35 Burst results for "thirty year"

"thirty year" Discussed on RNZ: The Detail

RNZ: The Detail

05:47 min | 3 hrs ago

"thirty year" Discussed on RNZ: The Detail

"Let's move to the two thousands now and the famous fat takes uproar and the repercussions of that. Did they kind of demonstrate the power. Pharma's ish but it also must trade issue. That new zealand has so while we compete ourselves with other wealthy developed nations. Our emissions profile is very different. Most of wealthy nations don't have primary industries as a backbone of the economy and for us it means that our emissions profile is half carbon dioxide and the other half roughly speaking agricultural emissions methane from cows and sheep and deer in nitrous oxide and boy not including agriculture in any of the pricing that seems to tax on emissions trading scheme use zones always only try to take a half of our missions and agriculture has remained out of the picture and in fact will remain out of the picture until at least twenty twenty four because of remains extend by begging back in two thousand and three. I think it was the in. We have a labor government and pete hotness the ministerial climate change. Who was trying to introduce another team to have a carbon tax but parallel to that called for mandatory labelling on agriculture leary. That would pay for her suj- to look at reducing methane emissions from livestock. But that caused the. You know the uproar that most people probably remember it became known as a fat techs and it's partially derailed or contributed to the effect that in the end. They're coming in here. Some members to introduce the techs on carbon dioxide either turks and during that time what we had was sort of voluntary negotiated agreements with individual companies. But nothing major in tim's off pricing carbon until two thousand eight. The government is said to introduce an emissions trading scheme after finally securing the numbers at needs to pass the legislation since its introduction. Two thousand eight a wing through a whole number of amendments changes tweaking here and the end during that time infected big at all for all sorts of reasons so in essence the ideas that you have a certain number of units or credits that account for the emissions that you allow yourself for that particular period and then in meters. Have to buy these serena these government and in the pay for the emissions but it's globally coincided with the time wean former soviet union collapsed and a lot of countries sent the economies collapsed and the emissions dropped and elites to your collapse of the price of those units below dollar so the became worthless essentially but fast forward to now. We now have an as remains on important tool that has this year began a series of walks him so there's quarterly auctions. The prices now at fifty dollars just about fifty dollars. It is starting to kick in as a price into new zealand. Emissions trading scheme is our primary toll for reducing climate pollution and outeiro will remain the main economic twelve main price tool into the future. But it's no longer the main tool. The big difference between nineteen ninety and now is public awareness and evine slight the student marches. Give veronica maduna some optimism on worth paul young. He was one of the people interviewed for the street. He was part of generation zero and then after the paris summit began a campaign to have a carbon zero egg that had clear it and clear goals in that space. And i was talking to him. He's now with. The commission is one of their models about exactly. How do you feel after having run this campaign having seems to finally some movement in that space but still rising emissions and i probably fool into his same sense of cautious optimism that while we looking.

Pharma new zealand leary pete tim serena soviet union veronica maduna government paul young paris
"thirty year" Discussed on RNZ: The Detail

RNZ: The Detail

03:50 min | 3 hrs ago

"thirty year" Discussed on RNZ: The Detail

"The sport on the scientific work the emissions stole continue to increase. They it's climate pioneered dave law and this quite a famous picture of him as a young scientist at a wind. Blown bearing head on wellington south coast. He started a co two measuring station. The back in the seventies and it still they're tracking continuously rising siato levels. This is to be the longest standing measurement we have also of rising co two emissions. Day flaw was in his twenty s at the time when he set this up and he was at that age sort of realizing not only seeing the rising missions here but it was a realizing the consequences. So he's gone through in. Frustration has probably understated description of it. He is now strongly involved worth school strikes for climate and a lot of youth groups that are now taking this really to the streets and he relates to their anger. That young people of looking back at you know the entire locks being spent discussing climate. Change that much action without much progress on policy he completely relates to that feeling now in his seventies there. I feel optimism because these young people and those highly innovative engineers scientists are out there. They really wanna do things in they have solutions before we move onto the two thousand key. Oto was that also a date. New zealand came back from the auto worth a negotiated deal that we would bring our missions back to nine hundred ninety labels and this was ninety ninety seven and we'll bring them back to ninety ninety levels but kyodo also under the rules. You could use offsets and you could trade with other nations. So that's where the idea of offsetting emissions rather than necessarily reducing them directly became important and forestry or sits in particular where a significant significant policy tool for new zealand. The thinking has changed since or optin was the minister who went to kyoto and negotiated a deal on behalf of new zealand and at the time on cute or favorite forestry offsets strongly but he has since changed his mind on it significantly. The thinking then was that it would give us time to give tom to develop policies to actually reduce emissions and it was clear eventually that it's not all long term solution at basted social. Tim fix to buy time because a Now realized that. It favoured the plantation of commercial pine. But that comes with a cease to affect that you plant the trees and their secrets the carbon. They stripped out of the out of the atmosphere. But then of course you cut the trees down and you release will at counter back into the atmosphere so forest off seats really. We can't rely on them for a strong as we have so far in the climate change commissioners quite clear on that for associates will remain a significant tool for the emissions. That we cannot easily reuse. We shouldn't rely on them as strongly as we have..

wellington south coast new zealand dave optin kyoto tom Tim
"thirty year" Discussed on RNZ: The Detail

RNZ: The Detail

04:18 min | 4 hrs ago

"thirty year" Discussed on RNZ: The Detail

"Carbon and give the incentive to industries to change something about the way they do things there was little thinking about regulation in fact that was looked down upon wouldn't do anything about changing the way we transport things around with into much thinking about how designed cities to make it easier for people to not have to use their car so all of this kind of thinking was just not happening. You mentioned the business. Roundtable was roger kerr in charge of it at the time he was and he passed away a few years ago so that wasn't able to talk him obviously but are have gone back to some of those submissions that the business roundtable made at the time and in this mission to this proposed comtex. By the time we're talking ninety three ninety four and the proposal was to have a three a period in which the industry would have time to volunteering find ways reducing emissions. And if that didn't happen in nineteen ninety-seven that'd be carbon takes introduced at tim. Knowles tunnel from carbon dioxide and today proposal the The business roundtable at the time made a submission to say that. We're not sure enough where the news would infect possibly benefit from rising temperatures yet. Cloud of to submission was that the temperatures would rise so gradually that people could adapt to it or industries for to it and the for new zealand. Shouldn't do anything too. Hasty end should do anything much at all. Really but the business roundtable. That's the right wing. Think tank of the time does something else it broughton climate sceptics people who were part of an orchestrated denial campaign and they came out and you know went on a tour and new zealand. So veronica who with a so one was richard lindzen. Who was an mit professor monotonous feerick physicist. I've published more than two hundred scientific papers. For thirty years i taught at. Mit during which time the climate has changed remarkably little but the cry of global warming has grown evermore shrill and beaune lem walk was not a one. he's arguments less about the understanding of the climate system. But more about how we deal with that in arguing for for standing back and doing this rather than war if you realize what. The climate science is actually telling us as climate change is a problem by reasonably manageable problem. Gosh so so. The business roundtable was hugely influential. I don't know about hugely Powerful yes a powerful lobby group representing business interests influential in the same said. The people there brought out obviously did get coverage in the media. You know i'm just wondering what attitudes were like. And they time it would have influenced some people and it was perhaps also. There's this sort of process that we still have ongoing today. But perhaps less saw off of sewing down. So you hit this. This one body that intergovernmental plan on climate change which was bringing to get a scientists to assist research into in produced. These reportedly six or seven years and there were hundreds of them involved in the process. You had this one body producing these assessments. But you had other individual often scientists with a with a good pedigree. In in academic research stowing doubt con raising questions. And that's did confuse people at politicized the issue. It polarized issue and raised arguments steps in time..

roger kerr new zealand Knowles richard lindzen broughton tim veronica
"thirty year" Discussed on RNZ: The Detail

RNZ: The Detail

07:14 min | 4 hrs ago

"thirty year" Discussed on RNZ: The Detail

"Me about nine hundred ninety. We were at near zero carbon emissions. So the brave for for the pace was to go back and look at the history because we know that we now looking at three decades of rising emissions science journalist. Veronica maduna was digging into the big story of our emissions record. She came across something staggering. Went back to nine thousand nine hundred because that is the year that we started. The inventories net country started to track the missions. And i to be honest. I was surprised to see that that. Back thing mia carbon neutral four carbon dioxide so not for the greenhouse gases such carbon dioxide a next golden. We're now trying to get back to you by three hundred fifty. I'm sharon brick kelly. Today on the details we were so close through two years ago. Now with part of the global meese code ran for humanity ever changes now. Rapid widespread intensifying. Our future is going to be warmer than it is right now. Crackling wildfires raging rivers devastating storms evidence. Climate change said on monday. That human activity is indisputably to as preparations gear up for this november's cop twenty six climate summit in glasgow we've known for decades world is warming and locally new zealand is currently on a parkway that would enable us to pow mystic target and fill our international obligation to reduce our greenhouse gas emissions by twenty by twenty fifty. You immediately. Think that if we've done something stronger. Being during the ninety. S chris kate. We could easily be innovative from the place. Now today. we look at the mistakes and missed opportunities with maduna. She's written about it in a story. For north and south called we spent twenty five years doing virtually nothing but first a basic explanation of carbon dioxide emissions versus greenhouse gas emissions. Who new zealander thing this three most relevant greenhouse gases are commodore signed me thane from agriculture nitrous oxide from agricultural. So the letter to are coming out of agriculture world. Carbon dioxide is essentially part of everything. Else we do. So that's energy. That's manufacturing transport that's carbon dioxide emissions are the main part. What was going on in thousand nine hundred i mean. Why was that figure so good. Was that joe too good policy or was it. Good luck more than letter infect. It was a carbon neutral points. It's not that we had no emissions. It's just that we had a good mix of emissions in the balancing from forestry. So it wasn't good policy because issue wasn't really good stage of developing policy. But ninety nine hundred was the year we're the intergovernmental panel on climate change produced. Its first assistance. Those the first time we actually looked at all the research that had been done up to that point points and what we can do to mitigate or to lower emissions reduce emissions. so it's important year in medicines. One surprise for me. When i was researching the story was that all went back to nineteen eighty eight back the climate scientists. It got together. He and wellington then done already discussed issues that we are still talking about that. Disgust civilized disgust. How arise in emissions and the consequence of warming will how we can do agriculture lift. Hell we can do just about anything. And what was the language like. That was used the because now the language is so dramatic really when it comes to talking about climate. Change us note. I mean code rid. The latest report it's apocalyptic almost but what we level of concern back. Then i've just got in front of y'all got a sunday star one page. Destroy that reports on this on this conference. Nine thousand nine hundred eighty eight and it describes it as an issue profound political importance. Something that will require significant changes across all industries and to me. It almost feels like we're word. Eddo level of recognizing this was a big issue in the nineteen ninety s in the green through a dip in both public awareness but was a sort of political importance and then confusion. I came with some of that. Denying forces was that nineteen ninety. There there was a major political assertion. Globally yes say. By that point we had the un framework convention on climate change. It started to find nations into commitments to do something that the actual plan when it happened much later in one thousand nine hundred ninety seven at kyoto climate summit but it was the beginning of of that process even before nine thousand nine hundred new zealand's labour governments sore climate change was the biggest show and had policies to cut emissions. But what was the hurry. L. pollution levels were offset by forestry. People won't really talking about it. The national minister simon ogden's proposal for a carbon tech's fellow ver. It could have put us with the group of countries that have reduced emissions and steed at gross emissions have risen twenty six percent over thirty years. You has manage previous targets by offsetting emissions. And i think that's one of the major factors that place into this that the policy approach was one of least cost like you not actually doing anything about real cuts about the actual pollution. Really what happened in in the nineteen ninety s. What was the tuning point. Who were the people influencing the decision making at this time after remember. This was the time of roy genomics very short time. We divided the della. We got rid of agricultural subsidies. We reduced tariffs. We simplify the tech system. Deregulation privatization in strong belief in market forces was the thinking at the time say hymns the focus was on. If we're going to do something about emissions it would have to come through a.

Veronica maduna sharon brick kelly chris kate maduna new zealand glasgow wellington joe simon ogden confusion un roy genomics
Boris Epshteyn and Rudy Giuliani Discuss The Corruption of the Biden Family

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:27 min | 1 d ago

Boris Epshteyn and Rudy Giuliani Discuss The Corruption of the Biden Family

"Got america's mayor the one and only true historic leader of this country. Mayor rudy giuliani mayor. Thanks so much for coming on or is always a pleasure. How are you. it's it's my pleasure. And my honor to have my honor to talk to you and i wanna go right back and we did this with commissioner. Kerik let's go back to nine eleven few days ago. I the honor of being there with you downtown. You give that powerhouse speech. I don't give one iota of crap. What the losers. And all of the weaklings in mainstream media say that was a powerhouse. Happy you came into it and you went hot on biden or used to be joe biden on the trader million. We know even more than we did when you were giving that speech of just how much of a trader gentleman on the pathetic st stance of the democrats in this country and the rhinos pushing back against china so mayor. I wanna thank you. I wanna thank you for your leadership. I want to thank you for your strength and wanna think of putting the country on your back twenty years ago on nine eleven and thank you for continuing to stand up. Sir thank you. It's it's a it's a. It's the thing that keeps me. Going is the fact that i know that i'm telling the truth that i have support for this year. You know it because you were there with me necessarily election allegations but also go way back to all the corruption of the biden family of thirty million dollars at least in bribes over thirty year period of pay for play scheme that started like little cheap scheme in delaware and became a massive twenty thirty million dollars for the communist. Chinese all provable. All they're all covered up by the media and the hard would have proved all of that and then now we have really the consequences of the fraud of two thousand twenty and that is the match killing people. His incompetence is letting people die. Who would not have died if we had a responsible president not even if we had trump but if we had a reasonably intelligent man operating with his full bringing

Mayor Rudy Giuliani Kerik Biden Joe Biden America China SIR Delaware
Plastic Surgery for Prisoners Goes Back to the 1950s

The Pulse

01:47 min | 2 d ago

Plastic Surgery for Prisoners Goes Back to the 1950s

"Science historian sharona pearl is interested in faces. She's researched physiognomy. Which is the study of facial features in their relationship to character. She's written about face transplants. She teaches at drexel university in philadelphia and she was working on a new book about face recognition. She was tracking down stories of people trying to avoid law enforcement taking drastic steps to change their appearance. Everything from people trying to dodge modern face recognition software to a famous british train robber ronnie biggs who got plastic surgery in order to evade the authorities after his massive train. Theft as she got deeper into this kind of research looking for more examples of people changing their faces using search terms like criminals and plastic surgery. She stumbled upon something else entirely. This whole other world turns up what she found. Blew her mind. All of these studies written from the nineteen fifties throws late as the one thousand nine hundred eighty s about programs in prison that gave people plastic surgery as a mechanism to lower rates of recidivism. That's right plastic surgery for prisoners nose jobs ears pinned chisel jolla lines tattoo removal all sorts of cosmetic procedures in an effort to give people a chance at a better life. Somehow if there looks were changed they would be less inclined to commit crimes and return to prison after they were released and this went on until about thirty years ago.

Sharona Pearl Ronnie Biggs Drexel University Philadelphia
September 17th, 1859: Joshua Norton Declares Himself Emperor the United States

This Day in History Class

02:16 min | 2 d ago

September 17th, 1859: Joshua Norton Declares Himself Emperor the United States

"The day was september seventeenth. Eighteen fifty nine a failed gold rush era businessman named joshua norton visited the offices of the san francisco bulletin. He gave the editor a short notice to be published in that day's paper and it began as follows at the peremptory request of a large majority of the citizens of these united states. I joshua norton of san francisco california declare and proclaim myself emperor of these united states. Now not much is known about norton's early life before his time as the self proclaimed emperor but what we do know is he was born around eighteen eighteen to a jewish family of merchants in present day. London when he was two. His family moved to south africa where his father established a successful ship. Supply business norton trying to get into the family business himself but his own ship supply. Company wound up going bankrupt after less than two years by the time he was thirty years old. Both of his parents and two of his siblings had died so one year later in eighteen. Forty nine norton left south africa for good in made his way to san francisco like many aspiring businessmen of his day. Norton had traveled to california hoping to capitalize on the recent gold rush after receiving his inheritance. He was worth about forty thousand dollars. Which is well over a million dollars. In today's money in san francisco. He invested that money in real estate including waterfront property. He also started a successful commodities business selling staple foods like rice and flour by eighteen. Fifty two norton had turned his forty thousand dollar investment into a quarter million dollar fortune. He was now one of the most influential and respected citizens of the city. But in a boom and bust town like gold. Rush era san francisco. What goes up. We'll certainly come down and often sooner than you'd expect.

Joshua Norton San Francisco Bulletin Norton San Francisco United States South Africa California London
How to Create Your Own Product for eCommerce

Amazing FBA

02:20 min | 2 d ago

How to Create Your Own Product for eCommerce

"What most people call market research. I call a very superficial idea. I mean it's twenty twenty one. This idea was being outlet for years. It's not enough to use helium tan or jungle scout. Whatever you up of choices if you're in the amazon space or of its new google space h refs or whatever the nfl shop or find your main traffic. John could be through legal Seo whatever it is. That is not enough in my opinion. Okay well that means you understand the keywords as being typed into google or amazon by the searches but you don't understand the lives of the searches and the search intent is always going to be a guest work so you really dive deep. I think and then the flip side of that is by diving deep into market research. It means you're creating a product is much more likely to actually exactly solve a problem for a specific insieme. So that the two sides of the same coin buddy okay so break down the steps towards what's step one. Step two step three. How do you do this. What's the routine. Yes so this is a market research side. The first thing is to start with who you are and what you know. A lot of people tend to start with keyword research and for example. Somebody who's twenty years. A doctor trying to see some brand plus it which he knew nothing about to send him. Could it be that we need to tap into your expertise in some married one. One example extreme example of somebody. I interviewed recently. Jason frontiers based on in florida actually formed the business for athletes and hip. One of his business partners has is a doctor of physical medicine. So in british contacts means a physiotherapists really genuinely expert. Very very expert in. And he's seven crawford athletes straightaway the have a competitive advantage built-in based on who's on the team which is something to really think about how you can get an item advantage built in because you have disadvantages already because you don't know what you're doing had this is your first time out with physical products or even if you go into new market and you've been selling in ten years or superfly may new market you have a built in disadvantage to build one in so. I think that's really important thing to be honest so brainstorming. What you really know. It's such a common story you just expressed and i've i've had these experiences. Well where you talk to people. And they have ten twenty thirty years of experience. In a certain industry or vocation and when it comes to them building an online business they go in just some completely random different like you know dream

Amazon Google Jason Frontiers NFL John Crawford Florida
A Friendly Ghost Story

Invisibilia

01:31 min | 2 d ago

A Friendly Ghost Story

"I think we talk a lot about ghosting in the romantic context right But it also happens with friends. Obviously and the reason. I want to talk about friend. Ghosting today is. Because i think it's an example of a larger problem with how friendships tend to end like what happened with one of our listeners. I just remember. There was one particular instance where she called me. And i looked at the phone and i was like oh i can't do this. I just didn't answer. This is dana lucic and a couple years ago. Dana goes did a good friend of hers when she learned her friend with pregnant. Oh my inner feminist is really angry at me. Because i know that women are able to do everything and anything to be cleared. Dana was excited for her friend but she was also worried about their friendship. Changing i am now thirty years old and i do not want children and i struggle when my friend start to have children because i feel like they change and i feel like they you know of course obviously wanna spend a lot of time with their kids talk about their kids and i'm just not interested. Gina this is like oh. You're having a baby. Congratulations you just lost a friend. It's like the exact opposite reaction society. Expects you to give exactly exactly. I really respect her ruthlessness about it. Yeah and dino wasn't always like this

Dana Lucic Dana Gina Dino
Exploring The Murder of Yvonne Lane: Reaching Out to Joe Wilkes

Murder In Alliance

02:12 min | 3 d ago

Exploring The Murder of Yvonne Lane: Reaching Out to Joe Wilkes

"It seemed like the best way to get to the bottom of what was going on was to finally speak to the man whose testimony landed david in prison for life. It was time to reach out to joe wilkes to be clear. I personally have not spoken to joe as you know the private investigators from proclaim justice advised me to let them do all the interviews during their preliminary investigation. Anything i may say or ask. A witness could taint their statements for the court. So john hardin wrote joe informing him of who he and danny wexler are and what they're doing reinvestigating the murder to find the truth of what happened now for i've seen between sue and joe hearing all the interviews. He's done with sue and other media. I did not think that joe would be too happy to hear from anyone plus if you remember even though he told police that he killed you on by cooperating and telling the police that david had hired him. He got a lesser sentence than david. Thirty years with the possibility of parole. Joe has already done twenty two years so he could be looking at freedom in just eight years. I figured he would have no interest in bringing all of this up again. I thought he would just wanna finish out his time and move on without any of the mass that happens every time he speaks to someone about this case and when i say mess i mean all of his conflicting statements in fact i figured he would actually send them a nasty message back telling them to fuck off or something if he even responded. But that didn't happen. Joe wrote back eager to talk and tell his story so the guys worked setting up a legal visit which proved to be next to impossible in ohio to get done in a timely manner and so we waited and waited. But in the meantime we couldn't wait time so we tracked down some other key witnesses. I

JOE Joe Wilkes John Hardin Danny Wexler David SUE Ohio
Re-using Your Entrepreneurial Skills to Build Amazing New Businesses with Doug Goldstein

Entrepreneur on FIRE

02:10 min | 3 d ago

Re-using Your Entrepreneurial Skills to Build Amazing New Businesses with Doug Goldstein

"One thing that i admire about you as a you do a great job. Leveraging virtual team members to create not old but new income streams so for fire nation. Share some examples of how you've done this most recently. I was thinking about this concept of gratitude. And in fact john i will tell you again. You inspired me. Yes you've been a journal or for many many years you manage spoken about and you got people going. I like a certain. Take on it. That i thought was different. Which was i thought that the concept of constant happiness was something that people should be talking about. My concern was people would write in their journal once a week twice a week when tonight and i wanted i believe that by by writing in a journal about your your the things. You're grateful for that's how you're going to develop happiness so this was my idea and i decided you know i wanna share this with people and i experimented frank bay experiment that i myself a lot and then i said i'm going to make this happen. What resources do i have so having now been an entrepreneur for thirty years. My day job is that i'm an investment advisor but i've done a lot of a lot of other entrepreneurial things let's say frequently around books but but the book is just the platform that i can launch an idea so i said i'm gonna write the constant happiness gratitude journal. But who do. I have to help me and i have a whole list of people. I've got my video guy who was able to make fantastic videos about it. I have all my five or and upward people and of course using and finding new ones. There was fantastic. You know attacked john. When i wanted to do the internal layout for the book i said i'm just gonna hire to interior layout companies and see which one i like best. Ooh just the idea that. I was able to to have people around me. Who would be able to help me do everything that i shouldn't be doing. That's an eye opener. And i mean you've spoken to many entrepreneurs and you know it's so hard for them to give away the work because they think only i can really do the layout because i understand the cover design or the writing the editing and that's just not true every the best entrepreneurs focus on one thing that they do

Frank Bay John
What is Joint Inflammation?

Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

02:35 min | 3 d ago

What is Joint Inflammation?

"Age we really don't die from infections. That's very rare in in a first world country but the body is hardwired itself to protect itself against some sort of infectious bacteria from damaging major regions of the body. And so the way that it's it's hardwired. This adaptation is through inflammation inflammation is an immune response where the body starts up regulating all these different immune cells that damage things and they take they certainly will target damage bacteria and protect us from dying from the infection. The unfortunate thing is when they're up when when we have inflammation up for a period of time. It damages are vital organs as well. You know we've all experienced like a sprained ankle and we've had swelling and pain in that area that's part of the inflammation processes damaging tissue. It's actually breaking down tissue so that the to the tissue can be rebuilt. it's also protecting against the infection. The problem is when that inflammation never stops and when it's a low grade Kind of smoldering level of inflammation over time that damages different regions right in affects every system of the body. And of course today we're talking about joints and the main things that will experience when we have chronic joint inflammation is joint degeneration osteoarthritis. And of course we will have pain rights. We'll have pain in the joint. While limited range of motion and mobility in the joint and we will obviously experience painted discomfort and a loss of interest star ranger motion and our ability to really live the way that we wanna live. So here's an example of a normal joint here's an example of osteoarthritic joint right a inflamed damaged joint now typically takes a minimum of twenty to thirty years of chronic joint inflammation. It's not like this happens overnight. Usually a long process. Twenty thirty years of chronic inflammation in the joint to get to do to degenerate. Like this case. So it's not even like a year or two. Although you know in certain cases you can have like a car accident whiplash or you know major trauma possibly to your knee. This is a knee joint for example. That accelerates the inflammation of time however usually these are processes that take quite quite a few years decades to

Inflammation Inflammation Chronic Joint Inflammation Degeneration Osteoarthritis Chronic Inflammation
Cycling Tours Are Latest Trend in Chernobyl

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 6 d ago

Cycling Tours Are Latest Trend in Chernobyl

"There is a new type of tourism for the exclusion zone thirty five years after the world's worst nuclear disaster I have on the bike store in Chernobyl area Chernobyl is not a place that springs to mind when choosing a scenic cycling routes the area is still dangerous guide Natalie to look says this group is checked for radiation levels we should follow the rules for visitors for example close should cover all your body also we can't deviate from the route for the riders like Iowa but do not it's worth the risk it's second time here and the man purpose for me to come to come here to see the nature how developed sort of face thirty years after the trade people are forbidden from eating and drinking around the zone in Chernobyl and are not allowed to travel in or out by themselves as they finish their tour the cyclists are checked for radiation levels before they leave the zone I'm a Donahue

Chernobyl Natalie Iowa
Militia Leader To Be Sentenced in Minnesota Mosque Bombing

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | 6 d ago

Militia Leader To Be Sentenced in Minnesota Mosque Bombing

"The leader convicted in two thousand seventeen bombing at a mosque in Minnesota faces sentencing today the leader of an Illinois anti government militia group who thirty say was the mastermind behind the two thousand seventeen bombing of a mosque in Bloomington Minnesota Emily clear hair he was previously known as Michael Hary and recently said she is transgender faces a mandatory minimum of thirty years in prison for the attack on the dar al Farooq Islamic center several worshippers were gathered at the center to pray when a pipe bomb was thrown through the window open imam's office co defendants said that Harry let the group and came up with the plan to attack the mosque motivated by a hatred for Muslims cited in the manifesto known as the White Rabbit handbook Kerry's attorney Shannon Elkins is asking U. S. district judge Donovan Frank for no more than the minimum thirty year sentence and says the gender dysphoria and misinformation fueled Aries inner conflict that led to the bombing prosecutors are seeking a life sentence well no one was physically hurt in the attack prosecutors say the bomb was an act of terror I'm Jennifer king

Illinois Anti Government Milit Michael Hary Minnesota Dar Al Farooq Islamic Center Bloomington Shannon Elkins Emily U. S. District Judge Donovan F Imam White Rabbit Harry Kerry Jennifer King
Manchin to Dems: Pause Social Spending Plan

This Week with George Stephanopoulos

02:05 min | Last week

Manchin to Dems: Pause Social Spending Plan

"Joined by west virginia. Senator joe manchin senator mentioned. Thanks for joining us this morning. You've called harris george. You've called for a strategic pause and the president's build back better plan three point five trillion dollar plan but party leaders from the president is speaker pelosi to leaders. Schumer have all rejected that call for a pause. Schumer says it's full speed ahead in the senate. It can't pass the senate without your vote where things stand right now. Would your job in very clear. I think i think strategically pauses necessary right now. We have the unknown in the unknown. Is everything you've been talking about. Covert what's going to happen with cova what they'll do to the economy. No one's talking about inflation or debt and we should have that as part of the discussion and then the geopolitical. What's going on around the world and what type type of challenges we face so the unknown is there and we don't know what that's going to going to partake what we do know. Is that basically the need for this. The emergency to do something in the next week is not there We've done five point. Four trillion george over the last year and mud a year and a half five point four trillion law. That money is still going out the door. There's no one going to be left behind for the rest of this year and most of next year. So the urgency. I can't understand why we can't take time deliberate on this and work back in january. You propose spending four trillion dollars on infrastructure. So what changed. We're talking about four. That was about four point five trillion. They had a talking about. Is that what you're talking about what you're saying about five having a having both of those put together and i said from day one. These are two complete different categories. The one we have in front of us right now. It's already passed in a bipartisan way. With nineteen republicans. George is the hardcore infrastructure. The roads bridges internet water sewer all the things that have been neglected for the last thirty years. The president went out and campaigned on this. He went out and sold this thing. We all got behind him. We had a bipartisan deal. And i think it's the greatest thing we could do. That's the one that has the urgent and emergency that we have. Let's get that done it setting over in the house right now.

Senator Joe Manchin Harris George Schumer Senate Cova West Virginia Pelosi George
‘The Metallica Blacklist’ Is an Enormous Tribute to an Enormously Influential Album

World Cafe

00:55 sec | Last week

‘The Metallica Blacklist’ Is an Enormous Tribute to an Enormously Influential Album

"Thirty years ago. In nineteen ninety-one the california heavy metal band metallica released its fifth studio album. The record was simply called metallica but earned the nickname the black album. Thanks to its mostly black. Cover to songs on. The black album. Represented a shift from metallica. They were more accessible melodic than the epic heavy metal shredders. The band was known for and music. Fans aided up the black album debuted at number one on the billboard. Two hundred the records. I single enter. Sandman reached number sixteen on the hot one. Hundred singles chart and over. The last thirty years has become an anthem. Used pump up crowds at sporting events in stadiums. All over the world now. A collection of songs called the metallica blacklist celebrates the thirtieth anniversary of metallica's black album it features stevie bridges my morning jacket kamasi washington and fifty other artists covering tracks from the black album.

Metallica California Sandman Stevie Washington
Deadly Passion: How an Obsession Led to Murder

Murder and Mystery in the Last Frontier

01:43 min | Last week

Deadly Passion: How an Obsession Led to Murder

"Once. Esther and jim retired. Esther insisted on moving south to swim. Washington soon after the move to swim esther learned. She had cancer and she died two years later. Esther's death hit jim hard and he decided to move back to alaska where he would be closer to his son. He bought a house in wa- silla on golden dale drive and his neighbors across the street were hanged dawson and his eighth wife. Thirty year. Old terry according to neighbors wheeler became good friends with the dawson's and was a frequent dinner guests at their house. Hank and terry dawson suffered marital problems in the summer of nineteen ninety-three and hank temporarily moved out of the house to live in anchorage. After hake walked out on her teri immediately called her neighbor. Jim wheeler to cry on his shoulder. Perhaps terry considered her relationship with jim platonic but friends say. Jim fell hard for terry. Jim apparently could not keep his emotions to himself because he told anyone who would listen that he was in. Love with terry dawson. Meanwhile terry and hank decided to work on their marriage and hank move back into their wasila home over the nineteen ninety-three labor day weekend by this time jim wheelers feelings for had grown into an obsession and he told several people that he could not stand. Think of terry and hank in bed together. Hank died in the explosion. Only four weeks after returning to live with terry in

Esther Terry Dawson Jim Hard Old Terry Dawson Hank Jim Wheeler Terry Jim Platonic JIM Wheeler Alaska WA Hake Washington Cancer Teri Anchorage
Everything You Need to Know About Larry Elder

Mike Gallagher Podcast

02:12 min | Last week

Everything You Need to Know About Larry Elder

"Larry elder is with us in. Larry i love so much a the aspect of your personal story and i think californians relate to sharing stories about your your father about your brother about your life. Your love of california people appreciate a common sense approach to what has been a distorted twisted version of the american dream by gavin. Newsom and larry. I must say i'm really encourage. The governor newsome is attacking you the way it is because for a while though he is because for a while he ignored you on. Evidently he must think that You do have the momentum that many of us are praying that you have Mike you're being charitable. This man is scared to death. He just gave up to interviews one with the editorial board of the la times and one with the editor boards of a bunch of other newspapers slamming. The table cursing angry. He went on with went to full captain clear on the scene from the cain revoke i was on the witness stand and kind of broke down had a mental breakdown yet. He mentioning my name for the first time. Because i'm the one he's afraid of. And i'm the one who can talk to black and brown people. Because i'm from the hood you pointed out. My dad came in nineteen forty sevens. You bought a house at now is worth six hundred thousand dollars. Because of the outrageous cost of living in california. The average price of a home is now eight hundred thousand dollars. A one hundred percent more than the eric price at home in america largely because of these environmental extremists that have taken over sacramento and run the state in the last twenty or thirty years gavin. Newsom as afraid. I'm going to be able to explain this way. So then joe jones six back can connect the dots between the outrageous cost of a home in california and left wing policies and sacramento and the rising crime and letting policies in sacramento this attack on the police this false assertions the police are engaging in systemic races. I mean we'll talk about the importance of choice in public education. So the money. Follow the child and the other way around lack round. Parents want school choice. They both the democratic party year after year the year. who's number one contributor teacher's union and they're adamantly opposed school choice. I can break the stranglehold over the democratic party. They have on minorities. Eighty percent of the kids in california are black and brown who have or getting a sub-standard education and they're scared. I'm going to be able to make that case. In ways that the average california can understand

Larry Elder Newsom Gavin California Newsome Sacramento Larry La Times Mike Joe Jones America Democratic Party Brown
First Class Fatherhood: ‘Nigerian Nightmare’ Okoye

First Class Fatherhood

02:05 min | Last week

First Class Fatherhood: ‘Nigerian Nightmare’ Okoye

"Joining me now. First class father. The nigerian nightmare christian koya welcome to first-class fatherhood. Thank you so much. thanks a. it's an honor to have you on the podcast. Let's start right here. How many kids do you have how old i have three kids. My oldest is thirty thursday. She's an actress. My second is seventeen on them. My last only season she plays baseball. My my second child is aboard on days. No playing sports way now but you will get there very cool. If you could chris. Please just take them into here to hit my listeners. With a little bit about your background what you do play for. The kinds of cheese was running back. I went to college at pacific university southern california But i've got before i got there. I was born and grew up in nigeria. I was originally it track them. Fueled guy threw the discus innate four. I thought i was going to being the olympics but niger. I didn't take me so. I switched to football in my gino yang college so ever since. Then i've been playing. I played three years in college and then chief drafted me after. I performed the highly of the senior bowl in the second round. So six years with the chiefs growing back. Yeah yeah the rest is history. What an incredible career you had christian so take me back to the beginning of your fatherhood journey here now so about about. How old were you when you first became a dad and had to becoming a father kind of change your perspective on life. oh man i I was let me see. I was thirty years ago when i first became a dad I take that back. I was twenty nine and we lost access child and then Got pregnant again. I down my my my daughter tiana at the age of thirty damn of course When you grew in that you have everything said doing willing career step aside it finally and that fits child just completely changes your life.

Koya Gino Yang College Pacific University Baseball Niger Nigeria Chris Olympics California Chiefs Football Tiana
Understanding the Role of the South African Medical Research Council

Goodbye to Alcohol

02:02 min | 2 weeks ago

Understanding the Role of the South African Medical Research Council

"Professor charles parry is the head of alcohol and drug unit of the south african health medical research council this organization reports directly into the department of health and has the overall goal to improve the health. That's the nation began king professor power to introduce himself a thank you. I live in kicked on south africa. My job. I'm the head of the southern research council alcohol tobacco and other drug research unit. I married. I have a son and daughter and i live in point and kick tom and for fun. I am long distance runner so or five times week. Either road running on the mountain. So that's what. I i do to keep felons in my life while you're in a beautiful possible to running on. I'll look at the on the promenade. So this organization that you've been working for thirty years. I thought it was so long about. What are the objects you so of the south african research council the medical research cobbler spurs was modeled. After the british. Emma's see so we have intramural research units and extramural units or tweet funded at universities and refund fund. What will self initiated research. It's it's a funding agency. And it was a conducts research and there are about lebanon twelve different intramural units to focusing on noncommunicable diseases infectious diseases burden of disease. And i hit up one looking at alcohol tobacco and other drug use and that we we're very very active in south africa. The the aim is really to improve the health of the nation. We we're set up by parliamentary grant so we also to parliament and we report to the the ministry of health

Professor Charles Parry South African Health Medical R Southern Research Council Alco South African Research Council Department Of Health South Africa TOM Noncommunicable Diseases Infec Emma Lebanon Parliament Ministry Of Health
Tommy Chong Discusses His Cancer Treatment

MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

02:52 min | 2 weeks ago

Tommy Chong Discusses His Cancer Treatment

"I have a who was She used to be a big pot smoker but hasn't smoked in thirty years but she's got cancer and just trying to have the conversation about the be roll it. Cbd can be complain healing because she's Person who went to get sober you know went through a program now doesn't touch anything that might be. Get your high at all. And i know. Cbd doesn't get you high but afraid of of anything might lead back to alcoholism or anything like that. So i to ask you about when you had canter beatcancer with cbd. The only treatment you went to or was that part of a regimen with regular medical stuff. Or how did how did you be cancelled. Only know it was part of a re regular medical not only raised their medical but the the very best because of my celebrity You know i i. The word went out that i needed the best of the best right. It's like anything you know like buying a new car or some. Yeah you can buy an old wreck knowing months because it's just laying there you give some guy twenty bucks you got it. That's the same thing as medical advice. The i know you know you got the you know the the guy down the street or you know the guy. The homeless guy might talia hotta not a conduct in ohio. How you should not be backdated or you know when you get that kind of advice or you can use your celebrities and see how how which you know you get. The best of the best right is that that's what rich people do. Rich people the past names of the best of the best around the best restaurant the best cook the best Bakke shit spot. The best end the best way to treat a an illness. And and and so i use my celebrity. I sure i did. When when i got cancer i had. I had a ton of people. Come up you know. Say well now. You can really proved marijuana. Is the only thing you need that you know or or rick simpson oil orch or if you try disdain. This work did not end and then it went to the first doctor went to. It wasn't even him. It was his son and his son kind of took over the office because the Original doctor died now. His son never really had the reputation that i was looking for however he served a purpose. It's like it's like asking a top lawyer for advice which you get for free and then you hire the the the cheapest lawyer in you. Tell them what to do

Canter Beatcancer Talia Hotta Cancer Rick Simpson Ohio
Steve Strang: America Is Heading for Another Civil War

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:38 min | 2 weeks ago

Steve Strang: America Is Heading for Another Civil War

"We were in kansas city. Mike bickel gave a sermon a teaching about the end times. And do you have a sense or does rick have a sense of where we're going to be in the next ten or twenty years. What what does he say. Or what do you know that he says that he shared. So rick has i mean. This is well documented. Rick has been prophesying for a number of years that we're going to have another civil war here in america and he's had various dreams at different times but it's documented in history. You know twenty thirty years. He's been saying this was coming. And the lord began to show him back in the eighties that america would have a liberal president and then of course clinton game in office. He thought for sure that was alabama coming off as he thought for sure that was him. But then you know biden. In harris are sitting in the oval office and basically in the dream something would happen. That would cause america to realize. Just how terrible marxism is in that. We would swing back to the right never to go back to the left again. Yeah and so he believes right now. We're on the precipice of perhaps it's already begun a civil war in this nation because our our government it's beyond fixing itself.

Mike Bickel Rick Kansas City America Oval Office Clinton Biden Alabama Harris
"thirty year" Discussed on Five four two and the Blue

Five four two and the Blue

01:50 min | 4 months ago

"thirty year" Discussed on Five four two and the Blue

"Maybe give me a suggestion on something you'd like to see done into a podcast or research for podcast you can reach me at thelen filed dot com or directly by email at felon file at g. Mail dot com. Be happy to hear from you. Were listening to over twenty two different countries worldwide and and. I'm really enjoying talking to listeners. By email or zoom meetings with them and finding out information about what's going on in their communities getting some great tips on some possible interesting shades of blue story for you guys in the future speaking in the future remember as future comes up to us be safe and be secure and if you have the opportunity do something nice for somebody is really a thing to do. It's always a good idea to take the high road in the meantime victoria. You've got the control board back. Go ahead and close us out. And we'll talk to.

"thirty year" Discussed on Five four two and the Blue

Five four two and the Blue

03:42 min | 4 months ago

"thirty year" Discussed on Five four two and the Blue

"The ordinary process of law cannot be served on him. Now therefore i charles b aycock governor of the state of north carolina by virtue of the authority in me vested by law do issue this proclamation of offering award of two hundred dollars for the apprehension and delivery of said james lunceford to the sheriff of madison county at the courthouse in marshall so on and so forth. Basically the same article except a different governor. Well apparently some people look for james. Let's fast forward about thirty three years into the future. Nineteen thirty three. James lunceford is now fifty eight years old and one day he shows up at the madison county sheriff's office out of the clear blue sky according to the newspaper article and you and then announced that he was wanted for the fatal shooting of his cousin. In one thousand nine hundred. Well the sheriff at that time and they weren't familiar with the case but james gave a full confession and confessed to the killing and said quote. I know i was justified. But i just wanted to get this thing cleared up and get it off my mind. The sheriff contacted the solicitor jeb at the time in asheville and after discussing the information with the solicitor. It was arranged. At the that james lunceford be released on a one thousand five hundred dollars bond which he paid in cash right up front now. The big question is where has lunceford been for the past thirty some years mel. After he left west. Virginia he moved to louisiana and took in continue life with his new with his wife changing his name to george w franklin and started working in cattle and farming became very good at it. Because it wasn't or in that time period he became a very rich man in the cattle business and owned a very large ranch. In de quincy louisiana. Apparently near maryville easy anna near lake. Charles lot's wife had no children of his own adopted. An older girl who lived with them for a number of years and supported and was one of the reasons. A james wanted to get record. Clear the story of the surrender of james lunceford four crime that he supposedly committed thirty three years ago. Drew a lot of press and attention in nineteen thirty three the headline of the charlotte observer. October twenty seventh nineteen thirty three north carolina fugitive a thirty three years to face trial and the article went on to explain how james lunceford was now a wealthy plantation owners how they placed it or how they listed it in an upcoming court. Date was set for november of nineteen thirty. Three james lunceford hung around in the area waiting for his court. Date come up. He was interviewed by several newspapers.

james lunceford two hundred dollars james October twenty seventh louisiana Virginia James lunceford charles b aycock asheville thirty three years ago thirty three years north carolina one thousand nine hundred Three lunceford de quincy louisiana madison fifty eight years old november of nineteen thirty Charles lot
"thirty year" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

03:07 min | 1 year ago

"thirty year" Discussed on Radio Boston

"It's part of why <Speech_Female> it can be difficult <Speech_Female> even now to <Speech_Female> get your hands on <Speech_Female> the Nintendo <SpeakerChange> switch console. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> A core part <Speech_Female> of the appeal is <Speech_Female> that the game allows <Speech_Female> players to <Speech_Female> be together <Speech_Music_Female> virtually in <Speech_Music_Female> real time. <Speech_Female> That's <Speech_Music_Female> what made the production possible. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> While they recorded <Speech_Female> the music separately. <Speech_Female> All of <Speech_Female> the performers were <Speech_Female> able to act out <Speech_Female> their roles through <Speech_Female> the game <Speech_Music_Female> as their <SpeakerChange> own <Speech_Music_Female> animal crossing avatars. <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> Watched the opera <Speech_Music_Female> and <Speech_Female> you hear it <Speech_Female> it sounds like these people <Speech_Female> are in the same room <Speech_Female> and there's no visual <Speech_Female> reminder telling <Speech_Female> you that they're not. <Speech_Music_Female> So <Speech_Female> it feels like <Speech_Female> this is <Speech_Female> performance that happened <Speech_Female> together <Speech_Female> when you see the <Speech_Female> squares on Zoom, <Speech_Female> you <Speech_Music_Female> know that they're not together. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> the best part of <Speech_Female> life theater is <Speech_Female> experiencing something. <Speech_Female> I think <SpeakerChange> together <Speech_Female> that's <Silence> Pellegrino again <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> before <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> the pandemic do <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> a Donnie productions <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> was planning <Speech_Music_Female> three in person <Speech_Music_Female> operas in received <Speech_Female> grants to help <Speech_Female> them employ about <Silence> forty singers. <Speech_Female> Now, <Speech_Female> the future <Speech_Female> for any in person productions <Speech_Music_Female> is uncertain <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> says <Speech_Music_Female> being ten. It's <Speech_Female> been like <Speech_Female> a uniquely devastating <Speech_Female> experience <Speech_Female> and that singing <Speech_Music_Female> is like one of the <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> most dangerous <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> like things you <Speech_Female> can do <Speech_Female> and it's kind <Speech_Female> of like <SpeakerChange> put <Speech_Female> the whole industry <Speech_Female> in chaos. <Speech_Female> Baynton, is among <Speech_Female> many in the industry <Speech_Female> experimenting <Speech_Female> with how <Speech_Female> to perform and connect <Speech_Music_Female> with audiences <Speech_Female> remotely <Speech_Female> the traditional <Speech_Female> way to do it <Speech_Female> is great <Speech_Female> but like <Speech_Female> these other kind of <Speech_Female> new, maybe weird <Speech_Female> ways of doing it <Speech_Music_Female> are also <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> exciting I. Think <Speech_Female> it doesn't. <Speech_Female> It's nice to <Speech_Female> be able to look. It doesn't <Speech_Female> have to be this like one <Speech_Female> way that everyone <Silence> kind of thinks of it. <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> And as pelegrina <Speech_Music_Female> points. <Speech_Female> Cartoons and opera <Speech_Music_Female> have been intertwined <Speech_Music_Female> for decades. <Speech_Music_Female> It pops <Speech_Female> up episodes <Speech_Female> of the ninety show. Hey, <Speech_Female> Arnold in spongebob <Speech_Female> squarepants <Speech_Female> and of course, <Speech_Music_Female> looney <SpeakerChange> tunes <Speech_Music_Female> and Bugs Bunny. <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> I feel like if you ask <Speech_Female> anyone, they're going to know <Speech_Female> the right of the <Speech_Female> Valkyrie theme. <Speech_Female> They might not know <Speech_Music_Female> the name, but they'll know <Speech_Music_Female> what it is in their head. <Speech_Music_Female> So I don't <Speech_Music_Female> think this is totally <Speech_Music_Female> out <Speech_Music_Female> of left <SpeakerChange> field. <Speech_Music_Female> That <Speech_Female> being said I think <Speech_Female> the video game is just <Speech_Female> like the next generation <Speech_Female> of that <SpeakerChange> kind of <Speech_Music_Female> cartoon. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> They <Speech_Female> hope that this approach <Speech_Female> to opera, we'll draw <Speech_Music_Female> nontraditional <Speech_Music_Female> audiences. <Speech_Female> Pelegrina <Speech_Female> says they have also received <Speech_Female> positive responses <Speech_Music_Female> from opera, <Speech_Music_Male> lovers. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> Benton said the most <Speech_Female> powerful thing about <Speech_Music_Female> the project was <Speech_Music_Female> performing <SpeakerChange> again <Speech_Music_Female> with other people, <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> I. Think we all felt kind <Speech_Female> of emotional <Speech_Female> like watching it for the <Speech_Female> first time and hearing <Speech_Female> all of our voices <Speech_Female> together <Speech_Female> and we were like, oh my gosh, <Speech_Female> like it sounds <Speech_Female> like we're together even <Speech_Female> though <SpeakerChange> we <Speech_Music_Female> were apart. <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female>

Nintendo Pellegrino Benton Arnold
"thirty year" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

05:28 min | 1 year ago

"thirty year" Discussed on Radio Boston

"Plane and little, and she has to do with all of that in addition to being a woman in a time when women had little to no autonomy. So she has quite a lot to overcome and Jane is resilient in the face of all that adversity. I think the resilience that I'm most moved by in the book is Jane's Moral Resilience like she would quite literally rather be starving and homeless and act outside her own values or sacrificed her independence and I think it was amazing as a young person and as you know a woman in my early thirties now to be. To have this example of someone who's committed to her own spirituality and morality in a way that honors her own passions and desires without robbing her of equity. And then quickly the second down endorsed that yet. It's so so good. And there are lots of great film adaptations as well. The. Second Book I WanNa recommend is full disclosure. By Cameron. Garrett which is a young adult novel that focuses on an HIV positive teenager whose navigating high school and all the normal things that teenagers deal with like making and keeping friends falling in love and just developing as a person and the protagonist is the black adopted daughter of two gay men, both of whom are also people of Color it's primarily a story of the resilience of HIV positive people but it also touches on the resilience of Queer folks and Black and Brown people So if there is a young person in your life that you want to. Share. Some of those important stories with full disclosure is a great book for them. Those are great recommendations and Nick I know you have station eleven on your list which really struck me I loved it. I read it a few years ago in it felt more like fiction than than I think it would feel now. Is the wonderful scary thing about that book because you know in the middle of the pandemic why not go back to a book that is about a Pandemic and flu that decimates the population. What I loved about the book was that it begins with Shakespeare, which is how I want of course, all of my pandemic post apocalyptic books to begin In this case, it's King Lear and one of the stars dies onstage, and that's how the story begins and then we flash forward twenty years out to this pandemic has literally killed most of the population that we have a traveling troupe Called the traveling symphony that is itinerant and age wander around the Great Lakes region and they are artists doing the only thing that they know how to do how precent though Emily Saint John Mandell was in her book to describe some of the things that are happening today is uncanny loved about it though is that at the.

Jane Pandemic King Lear Great Lakes Nick Emily Saint John Mandell HIV Cameron Garrett flu
"thirty year" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

03:11 min | 1 year ago

"thirty year" Discussed on Radio Boston

"You're going yes. Sorry. We have a delay. Of course we're all three different places due to the virus that we're talking about right now go ahead and add your point there. Normally. As far as you want some concrete data right now Massachusetts we have over thirty two thousand people that are living in nursing homes right in his estimated that at least ten, thousand of those people could be living in their own homes with the proper supports. So the onset decision on ninety nine ruled that unjustified segregation of people with disabilities in five discriminate because it violates the ADA and we all know to stable housing is one of the key determinants of health. Right. But if you look at it in this pandemic, ask for the Kobe nineteen, the highest death tolls over forty percent are amongst people living and working in nursing homes that's over forty five thousand people that have expired. Nationwide, in over fifty three, hundred people here in Massachusetts alone and folks that disabilities are definitely represented amongst those underlying medical conditions. So you know if you want to talk about again real intraday it integration, we have to be able to move folks out of nursing homes where they're more at risk out of these institutional facilities and move into the community where they can live independently access the American dream live, it fully, you know folks need some supports personal care attendants supported living do a variety of them, but the key for our state really is a lack of affordable and accessible housing. All right. So we have about two minutes left and I want to ask you both just briefly from each of you. If there were an ad a two point. Oh, law to come forward today what would be key provisions you'd WanNa see. Good question well, I'd say I think some key points for progress into the future. You know I think that that policy change and legislation and laws can change infrastructure and we've seen some impact there but but but laws don't necessarily change culture, and so I think when we think to the future of what could have the biggest impact we still have a lot of work to do as it relates to reducing or cultural bias and stigma around disability. Disability is something that impacts frankly nearly everyone at some point in life and that when we think about inclusive services. We need to understand that it's not just for a small subset of people in our society that's actually for everyone. So I, I would probably try to tackle it from the standpoint of thinking of how how we can. We can continue to make progress as it relates to things like the built infrastructure, things like accessibility and communications, things like closed captioning and accessible websites. But how we really get at the cultural change reducing stigma around disability and understanding that it's not a lesser way of living or something that needs to be devalued but actually heart of the big life experience that we all face. You that have about a half a minute left please are good for me. I'd say education and enforcement a laws only as good as it is enforced and I think education about some of the things that we talked about..

Massachusetts Kobe WanNa
"thirty year" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"thirty year" Discussed on Radio Boston

"Kind of a bellwether for whether some normalcy is possible during a global pandemic, the number of New England Patriots football players opting out of the two thousand twenty NFL season due to the corona virus is now to six including star linebacker and defensive captain, Dante hightower and the red. SOX are off to a miserable start to their coronavirus shortened season jumping four of their first five games with one of their starting pitchers out due to coronavirus complications. The world is watching and not just the games to see who will win in the match up between professional sports and the coronavirus. So here to give us a read on what's happening is Radio Boston's Chris. Derek? Chris. Welcome. Back. Thanks for having me spoiler alert the news is not good on that front. Well. Yes. So let's start with football and I'm going to ask you about the Patriots players opting out the same question I've been asking. So often during this pandemic, how big a deal is this? So I'm going to answer your favorite question with probably your least favorite answer, which is it depends I think you mentioned? Were we're still in the midst of obviously of global pandemic and I don't think anybody really knows exactly what the future is going to bring. We've heard a lot of talk about a possible second wave in the fall and we're going to be seeing college students returning to campuses and a lot of places kids going back to schools in some places So I think it all of this discussion really depends on what the next few weeks in the next few months bring for us. We may not even have a football season. So with that huge caveat at the beginning of the answer. I would say on the field it is actually a pretty big deal for the Patriots, just because of the names. Of the players who have said they were opting out this year you mentioned Dante High Tower is basically the quarterback of the defense. He's the guy who's out on the field calling the plays for the defense moving guys around when they need to move. He's one of the true leaders on this team coach Belichick has made him Mr February for all of his big plays in the postseason in super bowls. you also Patrick Chung who's kind of unheralded. But I think a big contributor who never really gets the recognition he deserves for the kind of flexible. He plays on this team You've got marcus cannon who's been a pretty steady presence on the offensive line, Brennan? bolden. WHO's a special teams contributor. So you've got some pretty big name players who have said they will not be playing this year for the Patriots. And clearly players who understand what the impact is of opting out. So what are they saying about this decision about why they're doing it when they know what it's GonNa do to the team? Yeah totally, and it depends on the individual player. So in Dante hightower's case, he just had a child about a month ago and he says, he thinks it's the right move for..

Patriots Dante hightower Dante High Tower football Chris SOX Boston NFL marcus cannon Derek Belichick Patrick Chung Brennan
"thirty year" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:58 min | 2 years ago

"thirty year" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"This week's guest on the economists asks our interview show was the businesswoman Ursula burns. She made history ten years ago when she became the first black woman to run a fortune five hundred company, but progress has been slow. The second was appointed just last month. Mrs burns revealed why she's changed her mind about using quotas to achieve equality. I've been in business for almost forty years. And we have been talking about this problem where half the population. We're not anywhere near half we're not even ten percent. They're more CEO's named John than there are women. You know, you heard all of that stuff, we have been pushing against this thing for, for a long time with the belief that if we just let them alone and give them the facts that they that system will change. Don't you get it if we just kind of lay it out, and give them the survey because the? They who are giving the facts to don't believe it's urgent enough to change it. That's why say, maybe what you do is to start mandating things saying level both level of a big company. Yeah. Think board levels starts. I I think. think. I should it be half forty percent. Give me a number. That's reasonable you do the study of available people whatever the heck it is. And you start mandating companies to get you say, basically, we.

Ursula burns Mrs burns CEO John forty percent forty years ten percent ten years
"thirty year" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:34 min | 2 years ago

"thirty year" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"For both of us. I guess it was a life changing experience. And I think we both issue in particular is you book in Chinese on the Chinese language service of the BBC a lot, and it was a sense of loyalty to an audience in China, that seems like a bygone age now we often talk now of how gentlemen has been largely forgotten in China, the success of the communist party in racing suddenly, public discussion of this, but also it seems memories whole generation has grown up now has heard almost nothing about this. But then, you know I go back to Beijing. And from time to time I meet people, and they asked me, how long have you been in China? I say that it goes back to the nine thousand nine hundred and it becomes clear that I was there in nine hundred ninety nine and then suddenly, the conversation will turn to that. Question. It's clear that for those who were there for those who did experience it. It's still grips their minds just as much as it does our. Tianmen might live large in the minds of those who witnessed it. But Beijing continues to cover up the crimes and censorship efforts ramp up whenever the nursery approaches this year has been no exception. University.

China Beijing communist party BBC Tianmen
"thirty year" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

06:10 min | 2 years ago

"thirty year" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Today, marks thirty year anniversary of the Inman square crackdown. In April nineteen Eighty-nine demonstrators mainly students began together TNN square to mourn, the death of who done relatively liberal communist party leader soon. They began calling for political reform. The protests spread beyond the city and the government's patients began to wear thin, late Sunday afternoon, military headed gulped is, again, flew over the square of heavenly peace, dropping leaflets bowling on the protesters to leave yet with fists clenched, the students pledged to stay on to the Dan. In the early hours of June fourth Chinese troops rolled into Beijing firing at crowds of people who blocked their path. Hundreds if not thousands were killed. Two.

communist party TNN Beijing thirty year
"thirty year" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"thirty year" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

"Is you know, it's interesting. I mean, it's thirty years, right? And the median age of China right now is thirty eight so a significant number of Chinese were not born. One channel score was happening. And the Chinese government has been extremely successful at wiping out. Any recollection of the ideas of the movement in any recollection of actually, you know, what happened? And so there's this remarkable documentary attack man, where they show pictures of the tank man to whom you referred earlier to Beijing University students that are like what's this is the guy doing performance, art? What is this? They have no idea of those images and of the importance that those images had to their country back in the day. And so the question is if you know something wiped out, so successfully will it ever have any residents again amongst the people of China. I don't know. I think we probably will at a certain point. There has to be a reevaluation of this. But people have thought it was going to happen. A lot earlier than it has so far that hasn't happened yet. The Chinese party state has a remarkable ability to really manipulate the minds of people in China still to this day, John I wanna thank you for coming on today to talk about the thirty th anniversary of gentlemen. Thank you. Thank you for having me, Sarah. John palm. I is a former reporter for the press and the Washington Post. He's also the author of the book the beautiful country and the middle kingdom American China seventeen seventy six to the present first person is produced by Dan Ephron, edited by rob Sachs. I'm Sarah Wildman, and I'm your host. Panoply..

China Sarah Wildman John palm Chinese government Beijing University Washington Post Dan Ephron reporter rob Sachs John I thirty years
"thirty year" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

04:27 min | 2 years ago

"thirty year" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

"And so this is happening at the same time, you have the country opening up to western influences opening up to western ideas, and it was this marriage between significant discontent in the lower levels of society with on opening of minds among the elite among the student population. And that created the potential for real instability at the same time. You also had within the party different factions jockeying for positions one faction believed in faster economic reforms and more westernization another faction that really oppose that as well. So you had you had to basically all the raw materials for real problems going from ADA nine students start to gather an and lobby the ability together without being monitored by the party. How do they do that? I mean, are they watched over are there? How does that happen? So what was starting in in as early as eighty eight in fact, even earlier than that? But eighty eight was really the beginning is that people wanted to form organizations that were not under the control come his party because one of the issues in China was that the party controlled everything. And there was no such thing as a right to organize freedom of sociation was is not part of Chinese communist party platform on the students. Basically that was a main demand that the student unions would not be run by the party. And so in universities such as Beijing University ching hall university Nanjing university Fudan, which is another major university in Shanghai students began to have these natch. Organizations formed and have these specically democracies what they called salons where Chinese liberals were invited to speak about democratization process about freedom of association and other freedoms the US Bill of rights statue of liberty the history of democracy, and in the west, and this type of interaction between Chinese students and some Chinese liberals really intensified eighty nine and the trigger, of course, for the demonstrations was the death of party secretary by the name of who y'all bond who died in April of nineteen eighty nine and who was somewhat of a symbol for westernisers in China. He is a guy who basically came out against chopsticks. He said using a knife and fork was more efficient, but he also was very important in rehabilitating, hundreds of thousands of Chinese intellectuals who've been purged during the anti rightist campaign in the mid fifties. But also the culture of Lucien from nineteen sixty six nine hundred seventy six and. How did you have access to them? I mean, did you already knew people from when you were studying in China, did you have greater access? So. Ahead lived in Chinese dormitory for a year and a half. And so when I went into these dormitories, I kind of felt like I was home, and that I think subconsciously resonated with the people there. I mean, I would like sit on their beds and kinda hang out like I hung out in my own dorm room six or seven years before. So I was a little bit younger. I spoke pretty decent Chinese. And I just kinda realized that they were like my classmates earlier jet. I mean a later generation, but they were very more my classmates their rooms looked and I think more importantly smelled like the room. I lived in an engine university for unit half. If for me, it wasn't as exotic as it probably appeared to many other western correspondents who hadn't had that experience. When you say, they weren't later generation that students that you described earlier are actually plucked back out of countryside and given the chance to go to school where these students who had expected to go to school. Yeah. These were students generally speaking who had gone through high school. So this is just their life experiences significantly different from the life experience from their elders and describe the energy of these meetings, these early meetings on campus, it was just full of this sense of possibility. And a real search for a new set of values for their country. A lot of patriotism deep love of their country and deep desire in the sense of what direction are we gonna take? And anything is possible. That was the overriding sense. You got was optimism about what China could do and we're trying to go..

China Beijing University ching hall bond ADA Shanghai US secretary seven years
"thirty year" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"thirty year" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

"From foreign policy. I'm Sarah wild Mun. And this is first person this week an inside account of the TNN square massacre. Thirty years ago this month student protests rutted in Beijing posing one of the most significant threats to the rule of the communist party in China's history. The demonstrations lasted two months and grew to include a range of citizens all demanding reforms in the country. For the first time in huge numbers. The ordinary men and women of Beijing the old and the young professors and taxi drivers have joined the student protests lending, their support to what is now taking on all the appearances of a peaceful popular uprising against the oppressiveness of communist rule campaign for China's renewal in an atmosphere of freedom and democracy, the focal point of the protest was Tiananmen Square. The heart of Beijing within a few weeks the government declared martial law and then in early June the world watched in horror as Chinese military tanks rolled in the streets of Beijing on the way to Chinaman's square. They fired indiscriminately at protesters there were reports of tanks rolling over students. The noise have gun five rose from all over the center of Peking, it was unremitting. On the streets leading down to the main road to ten on men square furious. People stood in disbelief at the glow in the sky listening to the sound of shots in the midst of all this chaos was John Pomfret who covered China for these Tosi press of the time hit an advantage over his fellow foreign correspondents. He had studied in China spoke Mandarin fluently and had many contacts in student movement. He joins us today. John, thanks for joining us. Thanks for having me. So we're coming on the thirtieth anniversary of the TNN square massacre. But I want to actually start with how you came to China in the first place. How did you come? So I went to college wanting to study neuro physiology. Okay..

China Beijing John Pomfret Tiananmen Square Sarah wild Mun communist party Tosi Thirty years two months
"thirty year" Discussed on Unorthodox

Unorthodox

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"thirty year" Discussed on Unorthodox

"And so when you're married to somebody and they're the narrative that way it's really hard on the secular person kind of dealing with the narrative of their believing spouse but it's also really hard for believing spouse because the secular person now represents an existential threat and so it was that was the process of becoming as you put it post christian was also a process or was it literally just waking up one morning i come done now like i said like thirty year process but i know but the moment you had the realization where the still some hang up some things you the moment i had to realization ultimate wasn't a moment is like inspires like us the guy guys like with the very end but the very very it was sudden well the very babies dying for years but the very very yeah yeah very end that should matters the very end wasn't deciding believe in god the very end was realizing that i didn't want to spend the rest of my life pretending that i did but you know you know like my there was nothing laughed for a long time but i didn't do the math to connect that with the rest of my life and the stuff i was doing like and so the bike crash was this thing where i was like oh you're going to die really soon what do you want to do with the rest of your life and and what should you do with the rest of your life and i became i became really convinced that what i needed to do was to try to create communities and an opportunity for people to have all those wonderful things that they get out of being jewish or they get out of being event gel christian to feel like you're part of a tribe a bunch of people that are committed to making the world a better place together that you have some rituals that you get together they help each other raise each other's kids all those things like like people who leave religious communities oftentimes fund himselves alone in a very very kind of cold world and they can't find the other people that want to pursue goodness in a secular way so you don't feel any resentment towards people who still are believers.

thirty year