35 Burst results for "thirty five thousand dollars"

What an Increasingly Booming Economy Means for Bitcoin

The Breakdown with NLW

02:07 min | Last month

What an Increasingly Booming Economy Means for Bitcoin

"What's going on guys. It is thursday april twenty ninth and tenth day we are asking the question of what an increasingly booming economy means for bitcoin. So the setup for this. Is that obviously for. Bitcoin and bitcoin has always been a macro asset in the sense that it is fundamentally about reorganizing the global economy in some way when it comes to the rest of the world however it's really only been in the last year that that idea of bitcoin as a meaningful player on the macro stage has come to the fore. The connection was made first and most profoundly by. Paul tudor jones with his great monetary inflation thesis. And since then. Bitcoin has been tied up in its digital gold narrative as an inflation hedge. Right there's no way to deny looking at micro strategy getting in and michael sailor talking about the melting ice cube of cash as a treasury reserve asset and stanley druckenmiller seeing five to ten percent inflation over the next few years. There's no way to deny that bitcoins. Narrative has been tied up in the fear of looming inflation. The question then becomes. What if that starts to withdraw. What if the macro narrative shifts. Where does that leave bitcoin so today. That's what we're going explore. And i think the start. Let's start with this idea of it. Being a booming economy one of the wall street journal's lead headlines today is. Us economy appears to be lifting off. Economists are projecting a quote robust consumer led recovery. Gdp grew at six point. Four percent seasonally adjusted in q one which is almost exactly what economists had predicted. What's more consumer confidence is approaching pre pandemic levels. In fact it's the highest. It's been in fourteen months and it's done nothing but increase for months in a row in particular a low income band people and families earning between twenty five and thirty five thousand dollars. A year has increased dramatically in march. Nine hundred thousand new jobs created an unemployment went down six percent.

Bitcoin Paul Tudor Jones Michael Sailor Stanley Druckenmiller Wall Street Journal United States
Tiffany Aliche's Financial Components to Become 'Financially Whole'

BiggerPockets Money Podcast

01:50 min | 2 months ago

Tiffany Aliche's Financial Components to Become 'Financially Whole'

"Alita welcome back to the bigger pockets of any podcast. Always so excited to talk to you. I love that you guys have me back. Thank you so much mindy. Thank you scott. I love being. I feel like i'm a regular now shooters. I think you're our normal three-time guest. Oh which is nice Okay so tiffany. You are a master of all things money and finance but where your budget needs to story. Starts you worry financial disaster. You had a lot of shame over your situation. And that caused you to withdraw from friends and basically from life. What would you say to thirty year. Old tiffany going through all of this financial horrible mess and two others listening who are feeling ashamed of the financial situation there. In how do you get you to stop feeling bad about a mistake that you've made so i'll say get you linda and explain what that means. Emitted in alsace. Shame is a liar. So the way i was able to go from like this secretive. Shame when it came to my money. Was that my best friend linda. Who'd been trying to reach me for months. After i lost my job after i lost all my money after i scanned into thirty five thousand dollars in credit card debt after i couldn't afford my mortgage and had to move back home at thirty so i was at the bottom of the bottom. I remember literally looking at the ceiling from my middle school bed saying you had more money at sixteen. They do thirty like in total. I'm talking about retirement. Savings pennies in my purse like is this was like shame on top of same so linda called me after trying to get me on the phone for some months and was gonna pretend like everything was okay. That was busy But you know your best friend knows you best.

Old Tiffany Alita Mindy Linda Tiffany Scott
FAA steps up enforcement against unruly airline passengers

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 5 months ago

FAA steps up enforcement against unruly airline passengers

"Federal safety officials are announcing stricter enforcement against unruly airline passengers citing confrontations with Washington DC rioters the Federal Aviation Administration says there's been a quote disturbing increase in incidents where airline passengers have disrupted flights with threatening or violent behavior this includes confrontations over facemask rules and from recent violence at the U. S. capitol so the agency says it will no longer give initial warnings to unruly passengers it will immediately launch enforcement action penalties can include fines up to thirty five thousand dollars and jail terms for threats or assaults the flight attendants union says it's applauding this new policy of first strike your out Jackie Quinn Washington

U. S. Capitol Federal Aviation Administratio Washington Dc Flight Attendants Union Jackie Quinn Washington
Netflix's audio-only mode could threaten podcasting

podnews

03:34 min | 6 months ago

Netflix's audio-only mode could threaten podcasting

"Letterman walks out. Onstage blows a kiss to the crowd grabs a might cover much. Thank you takes the mic office. Stand to see you move over. Podcasting net flicks is rolling out an audio only mode to the android app. The app also has variable speed playback and a feature called audio description. Which as you've just heard tells you what's happening on screen. The company will hope you. Don't listen to a podcast when you can listen to a movie or tv show instead. Try and digital has released the latest podcast report. The data covers most of november. The top five remains unchanged with npr at number one total downloads from the top ten publishers drops by more than five percent in a month that included the us presidential election and thanksgiving an incomplete rancor it measures participating publishers only and notably not iheart radio. Edison research published their ten for twenty compilation of their biggest findings from twenty twenty expects audio consumption spoken word and us election voting willing to that from our show notes now newsletter today story board and enterprise podcast and hosting platform has raised four point. Five million dollars in funding bryant barletta. The first sounds profitable deep dive yesterday. Looking at pod scribe. It's free to watch on the profitable website. Espn podcasting had a record year with ninety six point five million downloads in october alone. They say vox media studios to double the amount of shows it makes and plans to bring in one hundred million dollars in revenue in two thousand and twenty one. Steve hand wonders if independent podcasting has peaked. He was formerly at google's audio mused division at a us public radio. Nick held him to. Is broadly pessimistic about the podcast industry available content massively exceeds available interest. He claims and the changes in the industry in two twenty are a long way from won't made podcasts. Special he says and captivate has launched show notes snippets a simple way to at creatine snippets to your show notes. I'm an adviser. What does it take good and effective secretary. The president's cabinet well first of all congratulations. I'm thrilled by news that you're going to be nominated. That's a clip. From the deciding decade with pete buttigieg who learned had been nominated as transport secretary while he was doing a podcast with hillary clinton podcast. One australia has lost a show. And russia's podcast 'em salvation will become an independent production in two thousand and twenty one. She describes her relationship with sea. Who owned podcast one in australia as an abusive relationship. I keep going back to sa hired. Her for short lived stint on the ailing today. A famine sydney one in a list of underinvested breakfast shows on the formerly market leading station. Crooked media's wind of changes to be adapted for television says deadline and a sports podcast has crowd funded over one hundred thirty five thousand dollars in two weeks that tennis podcast has received funding from nearly one thousand two hundred listeners in the uk. It's been going since two thousand twelve

Edison Research Bryant Barletta Vox Media Studios Letterman NPR United States Pete Buttigieg Espn Nick Steve Google Australia Cabinet Hillary Clinton Russia Sydney
Passenger in Offset's car arrested for concealed weapon

Mojo In The Morning

01:58 min | 8 months ago

Passenger in Offset's car arrested for concealed weapon

"Dirty story over the weekend to offset detained by police while driving through a trump rally in beverly hills. This was Saturday afternoon. He actually took out his phone in recorded himself being pulled over share the video instagram alive he refused to step out of a car while being questioned by cops one of whom had a weapon drawn and I'm GonNa play his video in just a second the officer started off by telling offset. There had been a report that he was weaving guns at people as he drove through the area looking at me like that Bro. Medina turned. Telling you. Do it, but you got so Gaza. I I'm not I stayed with. Her driver I'm giving you more take your right hand turn off the I'm not doing no orders. You got guys outpointing. Turn Journal. On. Asking you to do I'm not gonNA WANNA because you've got guys. That's my choice nothing to move my half of my world this. Guys were wait somebody was told that I'm celebrity I offset from the Migos they bears that's why they following me. WHY WE'RE HERE Waving. The flag. What are you talking about? told me to my hair's up I'm not doing that you put my hands on twenty five thousand people. Public. Movement. Reiterate offset. said that trump supporters had his car with the flag pretty be was when this all went down and for the record, it was actually Cardi's cousin Marcello. Who is waving guns at people he ultimately was arrested. The cousin has now been charged with carrying a concealed weapon and carrying a loaded firearm and public. So he is being held on like thirty five thousand dollars moments before this happened on Cardi's instagram live. Videotaping some of the people that were in that. Trump rally to the time, but she was not in the same car with him.

Cardi Donald Trump Beverly Hills Turn Journal Marcello Gaza Officer Medina
The Surprising Truth About Environmentalists and Voting

Warm Regards

07:53 min | 8 months ago

The Surprising Truth About Environmentalists and Voting

"Nathaniel I'm really excited to have you on the show today. I have never seen so much discussion about get out the vote efforts around a midterm election. So were really here. We're really happy to have you here in excited to have you on the show. Well thank you jacqueline and thank you Ramesh I'm I'm really excited to be here with you guys. So, do you do you feel like we're seeing something different in this election we keep hearing all these projections about how college students are really GonNa vote this time and You know the projected voter turnout is really high in various places and I think I just read an article that my home state of Vermont has something like a ninety two percent. Voter registration rate for the state, which is crazy. Awesome. So do you do you feel something's different? Are we going to see a shift from the from the recent past? Yes. I absolutely feel like something is different. A field director just told me about an hour ago that a million people have already voted in Florida so far as also voting. and they're in person early voting hasn't started yet. So all of these people are people who requested that ballots be mailed to them. And have already made them back in and just to put that number in context just to give you a denominator I think barely six million people voted in the twenty fourteen midterms and Florida. So the hot a million people have already voted mean something's going on now who are those people that I can't tell you? I can't tell you with whether these are young people storm in the polls or liberals or conservatives I don't know. But you're right that there's a new energy going on this time around. Suspending of demographics mean you focus mostly on on kind of an untapped group, the the environmental movements, and we often think of environmentalists is really active in terms of making lifestyle choices. giving up meat or dairy, or or abandoning abandoning your car for a bicycle that takes a lot of effort and a lot more than going to the polls. So my question for you is, how are we doing? Are we actually voting as a group? Jacqueline you you ask the the sixty four, thousand dollar question no, we're not we're not laugh. Yeah environmentalists awful voters. I'm not going to sugarcoat it. We. We've done a lot of research on this and it's pretty easy to measure because weather you vote or not, and a lot of Americans don't know this. Whether you voter not as public, record. Now. I'll never be able to look up who Ramesh voted for or who jacqueline voted for but I can absolutely look up which elections you vote in in which elections you don't. And so people are able to run large polls and build predictive models and identify all the environmentalists in various states. And it turns out. That environmentalists. Habitually under vote they vote far less often than the average voter in almost every other state and just to give you some context here, I'll use say the two thousand, sixteen presidential election as an example. In two, thousand, sixteen, Sixteen, nine percent of registered voters voted. But only fifty percent of environmentalists did. Wow Yeah and if you go back to twenty fourteen, it's even worse. Forty four percent of registered voters voted but only twenty one percent of environmentalists did. Okay. So the obvious follow up question there is why? Yeah. Why? Is that one hundred, thirty, five, thousand dollars. That's Before thousand. In one dollars. So we know some of the reasons but only some of the reasons. So part of what's going on here is just demographic correlations so I don't know what the Environmental Movement was like ten twenty thirty years ago but. It certainly isn't now. What People Imagine as the stereotypical environmentalist. The typical environmentalists now is not well, it's not me it's not some white Yuppie who hops into their electric vehicle to get to their job downtown. people who deeply care about climate and the environment are now much more likely to make less than fifty thousand dollars a year. Be African American or Latino, and live within five miles of an urban core end they are predominantly younger but that's not. Not so much the case anymore. And all of those demographic groups that I just mentioned right now. Vote less often than the average American. So part of what's going on here is just that environmentalists are likely to be part of demographic groups that just habitually under vote. But the really interesting thing. Is that's not all that's going on here because even if you look at just young. Environmentalists vote less often than the other young people. Were even if you've looked just at Latinos, the Environmental Latinos vote less often than the other Latinos. So something else is going on here and the honest answer guys is we don't know what it is because it's really easy for behavioral scientists to measure why someone takes an action. So it's really easy to set up an experiment to to figure out how to get someone to vote. What's really hard? is to figure out the opposite. What's really hard is to set up an experiment to figure out why people don't take an action like exercising or voting or or vaccinating their children or something like that. the best you can do is ask them. And when we ask environmentalists why they're not voting. They lied their pants off. They lie France off and so and I'm. That other people or So, so no not more than other people and that's a good question but no, I mean no matter how you ask the question if you try to determine why people don't vote. The responses they'll give. Our responses that they think you want to hear. What we've realized is that even non voters still buy into the societal norm that voting is a good thing. So everybody wants to be known as a voter. Just, like everybody wants you to think that they brush your teeth, brush their teeth or or wash their hands every time or something like that. This voting is a societal norm that we all buy into and so I ask people why they don't vote. They will often before they even give you an excuse guys. They will lie their pants off and say, Oh, no, I vote all the time Jacqueline. And we that's a lie because whether you voted not as public record, right? These people looking at their voting histories and we know that they've never voted their entire lives and they swear up and down all the time that they vote whenever there's an election and so. The honest answer to your question and it's a good one is. We. Don't know why environmentalists aren't voting, but we've got some good ideas as to how to get them

Jacqueline Ramesh Environmental Movement Florida Vermont Nathaniel Environmental Latinos Director France
How to Not Have a Lost Decade

Money For the Rest of Us

04:13 min | 9 months ago

How to Not Have a Lost Decade

"Welcome money for the rest of this is a personal finance show on money how it works how to invest it and live without worrying about it. We host David Stein today's episode three, fourteen it's titled Don't have a lost decade. Recently, got an email from a new plus member. He says he's treating the material on the website like an online college course but he had a question he wrote that he's approaching a crossroad in his life and he would like to prepare himself for that crossroad. He works at one of the Best Public Gardens in us as a horticulturalist he's been there three years makes forty three thousand dollars per year has four weeks of vacation full healthcare and Hsa they have a four zero three. B. Defined contribution plan where he gets a six percent match his boss enjoy working with him and he enjoys his job. This member also has his own business, a lifestyle business providing premium horticulture services for high end properties. He started in two thousand nineteen gross four thousand dollars and anticipate grossing twelve thousand dollars this year he has no debt. The only thing he owns he says, that is worth. Any money is an old pickup truck that's worth about three thousand. Is roughly eighteen thousand, five hundred dollars in his defined contribution plan and using the online tools on money for the rest of US plus. That, he's on track to retire in his early sixties. y'All says about two thousand dollars in a savings account pays two percent and about fifteen hundred dollars in a wealth front Robo Advisor. Account. He's living on about eighteen to twenty thousand dollars a year. After contributing to is defined contribution plan and health savings account, he brings home about twenty, eight, thousand dollars but that doesn't include is overtime bonuses or the work in his business. After taxes and contribution he estimates that he's bringing home about thirty, five, thousand dollars with everything, which means potentially he could save fifteen to seventeen thousand dollars per year and certainly ten thousand dollars per year. He writes for the first time in my life I'm not living paycheck to paycheck am planning for the future. The business I own. Now as a hobby passion, I turned profitable. It has been a great space for me to learn and have done a lot of just that but it ultimately is a glorified landscaping business. What they really want to own is a retail nursery that one day will become an event, an education centre as well. I turned thirty two months. I thought at this point I would go beyond an entry level position. I thought I would own my own house and maybe own a business full-time. Those goals seem so far away. The question I want to pose to you is, how do I get from where I am today to owning a five to ten acre property that can use to develop into my next lifestyle business as soon as possible Had An additional investment question that address in a few minutes. I he's not in an entry level position. He is a master, her cultures he's studied it. He learned a lot of those skills working at an organic farm and Tasmania. Got, his university degree. He was admitted to a professional horticulture program at the Public Garden where he works, he is very, very skilled in all aspects of landscape design and gardening. and. There are a lot of people that would be very envious that he has his amazing job working in horticulture and one where he can listen to a lot of podcast which he does. In order to answer question I want to compare to couples I know I've known for about a decade. This particular members approaching thirty. He's looking out over the next decade. What has to happen so that he doesn't have a lost decade and can reach goals I'm positive he can reach his goals.

David Stein United States HSA Public Garden Advisor GOT Tasmania
What if lifesaving prescriptions were affordable for all

TED Talks Daily

05:01 min | 9 months ago

What if lifesaving prescriptions were affordable for all

"Hi Hugh Ted Talks Daily today a super cool idea to ensure people have access to the medicines they need to survive and thrive Kia Williams the founder of the nonprofit serum saw both a problem and a solution that exists in the pharmaceutical space and her idea link. The two together should explain in her talk from Ted Twenty twenty. Every day in this country families are forced to make impossible choices when it comes to their healthcare. Like Kimberly who said? There is time I to choose between my food and my pills. It wasn't luxury stuff because I didn't make that much. It was like, can I get shampoo or conditioner? Things you take for granted and Debbie. Who Said you put your medicine in one hand your living costs in the other. Okay. Well, what am I going to do? Am I GONNA get my medicine or am I gonNA pay my bills? Will. I can't live without my medicine but I can't live if I don't pay my bills ten thousand people die every month in this country because they don't take the medicine that they need. More people die from not taking medications than. Overdoses and car accidents combined. But you can't take medicine if you can't afford it. Today the average household spends three thousand dollars a year on medications about a third of folks who are uninsured said that they stopped taking medicine as prescribed because of cost even folks with insurance. If they make under thirty, five, thousand dollars a year half of them report skipping the medications if their insurance doesn't cover it. So there are. Million adults like Kimberly in like Debbie who are forced to make impossible choices every day. We all know that prescription drug prices are too high. In our healthcare system that makes some folks uninsured and other folks underinsured doesn't prioritize people who need access now and need medications. Now, ten million, it's a big number, but it's also a solvable number because there's also ten billion dollars of perfectly good unused medication that goes to waste. So this is an injustice onto sides people not getting the medicine that they need to survive and to thrive. In, that very same medication being sent to a medical waste incinerator to be destroyed this waste is unconscionable, but it also offers an opportunity I started serum a not for profit technology company with my co founders Adam and George. To turn discarded medications into a lifeline, we may not be able to fix all the ways in which our healthcare system is failing us, but we can fix this one. Medications come from manufacturers wholesalers who have safety stock, and when it's short dated, they destroy it. It also comes from healthcare facilities like fiddles pharmacies in nursing homes who end up with surplus when a patient stops taking medication or when they pass away. We can use this untapped source of medications to supply all ten million people who need medications, and we can do this today. Serum get surplus medications by putting recycling bins into the hundreds of facilities that have surplus they fill the been and when the boxes full serum initiates a courier pickup to pick up that medication in we handle the shipping the tracking the manifests in the tax receipt medicine donors want to donate because it's actually cheaper and easier than the highly regulated medicine destruction process. And they're strong tax incentives to actually donate. We then deliver those donated medications to people who needed a new prescription comes in in our platform matches that patient need with the inventory that's available. Our platform then generates a warehouse pick lists. The medications are picked in the prescription spills. We are building the twenty-first-century pharmacy experience that low income families deserve patients can register in under five minutes and have access to over five hundred different medications A. Stable list of medications for everything from heart disease to mental health conditions

Ted Twenty Twenty Kimberly Debbie Hugh Ted Kia Williams Overdoses Founder Adam George
Novelist Donald Ray Pollock On Factory Work And Finding Fiction Later In Life

Fresh Air

20:21 min | 9 months ago

Novelist Donald Ray Pollock On Factory Work And Finding Fiction Later In Life

"Today's first guest is author Donald Ray Pollock, whose novel the devil all the time has just been made into a new netflix movie premiering next Wednesday. It Stars Tom Holland and Robert Pattinson, and here's a taste in this clip. A young boy has just watched his father pulverized two guys after they made lewd comments about the father's wife, the son's mother. Afterward the father gives his son some advice. You remember what I told you. On. The buzzer gave you. That's what I mean. got. To. Sir. Good sons of bitches out there. One hundred. These that many. Cannonball. In, both the movie and the novel the characters in the devil all the time are driven to extremes whether their fathers and sons, serial killers or preachers. The story begins in the small town of knock him stiff a real place in southern Ohio where Donald Ray pollock grew up. He didn't become a writer until he put in over thirty years at the local paper mill and got sober. But. Once he did start writing. He was noticed quickly receiving both awards and critical. Acclaim. Terry, gross spoke to Donald Ray pollock in twenty eleven when the devil, all the time was first published. Donald, Ray pollock welcome to fresh air. I'd like to start with reading from your new book, the Devil, all the time It's about the second paragraph from the prologue. So would you just set it up for us? What we have here is A young boy's name is Arvin Eugene Russell and he's following behind his father Willard and there and place called knock him stiff and they're going to Willard's prayer logging as a log in the woods where he Wants to communicate with God and So this is where they are. You know early in the morning and their. have finally reached this log. Willard eased himself down on the high side of the law and motion for his son to kneel beside him in the dead soggy leaves unless he had whiskey running through his veins Willard came to the clearing every morning and evening talk to God. Arvin didn't know which was worse the drinking or the praying. As far back, as he could remember, it seemed that his father had faulted devil all the time. Arvin little with the damp pulled his Co. tighter. He wished he were still in bed even school with always miseries was better than this but it was a Saturday and there was no way to get around it. Through the mostly bare trees beyond the cross Arvin could see whisper smoke rising from a few chimneys, half a mile away four hundred or so people lived in, knock him stiff in nineteen, fifty seven nearly all of them connected by blood through one godforsaken clam or another be it lust were necessity or just plain ignorance along with the tar paper shacks and Cinder Block houses the Holler included two general stores and a Church of Christ in Christian Union and joint known throughout the township as the bullpen. Three days before he'd come home with another black I I, don't condone no fighting just for the hell of it but sometimes, you're just too easy going Willard told him that evening then boys might be bigger than you. But the next time one of them starts his stuff, I want you to finish it. Willard was standing on the porch changing out of his work clothes. He handed Arvin Brown pants stiff with dried blood and Greece. He worked in a slaughterhouse in Greenfield and that day sixteen hundred homes had been butchered a new record for RJ Carol meat-packing. Those boy didn't know yet what he wanted to do when he grew up he was pretty sure he didn't WanNa kill pigs for eleven. Let's Donald Ray pollock reading from his new novel, the Devil, all the time. You know in the reading that you did the father tells the sun that the next time. So many beats him up the sun has to fight back and that seems to be. A recurring theme like in the opening story of your collection of short stories, the collections called knock him stiff. The opening sentence reads my father showed me how to hurt a man one August night at the torch in when I was seven years old it was the only thing he was ever any good at. You certainly seem interested in the idea of a father. Kind of indoctrinating a sun on the need to fight back and then egging on to do it even when it's inappropriate. so was is this a story that played out in your life? Well, not so much in my life I. Mean as far as I don't my dad really didn't push me to fight or anything like that. But you know when I was growing up my father and I had a very Uneasy relationship. You've got to understand my dad was born in one, thousand, nine, hundred, thirty he's still alive. You know he's eighty years old and he's still kicking but He was born in. Nineteen thirty grew up in the depression I went to the eighth grade. He was working on the railroad by the time he was sixteen, and then he was in the navy. And, my dad is a very tough. Hard. man Stra very strong man. As and in contrast to that, my mother is very shy kind. Small Bone woman. and. Either fortunately or unfortunately for me, I took after my mother and I believe. When I was a kid, my dad was. Maybe disappointed for not taking after him more. So. You know that's where I guess part of that comes from it and part of it also comes from. Lived in stiff. That's where I grew up and I saw a lot of other fathers who were you know drinkers and hell raisers and they didn't treat their families very well You know maybe they went and worked for a while and. I got enough money to go on another band or whatever, and pretty much left the family to take care of themselves. So, yeah father's have a pretty rough time and my work I just. It's just. You know I'm a father. You know I have a daughter WHO's I'm thirty years old now and I have always felt that I. Wasn't. As good as I could have been. Her mother and I were divorced when she was very young she was like a year old and and I wasn't around that much and. That's probably the best explanation. I can give for why treat father's like I do my work. Were you bullied in school. You said you, you took after your mother who wouldn't hurt a fly. So and if you were bullied, would you fight back? Did you know how to actually I wasn't bullied in school I? Never really had any problems with that and yeah, I. Mean a would fight back if I had to but. That situation you know didn't come about very much probably you know just. No more than any other normal kid you know might face that sort of thing. But. Yeah. I mean I wasn't really interested in Working on cars or farm or anything like that was more of A. I won't call myself a bookworm because we really didn't have that many books but you know I like to read and watch old movies and drawl and stuff like that and My Dad. Just you know he's a very practical man I mean, even today you know his idea of success is. Owning your own farm, starting your own business or something like that and I know that he probably looks on what I'm doing now is. A pretty useless way to spend your life trying to write books. Would you describe what the town of knock him stiff was like when you were growing up well, when I was growing up there it was. You know relocated for us. Ok we'll knock him stiff. is about thirteen miles west of chillicothe Theo, which is you know southern Ohio. It was its own little place. You know there wasn't much else around there but it was a community There were three small general stores and a bar and a church, and probably four hundred, fifty, five, hundred people now I probably was related to. At least half those people. So did you find this nurturing being in a town where half the people in it were related to you or incredibly claustrophobic? I think when I was a kid when I was a kid I was claustrophobic for me. You know I was one of those kids I was always unsatisfied I always wanted to be. Else and somewhere else. And so from a very early age. You know I was thinking about escaping from the hauler. I just Thought that I'd rather be somewhere else are somewhere else. But where you are as in Chile coffee which is. PHILADELPHIA, which is about thirteen miles away like you got out but you didn't go very far. I, really didn't get out I mean that's the weird contradiction of that whole thing you know i. Wanted to escape and them what I finally got my chance or whatever I. I chose to stay I'm out at knock stiff at least once a week even today Ladder parents go to visit. My parents are still alive. You know I have a brother and two sisters and they all live fairly close to there and So I. Think though as far as escape goes what happened with me was I quit high school when I was seventeen. And I went to work in a meat packing plant much like Weller work, Dan? And then when I was eighteen I moved to Florida you know that was going to be I was going to get away that you know by moving to Florida and I was down are working a job in a nursery and I wasn't making much money or anything only been there a few months my dad called and said. Hey, I can get you a job at the paper mail if you come back up here so. I chose to come back. You know the paper Mills Calling it was union job and great benefits and. And I knew you know for a high school dropout that was probably going to be the best job I. Ever got. You had that job for. How many years did you work at the paper mill? I? was there thirty two years and you didn't start writing till you were around fifty or is that is fifth well I'm fifty six now and I started writing when I was forty five. Okay. So how come it took so long did you know? When you weren't writing did you know that you had that in you? Well. You know I'd always been a big reader as I said and I love books. And I think maybe in the back of my mind, you know always thought writing would be a great way to get by in the world and you know, of course, I was very naive about it. The principal reasons for me you know as far as being a writer were one, you were your own boss. To you could do it anywhere. And three, you made lots of money. Wasn't until actually began writing it. I found out. That was a real true. But I. Think you know Sorta like maybe a fantasy that? It was in the back of my mind for a long time. I had a problem with drinking and for a number of years and you know it was one of those fantasies that when you got half loaded and You started daydreaming or whatever it was. One of those things that you thought about right thought about. But it wasn't really. You know I went to school when I was in my thirties I went to college I went to Ohio University and I ended up with a degree in English and You. Know even while I was there though I wasn't thinking about being a writer I never took any writing workshops or anything like that. But then finally when I was forty five my dad retired from the paper mill. And there was just something about watching him retire and go home. and. You know that was you know pretty much the end of his career and it really. Bothered me and I. Just. decided. I had to try something else you know. To some other way to. Spend the rest of my life. So. When you decided, you wanted to learn how to write what did that mean? Any. Writers or anything in for a while I just sort of scribbled and struggled. And then I'd read an interview with a writer and I can't recall her name now or no it was a lady. But she talked about typing out other people's stories as a means of maybe getting closer to them or just learn how to put a story together. and. So I started doing that. Who did you type out? I typed out a lot of different stories I. I was typing out a story at least once a week and that went on for about a year and a half. So John. cheever hemingway. Flannery. O'Connor Richard. Yates Dennis Johnson the you know the list just goes on and on if it was a story that I really liked and it wasn't. Long I, type it out, and then I carry it around with me for a week and you look at over and you know jot notes on stuff like that, and then I'd throw it away and do another one. Typing a story out, just was a much better way for me to see how you know person puts dial together or you know. Moose from one scene to the next that sort of thing. Was it hard for you to find your subject matter as a writer? Well when I first started. Trying to learn how to write. As. I said like maybe I would copy out John cheever story. So then I would try to write my own story about some East Coast suburbanite having unfair. Something like that or maybe I'd write about a re Rita Andrei debut story, and then I'd write about a Catholic priest. and. So I did that for maybe two years or so and it just wasn't working at all for me. and. Then filing maybe at about two and a half years, I wrote a story that's included in the book. Knock him stiff called back teen. And it's a very short story. and. It's about these two losers sitting in a donut shop. And that was the first thing that I had. Written that I thought wasn't too bad. And so then I increasingly started focusing on you know the people that I knew about instead of nurses, lawyers, that sort of thing that I had absolutely no idea. How to write about There's a passage in your new novel that's about a bus driver and the bus drivers father had gotten a certificate from the railroad for not missing a single day of work in twenty years and bus drivers. Mother always held this up as like what you could do. If you really you know were strive and tried to accomplish something when the bus drivers father died the bus driver hope that that certificate would be buried with his father's. We didn't have to look at it anymore, but instead his mother just like. Put It on the wall, display it in the living room. And then the bus driver thinks it wore on you after a while other people's accomplishments. I love that sentence did you ever feel that way I mean he kochman here seems. So relatively small like a good attendance record and not to knock that. But for that to be like, you know the zenith of somebody's life is. You. but did you feel that way that a war on you? Other People's accomplishments? I don't think that I paid so much attention to other people's. Successes or whatever. But I, know that I was aware you know by the time. I was thirty two or so and I've been working at the mail for about fourteen years. And I knew that all the guys that I had come in with you got hired about the same time as mayor guys even much later than that. You know they own their own home. Maybe. They owned a boat and they had two or three vehicles and they were married and had kids and on and on and on. You know in contrast to them. I've been divorced twice. I'd filed bankruptcy when I got sober I was living in this little very small apartment above this garage. Of. Motel Room and I've been living there for about. Four or five years. I owned a black and white TV that my sister had given me and I had this seventy six chevy that had the whole side of smashed in and that was it. You know for fourteen years of working there. That's what I had. And so you know there was that sense I guess of me just being a failure. Wasn't really that I wasn't jealous of those people or anything like that. I, mean I had enough sense to know that you know where I ended up was my own fault. But there was always that that idea in back of my head that. I could have done more you know I could maybe went to college or something you know. I'm sure you know if I'd wanted to go to school when I was eighteen, my dad would try to help me. and. That's not the route that I chose though how has your life changed? Now as a published writer, you have a collection of short stories. You have a new novel you got a thirty five thousand dollars cash prize, the pen, Robert Bingham Award. So, what's different about your life? well, I have a lot more time to just set on the porch and. Smoke and daydream. Think it's a legitimate. Yeah well, at least that's what I tell my wife. But my life hasn't really changed that much I. Mean I get a lot more emails. Now you know that sort of thing, but you know I still live in the same house I still pretty much. You know my daily routine is. I really can't say that it's changed that much. It's a good life and I'm thrilled that you know I've got a publisher and. You know had at least a little bit of success. You know I know a lot of writers out there a lot of writers out there who are much better than I am. And would. Probably give their left arm. To be setting, you know where I'm setting today. Well Donald Ray, pollock thing you so much for talking with us. Terry I appreciate. It. Made my day. Donald Ray pollock speaking to Terry Gross in twenty eleven. The devil all the time a new movie based on his novel of the same name.

Writer Donald Ray Pollock Willard Terry Gross Ohio Arvin Arvin Brown Netflix Ray Pollock Donald Trump Donald Ray Arvin Eugene Russell Robert Pattinson Tom Holland Robert Bingham Chile John Cheever Ohio University Dennis Johnson Greenfield
Mastering Money With the Budgetnista

Motley Fool Answers

05:55 min | 11 months ago

Mastering Money With the Budgetnista

"So. Tiffany. Let's start with your personal story. So we're currently in third recession of the century. But I'm guessing that you're doing just fine partially at least because of the lessons you learned during the last recession to tell us a little bit about your history, what the last recession was like for you and what has happened since then. Now. Certainly The last question caught me off guard i. Was Not prepared. I because quite honestly I was a schoolteacher and you know I was pretty confident. I'm like, I don't know that schoolteachers lose their jobs because you know we are essential workers, and now yet here we are back again. But Yeah I was a schoolteacher and I didn't move my job actually in two, thousand, eight when so many of my friends did but I let I lost it at the tail end of two, thousand nine. So it really took me by surprise but. Up until like I would say, twenty, five, twenty, six, I was what I called financially. Perfect. I grew up in a household. Money was talked about wasn't scared of talking about finances. Might author was a CFO OF A small nonprofit? He also had his NBA in economics, his his a in finance. My mom was a nurse and we literally used to have money meeting so. I. Didn't grow up with the angst that most people did. So by the time, I was twenty five even though. I was teaching preschool wasn't making much. I think I was making like forty thousand dollars a year By the time I was twenty, five ahead. Forty thousand saved bought a Condo I. I had an ADL to I. Think Credit Score at didn't have any credit card debt. I paid off like my parents helped with my undergrad degree plus. I commuted. So what I did haven't stood alone. I was able to pay that off a few years after school. So financially perfect like okay. So I honestly couldn't relate although I was helping my friends with their budgets savings and things like that. I couldn't relate to the mistakes because I had not yet need them but I was going to then. When I was twenty six, I went on to get my masters in education and I was like, okay. So you now you went from no debt to a mortgage, not so bad. I had a a you know student loans because my master's not so bad. But by twenty six, I said, okay. Now, I'm ready to learn to invest and instead of asking my father who has literally two degrees in years of experience I'm GonNa ask a friend of mine. and. So I asked a friend of mine who appeared to be independently wealthy because he had like a really nice car. and. Like a like a fancy apartment he's well I think Spurs. You have to learn to invest with other people's money at. My money. So what he postulated as is that. Do, you have credit card said, yes. But I paid off in full every month because as instructed by my father, he was like well, did you know you could pull money off a credit card? I, did not know that. So he said not only can you pull off one? You could pull it off to I was like double the mistake. Let's do it. So I pulled off twenty thousand dollars off of my credit cards and I went to invest with him what's to say? That didn't happen I. ENDED UP Thirty, five thousand dollars in credit card debt when I didn't have credit card debt prior and I just remember thinking a first year. I said didn't want to take responsibility for the mistake that I made I did not tell my dad or my mom. But I pay just a minimum because I said, you know what? He's going to come back or he's GonNa. Take care of this because it's not my fault of Ansel from age twenty seven I didn't do anything. Well, twenty, seven night out the money twenty eight, just pay the maximum finally twenty nine, I said all right I'm GONNA pay off this debt just going to buckle down I live pretty frequently anyway, and then twenty nine is when I lost my job. So. Now, I've got a mortgage student loan credit card debt and I was like, okay, I don't know what to do. I've never been in the situation. So. Fallon to this light dark hole of like spiral like because I'm twenty nine going on thirty I've lost everything as far as I can tales financially. So I ended up moving back home with my parents without telling them why they knew it was the recession obviously, and they also knew I lost my job, but they didn't know. ABOUT CREDIT CARD DEBT Live with them for year than I. Am I live with my sister on her couch for year, try to figure out my life because back. Then now we're getting the six hundred dollars a week on our stimulus stimulus check. But what was happening then as they just extended unemployment typically, you can get unemployment for up to a year. They extended to two years. So I said, okay, you have two years to. To figure out what are you going to do with your life I was afraid to go back to work for someone because I thought it, you can lose a job as a preschool teacher essential. Then that's not safe. What could be safe? So I tried a bunch of different things I tried on party promoting party planning I volunteered everywhere I can think of, but while doing so I was helping my friends. But save get out of debt all these things in one day. My friend said, you should turn that into a business and I'm like you. Now I had gone to school my bachelor's degrees in business, but I hadn't used it. And so I, tried to charge people one on one. Only to find the people that you're actually helping with your budget. The reason why they hired us because they don't have any money. So that was a bad business. So I, switched my business model to one too few and I worked on getting contracts and I got my first contract with the United, way? And I rose excited 'cause they were going to pay me I think like. Three, or four, hundred dollars a class and I had a six week course that I'd written. For them, and so I did, and that was like my first. Okay. Maybe I can really make a run at this My little sister gave me the nickname, the budget. So that became because she said like, I'm not like the fashion. Easter. Who is really fashionable, but I am very cheap so

Money NBA Tiffany CFO Ansel Preschool Teacher Fallon
Income Share Agreements - Good For Students or Investors?

Money For the Rest of Us

05:58 min | 11 months ago

Income Share Agreements - Good For Students or Investors?

"Welcome money for the rest of us. This is a personal finance show on money how it works, how to invest it and how to live without worrying about it. We host David Stein today's episode three seven. It's titled Income Share Agreements. Good for students. Or. Investors. Over five years ago and upset forty-five of money for the rest of us. I introduced income share agreement as a way to partially fund college. An income share agreement is a contract where individuals agree to pay a certain percentage of their income for a set period of time in exchange for an upfront payment that is usually used to pay for education cost but can be used for other things. For example, a line income share funding says that you can get an essay for home repairs, debt consolidation, paying a medical bill or even planning your wedding. Not sure I would do it income share agreement for most of those things. They are traditionally us to invest in what is known as human capital, our ability to earn money by getting more. Education. Another name for income share agreements is human capital contracts. Income share agreements were first proposed by the economist Milton Freeman in a nineteen, fifty, five essay titled The Role of Government in education. He wrote vocational or professional education is a form of investment in human capital precisely analogous to investment in machinery buildings are forms, of non human capital. Its function is to raise economic productivity of the human being. If it does. So the individual is rewarded in a free enterprise society by receiving a higher return for his services than he would. Be Able to command. We discussed this concept summit upset to forty five is college worth it. And determined, there is a positive financial return in investing in human capital. By attending college, you can earn more, you build your social capital, your network you gain knowledge. Having a college degree allows you to pass filters that many companies put in place with their hiring practice in that, they only hire individuals with college degrees. Freeman continued. If a fixed money loan is made to finance investment in physical capital, the lender can get some security for his loan in the form of a mortgage or a residual claim to the physical asset itself, and he can count on realizing at least part of its investment in case of necessity by selling the physical asset. In other words, the lender has some collateral that could be sold in the case of default. But Freeman a problem if the loan is made to invest in human capital. He writes the lender clearly cannot get any comparable security in a non slave state the individual embodying the investment cannot be bought and sold. Freeman then pointed out that because there isn't collateral that the interest rate charged on student loan would have to be sufficiently high to compensate for the capital loss because there wouldn't be collateral and that the interest rate would have to be so high making the loans unattractive to borrowers. Now. A solution was found. Federal guaranteed student loans. The total US Student Loan Dad. Private and federal is one point six, four, trillion dollars. Only a hundred and twenty, four, billion of that one point six trillion is private. The average federal student loan debt balance is thirty, five, thousand dollars and the default rate is high. Eleven point one percent. It's particularly challenging for individuals that have taken on a lot of student loan debt to pay off. A Brookings Institution study from two thousand eighteen found that the median borrower who had less than fifty thousand dollars in student loan debt in the early two thousands paid off the debt within ten years. While the median borrower, they had more than fifty thousand dollars in student loan debt ten years later still owed about seventy, five percent and most of the students falling behind on their student loan debt are those that have a balanced greater than fifty thousand dollars. Friedman's proposed solution income share agreements. They weren't necessarily called that, but he said that. A contract could be structure where an investor would buy a share in an individual's earnings prospects. To advance him, the funds needed to finance his training on condition that he agreed to pay the lender a specified fraction of his future earnings. In this way Friedman wrote, a lender would get back more than his initial investment from relatively successful individuals which would compensate for the failure to recoup his original investment from the unsuccessful. There seems no legal obstacle to private contracts of this kind even though they are economically equivalent to the purchase of a share in an individual's earning capacity and thus to partial slavery. These. Agreements have been criticized perhaps not slavery, but certainly indentured servitude. Although Miguel Palacios yet us in his book investing in Human Capital felt that the analogy to slavery or indentured servitude was incorrect because the students retain the full freedom of action they're not forced to stay in a given job or even a work in the field in which they trained in. So they have the ability to to work anywhere they want.

Human Capital Milton Freeman Friedman David Stein United States Brookings Institution Miguel Palacios
Rapper Kanye West files for Oklahoma presidential ballot

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

Rapper Kanye West files for Oklahoma presidential ballot

"Rapper Kanye west is qualified to appear on Oklahoma's presidential ballot in November but it's not clear if the celebrity is actually running for the nation's highest office you may recall in July fourth Kanye west announced he was going to challenge president trump in November although west is missed the filing deadline in a number of states he didn't get the paper work and the thirty five thousand dollar filing fee in on time for Oklahoma one of the musicians advisers had told New York magazine that west was out of the running but TMZ is reporting the west campaign has filed papers with the Federal Election Commission west too has said that he has bipolar disease told Forbes magazine earlier this month that if he wins he plans to model his White House on the fictional land in Black Panther adding let's get back to Wakanda I am Jackie Quinn

Kanye West Oklahoma Forbes Magazine White House Jackie Quinn President Trump New York Magazine Federal Election Commission
NASA Needs A Toilet That Works In Microgravity And Lunar Gravity

Woody & Wilcox

02:28 min | 1 year ago

NASA Needs A Toilet That Works In Microgravity And Lunar Gravity

"I. Don't think we actually ended up talking about this yet. Even though it's been something that I think it was on several of our radars for quite some time now we always are getting into some of the unexpected ramifications from the Covid, nineteen situation and I don't know that these are related, but maybe the fact that we're focused on it now more than we would be if we weren't all under this pandemic situation, the fact that NASA is offering people a little side money, a little side Gig. I know you've seen this what he I think. They would like you to Come up with a toilet. NASA. The NASA by the way. The whatever it stands for North American space guys. Matt Sustain. National Aeronautical. Agency came very high and mighty when I didn't get mine anyway. We all know what NASA is. They have the lunar. Lou Challenge sees me. It's administration. I don't WanNa. Leave the people wrong. Lunar Lou Challenge I. Don't think we even said what it was so i. don't think we let anybody wrong the only way they. Yes, they would like to create A. For Space, specifically, it has to do with the moon and the base that they would like to build their. That's why they're calling it the lunar Lou. Qualified for that here's somebody from well. You may not be, but that doesn't mean everybody's not. Here's a dude from NASA explaining a little bit. Hollow it just was not animal tail. Astronauts do not take. The Apollo bad scenario again there's suction involved or any good seal, but. On for going number two, so it's not just sitting on a toilet and going. STRAPS and harnesses. So I you know I'm sure what he has all the answers because he studied how astronauts go to the bathroom for years now, but the headline and I've tweeted out the link by the way you could win thirty five thousand dollars. Maybe I should mention that right upfront which I gotta be honest doesn't sound like enough to me. You create a toilet that they use with NASA. Seems like there ought to be a little bit more donut for you, but thing says help astronauts go back to the moon and twenty twenty four NASA seeks new designs for a toilet that will work both in microgravity and in lunar gravity,

Nasa Lou Challenge Matt Sustain Wanna National Aeronautical
Unemployment And The Racial Divide

The Indicator from Planet Money

02:14 min | 1 year ago

Unemployment And The Racial Divide

"A few months ago, a team of researchers from the J. P. Morgan Chase, institute and the University of Chicago put together a report from a huge new set of data and Stacey I hate sound too nerdy about this. You love data I know maybe I don't need this. But actually this data sat is really exciting and really quite extraordinarily. The data said that was put together for us for this study was very valuable and doing analysis. That wasn't possible before. That is economists, Damon Jones from the University of Chicago. Harris School of public policy, Damon is on that team of researchers, and basically he says the data come from about one point eight million J.. P. Morgan. Morgan Chase banking customers that is a huge sample which allows his team of researchers to see the different sources of income for families, this income can beat from things like your wages from your job, but also for example, a tax refund or unemployment insurance benefits, and the team can also see how families are spending their money almost in real time month to month or in some cases week. Week to week it's a view into how people make economic decisions, and crucially it lets researchers break down the data by race and ethnicity to offer a picture of the ways that different racial and ethnic households experienced the economy in different ways on one. The first findings that we've found looking at take home pay so that's how much is being directly deposited into your account. Is that we? We found on average that black and Hispanic families earned about seventy cents on the dollar when compared to their white counterparts, the median Hispanic family and the medium black family make roughly thirty five thousand dollars a year, the median white family about forty seven thousand dollars a, and that doesn't matter whether you look at the lowest earners or the highest earners are people who were in the middle. There's consistently a lower level of take home income for the black and Hispanic families, and another finding was that there are big disparities in the money that people have saved up and can use to pay their bills. This money is called liquid assets, liquid assets or things like cash. Your bank account things similar to cash

Damon Jones University Of Chicago J. P. Morgan Chase Morgan Chase P. Morgan Stacey Harris School Of Public
Human Life Is Literally Quieter Due To Coronavirus Lockdown

Environment: NPR

07:11 min | 1 year ago

Human Life Is Literally Quieter Due To Coronavirus Lockdown

"Life on down inside our homes might be noisy outside. The streets and skies are noticeably quieter. And because there's less human sound out there. Many people are hearing more wildlife as invisible. Is Amy Wendell reports? The relationship between human noise and the rest of nature is often discordant. So is our quiet in this moment. Having any impact the Internet is humming with rumors of animals. Reclaiming cities and towns. Dolphins are allegedly swimming in Venetian canals. Black bears are supposedly rating trash cans in La and mountain. Goats have been seen descending the Welsh hills to stroll through town some of these quarantine silver lining stories have been debunked though for now at least the goats seem legit but other anecdotes about nature being more present in the absence of humans. Come from reliable sources. Npr's Eleanor Beardsley observed for the first time in years birds singing throughout Paris. But what really we've on is. I'm sitting by the San River right now on a sunny evening and I just heard a river bird like egrets on polls and stuff. Is that not wild? I have never heard that before. Yeah we can hear subtlety of life around us that we haven't heard in a long long time this is Bernie Krause. One of the founders of a field called soundscape ecology that studies. How all the sounds in an ecosystem interact with each other and with us. Crouse has been recording the natural world for more than fifty years and in that time he's observed lots of ways are noise is disruptive to wildlife to the fraud in Jeff. He tells this story of how back in the Nineteen Ninety S. He was recording thousands of frogs that gather in the spring at Mono Lake in California and Croke in unison Buddhist. Really big almost like all the little frogs have joined together to become one giant frog. It's actually a defense mechanism helps keep predators from locating and attacking individual frogs but cross says the military started doing test flights over mono basin and the roar of the jets would cause the frogs to fall out of sync. Say would take like forty five minutes before they could get in sync again and during that period of time we watched as a couple of great horned owls. Coyote came in and picked off a couple of frogs. Eventually this led to significant population decline. All because of a jet across says it's not just jets it's helicopters and chainsaws and tractors and traffic messages endless mounts of noise until now with billions of people stuck inside our noise. Sprint is dramatically quieter in Paris. For instance a group that monitors noise pollution saw as much as a ninety percent. Drop in human sounds since the city went on lockdown so how is this relative? Quiet impacting wildlife. There was a question trending on Google. Arbor D- singing louder. This is Megan goal. A sensory ecologist and professor at Vassar College. If anything I would actually guessed that the birds are not singing as loud. That's because goal says they aren't having to compete against human sound which could be a good thing for the birds for one thing. All explains noise has been shown to increase stress hormone responses in birds which affects immune function. So less noise right now might equal less illness plus birds living in bustling cities or even busy suburban neighborhoods. Have to expend a lot of energy singing louder so now that things are quieter she says the birds might have extra energy to us on different things like spending time foraging saving energy to feed your kids etc so possibly will see animals that have larger broods or healthier offspring. You might also get changes in how females are selecting meets now out of that speculation of course but I think there's a lot of really interesting things that could be happening while how this all plays out for wildlife is for the time being left to informed speculation one impact of our stillness is ringing clear as a bell so the earth is like literally humming underneath our feet that's right. Yep. Any for Seto is seismologist. Who recently observed along with colleagues in Brussels in California a huge drop in human caused vibrations on the Earth's crust it was impressive It was just a reminder that we as a civilization have a noticeable imprint on the world in ways that sometimes we don't appreciate I for one did not appreciate that. Humans rattle the earth like a tiny earthquake. But we do mostly from transportation automobiles planes trains even are walking registers on seismographs as a kind of constant static and now that static is way less noisy giving seismologists a unique opportunity to perhaps detect more subtle vibrations that usually get drowned out like the ones coming from inside volcanoes close to cities. I think it's an open question. How strong this changes? But it's something that I know. People in the seismology community are really interested in exploring and some scientists are attempting to measure this strange and profound sonic experiment above ground. The silent cities project is a call for scientists journalists artists. Really anyone with good enough audio equipment to record what they're hearing while stuck at home to me. It's very peaceful to walk and be able to hear liberty. Tiny sounds Amandine. Gas is a soundscape ecologist in France who helped create the project back insects moving in leaves for example. Does eating the flowers. Also it's spring right now so so increase also annoys the wildlife. Sounds you hear so far? Participants are recording one hundred and sixty one locations all over the world and the data an expected thirty five thousand dollars or more audio will be available for any researcher who wants to analyze it in the future. Listening to our new sound environment is not just for researchers though ecologist making gall says it can be for everyone one of potentially positive things that could come out of. This is that people are having a chance to interact with the world around them in a way that they may be having interacted with before and those interactions could lead people like eleanor. Beardsley to not only consider the wildlife around them now. The birds singing on the sun but help them keep it in mind as things get back to being noisier.

Eleanor Beardsley Paris California Researcher Amy Wendell Bernie Krause Nineteen Ninety San River Mono Basin Mono Lake La And Mountain Vassar College Google Crouse Coyote NPR Megan Arbor Fraud Sprint
Supermarket throws out $35K of food after woman coughs on it

Markley and Van Camp

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

Supermarket throws out $35K of food after woman coughs on it

"This in Pennsylvania because the grocery store thirty five thousand dollars in food what they do it happened yesterday at the supermarket in Hanover township the co owner said the woman came into the store and proceeded to purposely cough on all the produce a section of the bakery the meat case other spots in the store estimated the food value was well over thirty five thousand dollars he also said Lee efforts are being made to make her be tested for corona virus the she's not

Pennsylvania Hanover Township LEE
Is Universal Basic Income Being Applied Today?

Automated

07:41 min | 1 year ago

Is Universal Basic Income Being Applied Today?

"I just wanted to briefly mention that though I've brought up a number of technologies that are fighting the corona virus. Few Times on this podcast of course as this fits into the main theme of this podcast. I absolutely wanted to say that. It's obviously the medical professionals that are putting themselves on the line and working incredibly hard to battle this pandemic. I think that technology is really cool. But it's clearly in this case the real work that's being done by humans but maybe to look at things a little bit more. Positively here Along with Italy here in Spain you may have heard that every night at eight or ten PM. We all go to our roofs or balconies and cheer on and support the staff in hospitals and clinics. I really hope that. This trend continues As well as starts in other countries as this global problem continues. I really think that the acts of solidarity like this along with seen innovative community actions like a free fitness class given by a personal trainer on his rooftop to his surrounding neighbors or a saxophone and guitar. Gem applauded by surrounding neighbors has been really great to see shared all over social media. But I think that this is also a very interesting time for different reasons so two episodes ago. I started talking of universal basic income or you. Bi as one of the first solutions to a future where automation eliminates a large proportion of jobs yet. Only in this last week did this future solution get thrust into the present or at least parts of it did so for today's episode. We will look at a few things surrounding. Ub I I the main criticisms of it secondly some alternatives and thirdly the current manifestations of it that are possibly starting to come about across the world in response to the economic crisis that we are so perhaps the most frequently used point against you is the laziness argument so it comes in many forms but ultimately says something to the effect of if you give people free money. They won't be incentivized to work but rather to be lazy as well as losing the meaning in their lives that were provides so this would appear to be almost common sense. I think that the examples provided in the previous episode on New Guy Really. Show a different story. There have also been studies that look at the results of several basic income programs together and they answered this question specifically one of these studies in particular found overall. The program's analyzed suggest either. No effect on labor market supply or a slight reduction in work and earnings so the evidence does not suggest an average worker will drop out of the labor force when provided with unconditional cash. Even when the transfer is large so they'll of course all pilot programs that have had some form of UPI have not been permanent and are thus not perfect examples. The findings do tend to lead one to think that the first critique doesn't necessarily hold up so the second main argument against you. Bi is usually connected to the price tag of such policy for this point. I have confess that I'm actually on the fence about it. There are really several arguments reports on both sides that I think I won't be able to make a solid argument for one case or the other in this podcast I will definitely have to invite people In the future who have more expertise in myself on the subject but this is also why there is so much debate around this issue and why there are so many alternative programs presented so as mentioned previously one of the main propose alternatives is for a UB I program that replaces all social welfare programs like food stamps housing subsidies etc. The argument typically made for this is that doing otherwise would be too expensive and that a nation couldn't absorb all the extra costs so the usual price tag is that a universal basic income or a guaranteed minimum income would require some thousand dollars per month to essentially end poverty so if we use America as an example. Some two hundred ten million people are above the age of eighteen and thus eligible for most forms proposed. Which would cost the American government two hundred ten billion dollars per month so this is about two and a half trillion? Us dollars a year which is really no minor some so whereas on the other side of the argument with a UB. I in place. Many societal expenses would be reduced or even eliminated like those connected to petty theft The prison in justice systems mental as well as physical health care costs talked about in the previous episode homelessness etc. Poverty has also been shown to be one of the most expensive things in our modern society so their across different Western countries that show that he's single homeless person cost the taxpayer an average of some twenty to thirty five thousand dollars per year. It's really no wonder. Then why those who promote UPI claim that the estimated costs are usually not very accurate. So the thousand dollars per month example also happens to be the amount proposed by the recent presidential candidate. Andrew Yang who I would argue really has been one of the main people pushing you. Bi into the public awareness at least in the US so Andrew. Yang's UB program better known as the Freedom Dividend was going to be mainly financed through new taxes on the wealth. Generating large corporations like Amazon facebook and Google as well as a value added tax and consolidating some welfare programs and I think that he did a great job pushing the idea that it was financially feasible to implement such a program but moving on with the other critiques of one of the more obvious points. I think against it is that it is in part wasteful in its approach so if everyone over the age of eighteen for example is to receive these payments then this includes people absolutely do not need it. Think of for instance Bill Gates who has an estimated net worth of some ninety six billion. Us dollars so an extra thousand dollars. A month amounts two point zero zero zero zero zero one percent game which is absolutely unnecessary and should be distributed to those who actually need it or so it is argued at least by those who propose a UPI so of course those who do not need a you guy could refuse it but in principle this can be seen as a valid argument against such a policy and finally one of the main arguments against you be. I is the dependency on a government for your survival can really bring along with it. Many connected problems so we might not even know the psychological impact of having an entire nation completely dependent on government. It might create a less innovative or more complacent society and one as well who would be unwilling or even unable to stand up to corruption for fear of being cut off from their main means of survival. I think that is something that is really worth keeping in mind especially as conversations about implementing. Ub Take place over the next couple of

UPI United States Andrew Yang American Government Bill Gates Theft America Spain Italy Amazon Google Facebook
NASA clears Axiom Space to put commercial habitat on space station

Rick and Bubba Show

00:22 sec | 1 year ago

NASA clears Axiom Space to put commercial habitat on space station

"NASA has contracted with Texas based axioms space to build a habitat module for the international space station that would serve as a hotel for space tourist concept images of the axiom segment include plush crew quarters in a three hundred sixty degree earth observation window the largest ever constructed for space but before you book your rates are going to be about thirty five thousand dollars

Nasa Texas
"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:32 min | 1 year ago

"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"His thirty five thousand dollar toilet yet Vestron faint he of the thirty five thousand dollar toilet that kind of behavior got thing fired up a pretty quickly he found himself running another bank called C. I. T. and that's where stain wise when his neighbor came calling so that banks that Stephen nutrients group bought off the government for zero dollars five years later he approached John saying he's upstairs neighbor and they agreed on a price three point four billion dollars but people was to be raised by this I mean didn't we just go through this whole crisis were banks were considered too big to fail and now we're going to create another make a bank run by this guy yeah and it would have been the first new mega banks since the bus okay so what happened when the news of the deal between the new chin and John Thain got out and how was seen the jolly involved well the new set off a ton of protest across the country homeowners in consumer advocate mobile lies to try to stop the sale that brings us back to sandy jolly she was one of the activists to force the federal reserve to hold a special hearing she testified about what happened to her family but in August twenty fifteen the sale went through anyway you want to give up in it's not in my nature to give up remember sandy had been fighting many chins bank for years and she still lost her family home then she paid tens of thousands of dollars in rent to live in that same house as she battled many agents bank sandy heard from a lot of other families hundreds of them families who had the same problem she did her phone rang off the hook with desperate people seeking advice well what I did learn along the way in losing every step of the way was I learned how to use every step of the way to the benefit of the next person so that it wouldn't happen to them and I should talk to these families were trying to hold on to their homes she realized this wasn't just her problem and I was just looking for a bigger solution an alternate solution because that's always when I'm trying to look for what are my next options sandy became convinced that the bank was constantly breaking the law and she wanted to do something about it so she went online and found David sure a Washington DC lawyer one of the top whistle blower attorneys in the country he specialized in a particular type of case representing people who say they have evidence the government has been defrauded my personal first conversation with sandy I remember because I remember her story is being different she wasn't a typical insider sure got his firm's private investigator involved the Czech sandy out and to be sure she was telling the truth he decided to take the case she was like in the industry or something she was someone whose parents were a victim of this fraud and I found that fascinating Cindy came armed with piles of documents she'd spent years accumulating about her own story and the other family she heard from the fraud sandy allege was really complicated there are a lot of consumer protections many chins bank was supposed to provide for families with reverse mortgages for example they were supposed to give the bears a chance to keep the house when elderly bar were died but sure this is the bank can follow these rules he says they broke the law she basically set up a system whereby this company would as quickly as possible immediately for close minu chin and build the government for his cross on the foreclosures for things like attorneys fees and appraisal costs because the foreclosure was improper those fees are not legitimate so is a couple of thousand dollars per house which may not sound like a lot but it added up to a hundred two hundred million dollars or something by the time that you know you at all like I told you earlier the government had agreed to back up all these bad mortgages even picking up these other costs if there was a foreclosure but if these foreclosures weren't legitimate and Steve minu chin would be breaking the law so David share called a friend in the US attorney's office and soon sandy was headed to Washington for a meeting at the justice department several members from Hyde the department of justice FBI agents and they grilled her for hours that's my recollection of the meeting I got very intimidated and after all that grilling the government decided.

"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on KOMO

"Retirement this is aging options with receiving a guy. and a girl summers journey receive in the studio this afternoon thanks so much for joining us I eat a lot of people get concerned about Alzheimer's Reggie but this article is interesting something called NPH mimics Alzheimer's disease all we'll talk about that because it it NPH is reversible Alzheimer's isn't it really is and then even though it sounds like this is some new news coming on and and the reality is it's not ten you news coming on this is banned the key is from many many different key for for many years eight years ago or so I dealt with this same exact issue with a client of mine and we've got a call today so let's get to the call and then after the call have for this segment next segment that's really cared on this article because this impacts more people than what one would think walking around with the wrong diagnosis thinking that there is no hole that's wrong absolutely here Steve are have a financial planner who is suggesting I take out a whole life insurance policy for five hundred thousand dollars it would cost me think thirty five thousand dollars a year nine thousand would go to the government and twenty six thousand dollars would go in the payment for the whole life insurance and I would pay that forever forever never never and then when I die my daughter would get the five hundred thousand dollar policy and any other accrued savings that's in that whole life policy and I'm wondering is this a good idea well you know that's a that's a interesting questions TV with full disclaimer I got to tell you I have a life insurance back on many many years my first job was with metropolitan life insurance companies and so unlike many of the other trainings I have inherently nothing against life insurance but some people.

Alzheimer Steve NPH Alzheimer's disease five hundred thousand dollars five hundred thousand dollar thirty five thousand dollars twenty six thousand dollars eight years
"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on KTOK

"Than thirty five thousand dollars nineteen arrest in northern Oklahoma after a nationwide FBI led investigation into child sex trafficking Jim Forsyth reports also US attorney Trent shores says all of the suspects use the internet to reach out and engage child victims virtually any social media application any website any community gaming forum that your children may participate in could make them vulnerable could give a child predator access he says the suspects face charges in state and federal court he says in addition to the arrest for child victims of alleged sex trafficking in northern Oklahoma were rescued the city of Edmonds says the police shooting of a naked unarmed black teenager in April was justified the city filed its answer in Oklahoma City federal court in response to a civil rights lawsuit filed back in may by seventeen year old Isaiah Lewis's parents the city contains laws were shot after he was in their words ineffectively tasered police say Louis broke into a home and a sold at officers who had followed him inside and a taser didn't stop him when they didn't they shot him I'm Brian again in other news to former prison guards have been arrested Beth Myers reports two former guards who worked at the North Fork correctional center in fair have been arrested and charged with distributing methamphetamine this after a cell phone found on an inmate who was a gang member showed communication between me and made and one of the former guards thirty six year old Michael washer and forty two year old Travis washer are married and after the phone was found their housing canoe was searched and DO see officers found more than seventy grams of methamphetamine and eleven cell phones the washers space up to forty years in federal prison if they are convicted looks like we won't get.

Beth Myers Travis Oklahoma City Trent shores US attorney Michael washer methamphetamine North Fork correctional center Oklahoma Brian Louis Isaiah Lewis Edmonds Jim Forsyth FBI thirty five thousand dollars thirty six year
"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

The Dave Ramsey Show

03:01 min | 2 years ago

"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

"Thirty five thousand dollars a year. And that is their only income. He's living in his mom's house. And now she is very upset because she thought that she was going to be taking care of by him. And so they're both coming from different sides asking for advice from me. And my first thought was oh, boy, what would a good a long day. So so what he's supposed to take care of his mother. Supposed to take care of his body. He brought his wife over from a different country. Honestly, it'd be lives in his mother's house. And so the disagreement is what? She wants to be she wants him to be more independent. She wants to have a place of their own, but she doesn't have the money for it. And so yes, okay. Well, they make thirty five thousand dollars a year. Right. Yeah. And when she go into work. At we're really not sure she in in her home country. She was a psychologist. She had the start of tation, and she now has to get recertified in the United States and order to continue that and she then workers something else while that's happening though. Yeah. And she's she's being very stubborn like right now, they're not even living together. And he's giving her all these different options on we're married. Not living together. Now that just got married. Yes. Well, so he's he's been taken to the cleaners a mail order brides. What's happened? Pretty much, but her her family is actually here. She does have family members that live right next door to my parents law, which is how they met. But. And the family is very much for your question. I mean, this guy has marriage trouble. And it sounds like he's been scammed. So how are you going to help him? I don't think you can help him. He's trying to figure out how they can how can make her happy and chain figure out. We've already figured out. What makes her happy? Do you ever everything she wants, and then some and that's called Princess syndrome? So no, you can't you can't make apprentice happy princesses have to grow up and become women. What would I have to tell her just put on our big girl Taylor anything? She hadn't asking you. He was actually she. She a message the other. Yeah. And and that's the other thing is that she's she doesn't speak any English. So we have to speak through Google translate for everything. And she's she's having a hard time coping with that fact as well. So. Yeah..

Google United States Taylor Thirty five thousand dollars thirty five thousand dollars
"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

04:03 min | 2 years ago

"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Mike starts off this hour in battle creek Michigan. Hey, mike. How are you? Pretty good about you better than I deserve. What's up? Save my dollars. So. One starting to pay off my debt. My question is I owe about thirty five thousand dollars to the IRS. I'm also behind on my property taxes. So do I put those in front of my other debt or do? I. How much do you owe on property taxes? About four thousand. Okay. And what's your household income? Right around seventy five. Okay. Why are you thirty five thousand behind with the KGB? I mean, the IRS. I owned a business, and I find that they kept getting more and more and businesses had to just give it up, but I kept on to it longer than I should about. And you didn't keep up with your taxes. Okay. No. I didn't by a lot of illness in my family. And I wasn't able to don't you? Are you do you have that on an installment plan right now? Yes. I do good. Okay. As long as you're paying that. They generally will not jump in and screw up your life to severely. So. Yeah, I'm going to clear up the property taxes for first. And then the IRS second for this reason. Number one, the property taxes are significantly smaller. And you'll be able to knock them out pretty quick and be done with it. Number two. You've got the IRS on an installment plan. So they're not gonna come after you they property taxes will though if you don't pay you're gonna have a problem. So yeah, I'm gonna go ahead and clear that and then I'm gonna work on the IRS. And then I'm gonna work on the rest of my dad's. But let's clear the IRS before you, call your any other debts. It's gonna take you a little while. But you need to really roll up your sleeves and say, we're going to cut everything in sight and get this paid off as fast as we possibly can John is in San Francisco. I John how are you? Pretty good. How are you doing better than I deserve? What's up? Great. Hey, so I don't know if you know anything about the bay area, but incredibly expensive like the top three in the United States. Live. Working at work here in the bay area where do not live in idol live about now away take change about two months and a bunch of. So I kind of traveled to eighty four and a half hours per day. My wife, and I live in. We've just had a new baby. Congratulations. I'm trying to figure out. Kind of move away from here and get to another state where it's cheaper to live right now. I about twelve on my monthly rent. What do you do for a living? I worked in a shipping. Okay. And what are you making? Yeah. Now as well in the bit area. Like, I can't work anywhere else. How that necessarily? Well, yes to answer your question. I'm very familiar with obey area, real estate prices and Silicon Valley and everything else. Nellie in San Diego, California. Issue Manhattan, you know, same situation. And so, yeah, there are some of these markets, and so can valley's got a real problem. I mean, they're having problem getting just people that do service work because I can't afford to leave there. It's the same issue, and you know, but just on a regardless of the macro situation. In other words, the overall economic discussion regardless of that year, a young man with a baby and you're spending four and a half hours a day travelling to make fifty seven thousand dollars a year. Fun to me. Yeah..

IRS Mike battle creek Michigan KGB John United States Silicon Valley San Diego San Francisco California Nellie Manhattan fifty seven thousand dollars thirty five thousand dollars two months
"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on KTOK

"Mary. It was found to have a strong odor of feces and urine cockroaches throughout the house. There is a trash observed rotting food the facilities in the bathroom did not work sergeant Nick John says minor and borough are scheduled for a bond appearance in Garfield county district court on December third bond is set at thirty five thousand dollars each more on the debate over whether there's a connection between cell phones and cancer. Rich Denison reports. Your cell phone will give you cancer. If you happen to be a rat for those of you who are humans, the American Cancer Society says don't worry about it last week. There was a warning issued by the national toxicology program, which is part of the department of health and human services. It said that a study unwraps shows a clear increase in a type of heart cancer and a possible increase in brain cancer. These rats were bartered with high amounts of cell phone radiation for. Nine hours a day for most of their lives. But before you toss your phone in the trash, both the American Cancer Society, and the food and Drug administration say these study results should not be applied to humans the elections tomorrow about the Oklahoma state election board says one hundred sixty three thousand voters already have cast ballots. The election board says more than fifty seven thousand have voted so far by mail and more than one hundred six thousand voted in person absentee between Thursday and Saturday. The election boards has fifty point eight percent of the early voters have been Republican forty point seven percent democrat eight point two percent, independent and point three percent. Libertarian election. Board officials say two million one hundred twenty thousand eight hundred forty three people are registered to vote in Oklahoma. Polls will be open from seven to seven tomorrow. Meanwhile dot is reminding political candidates and volunteers that putting campaign signs along state. Highways and bridges is illegal illegal.

American Cancer Society heart cancer brain cancer Oklahoma Garfield county Rich Denison Nick John food and Drug administration department of health dot thirty five thousand dollars eight percent seven percent three percent two percent Nine hours
"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Made thirty five thousand dollars well in today's today's world thirty five thousand dollars a year is not as good as it was say back in nineteen eighty two so they will go back to that thirty five thousand that you made in one thousand nine hundred two and inflation index it so at that point it becomes rather than thirty five thousand it becomes something greater eight ten thousand earned in nineteen eighty probably inflation indexed up into the fifty thousand dollar right yeah something like that fifty thousand become one of his best thirty five maybe maybe not what does that thirty from nineteen eighty thirty eight years ago whoa thirty eight years ago okay yeah so it's probably he might have had thirty five years after that year so they may not even be using that year even inflation indexed yeah but what you can do if you wanted to project out your benefit you do this i guess you is it you don't have to go to my social security do well my social security is a personal site inside of the social security administration is something they tried to get everybody to do and you will do when you sign up for benefits because that's where you put in your formation as far as where you want your direct deposit to go and you can do some changes of their but prior to actually signing up for social security they pushed a lot of us into you know hey get your own my social security account and you can look at your statement you know your projection any day of the week you want you can check your you can check your permission and they wanted to do that rather than mailing those statements out because they stop mailing this statement out for a while because they were trying to get everybody to go online not everybody went online as the older folks and they can play that they weren't getting their benefits statement that the statement the projections so if you sign up for my social security account you won't get one in the mail if you did not sign up for my social security account you'll get one in the mail every five years every with it ends at zero or five.

thirty five thousand dollars nineteen eighty thirty eight y fifty thousand dollar thirty eight years thirty five years five years
"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

03:40 min | 3 years ago

"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"Thirty five thousand dollars and seven months go and your range of income during that time we started at about sixty and we went up to one hundred and thirty five over doubled your income how did you do sound like somebody got a job yeah well we're really blessed and the same month that i graduated my master's degree and began working also received a promotion at work okay cool so what's your masters in occupational therapists oh nice ding dang which right into that field that'll make money good what do you do it i'm a manager for in and out burger don't great okay great company very good way to go you guys good what kind of debt was the thirty five thousand well it was all mine about twenty five thousand dollars my student loans and ten was my car okay how long have you guys been married i just had two and a half years okay cool so you're in school you graduate from school but while you're doing that you got this going tell me the story what happened well we knew once i graduated with my masters that we wanted to pay off our debt right away so we didn't have a specific plan now on your podcast so inserted a convincing me i need to listen and we need to sit down and go over budget and a baby it's a really turned us year direction and we started getting really strict on on a budget and as soon as i started working we pretty much just through all my income i bet wow very cool good for you guys very very well done so what do you tell people the key to getting out of debt is well i i would say one of the most important thing is it'd be their partner and making sure that you guys dream together and another big part for us especially living in la is to not be in competition with the joneses because those things really don't matter because you got so much ready you know yeah it's pretty easy to get caught up in the loving other people's life instead of yours is rachel says right and i'm a huge book and i wanna give a shout out to my older sister karen who got me on your plan she's a huge fan of yours okay very cool garage relations you got so how does it feel to knock that out that fast seven months yeah i can't even tell you it is awesome go ahead it was a little concern when i taught we made our final payment we had about forty dollars checking account we had her a new direct deposit coming in the next day we're just so excited when that time came to make last payment on my car that you know we just went for dad i love it well way to go you too you've been leaning in i'm proud of you very well you got a copy of chris hogan's book for you retire inspired we want that to be the next chapter in your story that you become millionaires now thank you how old are you too i'm twenty five and i'm twenty three wow yeah millionaires millionaires in your future without a doubt i think so i think as long as you stay away from the debt and you continue to live like you've been learning this is pretty incredible staff yeah so all right barrett at chelsea los angeles thirty five thousand dollars paid off in seven months making sixty two one thirty five count it down let's hear a debt free scream okay ready three two.

seven months Thirty five thousand dollars thirty five thousand dollars twenty five thousand dollars forty dollars
"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

04:15 min | 3 years ago

"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on WGN Radio

"A monthly story about about tesla there they built a giant tend to ramp up their model three production this is one of my favorite stories of the year okay let's hear it this is the craziest story of the year so tesla has been promising for a considerable period of time that they would get production of the model three that's the new compact sedan that's the car that was supposed to be thirty five thousand dollars that they were gonna get production up to five thousand units a month and they'd really hope to do that sometime last year that didn't happen at all sorts of production staff who's trying to go to this sort of mass production and it hasn't happened yet this year it happens last week that part of the respect it happened because tesla built a gigantic tent outside of their factory and set up a second assembly line in the ten oh my god near as i can tell they produced about a thousand vehicles in the tent in about four thousand vehicles in the factory and they hit their five thousand units crazy absolutely nuts the now now in addition to building this giant tent and manufacturing did they have to hire more people did must have to go out and hire more people that's a good question i don't know the answer to that but i suspect they had to bring it at least some extra yeah because it was a separate line so i'm gonna assume they did yeah now some people are saying that this one expert of chicken to call that insanity what where do you fall on that it is insanity but musk is it's got the habit of doing everything he can to prove people wrong and and no one he was ever gonna hit five thousand units so he's talking about six thousand years by the end of next month probably not going to happen because tensing cannot be a permanent situation right and where is it located right outside it seems to be right outside the factory yeah this is their fremont california factory that they had purchased from toyota some years ago that's great that's great now in addition to that i mean i it brings up a story that you wrote called dancing on tusla's grave yeah where you why are so many members of the automotive media rooting for tesla to fail what did you you wrote that piece tell us about that one yeah increasingly i'm seeing a certain amount of hostility mostly in social media not as much an actual published work but more on social media towards tesla and and i completely understand how elon musk has rankled winkled the nerves of people watching this happen because he does not play by standardized roles he says things that he did he doesn't keep promises that any other auto executive would be expected to keep so it's just a wacko down there that would upset people but on the other hand has done some amazing things and one of the reasons i wrote those pieces because i'm really concerned that tesla did nearing the end of its functional it's functional existing yeah and this is because the federal tax credits seventy five hundred dollars credit that people get so purchasing a vehicle that they could take off the taxes are about to run out for tesla and this this is this is interesting point for two reasons one they're going to somehow have to deal with the fact that you're just suddenly became seventy five hundred dollars or expensive but secondly i think it's worth noting that tesla became the first company to do this in america i mean there's something to be said for being the first company sell two hundred thousand electric vehicles yeah and i think that's kind of getting lost in this you it's impossible to call failure because they've accomplished so much yeah i mean that makes sense but also you know talking about this tom you're saying that tesla's future is in jeopardy probably but then you know you're talking about a guy who thinks out of the box and things kind of crazy out of the box while that's happening while the the numbers don't look so good for tesla he went and just built a giant tent and i mean this is the way this guy works is there any has anybody ever liked sat down there haven't been any kind of long interview with this guy just about the tesla park not the space part there is i found the interviews that.

seventy five hundred dollars thirty five thousand dollars six thousand years
"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on The Church of What's Happening Now

The Church of What's Happening Now

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on The Church of What's Happening Now

"What's that cost ninety five a shot everyday why the analyze that that was booked out of new york they would send me changes every day bags of them bags of them at ten dollars a piece you think any of those things had to do me didn't change that one of my life just a money they spent there is such a waste just the money spent time colloquially first class as listening in the back of the fuck in plane on frontier and they lost my luggage or some shit it was fucking price you know just the money that they stay spend like during the long issue hard i'm one time i asked adam for something and the one that produces came amidst absurd we can't do it and i found that fucking a weekly that they decided to hire some guy like monday night late but they need a met tuesday at nine and they overnight full from minneapolis seeing thirty five thousand dollars now so you couldn't wait for a commercial flight and pushed that same back to twelve thirty five thousand dollars number put him on a flight from minneapolis overnight one of those fucking all i see what you're right right right right jeeze this guy was so crucial to the movie we wanna tell you it was so barras he was so crucial to move it does have you climbed the scene couldn't wait till lunch you gotta fuck and tell you couldn't fly the six am you couldn't take the six am do you remember to i forget what his name was but he was a retired cornerback oj simpson retired like calling the right position that wasn't any good when he was a sweetheart of a guy he was a fuck in but five no he was voted to dennis rodman none and babe ruth i dunno it was fucking crazy that they flew men nice guy they fool men for one scene.

new york adam minneapolis oj simpson dennis rodman twelve thirty five thousand do thirty five thousand dollars ten dollars
"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on The Tom Leykis Show

The Tom Leykis Show

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on The Tom Leykis Show

"Knowing that you goal in life was to make thirty five thousand dollars a year ron you're wrong my life my life was not to be a single mother making thirty five thousand dollars a year i that's that's the how did you screw up that goal how'd you do that having a child out of wedlock you did that yourself that's i agree the lord didn't reach his hand down from the clouds and say poof you're pregnant why did you decide to do you made that decision i agree with you have i said anything was that a good decision to the music that was not why did you do having a it was stupid stupid stupid very stupid oh yes i was dumb come you know going after the bad boys which is exactly what we always talk about here and here i am today this is what i'm saying you know here today tom and you know you're talking me a little bit and i'm surprised because you actually spoke against career women you know you don't want to date women who spend all their time at work i don't wanna pay any women's bills and you see my experience you you may not be like the rest but my experience with women like you single mothers so is that when you meet a guy you expect to at some point if the relationship remains a relationship you expect they guy to meet your kid and then you expect that guy to help you financially even in little ways somehow take us to the movies take us to lunch take us to the beach things like that and i agree.

ron tom thirty five thousand dollars
"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Thirty five thousand dollars some experts say could go for as high as three hundred thousand dollars with bidding lasting through january twenty yes expensive but you will also probably win your man cave bragging rights salaam had already sold the trophy to a memorabilia dealer in 2013 out was three years before he committed suicide in a bolder parked in 2016 reporting live conner sri if koa newsradio khurana pot shopowners help the industry will continue to grow despite last week statement from the ag jeff sessions that hill encourage enforcement of federal laws against pot wanted james is the ceo of locally owned simply pure she says sessions decision could bring back the failed war on drug a war that has lost billions of dollars has ended millions of lives and has been the reason for mass incarcerate in the united states he says colorado's elected officials will have to fight sessions decision if they want to keep their jobs despite the low snowfall the lowest in thirty three years in colorado to start a winter steamboat springs is hamann right along they've actually added snow on every storm this season and they're 80 percent open it's really a big shout out to our groomers and are so makers who've taken over as mother nature cbos lauren cast and speaking with our partners at cbs 4 steamboat added six inches of fresh powder during the last storm senate minority leader chuck schumer urging president trump to sign a bill that would equip new york's jfk airport and other points of entry with devices designed to detect the opioid fenton all as it is smuggled in it is a chemical it imported from china and are evil drug dealers often mix it with opium because it gives.

united states mass opium colorado low trump president koa newsradio new york storm jfk airport chuck schumer millions ceo jeff sessions senate minority leader cbs china
"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"Mike starts off this hour embattled creek michigan hey mike how are you got ta by you better than i deserve what's up bomb on two thousand dollars kevin some trouble one and i'm starting to pay off my debt my question is i owe about thirty five thousand dollars to the irs and i'm also behind on my property taxes so do i put those in front of my other debt or do i how much you'll on property taxes about four thousand incoming mortar household income uh right around seventy five and co why are you 35000 behind with the kgb i mean how rush uh i owned business and i find that they've kept getting more and more and to find that had the just give it up but i kept on to a longer than it should have obviously and you didn't keep up with your taxes ochre uh no i didn't um i had a lot of illness in my family and i wasn't able to touch it are do you have that on an installment plan right now yes i do good okay as long as you're paying that they generally will not jump in an screw up your life two severely um so yeah i'm going to clear up the property taxes uh for first and then the irs second for this reason uh number one the property taxes are significantly smaller than you'll be able to knock them out pretty quick can be done with it number two you've got the irs on an installment plan so they're not gonna come after you they you know property taxes will though if you don't buy 'em you're gonna have a problem so yeah i'm going to go ahead and clear that and then i'm gonna work on the irs and then i'm gonna work on the rest of my dad's but let's clear the irish before you clear any other deaths.

Mike irs property taxes thirty five thousand dollars two thousand dollars
"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

The Dave Ramsey Show

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

"This hour of the show is brought to you by last pass the password manager i personally used last past let you easily secure organize and manager loggins and passwords ride at your fingertips visit last pass dot com slash dave that's last pass dot com slash dave and live from the headquarters of ramsey solutions it's the dave ramsey show a work that is dumb cash is king and up paid off home mortgage has taken the place of the bmw as the status symbol of choice i am daveramsey your host this is your show we invite your calls toll free and nationwide at triple eight eight two five five two two five that's triple eight eight two five five two two five mike start solve this hour embattled creek michigan hey mike how are you paul w better than i deserve what's up bomb i'm gonna keep my fouls and dollar so just having some trouble one and i'm starting to pay off my debts my question is i all about thirty five thousand dollars to the irs i'm also behind that my property taxes so do i put those in front of my other debt or do i always a much deal on property taxes uh about four thousand anchor what's your household income uh right around seventy five and so why are you 35000 behind with the kgb on the irs uh i owned business and i find the ad they've kept getting lower and more and business to find that had to just give it up i i kept on to a longer than i should have obviously and you didn't keep up with your taxes okay uh no i didn't um i had a lot of illness for my family and i wasn't able to don't you are do you have that on installment plan right now yes i do good okay as long as you're paying that they generally will not jump in an screw up.

loggins bmw mike irs property taxes kgb ramsey dave ramsey thirty five thousand dollars
"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Proposed budget breaks the trump campaign pledge by making massive cuts to medicaid and medicare a man from huntington park called the office creeper has been caught and that south thanks to an anonymous tech center glendale police not tip identified anthony fear i'll left the man who would walk through offices in arcadia glendale burbank antacid dina and steel wallets and purses that were unattended police said a search of his home provided evidence tying him to various thefts the area has been charged with fourteen felony counts which include commercial burglary identity theft and grand theft he also has nine previous violent felony convictions red sea over there i kfi a findings tesla has released between four hundred and seven hundred employees this week after their performance reviews word of the departures which the company stress were dismissals and not laos first emerged through a report by the mercurynews of san jose de palo altobased company said earlier in october that production bottlenecks had left it behind schedule for its model three release those let go included engineers managers and sales staff just as the company led by entrepreneur ilan musk prepares to release its model three sedan later this month the new tesla's start at thirty five thousand dollars and the home in northern california of the cartoonist who created peanuts has burned to the ground in the deadly wildfires the widow of charles scholtz was able to escape the house in santa rosa schulte son says the home and all of its contents or destroyed including peanuts memorabilia melted the artist work is safe and secure though and the charles m schulz museum in santa rosa on traffic from your helpful socal honda traffic.

huntington park glendale tesla laos ilan musk california the house santa rosa anthony burbank burglary identity theft theft san jose de palo charles scholtz charles m schulz museum thirty five thousand dollars
"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

02:08 min | 4 years ago

"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"The battery which is a high tech but battery which power powers everything in the via kohl functions correctly can you massproduced something like that will you've never massproduced anything a couple of the numbers by the way the model three for those of you who have followed the story that's the socalled cheapo tesla thirty five thousand dollars as opposed to the cars that they sell it right now between seventy five and one hundred fifty thousand thirty five thousand dollars fully electric there's obviously an incredible demand for it and i do believe the market is starting to speak i believe that we're going to be a society in which people preferring electric car to a gasoline car they're simply going to decide that it's cheaper and it's more convenient to plug the car into their garage then go to gas stations endured were doing now but whether or not it's going to be tassled oppose it off item i follow bob lutz the guy the car guy who's executive for all the major car companies interesting character he says tesla's going to go under tesla stock has done nothing but sore the value of tesla stock is several times the value of the stock of general motors general motors sells hundreds of thousand of cars kessler cells last year sold twenty six thousand let's just i about on the carnage mandela you can't start a car company up and just go from make an five thousand ten thousand cars a year to five hundred thousand cars a year you have no idea what you're up against maybe he's right maybe he's rogge i just look back though to almost anybody who was the first one in any break through remember the commodore computer was the first personal computer remember atari they kind of invented video games wasn't 'pacman really the first one all what pongpan iit everybody who's first never makes it it's always the one that second that figures it out that step said in does it microsoft wasn't in anything gugel wasn't firstaid anything yahoo and others were doing search engines before them about the only one i could think of her the one that was first dead ended up dominating.

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"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on WFLA News Radio

WFLA News Radio

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"thirty five thousand dollars" Discussed on WFLA News Radio

"Percent but the federal tax burden per taxpayer jumped from fifteen inflationadjusted forty six fears ago to thirty five thousand dollars each and now let's look at the political bigger picture there are many reasons why this is a scandal he says starting with the fact that despite this tax burden reality politicians often boast about how tax rates are much lower than they were a nineteen sixty one you see folks i run into this on a weekly basis i talk declined to say chuck this is unbelievable on pay more tax in retirement than the amount of tax i was paying in my peak wage earning years and the fact is that the next part of the scandal is that the federal debt is still growing north of twenty trillion dollars and counting but the biggest reason this is a scandal jake says is that all the new taxes that are responsible for this massive jump in our costs or hidden in the fine print i some of you i had a gentleman that complementary he's been listening to me every sunday now for about gosh half a decade and i'm sure he's heard me say this but look at your most recent hotel bill or your cell phone bill builders three other taxes there that at a very very quickly and it's the new taxes that to the federal government that's hard to keep track of granted some of those new taxes are for generally more popular programs he says which are like medicare medicaid see those weren't tax back in nineteen sixty one it 'cause they didn't exist in social security member with which was promising ever be taxed yet alex eighty five percent.

tax rates chuck jake social security thirty five thousand dollars twenty trillion dollars eighty five percent