to become serial killer so his fantasies began to form around that notion and then he just identified with one day he was going to be is famous. Jack the ripper or ted bundy or any of the other ones and He said about to do that.

Dennis Rader Katherine Ram Slant Dr Ramsland Catherine Rams Lynn Kansas Raiders America Jack The Ripper Ted Bundy
Rhythms of Sacred Protest - Koach Baruch Frazier

Judaism Unbound

02:05 min | 3 weeks ago

Rhythms of Sacred Protest - Koach Baruch Frazier

"Wanna talk about somebody coming to to do what you're doing which is to be in rabbinical school after a career in another field. I'm just curious about that because up until relatively recently being a rabbi was like something that people did more or less out of college and as somebody who's now on the old side. I kind of feel like i actually have learned a lot in the last thirty years and if i were to become a rabbi which i've got rid would never be but if i if i did today audi much better at it than i would have been thirty years ago and so i'm wondering just could you talk a little bit about how you made that decision to become a rabbi. After having done something else for a long time. And how has that influenced the way that you experience being a rabbinical student. One of the things that was on my mind. When i decided that i wanted to go to rabbinical school was as a leader Leader in community already in saint louis missouri. Which is where most recently from people were already assigning the title. Rabbi to me. It felt very strange. A i that was one thing that propelled into rabbinical school. The other thing is that. I spent a lot of time as an audiologist and i was starting to notice that some of the people who were coming to me weren't necessarily coming to me for their physical. Let's say a problems or their physical situations that they were actually coming to me. And i was more so as chaplain than i. Was there. audiologist in as that started to shift. I say you know what. I think i should go to school. So that I've gone to school for a audiology. And i felt of my career was great and i also knew that there was foundational learning. That made that career great along with the experience in so i decided that i needed to go to rabbinical school to get some foundational learning so that those moments in time when i'm spending with people as their rabbi that the foundation is there

Audi Saint Louis Rabbi Missouri
Episode 149: Wendy Murphy on achieving gender equality under the law [TEST]

en(gender)ed

04:09 min | 3 weeks ago

Episode 149: Wendy Murphy on achieving gender equality under the law [TEST]

"Welcome to engendered. The show that features stories that explore the systems practices and policies that enable gender based violence and oppression and the solutions to end it. We used gender as a lens to understand power and oppression teach feminism and decolonized hearts and minds one story at a time engendered sponsored by candu. It spelled k. N. d. u. I t. and i'm your host terry. Un on this episode of the gender podcast as is wendy murphy former child abuse and sex crimes prosecutor who teaches at new england law school in boston and heads the women and children's advocacy project under the center for law and social responsibility. Wendy specialize in the representation of crime victims especially women and children. She also writes and lectures widely victims rights and criminal justice policy and published an expose on the american legal system and justice for some in two thousand and seven. We speak with windy today about the era. Its implications for women especially with respect to title nine and the need for feminist revolution in public policy law and in our collective consciousness. Welcome wendy thanks for joining our show. Thank you so much for having me. I'm really excited to be here. I think one of the unique things about you is that you both teach about sexual violence and gender inequality as well as practice it and tell us what you do and why you think that's important. Yeah i definitely don't practice sexual violence just want to be. I know what you meant. Yeah i teach a seminar called sexual violence and law reform. I've been teaching it for twenty years at new england boston. And you know what i do is which is not what most law students learn as i teach students. What's wrong with the law and how to use their skills as lawyers to fix it and in that sense you know i get to plant seeds. Help young lawyers think about their roles as lawyers and also help them to think differently about the law which is how most lawyers learn instead of just reading the law and applying the law to a certain fact pattern. How about reading the law in questioning whether the law is designed to to do what it purports to do and you know when you are a critical thinker as a lawyer. You're going to have a lot more opportunities to use your skills as an attorney to make things better and a lot of people go to law school for that reason right. A lot of my students are women. They've been raped in college They know someone who was raped in college. They take my class because they are outraged at the injustices that women endured when they were raped in college. And what. I love about how they feel at the end of my classes that they they sort of feel not just that they have consciousness but that they have now made sense of what didn't seem to make sense when they saw the injustice in what i mean by that is i help them understand how the law is. Designed to perpetuate sexual violence rather than prevented and it makes them a little crazy because nobody likes to hear that the law is designed to cause harm. But it least gives them clarity. That's why all this horrendous stuff happened. So that's helpful. And then i do litigators. Who mentioned litigated in court as well as teach because i think to be a really effective lawyer on behalf of women's civil rights a constitutional rights which is mired expertise. You have to be a kind of in the academy and in the trenches at the same time. If you're writing scholarly stuff and you know what's going on that's that's hurting women in real world cases. You're you're a better scholar and vice versa. If you're in the trenches litigating cases and you understand what the academy is saying about these big doctrines that affect your client's rights. You're gonna be a better litigator. So i make it. My you know might cause if you will to try to keep my head and feet in both places at all times. It's hard. But i i try just to give a shadow to other people who are doing that. How many other people are there and can name well. That's a good question. I think when. I first started doing this work. Which was thirty years ago.

Wendy Murphy New England Law School Women And Children's Advocacy Center For Law And Social Resp Wendy Thanks Boston Wendy Terry UN New England
"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

05:30 min | 11 months ago

"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

"Yeah I mean I think that as we're seeing in all of the various protest movements today that there's a certain hope that is particular to young people I mean youth is itself really hopeful concept right? Like all the future lays before you how can we shape it into what we want it to be, and so I think in that way stories about young people just kind of tap into that happened to that hope. And Nick. I was thinking and listening to the two of you is feels like some people are kind of diving into the darkness with their reading with these challenging subjects and challenging texts. Whereas, others might WANNA escape but but I'm hearing more and more people are diving in why do you think that is? For me when it first happened and craziness was for overtaking and we didn't know there at the beginning in March how bad it was going to be when we were talking about, I remember our events coordinator on March I was saying are going to cancel all of our events and that was inconceivable. But when I went to books books that I used to go to that were you know, let's say funny books lighter books they just weren't resonating with me whereas you know talking about why if I picked up the hate you give By Thomas Dot somehow since it speaks. So directly to where we are right now it just resonated more and you know we're lucky that that we have so many brilliant why authors and that that you know genre I'm is so rich but the I don't know I guess it's just the you know what my ear was looking for and and at this moment I I'm not looking for you know Good Day Sunshine I'm looking for revolution and so that I think is why some people are gravitating one way rather than the other. I am on a hard clock here. I've got less than a minute. So lightning round your next book Camille. Big, friendship how we keep each other close by..

Nick events coordinator Camille Thomas Dot
"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

05:28 min | 11 months ago

"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

"Plane and little, and she has to do with all of that in addition to being a woman in a time when women had little to no autonomy. So she has quite a lot to overcome and Jane is resilient in the face of all that adversity. I think the resilience that I'm most moved by in the book is Jane's Moral Resilience like she would quite literally rather be starving and homeless and act outside her own values or sacrificed her independence and I think it was amazing as a young person and as you know a woman in my early thirties now to be. To have this example of someone who's committed to her own spirituality and morality in a way that honors her own passions and desires without robbing her of equity. And then quickly the second down endorsed that yet. It's so so good. And there are lots of great film adaptations as well. The. Second Book I WanNa recommend is full disclosure. By Cameron. Garrett which is a young adult novel that focuses on an HIV positive teenager whose navigating high school and all the normal things that teenagers deal with like making and keeping friends falling in love and just developing as a person and the protagonist is the black adopted daughter of two gay men, both of whom are also people of Color it's primarily a story of the resilience of HIV positive people but it also touches on the resilience of Queer folks and Black and Brown people So if there is a young person in your life that you want to. Share. Some of those important stories with full disclosure is a great book for them. Those are great recommendations and Nick I know you have station eleven on your list which really struck me I loved it. I read it a few years ago in it felt more like fiction than than I think it would feel now. Is the wonderful scary thing about that book because you know in the middle of the pandemic why not go back to a book that is about a Pandemic and flu that decimates the population. What I loved about the book was that it begins with Shakespeare, which is how I want of course, all of my pandemic post apocalyptic books to begin In this case, it's King Lear and one of the stars dies onstage, and that's how the story begins and then we flash forward twenty years out to this pandemic has literally killed most of the population that we have a traveling troupe Called the traveling symphony that is itinerant and age wander around the Great Lakes region and they are artists doing the only thing that they know how to do how precent though Emily Saint John Mandell was in her book to describe some of the things that are happening today is uncanny loved about it though is that at the.

Jane Pandemic King Lear Great Lakes Nick Emily Saint John Mandell HIV Cameron Garrett flu
"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

03:23 min | 11 months ago

"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

"Which of course is? Frightening on so many. Different levels. But that when they call you, a terrorist is just an amazing book really a resilient writer, the other. is they can't close all by Larry who was a terrific young journalist and this book stemmed after Michael Brown was killed. You know yet another young African American man who was murdered on this time, of course, by the police. So those are two books that are high on the list, but maybe weren't as popular as you know between the world in me or how to be an anti-racist, which also, of course, are wonderful wonderful books. I'd love to get your reaction to one that has really stayed with me books about ten years old now. But in this space, it's called the warmth of other suns by Isabel. Wilkerson and it's about the great migration. I think it was published in two thousand ten and tracks a number of families migrating from the south to the north over a forty year period and tells incredible stories of what people left, what people came to how they built their families, and for me was just a deep education in a piece of our history in America that I was just not taught in school at all. I don't I'm sorry. You're familiar with the fact that I got dead silence for both. I'm GonNa have to carry the torch on that one alone. I was having the the the microphone over but no the. Book came out. It was a huge huge seller. That's one bit. In all the bookstore associated with has continue to sell incredibly well, and like you say it was a piece of history that for me I also was unacquainted with and to see that Modern Day migration you say, going south to north and what had to be left behind and what they faced on that journey north. Yes you know just just incredible Wilkerson is just wonderful. Yeah and I would absolutely cosign I think that a lot of times what we're taught in schools about black history is really like all around the civil rights movement and it's like black people don't exist like much before or after nine hundred and sixty five. So it is nice to tell these other stories. So Camille to come back to you because I want to shift into fiction. Now, sometimes would a fiction book can do is give us a chance to escape but also either validate our reality or give us a way to make sense of it or maybe in this case with stories of resilience overcoming role modeling, what it means to truly tough it out you've been talking with us about little women in the past. I know you admired that book are there other fiction books that came to mind for you on this subject? Yeah. There are a couple. The first is an Oldie but a Goodie Jane, Eyre, by Charlotte Bronte Now, if you haven't read this book since you were forced to in high school I, we encourage you to crack it open again. I began my relationship with this book as I think an eighth grader and it has become over the years my favorite book of all time I mean Jane Eyre is kind of Proto feminist novel she describes herself as poor. Obscure..

Jane Eyre Wilkerson America writer Charlotte Bronte Michael Brown Camille Larry
"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

03:13 min | 11 months ago

"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

"Disability Rights is human rights. Disability rights is civil rights in needs to be taught in school people need to understand how we got to where we are. Now you know it was a bipartisan move to pass the ADA, but it wasn't because there was some benevolent feeling. In fought for it. And that is Portland towns, the Third Deputy Director of the Boston Center for independent living and Dr Sherri Blau at a sports medicine specialist at Brigham and Women's Hospital. Thanks to both of you for joining us to mark the anniversary this week. John? Okay. Have you had that day or week yet this year where you are just done with twenty twenty illness and death job losses police violence protesting during a panic political strife it has been a tough year so far. So where do you turn for hope and strength when it gets tough? Well, our next two guests turned to books and draw inspiration from great stories of overcoming and that's what we're going to talk about for this next segment and we want you to tell us about your favorite books about overcoming about resilience. What are you turning to read? Maybe, there's something new. That's moved you. Maybe there's an old standby that you've turned to again who are the role models real or fictional that show you the way forward now or maybe you're finding that you just can't pick up a book and you WanNa tell us about that eight, hundred, four, two, three, eight, two, five, five, that's eight hundred four to three talk or tweet us at Radio Boston. So our fellow travelers for this conversation I we have Camille Washington she hosts the culture podcast, the unfriendly blackhawks welcome back Camille. Inks happy to. Be here. and Nick Petra lacks who was the assistant manager of Brookline. Booksmith. Welcome back to you as well nick. Thank you very much appreciate that. So, we are talking about resilience stories that show us how to overcome nick. I'm going to start with you because like many Americans you've been furloughed from your position at Brooklyn Booksmith it's gotta be an extraordinarily tough time. So with that in mind has it informed how you've thought about this concept resilience overcoming how do you define it? I would absolutely agree that it has forced me to rethink. Everything because you know I did something for you know twenty plus years and suddenly I'm not doing that So turning to books which I think is a wonderful touchstone for so many people You know it's it's they're not allowed you open them and they are activated when you read them and so I find them you know amazingly effective to remind me that people have been. You know through of course much much worse than what I'm dealing with and I. Enjoy seeing those stories. Unfold between the pages. Camille. How about you? How are you thinking about this idea of resilience this year so many people twenty twenty just been. Made me one of the most challenging in their lifetimes. Yeah I think that there are many people who would like to return the year twenty twenty to the store if they could..

ADA Camille Washington Nick Petra Dr Sherri Blau Third Deputy Director Brigham and Women's Hospital John Boston Center Portland Radio Boston Brooklyn assistant manager Brookline
"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

03:11 min | 11 months ago

"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

"You're going yes. Sorry. We have a delay. Of course we're all three different places due to the virus that we're talking about right now go ahead and add your point there. Normally. As far as you want some concrete data right now Massachusetts we have over thirty two thousand people that are living in nursing homes right in his estimated that at least ten, thousand of those people could be living in their own homes with the proper supports. So the onset decision on ninety nine ruled that unjustified segregation of people with disabilities in five discriminate because it violates the ADA and we all know to stable housing is one of the key determinants of health. Right. But if you look at it in this pandemic, ask for the Kobe nineteen, the highest death tolls over forty percent are amongst people living and working in nursing homes that's over forty five thousand people that have expired. Nationwide, in over fifty three, hundred people here in Massachusetts alone and folks that disabilities are definitely represented amongst those underlying medical conditions. So you know if you want to talk about again real intraday it integration, we have to be able to move folks out of nursing homes where they're more at risk out of these institutional facilities and move into the community where they can live independently access the American dream live, it fully, you know folks need some supports personal care attendants supported living do a variety of them, but the key for our state really is a lack of affordable and accessible housing. All right. So we have about two minutes left and I want to ask you both just briefly from each of you. If there were an ad a two point. Oh, law to come forward today what would be key provisions you'd WanNa see. Good question well, I'd say I think some key points for progress into the future. You know I think that that policy change and legislation and laws can change infrastructure and we've seen some impact there but but but laws don't necessarily change culture, and so I think when we think to the future of what could have the biggest impact we still have a lot of work to do as it relates to reducing or cultural bias and stigma around disability. Disability is something that impacts frankly nearly everyone at some point in life and that when we think about inclusive services. We need to understand that it's not just for a small subset of people in our society that's actually for everyone. So I, I would probably try to tackle it from the standpoint of thinking of how how we can. We can continue to make progress as it relates to things like the built infrastructure, things like accessibility and communications, things like closed captioning and accessible websites. But how we really get at the cultural change reducing stigma around disability and understanding that it's not a lesser way of living or something that needs to be devalued but actually heart of the big life experience that we all face. You that have about a half a minute left please are good for me. I'd say education and enforcement a laws only as good as it is enforced and I think education about some of the things that we talked about..

Massachusetts Kobe WanNa
"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

05:14 min | 11 months ago

"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

"That's one example. But there are several others where people with disabilities are still largely excluded is unfortunate because it would disabilities representative, very large market You know on the whole, it's twenty to twenty five percent of our population and it's a real miss from a business standpoint for a lot of small businesses to not be accessible to the whole community. Absolutely. PORTLAND, I've heard a number of arguments over the years the Beacon Hill case being just one that good design good responsiveness to the requirements of a d a good design for people with for example, a mobility disability really is good for everyone everyone benefits from those investments as Dr. Blau just said. You, know you improve your customer base, etc. So what do able bodied listeners misunderstand about the Ada about disability project protections about investments in? Disability assess that people need to understand. Folks have to look at I mean the disability community is broad. Okay. There's many many different kinds of disabilities and not all of them are mobility related but the the the family of people with disabilities is one that you could join at any time. So there may be accessibility features that you may not need now but that you may need later as a result of a change in your. Functional ability whether it be from age from a motor vehicle accident from a stroke or anything else. So if you look back at the concept that was once Kinda hot topic of like livable, communities people can understand that curb cuts don't just assist folks with disabilities who may be using a wheelchair but also mothers with strollers people that are pulling a shopping Carter's they're going to the laundry. Elevators aren't just for people who are unable to amputate, but it's also good for elders and people carrying packages. So I mean the argument of aesthetics will because this is historic and we liked the cobblestones aesthetics over accessibility has never been a valid argument for me. So if we really want to have a accessible society and access to the American dream for everyone in the communities, themselves.

Carter representative Dr. Blau PORTLAND
"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

03:55 min | 11 months ago

"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

"Difference children with disabilities how right to a full and complete education and the ADA generation kids understand that. Yeah. I would agree cartland than I think is I think as well. You know the FDA has ensured that that people with disabilities have their basic civil rights protected in that also have opportunities. A recourse of legal action if civil rights aren't protected and I think that's a very powerful thing. has changed come willingly when when when the act was signed into law did change come quickly easily and on which frontiers and wear has changed been slow to come even though it's codified now. I'd say that. I. I I'd say that I think it was incremental and we continued to see incremental change a for example, a lot of the changes in infrastructure that we enjoy. Now things like ramps and elevators and automatic door openers. You know those things weren't put into place overnight. So from the standpoint of physical access changes been very incremental and it's important to know that the ADA is more proactive than retroactive. So if you have an old. Building, that you haven't renovated in forty years that wasn't built under the premise or under the protection of the ADA. It probably still is an accessible and unless you choose to renovate it or get new permits to renovate it, you may not have to make it accessible. So early, what we really sees that new construction comes online it comes online in a way that is accessible. So we've seen slow culture change in that regard. For sure sitting here. No. Please go had. Yeah. Mean shortly after president was signed the a until into law, he also said, let these shameful walls of exclusion come tumbling down and while many of those walls have come tumbling down there certainly continued to many barriers there's areas to healthcare married to affordable accessible housing and that's a huge win for folks with disabilities they may be accessed to. The folks need a place to live, and that's still continues to be a huge problem, not only in Massachusetts but across the nation. Yeah and also thing. Oklahoma let me just yet. Let me just ask this one just following on specifically with the two of you were just talking about it makes me think of. Sorry Five Year Long Battle on Beacon Hill over sidewalk cutouts, the Beacon Hill Civic Association challenge that there was a lawsuit it took five years. Those cutouts weren't put in place until around May of two thousand nineteen. So how do we think about those kinds of battles given what you've just been? Yet I think it's a really important point and. A lot of the a lot of battles and wins as it relates to access have been hard fought over the years and there are still many ways in which you know the FDA has been very powerful and very impactful. But there are ways it's still limited to..

ADA FDA Beacon Hill Beacon Hill Civic Association Oklahoma president Massachusetts
"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

04:08 min | 11 months ago

"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

"Games in his possible. Especially when you have to put a couple of teams on the shelf, you're already talking about a condensed calendar. So there's limited time. The League has already said there. Okay. If they get to the end of the year and teams have not played an equal number of games, they'll deal with that At that point, they would just ranked teams by winning percentage versus actual numbers of wins But really in the long term, if this becomes a problem more than one team has a huge outbreak like this. I. Don't know how they make it work. Yeah once again, a bellwether right for so many other things I. Think a lot of people are watching to see if they can pull this off. All right. I, just WanNa have seen a lot of people say if a multibillion dollar organization like baseball with thousands and thousands of tests being run over the course of a few days can't handle this. How does that change our thinking about college campuses and schools and things like that? I think you're absolutely right people are watching this pretty closely. Exactly exactly and we will continue to before we let you go though I must torture you we drive around the collar teams. Now, let's talk about the socks. The sucker nobly, it's been ugly and it's an issue that we talked about last year. We talked about in the off season it's pitching. They have no pitching starters or bullpens are they don't have enough anyway they have a pretty solid lineup which is interesting and. You would think that okay they should be able to hit their way into wins and maybe they will in the long run over the course of the season. But so far you can tell that the lack of pitching has really weighed on the offense I wanNA play a cut here from zander. BOGART's WHO's known as being incredibly upbeat. He's a real leader in the clubhouse. He's a guy who's always kind of giving positive affirmation of folks in get your next time. Let's go do this. This is what he said after the loss on Monday there's stuff. You know. Obviously. It's not just like one wrong. You know as a corporate and then they just find a way to add on some more before we can kind of get some going and gets up. And you see the video that goes with that he's shoulders slumped. He is depressed and you can tell this offense is putting extra pressure on themselves knowing they don't have the pitching to hold the other team down hitting a baseball is often called. One of the hardest things to do in professional sports. That's why if you can do it three out of ten times, you're considered really good and so if you have that added pressure of now, you have to produce runs or this team will lose that really starts to weigh on you makes it even harder. All right. So Chris, we've got a little less than a minute left. So let me just ask you because that was depressing. Rays of hope to leave us with with the restive titled Towns Pro Sports Teams I do have a little bit of hope, and this is something people are kicking baseball for not doing the NBA and the NHL have created bubbles players to bring their seasons back both of which will start towards the end of the week here I think that is a at least the best hope that we have to try to get some normalcy going in the world of sports..

BOGART baseball Chris NBA NHL
"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

05:57 min | 11 months ago

"thirty years" Discussed on Radio Boston

"Kind of a bellwether for whether some normalcy is possible during a global pandemic, the number of New England Patriots football players opting out of the two thousand twenty NFL season due to the corona virus is now to six including star linebacker and defensive captain, Dante hightower and the red. SOX are off to a miserable start to their coronavirus shortened season jumping four of their first five games with one of their starting pitchers out due to coronavirus complications. The world is watching and not just the games to see who will win in the match up between professional sports and the coronavirus. So here to give us a read on what's happening is Radio Boston's Chris. Derek? Chris. Welcome. Back. Thanks for having me spoiler alert the news is not good on that front. Well. Yes. So let's start with football and I'm going to ask you about the Patriots players opting out the same question I've been asking. So often during this pandemic, how big a deal is this? So I'm going to answer your favorite question with probably your least favorite answer, which is it depends I think you mentioned? Were we're still in the midst of obviously of global pandemic and I don't think anybody really knows exactly what the future is going to bring. We've heard a lot of talk about a possible second wave in the fall and we're going to be seeing college students returning to campuses and a lot of places kids going back to schools in some places So I think it all of this discussion really depends on what the next few weeks in the next few months bring for us. We may not even have a football season. So with that huge caveat at the beginning of the answer. I would say on the field it is actually a pretty big deal for the Patriots, just because of the names. Of the players who have said they were opting out this year you mentioned Dante High Tower is basically the quarterback of the defense. He's the guy who's out on the field calling the plays for the defense moving guys around when they need to move. He's one of the true leaders on this team coach Belichick has made him Mr February for all of his big plays in the postseason in super bowls. you also Patrick Chung who's kind of unheralded. But I think a big contributor who never really gets the recognition he deserves for the kind of flexible. He plays on this team You've got marcus cannon who's been a pretty steady presence on the offensive line, Brennan? bolden. WHO's a special teams contributor. So you've got some pretty big name players who have said they will not be playing this year for the Patriots. And clearly players who understand what the impact is of opting out. So what are they saying about this decision about why they're doing it when they know what it's GonNa do to the team? Yeah totally, and it depends on the individual player. So in Dante hightower's case, he just had a child about a month ago and he says, he thinks it's the right move for..

Patriots Dante hightower Dante High Tower football Chris SOX Boston NFL marcus cannon Derek Belichick Patrick Chung Brennan
"thirty years" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:58 min | 2 years ago

"thirty years" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"This week's guest on the economists asks our interview show was the businesswoman Ursula burns. She made history ten years ago when she became the first black woman to run a fortune five hundred company, but progress has been slow. The second was appointed just last month. Mrs burns revealed why she's changed her mind about using quotas to achieve equality. I've been in business for almost forty years. And we have been talking about this problem where half the population. We're not anywhere near half we're not even ten percent. They're more CEO's named John than there are women. You know, you heard all of that stuff, we have been pushing against this thing for, for a long time with the belief that if we just let them alone and give them the facts that they that system will change. Don't you get it if we just kind of lay it out, and give them the survey because the? They who are giving the facts to don't believe it's urgent enough to change it. That's why say, maybe what you do is to start mandating things saying level both level of a big company. Yeah. Think board levels starts. I I think. think. I should it be half forty percent. Give me a number. That's reasonable you do the study of available people whatever the heck it is. And you start mandating companies to get you say, basically, we.

Ursula burns Mrs burns CEO John forty percent forty years ten percent ten years
"thirty years" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:34 min | 2 years ago

"thirty years" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"For both of us. I guess it was a life changing experience. And I think we both issue in particular is you book in Chinese on the Chinese language service of the BBC a lot, and it was a sense of loyalty to an audience in China, that seems like a bygone age now we often talk now of how gentlemen has been largely forgotten in China, the success of the communist party in racing suddenly, public discussion of this, but also it seems memories whole generation has grown up now has heard almost nothing about this. But then, you know I go back to Beijing. And from time to time I meet people, and they asked me, how long have you been in China? I say that it goes back to the nine thousand nine hundred and it becomes clear that I was there in nine hundred ninety nine and then suddenly, the conversation will turn to that. Question. It's clear that for those who were there for those who did experience it. It's still grips their minds just as much as it does our. Tianmen might live large in the minds of those who witnessed it. But Beijing continues to cover up the crimes and censorship efforts ramp up whenever the nursery approaches this year has been no exception. University.

China Beijing communist party BBC Tianmen
"thirty years" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

06:10 min | 2 years ago

"thirty years" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Today, marks thirty year anniversary of the Inman square crackdown. In April nineteen Eighty-nine demonstrators mainly students began together TNN square to mourn, the death of who done relatively liberal communist party leader soon. They began calling for political reform. The protests spread beyond the city and the government's patients began to wear thin, late Sunday afternoon, military headed gulped is, again, flew over the square of heavenly peace, dropping leaflets bowling on the protesters to leave yet with fists clenched, the students pledged to stay on to the Dan. In the early hours of June fourth Chinese troops rolled into Beijing firing at crowds of people who blocked their path. Hundreds if not thousands were killed. Two.

communist party TNN Beijing thirty year
"thirty years" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"thirty years" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

"Is you know, it's interesting. I mean, it's thirty years, right? And the median age of China right now is thirty eight so a significant number of Chinese were not born. One channel score was happening. And the Chinese government has been extremely successful at wiping out. Any recollection of the ideas of the movement in any recollection of actually, you know, what happened? And so there's this remarkable documentary attack man, where they show pictures of the tank man to whom you referred earlier to Beijing University students that are like what's this is the guy doing performance, art? What is this? They have no idea of those images and of the importance that those images had to their country back in the day. And so the question is if you know something wiped out, so successfully will it ever have any residents again amongst the people of China. I don't know. I think we probably will at a certain point. There has to be a reevaluation of this. But people have thought it was going to happen. A lot earlier than it has so far that hasn't happened yet. The Chinese party state has a remarkable ability to really manipulate the minds of people in China still to this day, John I wanna thank you for coming on today to talk about the thirty th anniversary of gentlemen. Thank you. Thank you for having me, Sarah. John palm. I is a former reporter for the press and the Washington Post. He's also the author of the book the beautiful country and the middle kingdom American China seventeen seventy six to the present first person is produced by Dan Ephron, edited by rob Sachs. I'm Sarah Wildman, and I'm your host. Panoply..

China Sarah Wildman John palm Chinese government Beijing University Washington Post Dan Ephron reporter rob Sachs John I thirty years
"thirty years" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

04:27 min | 2 years ago

"thirty years" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

"And so this is happening at the same time, you have the country opening up to western influences opening up to western ideas, and it was this marriage between significant discontent in the lower levels of society with on opening of minds among the elite among the student population. And that created the potential for real instability at the same time. You also had within the party different factions jockeying for positions one faction believed in faster economic reforms and more westernization another faction that really oppose that as well. So you had you had to basically all the raw materials for real problems going from ADA nine students start to gather an and lobby the ability together without being monitored by the party. How do they do that? I mean, are they watched over are there? How does that happen? So what was starting in in as early as eighty eight in fact, even earlier than that? But eighty eight was really the beginning is that people wanted to form organizations that were not under the control come his party because one of the issues in China was that the party controlled everything. And there was no such thing as a right to organize freedom of sociation was is not part of Chinese communist party platform on the students. Basically that was a main demand that the student unions would not be run by the party. And so in universities such as Beijing University ching hall university Nanjing university Fudan, which is another major university in Shanghai students began to have these natch. Organizations formed and have these specically democracies what they called salons where Chinese liberals were invited to speak about democratization process about freedom of association and other freedoms the US Bill of rights statue of liberty the history of democracy, and in the west, and this type of interaction between Chinese students and some Chinese liberals really intensified eighty nine and the trigger, of course, for the demonstrations was the death of party secretary by the name of who y'all bond who died in April of nineteen eighty nine and who was somewhat of a symbol for westernisers in China. He is a guy who basically came out against chopsticks. He said using a knife and fork was more efficient, but he also was very important in rehabilitating, hundreds of thousands of Chinese intellectuals who've been purged during the anti rightist campaign in the mid fifties. But also the culture of Lucien from nineteen sixty six nine hundred seventy six and. How did you have access to them? I mean, did you already knew people from when you were studying in China, did you have greater access? So. Ahead lived in Chinese dormitory for a year and a half. And so when I went into these dormitories, I kind of felt like I was home, and that I think subconsciously resonated with the people there. I mean, I would like sit on their beds and kinda hang out like I hung out in my own dorm room six or seven years before. So I was a little bit younger. I spoke pretty decent Chinese. And I just kinda realized that they were like my classmates earlier jet. I mean a later generation, but they were very more my classmates their rooms looked and I think more importantly smelled like the room. I lived in an engine university for unit half. If for me, it wasn't as exotic as it probably appeared to many other western correspondents who hadn't had that experience. When you say, they weren't later generation that students that you described earlier are actually plucked back out of countryside and given the chance to go to school where these students who had expected to go to school. Yeah. These were students generally speaking who had gone through high school. So this is just their life experiences significantly different from the life experience from their elders and describe the energy of these meetings, these early meetings on campus, it was just full of this sense of possibility. And a real search for a new set of values for their country. A lot of patriotism deep love of their country and deep desire in the sense of what direction are we gonna take? And anything is possible. That was the overriding sense. You got was optimism about what China could do and we're trying to go..

China Beijing University ching hall bond ADA Shanghai US secretary seven years
"thirty years" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"thirty years" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

"From foreign policy. I'm Sarah wild Mun. And this is first person this week an inside account of the TNN square massacre. Thirty years ago this month student protests rutted in Beijing posing one of the most significant threats to the rule of the communist party in China's history. The demonstrations lasted two months and grew to include a range of citizens all demanding reforms in the country. For the first time in huge numbers. The ordinary men and women of Beijing the old and the young professors and taxi drivers have joined the student protests lending, their support to what is now taking on all the appearances of a peaceful popular uprising against the oppressiveness of communist rule campaign for China's renewal in an atmosphere of freedom and democracy, the focal point of the protest was Tiananmen Square. The heart of Beijing within a few weeks the government declared martial law and then in early June the world watched in horror as Chinese military tanks rolled in the streets of Beijing on the way to Chinaman's square. They fired indiscriminately at protesters there were reports of tanks rolling over students. The noise have gun five rose from all over the center of Peking, it was unremitting. On the streets leading down to the main road to ten on men square furious. People stood in disbelief at the glow in the sky listening to the sound of shots in the midst of all this chaos was John Pomfret who covered China for these Tosi press of the time hit an advantage over his fellow foreign correspondents. He had studied in China spoke Mandarin fluently and had many contacts in student movement. He joins us today. John, thanks for joining us. Thanks for having me. So we're coming on the thirtieth anniversary of the TNN square massacre. But I want to actually start with how you came to China in the first place. How did you come? So I went to college wanting to study neuro physiology. Okay..

China Beijing John Pomfret Tiananmen Square Sarah wild Mun communist party Tosi Thirty years two months
"thirty years" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"thirty years" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"The last thirty years, and he's recognizing that at his stage of life that he needs to start moving away from that business. And so it was a construction business. And you know, he realized that he's not going to be able to use his body as much as he gets into his seventies and eighties and they'll last month we had another student again same story. He'd built a successful construction business recognized that he needed to start taking different actions and start learning. A new skill to take advantage of the assets. He had and more importantly to not be relying on trading his time for money and part of it is just you owning that and recognizing that. If you start looking at your financial habits, if you're not satisfied with your financial results you need to break. Those habits you need to start doing something different and need to start making more productive financial habits. And so not only do we have business owners that have come in. And we have folks that work in factory and just feels like feels like they they're being treated as a number, and, you know, in with the factory worker, you know, he came to us and said, you know, what I need a different approach. I need a whole different. I need to stop trading. My time for money. And unfortunately, that's what most people have been trained to do. I know for me growing up. That's what I was trained to do. How is trained to trade my time for money? But as I started to look at the world around me as I started to look at the opportunities..

thirty years
"thirty years" Discussed on Doug Loves Movies

Doug Loves Movies

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"thirty years" Discussed on Doug Loves Movies

"Thirty years. A little under three. Yeah, that's my guess. Under three years. That's your kiss. Three years give or take ten months. You three twenty. Are. Okay. The mess tres. So we got anywhere from six years to two weeks. Tom Hanks. I pretty big role and he knows you're alone. And then his second feature film, he started pretty big role in the movie. Never have heard of that knows you're alone. Never heard of never heard of classic, and I'm Scott twice. Yeah, anyone by applause because that's works on audio to one person. Popular many, and I read it. I thought I read Tom Hanks pulse here, thinks he's career didn't release started till Bessler parts. I've said in the meetings. Catch on TV like we didn't ask you anything. To the listener at home. If you look it up better on that, we'll Kapiti page by now. Do it. We on how did this get made kept on calling Stellan Skarsgard stellar skateboard because that's what auto credit to iphone. And then it was automatically changed and now on his Kapiti pages permanently locked because every time they would change it back, it would just go back to stellar skateboard. Skateboards skateboards. And now I know that and we made a shirt that's still skateboard and now I also that he has it still scars garden skateboard. Hat. And that's been get a shirt. It's like a sub podcast. Really. Scares guard good a shirt. Podcast, right. Tell you the barracks, the providence, if you will, all guards shirts. Oh my God, Jeff. I wish your laugh.

Tom Hanks Stellan Skarsgard Scott Jeff Thirty years Three years three years ten months six years two weeks