27 Burst results for "thirteen fourteen years"

Protesters Rally Across Myanmar, Defying Coup and Risking Crackdown

Monocle 24: The Briefing

04:44 min | 4 months ago

Protesters Rally Across Myanmar, Defying Coup and Risking Crackdown

"We start today's program with the ongoing turbulence in myanmar. Massive crowds of protesters have taken to the streets as demonstrations continue against last week's coup in which the army detained elected leader. Angsana suci over the weekend me and my its largest protests in more than ten years. It's also reported that police in the capital have used water cannon on workers conducting nationwide strikes for more on this. We're joined now by professor penny green. Who's amendment expert and director of the international state crime initiative. A penny. good afternoon to you. Thanks for being with us. Just tell us first of all about your reaction to what we've seen and indeed heard about over the weekend Water cannon deployed these huge protests This is something quite different than we've seen for well more than a decade yes indeed. The last massive set of protest took place in two thousand and seven. And and i think it's. It's really quite remarkable. What's happening inside. Myanmar at the moment and the courage of the demonstrators is is really phenomenal. I think that many of these people especially the young have really effectively only known some kind of democracy albeit very fragile. I mean it was very very weak democracy but the freedom that came with after five decades of military rule is something that the people of do not want to let go of. I'm penny we'll talk. Maybe in a moment about what the military's reaction to this might be sort of medium-term in a second. But i did want to ask you about that point about the this as brickley democracy as you pointed out it is nevertheless it. Is you know thirteen. Fourteen years of that and so many people who are teenagers young people students will only have known that. Do you think that reflects. I don't know if it's a miscalculation by the military but it may be an underestimation of exactly how wedded to those notions. This this younger demographic all is it probably is a miscalculation. I think that the military scared basically very fearful of the power of the people of myanmar. They lost so badly there. They're usd pm. Military party lost extremely badly in the november twenty elections And as a result. I think Recognized in some senses that the writing perhaps was on the wall and the only way that they could shore up. The future of their their authority was to initiate a coup. I mean there are all sorts of other explanations for the kutu loudly relating to the the power and wealth of Commander in chief gentleman lie. But i do think that they have probably miscalculated But it's it's also true to say that the man my people. The burmese historically have risen up against the brutality and repression of military hunters in the past particularly nine hundred ninety eight and again in two thousand and seven even though they hadn't been tasting democracy in the recent past. So i think that there is that that there is that desire for freedom which will emerge. I'm presented itself in. These kinds of situations are well short term than the police have been very clear as as we mentioned you know that's been the deployment of water cannon In napa all ready and you know it's been presented as very much a choice to the protesters leave move on or face force potentially increasing force. Do we have any sense of the lengths to which the military and police authorities will go to in terms of escalating that force in terms of the potential for more violence on the streets. Well we look at history. We know that this military is capable of the most barbarous repression. We only have to look at the genocide hinge which took place in over the last over this infect period of so-called democracy But the worst of it was saying in two thousand seventeen when thousands were killed and eight. Hundred thousand were driven across the border into bangladesh. And if we could look back historically to two thousand to two thousand and seventeen to nineteen ninety eight. The military deployed Brutal force against all forms of demonstrators. So we know that that is on the cards. And they have issued a message via state media to the people of myanmar now to say that unless you abide by the law you have to expect that there will be A reaction and that reaction. The people of myemma know well. We'll be one of violence.

Myanmar Professor Penny Green International State Crime Init Brickley Military Party Army Napa Bangladesh
Talking On Tik Tok

Mentally Yours

05:35 min | 8 months ago

Talking On Tik Tok

"One welcome into the yours Metro Kerry Kayes. Mental. Health. PODCAST. My Name's Yvette and stay on chatting to izzy staten. Jesus social? Media. Star. Who Talks about all things mental health on her tiktok Youtube and instagram and she's also a singer. We're going to be chatting about life online eating disorders and making music. is He thought much protecting welcomed does all thank you for having me on so excited to be chatting to honest. For several reasons. But nicely, because you WANNA stunned Tiktok your big puzzle take home and I'm very excited about that. Also bit sketches like. The understanding TIKTOK. So I think the best thing is district took about a why did you decide to start talking about mental health stuff on that platform? Well, I talk about my mental health problems on all social media platforms specifically because I have. Known a school borderline personality disorder. which has quite a lot of negative connotations around it about like stereotypically will people alike with it and I wanted to show people you lot of different people that you wouldn't expect might have. and so that was ready wireless. So vocal on social media platforms and take talks a great. site to solve tell funny stories from your podcast, and because I've been mentally ill for quite a while. Most of like my funny entertaining stories are often around that. Yeah really love it over Steph. Sort of check out your account is really great end enough sort of how frank you're TIKTOK. Really interesting. I think it's one of those things that people my age of. Any like sued if anyone twenties is still kind of going on this thing, I would we actually do with it but basically frank chats with people. Just speak your mind and also you've got to adorable dog Seeing Ahmad, about dokes Bichon FRISE is that right? Yes, she is a beach on free say She's fiery key. She's the love of my life. Yeah. Already her on there as well I think it kind of helps keep things light between. Sometimes. It's a bit hard just by mental health stuff but you will say. Your Doable Dolan there as well. So it's nice to have the mixture. On Yeah She's always Kind of response if you had some people, do you have a find it difficult to just about your mental health them in that sort of way because I know that people combative. That can sort of get into into dams. That sort of stuff have you found it? When I was younger, actually my school didn't assembly about time that I had tried to kill myself. which was the first time I'd ever have people of coming into my DM's saying, Oh, I, heard this happened to you and you get a now with talking about it as well. You get a lot of people that will dm you and say, Oh, I'm ready struggling with my mental health and sometimes it's difficult because if you integrate place with your mental health, it's very difficult to help others and you can feel of responsibility when you have a load of twelve, thirteen, fourteen year olds mass you saying that they're ready L. and they need a little help and then getting it so it can be a lot to take but generally. I don't, mind if. People make. Negative commands all criticize me talking about it because I personally don't see a problem was talking about it. I'm very careful about what I say I didn't give people especially in regards to Anorexia or self. self-harm a lot of people when they talk about it can accidentally give tips. I'm very careful with that so I have. I'm like a Schule that what I'm saying is not going to negatively impact people. Some people think on the Internet you'RE GONNA end up offending someone. Yeah. Couse. Do you have sort of boundaries in place in terms of what should go online and instead of what you'd have? Generally, I try not to follow too many people with mental health issues I mean I. Obviously I follow a lot like to have variety or I think you can sometimes become too consumed and people can post a lot of. Quite upsetting sometimes because people can pass like I'm feeding ready down. Awful. So I sort of like to try and keep a variety to make sure that I didn't become too embroiled in just the negative stuff. This is all new to me to be honest Kazakhstan. The TIKTOK side of things new to Mina city of on Youtube another social platforms. But for me sort of twisters, the place that I. Got It to chat to be about mental health stuff generally, and I'm still getting to grips with TIKTOK. What was the community like on Tiktok in terms of mental health checks on a straight feels fairly supportive of. TIKTOK is very supportive on it's mostly. So of Gen, Z. Kids. And I think as a whole always really sports each other the thing about Tiktok that's quite different to a lot of other platforms is that every time you release a video, it can be seen by a whole new audience of people. If it gets picked up by the Algorithm, it will get to it can go out to hundreds and thousands of people. and so you're always interacting with a new audience. From tiktok in. Particular I've never had many negative comments to be honest. They've always been really quite leaned.

Tiktok Steph Yvette Kerry Kayes Staten Youtube Izzy Kazakhstan Ahmad Frank Anorexia Bichon Frise
Children of Incarcerated Parents with Ebony Underwood

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

05:56 min | 9 months ago

Children of Incarcerated Parents with Ebony Underwood

"Hi, my name is under would I'm fighting for the rights of children and young adults impacted by parental incarceration? Sorry Not Sorry Evans thank you so much for doing the podcast. I WANNA start by talking about your story your father has been in prison for more than three decades. Only. Right now they're still funny. Listen I'm GonNa play so you could hear. Paid. Call you. I'm happy charged for this call college from. Being, recorded for. Monitoring. Hold on I'm doing interview but I'm GonNa get into politics because he can talk they're. Sorry no don't be sorry at all I totally get it. You don't WanNa. Miss that phone call. Oh my God. You know why? Because the federal prison system is on lockdown this is the first time national lockdown and like twenty five years. been on lockdown. So the way that he called like we speak very frequently prior to Kobe, but since Calvin with whenever he calls so I can't miss his call. No of course, not especially when it's public health going on just he feel like he is being exposed in a way that makes him very vulnerable. He's sixty six years old. So he is part of what the CDC considers the most vulnerable population to cove is. We did look at. A time for y'all get it. There is an added touch desperation two calls coming out of jails and prisons. Around the country these days guys is called in it and there's no way to escape us. Oh This is what you see. Me noted I love you and you know. I mean at this hour Dabbagh Israel. Confinement. and social distancing are mostly incompatible. Sale. You have to basically figure out how are you going to just because a few feet down from you is another person. Learn scary for me every single day. I. Talked to him over the weekend. So that's why I was okay with letting my sister taught him because he didn't talk to him but I talked to him over the weekend and he shared with me that he actually was tested and he's negative thank God how do we keep him negative? I mean do they have any protocol whatsoever in place because from what we're hearing it's close quarters there's no masks there's no sanitation is that true? So this is what I know about federal institutions right there oldest. That's number one no error. He has been social distancing till the way that they've been doing it as separating people and allowing each group of people I think it's like ten people at a time. So they're like dorms and bunks, and so within his dorm, they allow the men to go out but because of his age he's like it just seems like there's too many people out and I'm a little tired but which is Kinda bad. Because every other day he gets the shower go commissary and like either email or call all within one hour the twenty three remaining hours he's shelter in place in a cell he basically on lockdown. So it's really heartbreaking sides calling his daughters is there anything that is giving him hope in this time the work that I've been doing tell me how old you were father was incarcerated. I don't actually say my age but I'll say this. I like that. Because of the issue that I'm talking about mainly but I was an adolescent young adolescent when my father was incarcerated and it completely devastated me completely I'm sure and that's such a hard age for a young woman anyway. Yeah. I was a young adult. So it was like thirteen fourteen years old when it occurred what effect did it have on you? I mean besides just being hard how did that manifest itself on your being on your heart? Right, so you know the stages of grief I would say most immediately. Just, Kinda give you an overview what happened. So my father was in the music industry he was a music manager promoter and publisher, and at the time of his arrest, he was like the pinnacle of his career like really doing well. So he traveled very often because he promoted records, he would often go to different states go to radio stations to promote different aren't because he couldn't go to everyone he worked for all different labels and so he promoted many different artists. From like Michael Jackson to like Kenny loggins well under yeah. It's a Ray Charles like all of people and so when he was arrested I guess my gut reaction was to just assume that he was on the road writings traveling because there are no real instructions for how this occurs. Right? I believe it was a coping mechanism. Yeah. Probably that is true it amazing how resilient we can become right after Moodley, and so for the first nine months, we act that way so. It's me and my sister, my sister we have the same mom and then I have two other brothers, an older brother and a younger brother and my younger brother was actually president when my father was arrested he was five years old and he was actually there hasn't of the whole arrest fathers in federal prison. So big like da you know these drug charges. Yeah. It was not good. So my sister and I weren't there and so we just kinda like to him being. On the road some of the first nine months we did not see him right and then he calls and he had been calling all along and now it's this new format calling receive a call and you hear this sweetness from a federal institution. Blah. Blah Blah and so okay, that's new. But whatever again Kinda put him in mind and just assuming that he's where he is but he says the US at that nine month part. Are you guys GonNa ever come visit me?

Wanna CDC Evans United States Dabbagh Israel Ray Charles Kobe Michael Jackson Kenny Loggins Moodley Publisher President Trump Calvin
Drug Addiction In America

Mentally Yours

04:32 min | 9 months ago

Drug Addiction In America

"Woken to Mentally Yours Metro could ikaes weekly podcast about all things mental health. Today we're talking to Dave. Marlon, he was the CEO of crossroads of Southern Nevada, which was the largest addiction and Rehab Center in the area, the psychotherapist drug and alcohol counselor, and he basically knows everything about addiction and mental health issues in the US and beyond. Making me talking tim today about how the pandemic has been affected addiction issues to get help if you're struggling and how to recognize if you might have a problem with drugs or alcohol. Bruce Dave. Thanks so much for joining us on mental yours and welcome from across the pond. My first question was basically because obviously as I mentioned, we're in London. You're in the US, it such different situation in terms of addiction, mental health, and obviously the pandemic to get started. Could you give kind of a brief overview of the reality of addiction in the US? How serious the problem is that how widespread is a? The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation calls addiction the number one health problem in the US. If we look at the the number of prescription opiates that are consumed in the entire world The United States consumes more than eighty percent of them. We. have. You know we've always had an alcohol problem for a percentage of our population. we we developed enough and phetamine mean and a cocaine problem over the last. Twenty years, and in the last five, six years Oh actually even a little longer. An opiate problem has has become. Our most serious addiction challenge. Kind of the most common addiction issue that you see people coming into your center with. It it's interesting. I've run Iran the largest treatment center in Las. Vegas of. Gene. Years. And now as a private center and they're absolutely opiates or over my last three, four years, they're opiates was the number one drug of choice that clients had presented to solutions recovery without the opiate use disorder their primary. Primary substance. Now I work at an indigent facility in in downtown. Las Vegas where. More than half of our clients are homeless. And what's interesting is with this demographic, there's a much higher methamphetamine use. Would say my number one. Substance of for clients is nothin vitamin with opiates and alcohol running for a close second place. That's really interesting I. Think What was interesting that you said kind of opiates have been coming up over the lost six years because for me, it's felt like the coverage has been really recent like only in the last couple of years, we taught it to the opioid crisis this being a sudden kind of unexpected issue but you're saying it's been building for a long time. It has. Interestingly, fourteen years ago I was running the largest health insurance company in the state. And I remember in my last. My last year or two I remember looking at pharmacy reports and we were all scratching our heads saying what is this Oxycontin and why did it not show up two years ago and now I remember when across the ten million dollar mark at the Insurance Company for monthly use so it really begins began spiking. Thirteen fourteen years ago. It became. Newsworthy in fashionable. Six seven years ago, and now we're a were still squarely in an opiate epidemic.

United States Las Vegas Bruce Dave Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Rehab Center Marlon TIM CEO Southern Nevada LAS Cocaine London Methamphetamine Iran
Dr. Larry Lauer on improving your mental skills

The Tennis.com Podcast

08:59 min | 1 year ago

Dr. Larry Lauer on improving your mental skills

"Hello. Everyone welcome to the tennis. Dot Com. Podcast we are in Lake Nona at the US J. National Campus. I'm your host Nina. Panic joined by my co host. Irena Falconi. Hey guys. How's it going this episode? Special guest is Dr. Larry Lower Larry Welcome. Thanks for having me. I'm looking forward to it. Can you give us a brief little bio about who you are and what you do here? Well here I'm the mental skill specialist for player development. I work with are pros and our juniors Getting Ready for competition preparing mentally. I work with the coaches as well to get players ready. So my job is while the coaches work on the physical side is to work on the players mental side and make sure that they're prepared for competition as well as helping them deal with things that happened in their life. So it's not just about The player on the court but the player off the court as well the holistic approach. And it's my job to make sure that the players have what they need to compete in a happy way in a healthy way and a high functioning way. Have you always wanted to do this from the very beginning was this? You're calling well not since I was a baby but Certainly when I not not really no being not being facetious anymore being serious when I was younger I wanted to be a coach and civically a baseball coach. I wanted to play professional baseball. And that didn't work out We don't need to get into that and this podcast and since tennis sports play so I had decided I was going to be a coach and maybe actually go into commentating. On Television Live sports events. I was interested in and so went to Clarion University. My Hometown University and really wasn't that interested in the courses and communication and and the degree. So I I ran into the psychology doctor Dr Easily Krause who knew that I played sports and coaching as well and she said hey you know there's actually something called sports psychology. I was around nineteen years old. I'm like what does that was. Clueless had no idea. This is dating myself but this was like nineteen ninety-two right. What is that and she said? Well come check it out. I'm going to have a special course on sports psychology and so I took the course and love. It fell in love with it and at that point. I knew that's what I wanted to do. Because an answer questions I had about my own performances in terms of at times playing great and other times. Not Performing You know going in and going four for four and having a home run and three RB is in the next game striking out four times. And why does that happen and why are sometimes feel on and other times just way off? Why sometimes in the feudal my locked in and other times? I'M MAKING MISTAKES. Couldn't answer it for myself necessarily and. I wanted to know to help myself but also to help the players that I was coaching in Baseball Thomas. Coaching sixteen seventeen eighteen year old Baseball in Pennsylvania says I dug deeper into psychology and and Indus. Four psychology started answering the questions that I had so that that was really the start and then I was fortunate to be able to go to. Unc Greensboro with Dr Dangled Who's one of the best sports psychologist in the world and having worked with him? I really got a deep understanding of what it means to perform under pressure and in really the literature sports psychology and Research and application. And really that kind of set me up. That's that's a quick version of it for what I'm doing today. I know you said baseball is not the same as tennis. But you can relate to players who have struggled in their sport given your background playing sport but you can also maybe I know you work with professionals who maybe are successful. But you probably people that. Don't make it right absolutely so you can relate to. I WANNA get dark. Unless you can relate you can really yeah. You can relate to someone who is struggling with finding their identity after thinking they were. GonNa make it as a pro and not getting there right. So how did you? How did you work through that if you can talk about that and you know? Is there a formula for figuring yourself out after your dreams and your hopes kind of change that is deep this early? So that's a great question you know getting into my psyche this turning turning the tides on me. We're GONNA talk about Irena. We will okay good so much better about that well honestly schering dot. Me That was that was a process Having gone to college and and and walked onto play baseball and it didn't work out and I didn't really understand recruiting process and probably could played somewhere but ended up not playing coming from a small rural area and losing that dream. That point was really difficult. And so I'm I'm age. Nineteen you know and and not yet mature as I am now. I know it's hard to believe. But and and it took a while it was kind of a tailspin for a while I was. I wouldn't say I was depressed but I was pretty down about it and upset that this dream that I had didn't work out. And it took me some time to sort of regroup and certainly being in college and and having those experiences helped a lot where I was exposed to different things and ended up really being mentored in a in a wonderful way by Dr Crowson. In the field of psychology. And helping me take something that You know was a big disappointment in not being able to further my baseball career and actually turn it into something. We're now my mission is to help. Other people have what they need to be successful. Because I felt like maybe I missed out on some things for sure. I miss out on some things. I didn't understand the psychology. I didn't understand the process of figuring out how to get seen and recruited and go to college and play baseball. I didn't I don't understand any of that. I didn't have that opportunity so I wanna make sure that the players that I have a chance to come in contact with have what they need to reach their goals whether or not they do. It ends up being on them. But I don't WanNa be the reason that they don't get there and that's really important so that that changed my whole outlook on life but it took some soul searching and sometimes of just you know like what am I gonNa do you know. And there's no like easy way is not like okay. Do these three steps and it works out you need to. You need to go there. You need to think about what it is you want and realize that you know as my friend David Roth for. Who's ex-navy seal said that you have more than one mission in life the mission changes and for me that Dreamer. That mission changed at age. Nineteen where base? No baseball was no longer an option as as a player and I had to figure out what I was going to do and I found a new mission that was to help other athletes and help coaches. And that's something I truly love and enjoy and that's probably where a lot of the passion comes from because you know I hate to see people miss out on an opportunity at least have the chance to be successful. Speaking of helping people a lot of coaches talk about being able to see something special and a player that does eventually make it. Do you find that. It's easy to to to see that with With players that you work with are you able to see whether their mental skills are above and beyond someone that potentially does not make it? I think I can see the outliers. Pretty well. The people who just stand out but probably most people can one of the one of the things I think we fall. Prey to his as coaches is believing that we know. Who'S GONNA make it? And who's not and if you go back through history of looking at drafting or selection processes were not very good at determining and identifying. Who's GonNa make an WHO's not? It's really a numbers game to be honest. You you make enough choices. You'RE GONNA hit on somebody right so and not to others a lot of people out there that do this work and there's a lot of good people out there but it's really challenging to no no of someone can can do this at the highest level but what I will say is the thing that you look for. I is to someone have the passion to do tennis to do. The whatever given initiative sport activity it is and that is something that you you can see in person as you spend time with them I think it's a fallacy to think that you can go watch a player once or twice a tournament and thank. You have a figure it out you know. Thirteen fourteen year old player. Once you get to know someone I think you can start to understand better than this person may be has the building blocks of something pretty special but it needs to be now nurtured and developed and that in my mind you know there's not many players is not many. Serena's there's not many rodgers out there so but there's a lot of great players who developed through the pathway right and we wouldn't have known at thirteen but we know now

Baseball Tennis Irena Falconi Lake Nona Dr. Larry Lower Nina Clarion University Dr Easily Krause Us J. National Campus Dr Dangled Hometown University Dr Crowson Pennsylvania Serena David Roth Rodgers
"thirteen fourteen years" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

04:18 min | 1 year ago

"thirteen fourteen years" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"I shall fight for my liberty some of the time comes for me the gold love the look and feel for the black listener in Chicago the experience of hearing this sort of program was unprecedented I don't know how to describe it radio pioneer Bernie Hayes Sir what thirteen fourteen years old starting a school they really made me feel good that you swallow but here someplace one of the things and and he gave you hope to bomb may back into that back to me that but she with these people achieved wasn't Amos and Andy this was about black people and they were describing what they did and it was a exhilarating it was a magnificent and we didn't know half of the people that we heard that were presented the documentaries and to to us this was a we didn't realize how big it was and what impact it had on this at the time but we know we loved it and enjoyed it and we finally got to to be proud of who we were hearing the stories and discussing them Monday through Friday waiting for Sunday morning to come again on a way to church sometime we miss church of some of the episodes were or that throwing Besser Sonya Williams dorms show did not just deal with historical figures so yes Harriet Tubman Sojourner truth Denmark VC yes they were hurt historical figures they were no longer live by the time he decided to focus on them but he also dealt with contemporary figures lessons use was clearly still alive from when the show was on so was Lena Horne so was Jackie Robinson but the sentiments that they expressed would just not things you heard on radio on a consistent basis at that time if you heard it all and that's one of the reasons why destination freedom did not become a nationally distributed show even though that's what dorm really want it he he he really pushed NBC and WMAQ to make it as widely available across the country as a missing Mandy was but there was a real push back against that and the reason was quite frankly that they knew and it was true that southern affiliates would balk at the characterizations at the blue zebra so call radical views and because we are talking about a network that is you know run by money in advertising and all they knew that if they didn't have southern affiliates and of course so then advertises that that they would lose money but of course it wasn't just about money Bernie hippies no they knew what people here this still in he we've got a base of sermon you can't be a level playing field with the for calling Americans or Asians you can do that now what is keeping down the best we can not as you make your no let them know what they've done that's why you know we can't find birth certificates we can't find records of us coming over on the ships that's funny when educate African Americans that's why he got a date less than nothing meet shuttle what was that for this program to come along game he this whole that was an excerpt from the sound of freedom in audio documentary by journalist mark kill steam we'll talk to one of the voices.

Patricia Scanlon, CEO of Soapbox Labs, on Speech Recognition That Actually Works for Kids

The Voicebot Podcast

05:28 min | 1 year ago

Patricia Scanlon, CEO of Soapbox Labs, on Speech Recognition That Actually Works for Kids

"Okay voiced by listeners. I've been looking forward to this Patricia. SCANLAN IS CEO of Soapbox Labs Patricia. Thanks so much for joining me today. Thanks Oh man okay so to get started. I know a lot of people know about soapbox labs but I think a lot of people do not and so why don't you this sort of introduce yourself. Elf what you do with the company and what is so box labs do at a high level short. I'm the founder and CEO Soapbox knobs on a very high level. We are voice his technology for kids so we power third party APPS web services products that want to voice enabled for children and this is is important because Asr's automated speech. Recognition are generally tuned to adult voices adult speech patterns in Africa children correct. Yeah historically cleo always has been it's it's pheno people often told us I know kids as us like just another accent. We've just throw of audio into you into the models have been built frauds. Motley novels behaviors. Just tune it to a kid's voice on it just does not work. Historically clean never worked on on people are still trying to unfortunately no. That's why we pretty much standalone Nariaki for speech recognition for children Tick because we had laser. These are focused on this problem for over six years right. So how did you come to recognize. This is a problem we we can go back act to the fact that obviously your your time at UCD you're really focused in speech recognition. But a when was it that it came to you that hey kids are is different in the way the technology handles speech wreck. I had my own house. Basically my daughter was three at the time mm-hmm and I was observing her interacting with technology. You know she was it was. It was kind of twenty thirteen and with the dawn of Oh absolutely ipod everybody. There was at millionaires. All over the face of people really invested in making a lot of cool apps up through the in education that age group as well. I was observing her. Interacting with a reading up those teach ner emergent stage reading where you're teaching them sounds and blend them and the Dakota his watching in how a really cool piece of technology that actually it's been designed with pedagogy experts in university collaborations beautiful graphics and really it was a great a product but a reading light on the ability to assess her pronunciation. Recall what was trying to teach her so seem. I'd spent a thought point joint. I've been in the area of speech recognition for like thirteen over thirteen fourteen years. I'd always worked on speech recognition to me just seem so obvious that we should be using voice these technology to assess a child's pronunciation recall and I don't know when you're read or learning language and it just really struck me that wow there's nothing thinned out there that doses ANA level of accuracy for children's voices so I started to investigate researcher for many years. Why is this a problem? You know why nobody managed to solve this. Given the fact was twenty. Thirteen right to think that it was everywhere. The technology space was gaining gaining traction and gain not quite becoming accurate Still Good Way to go with twenty thirteen while I was working in the space and seeing the leaps we're making in Adel speech recognition and then looking at this neglected area of children's speech I'm realizing there's a huge gap here a huge opportunity. You know from an entrepreneur to be addressed To be able to give children a voice to be able to let them be hard weather they were reading or learning the language or gives playing with a toy or game. I know seen how different a child's speech is. You're talking from age three. You're very. The child is very physically. Three different from Exposes a good way to describe Indus- their vocal tracks are thinner. VOCA trucks are shorter on vocals. Walter smaller. I'm what happens in not as the of the signal. The voice signal actually resides in different parts of spectrum. were certainly former frequencies concede to Then the speech behaviors are very different than adults rights of pink or five year old seven year old or nine year old. How they speak? Take the patterns of speech Elongate Over a nun seeds there. They'll sing the whisperer. Spur the But they also don't tend to follow language either so this whole series of aspects to this stuff should inform Sola should be should have been more obvious feeless like It will fall apart. Adults Systems are trained on adult voiced as adults speech behaviors With full apart with kids on the younger you get worse spouse was in my learning. By absorbing observing in my own daughter I mentioned to scratch heckle. Why is this knocking solved in on quite a bit of Exact problem

Founder And Ceo CEO Scanlan UCD Africa Adults Systems Motley Sola Adel ASR Dakota Voca Researcher Walter
"thirteen fourteen years" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

04:39 min | 1 year ago

"thirteen fourteen years" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Do you like monster wants to eat it it's god listen to get across to get a little garlic sauce on it we get some extra pizza sauce actual arrangement little ranch action how would the last bite of a pasta still the same no you're right about that one right the same rule applies to the salad I guess Christopher do you remember the the the the time you infamously stole my last night of love famous don't tell that story because it's in for me within the coding family we were yeah I think you just ruined the punch line I don't know how does it end we were in Vegas we took a vacation to Las Vegas before I was of age I don't know why my parents did I must've been twelve thirteen fourteen in that range and we went out to this really nice seafood dinner and my dad got the biggest flops there you could get and he was making a big deal if he ate the whole thing and when he got his last bite he was holding the fork up like it was like send them by the fossa hello and and I'm like in thirteen fourteen year old I'm trying to just be a rabble rouser I grabbed the fork and I was like let me see if I let me see it and I take it and he's like he wouldn't do it and I'm just like I'm holding it and I ate it and I and he had like you said it's stuck with them if they bring it up once a year at least so you'd never respected your father do you believe that the phrase is rebel rouser do you believe they get caught up in the air Dan and I were just very often I feel yeah should russet rebel rouser rabble rabble rebel I know I didn't put it on the pole Antonio have you ever heard anyone other than a thousand use the phrase rabble rouser like you shouldn't know that freight speaking of tomatoes leave those out of my salad I do not need to males not salads or one of your child the waiters are chopped into tiny little pieces made other heavy that's a classic ingredient that always sinks to the bottom hem what did I I'm a little cherry tomato missile kind of in half know what it is I get the cherry tomato out of myself yeah and on the ball as well Antonio get the cherry tomato Val out of my salad yes or no does a little ones that you can like fitting your modified yes explode as they burst that's correct why you got to have them they don't explode you avoid that explosion and I've been disqualified from this conversation because I don't eat salad yeah he's been miserable the entire conversation because Roy doesn't mean anything rather but vegetables raw I spent ten years eating out of a vending machine no I eat vegetables but I don't really you are responsible for more stolen Doritos around here than anyone in the history of the Doritos brand you ate for ten years like someone would eat at a at a machine outside of a bait shop that's how it like fish would eat it died it was disturbing I was worried for your future every time I looked up your every meal was bag of Doritos but I'm perfectly healthy thing yeah when I was when I when I first started interning everyone would give me little tasks and the only tax road give me is go get me blue Doritos get me blue Garrido Chris a lot of people on the tax or saying that mac and cheese can be the final bite of Machen fees could be outstanding better than any bike you'll take during the mac and cheese you know I do agree with if you have enough cheese at the end of the skillet that's the thing that's the good thing to do with mac and cheese after you've had the mac you just go around to get the melted cheese all my god get two or three spoonfuls he's mad that she's all all right so one of the nominees here for best last bite the nominees are salad and are we allowing Antonio's pizza here because you made a good argument for but you all seem to disagree with you brought in Pasay the imposter places people right ice cream cone from dust on the bottom of the a bag of Doritos buy low sell high ground for a summer pictures thank people old spice we'll help you smelled better more fragrant Tellem's to god this new brand the commercial segment is brought to buy old spice what the feds and a longtime NFL spokesperson Ricky Montez sweat they have always been a fan of the number ones would run any other and to the contrary in fact the old spies would never consider a person named sweating real sweat as the same thing I would just be crazy crazy crazy crazy so remind me that mon says was name is what he plays defense and old spice what defense is the superior defense against what is it that a great coincidence that's it for now but on the day of their show on ESPN radio.

"thirteen fourteen years" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"thirteen fourteen years" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Not I just I mean I'm gonna see it will review it you know I'm I'm more interested in the Natalie Portman movie which I'm gonna see. I'm gonna much more just I didn't know what was based on the true story did you know was based on a true story member Vic you probably remember this number years ago when the. I'm sorry my computer's not shutting down to to to affect my almost did I just if you're looking at right now and it's it's showing that. anyway so what was I saying Lucy in the sky TEL yeah it's based on a true story and Vic you might remember this. about years ago I wanna say may be. thirteen fourteen years ago this is real a true story about a female astronaut who was obsessed with a guy and drove all the way down I guess it was to Florida and she it depends on you remember this you're looking at bell she was the only. she was going to kidnap the guy she was obsessed with them yes yes yes it was another astronaut and she drove down to Florida and non stop and she had like depends on and she had a weird bunch of stuff in the car you guys remember I don't remember the details about detail that's the one thing that I did that yeah I remember they made a big deal out of that like she was wearing depends and because she didn't want to stop she wanted to get down there is life is possible thank you kid no no it's a true story and this is based on that I had no idea I leave it up to an astronaut the first two were they don't recognize that the tell that'll save time all went to pay yeah but I mean that was that's a true story mentions obviously shoes shoes very disturbed but I had no idea that the until I Portman was on with Kimmel the other night any one reason I watch Kimmel anytime is if he's got a good Gaston because I can't stand are not Kimmel Fallon. but I did not know that it was based on that story wow yeah that changes what I thought this movie was going to be about yeah now I don't know how accurate it's going to be I it's inspired by this story so I'm just going to probably change a bunch of stuff sure but yeah so help me god if there's no depends I don't know I'm walk right I don't haven't seen it yet so I don't know anyway that's it alright let's take a break here because wanted her been here he's our good friend he's a consumer man he's here to help you out three.

Kimmel Fallon. Natalie Portman Vic Florida Lucy Gaston thirteen fourteen years

How I Built This

08:37 min | 1 year ago

"So what are the guiding principles of creativity is that some of you very best ideas. Come out of sheer frustration products like honest tea or cliff bar olders dyson these all came about because their founders couldn't find the beverages or energy bars or shoes or or vacuum cleaners that they wanted so they invented them but in the case of Tristan Walker. I think it's safe to say that he didn't just start from a place of mild frustration. He actually started from a place of being fed up even angry because for most of his life he had felt completely league ignored totally overlooked whenever he walked into the shaving. I'll drugstore virtually all the big shaving brands were making products that worked well on men with relatively straight hair but tristen couldn't find a high quality razor that worked on his curly facial hair without leaving razor bumps olivarez neck Kajol line and he knew that like him many African American men were dealing with the exact same problem so he decided to design bevill a shaving system with a simple single blade razor that was easy on his face and he wanted everything about the product to look and feel great not like the dusty boxes of shaving products for African American men that we seem to be on the bottom shelves at the drugstore and his ambition to build a black owned and led consumer Marand as big as Johnson Johnson or proctor and gamble but of course when I tried to raise money from all those VC firms on sand hill road in Silicon Valley and he got a lot of knows but eventually he was able to launch his company with a razor some shaving cream but of oil and brush and over the past five years his brand has grown to include more than thirty specialized hair and beauty products for men and women which are now sold and lots of big retailers lers across the country a few weeks ago. Tristan sat down to tell me how he did it in front of a live audience at the Lincoln Theater in Washington. DC tristen Walker Central. I'll take it so let's start. Let's start at the beginning. Tell me about about out your childhood knew you grew up in Queens where I like to describe. It is a bit of the Rosa grew from concrete story. I grew up in Queens New York projects. It's Welfare Bouts of homelessness that sort of stuff right and I realized very early at one goal in life and as as wealthy as possible as quickly as possible Salaam. I realized three ways to do it. I was to be an actor athlete that didn't work second second was to work on Wall Street that didn't work in the last entrepreneurship and then thank goodness. I came to that realization. We were a little boy. A A your dad died. He was killed killed and you grew up with an older brother and your mom. What did your mom do yet for work so oh my mom worked three jobs mainly New York City Housing Authority Administrative Assistant? She spent some time working for Time Warner Cable and she did some retail all at the same time within seven days. I don't know how she did it. She did it. Thank goodness for her. It was not easy but she persevered and as a result of I think her perseverance good fortune beam I graduate college in my family and she she really in what what do you remember about like your neighborhood growing up as a kid I mean would did you do. Did you add in do much because I couldn't do much like my father was killed. When I was three years old? I don't remember too much about him other than the fact that he was killed when I was three years old which is a little bit telling to Kinda type of environment that I did grow up in so you know I lived probably the first six seven years of my life live in Jamaica Queens New York forty projects in the time I turned around seven years old. We moved to flushing Queens. Another project can development and it was much of the same right. My mother was like you're going to be the one you're not gonNa go through this stuff very disciplined. Stay home. Get Your studies and you're not going outside. When I snuck snuck outside? She caught me. I got in a lot of trouble but that was really kind of my life right. Get to school get home. Do you work repeat and you know that discipline actually Kinda got me to wearing them. Now school easy for you has a kid yeah. I was a good student because the discipline that was inspired me I always excelled right. I tended to be at least up until high school anyway at or near the top of my class you know and I kinda slow down when I say that stuff because by the time I got to high school. I realized I didn't even know what a verb was right. I wouldn't do this entire time. All the way up until my high school years doing really really well at the top of my class not even knowing what verb now and that sort of thing was as a teenager you ended up going to this really elite private boarding school hotchkiss in Connecticut the way I like to describe posh kisses is the first time I got to see how the other half lived. I went to school literally rockefellers Ford's right and I learned a couple of things first name mattered to being wealthy wasn't same as being rich and the last and probably the most important was I can compete with each and every one of them while while while I didn't know Oh what a verb was I learned and by the end of my four years they're you know on a roll like that. Sort of thing you know is then absolutely just wonderful experience for me but transformative in a little bit different from how I grew up was it was the transition for you when you got there because you were like fourteen years old. I've been living away from home since I was thirteen fourteen years old and were the first few months at hard for you. academically we get to the school and I realize I don't even have a computer and you know all of my other classmates had computers that sort of thing and I went to leave as the English professor who is my adviser at the time and I remember he took me to this basement. We're all used textbooks are and then he was old compaq like Presidio L. Computer that we had the like hall out and take it to my room so academically. It was very tough because I wasn't equipped with the tools to compete but over the years accelerating so you fish you go to Stony Brook University New York to study economics. Most most students don't necessarily know what they're gonNa do but did you have a sense of what you want to pursue their and what you thought you would do after I mean I was always thinking about the after I wanted to get wealthy yeah I was pretty singular in that help very singular in that hope and overtime that's kind of morphed and changed and the things that are important Ed Morrison changed but I knew I was very very very focused on how to get there and Wall Street was the next greatest option. All this silicon valley stuff at new idea about my world was New England so you're thinking do this degree and I'll go into finance plows e- economics is the closest degree we had at Stony Brook again to Wall Street Okay and in between my first and second year of university I got an internship and Lehman Brothers back office halfway through I I said I want to try some of this front office stuff so I left that enjoined trading desk at the time just observing so when you graduate so you you went actually went to work for Leman and then as a traitor and then everything and eventually JP Morgan in that time at that time time period. Did you still think this is what I should be doing. This is my sort of path to the worst years of my life. This is two thousand and five when I joined the company and as a traitor. Your job is to make money

Tristan Walker Queens Time Warner Cable Queens New York Jamaica Queens New York Stony Brook University New Yor Facial Hair Lincoln Theater New York Johnson Johnson Washington Silicon Valley New England Walker Central Ed Morrison Ford Lehman Brothers Jp Morgan
Wendy Kopp on Developing 'Teach For America'

Skimm'd from The Couch

12:23 min | 1 year ago

Wendy Kopp on Developing 'Teach For America'

"We're going to jump into it. Which i questioned. Skim your resume for us. Well my resume. A is not that long because as you just said <hes> i thought of an idea when i was a senior in college that has really kept me busy ever since i never would have guessed that i would still be going at it thirty years later that it would take me all across this country tree and really all across the world i through teach for america and now teach for all and that's really the extent. I don't even have a resume. I hope never to have won well. So what is not on your linked in <hes> that we should know about you. Maybe the other side is that i have four kids a loving loving husband and a wonderful family we talked about when i was looking at the names teach for america and then teach for all and i was thinking teach for all like do feel like career working down in america and now you're moving goodness <hes> no in fact green for many many years until maybe thirteen fourteen years ago i had my head down fully focused on the massive inequities and continuing challenges in the u._s. I had honestly i mean it's almost embarrassing to say now but it i'd never thought about the rest of the world. Is it related to this. <hes> what happened was that i started meeting. People i mean never something in the water and within one year i had met thirteen people from thirteen different countries who were just determined that something similar needed to happen in their our country and we're looking for help and that is what ultimately led to the launch of of teach for all twelve years ago now as a network of independent locally led organizations in now fifty soon to be more than that <hes> countries and growing walk us through what what it meant to to step down from teach for america to do teach for all like what that meant for you and your career <hes>. It's so interesting because i must admit admit. I don't think i thought about it. As stepping down exactly i think in the five years prior teach for america had doubled in size and teach for all had grown from zero to twenty five network partners <hes> and sort of as i have done and his anyone growing enterprise is does at every year along the way you kind of constantly. Ask yourself like what does this need. You know like what what teach for america need. What is teach for all need and it it just became came really clear that each of these organizations needed dedicated leadership and <hes> you know there was so much the amazing leadership at teach for america and it just felt like it was ready for <hes> you know lisa vian wave beard is an incredible bowl woman who really grew up in one of the communities in which teach for america works and then became a core member and then you know joined our team and really help build teach for america <hes> you know to to step forward and lead the organization which she now does so it it wasn't it wasn't hard like i didn't feel like i was giving something up. It just felt like this is great like she can take it to the level. It needs to go to an and i can put all the more energy and entities for all which it needed at the time. I'm as well so i'd be hard pressed to find another example of someone who senior year college project has received accolades and honor degrees that have income from it truly you have wind so many awards. You've earned fourteen honorary doctorates which one is the meant to most to you. I honestly just i feel so unbelievably privileged to have somehow found my way to this idea that has enabled me to you know work with such incredible wool hearts minds and souls all over the world who are kind of drawn to the same thing in to be part of something that's making such a meaningful difference <hes> <hes> and that's that's all i focus on honestly. Did you have a moment that when you got the presidential medal of honor where you're like. How is this happening have to admit i mean this. It's just not it's not just me going this far. What does a typical day look like for you. Do you have a routine then. Is there consistency in your days. There's so much variety in my days. I mean i just got back from two weeks across you know visiting teach for afghanistan and and teach for nepal and teach for india and teach thailand <hes> and then went on a week of fundraising on the west coast and now i'm i'm in new york which is a rare thing we're actually live and i'm like just got my days packed with internal meetings and that's part of the beauty of this whole thing you know <hes> but i try to stay on a bit of a routine like i get up really early and look at what has creeped into my email box <hes> and you know gonna run women and then get my day going so and i go back to you as the college student. Who are you in college and when you think about looking back a who you were that in who you are now. How are you different. Oh gosh that's a really good question. I was in total funk my senior a year and i could not think of it these topic. I couldn't think of anything i wanted to do after i graduated and i think where did you go to school. I went to princeton and until hill my senior year i had been in overdrive from birth rate like but i think it was almost being in that funk that ultimately led to this inspiration like i was was just searching for something i knew i was going to work incredibly hard whatever i did and was just searching for something that would make a meaningful difference aunts and i felt that i wasn't alone that. I was like one of thousands of people out there who were searching for something similar and that's really what led to this idea like. Why aren't we being called upon. I mean at the time we were being called upon so aggressively to commit just two years to work on wall street. You know it's like why aren't we being recruited ended as aggressively to commit just two years to teach in low income communities like to address the equity and opportunity you know <hes> so that's what led me to the idea <hes> which i was the last senior to declare a topic. I couldn't even find an advisor anyway at from the minute minute. I thought of it. I just realized this has to happen and i've been obsessed ever since so anyway i don't even know how to explain all the ways which i have changed and evolved. It would be hard to rebuild pieces. I think i had little con. Have you ever read a <hes>. Honestly several years ago and realized yeah like i don't want to. I wouldn't wanna read. I know i mean you can just imagine the incredible credible learning curves on every front that i have con- through from first of all just the substance of the work i mean you know really what it takes to recruit and develop people who will be effective teachers for the kids facing the greatest challenges and who will learn the right lessons and then go onto effect systemic change. I mean just i had really no idea <hes> what would be entailed in that and then all the other aspects from how to build a strong organization to how to actually build a sustainable funding base to how to navigate the politics of of the world <hes> and i think i went through just massive learning curves with teach for america and then a whole new set of learning curves teach for all how do you build a network that you know has everyone united but also everyone encouraged to innovate and <hes> and how do you navigate the foreign aid system. I feel nothing but like incredible privilege to go through all these learning curves. I'd love for you to explain kind of the central thesis around teach for america for our listeners. Yeah and around teacher american also also teach for all really 'cause. It's there's a core purpose that unites all of us across the teach for all network from teach for america to teach for india to too many many any others in between i mean i think we have to start by thinking about the nature of the problem like we're all working to address the fact that the circumstances of kids birth predict kicked their educational outcomes and life outcomes and we view that as a really complex problem right. It doesn't start in classrooms. There are whole segments of kids kids in countries all around the world that face many extra challenges. They show up at schools when we're lucky enough for them to show up at schools that were really never designed to meet their extra needs. There's a whole prevailing ideology about the low potential of these kids that fuels the whole thing so it's a complex problem and in the face of a complex problem like that. There's no one solution right. We're not going to solve this problem with any one thing not with roic teachers not with a different curriculum not with a laptop happen. I mean this is gonna take so many changes to really address and and our whole belief is you know we we need to change the whole system and that's that's gonna take a lot of people at every level of the system at every level policy across sectors in communities you know coming together around a vision for all kids having the chance to fulfil their potential so we think of our mission as to develop collective leadership to ensure all children fulfill their potential <hes> and sharon approach to doing that which is all around kind of galvanizing a rising generation of leaders in any given country to channel their energy into the arena of working with the most marginalized kids initially commit two years to teach knowing that those two years can can be really important for the kids. They're working with and also knowing that what you learned through that process for the teacher themselves so transformation like it changes everything your understanding of the problem your commitment to addressing it and it becomes foundational for a lifetime of leadership and so we're trying to grow the force the people who throughout their lives working at every level of the system and and across sectors will be committed to working for change and who through their own leadership leadership will support and catalyze the leadership of others their students. The students parents other teachers in the schools others in their communities. You just talked about how big the issue is isn't. There isn't one solution when you think about doing this for thirty years. How'd you keep that passion up. Do you burn out. Do you ever feel like this is just too big. I think one of the things about this role of mine is that i mean every day a a c juxtaposed on the one hand the incredible disparities and inequities were addressing and on the other hand evidence evidence that it really is possible to solve them and i think that juxtaposition has kept me going for thirty years. I honestly don't think i've ever felt burned out. <hes> you know again. I feel like it's such a privilege to be able to see this at so many different levels like i can zoom in and be kind of somewhat proximate to the issues and and then zoom out and see real evidence. I mean honestly right now. What keeps me going just seen what's happening in communities where we've been working for in some cases thirty thirty years and to see you know if you have historical perspective despite the fact that yes. It's not anywhere near where we need it to be today. If you have historical perspective you realize oh my gosh but how much worse it was even twenty years ago. Is the school or study you went into. We started in in six areas of the u._s. In new york city los angeles new orleans <hes> some rural communities in north carolina and georgia when you skimmed your thesis or when you think back to the lessons of those earliest years.

America New York India Princeton Advisor Afghanistan Lisa Vian Core Member Sharon North Carolina Los Angeles Thailand Georgia Two Years Thirty Years Thirteen Fourteen Years Thirty Thirty Years Twelve Years Twenty Years Five Years
"thirteen fourteen years" Discussed on Oprah's SuperSoul Conversations

Oprah's SuperSoul Conversations

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"thirteen fourteen years" Discussed on Oprah's SuperSoul Conversations

"Ideas that merged which was was how to value another human being and that and i think i've said in other ways race when you know somebody's patties race. That's least information you. You don't know anything. The real information is elsewhere. When i first read the bluest sti- the thing that struck me the most is <hes> that anybody who allows themselves to be defined outside of their own personal vision for themselves that is a form of insanity and look at what the world has done to women and get out pull. Uh pull it up shaping up as you know you see young girls now thirteen fourteen years ago having plastic surgery already the colored contacts well would have to go. I should say that tony use it did pull the colour wouldn't have to go buy some style number one question but why did she have to go insane. There were no exits thank you. That's exactly there. Were no exit. There was nothing there were no adults. <hes> there were no teachers. There were no parents. There was this man in the neighborhood who said yeah you're right. You're horrible. I'll fix it but she had no doors open into her so she made a door for us and that was her of.

tony thirteen fourteen years
"thirteen fourteen years" Discussed on Angela Yee's Lip Service

Angela Yee's Lip Service

03:03 min | 2 years ago

"thirteen fourteen years" Discussed on Angela Yee's Lip Service

"I was at tower records like every job I've ever had adding a customer service or whatever but I know what hard work is since I was like as thirteen fourteen years old you know so I try to dibbled and dabbled in the streets as I say quick that was not for me. You don't mean like so. All I know is hard work. You know what I'm saying so sometimes I'll so consumed by Donana people that I take care of the people that depend on me. You know what I'm saying. It's like you lose sight of the fact that the people that really matter to you most. They're hurting. They need you day you know saying and about like just in some money or it's about time situation. You know what I'm saying. It's about physical year. The real thing for me in the last two years is is having no I believe in protecting my family a loved one so I don't put business completely out there but a particular family member where I had to see like get guardianship of them go in and go in my world had stopped everything. Athena's moving in my world and go and take care of them eight and get them back right. You know what I mean and that right. There Kinda like was groundbreaking from me great because it was I was on <hes>. You know what I'm saying. It wasn't able to do it it. What you know what I mean no other family member whatever it was Kinda I got the call we think the only one that they can make this APP and stop every day regardless of what was going on and in a going on at the time but I made it my business to you know any you know sometimes when you move so fast like the Creator Universe will do things grab your attention? You know what I'm saying just like just just like the people take for granted and your world. You know what I'm saying like so they'll go grab the attention. It'd be like Yo. You know what I mean like you. Can't you can't so you saw sewed so I think that for me. There's still a work in progress and that's something definitely I am. You know without notice challenge that we're going okay. That's fair enough now that you know. Is it warm out. Finally the last thing I want to do is stay in the house standing over the stove trying to cook like something. There's so much fun stuff to do during the summer. I just knew that option to just eat and go. That's one of my favorite things is about daily harvest daily harvest delivers thoughtfully source chef crafted food. That's built on fruits and vegetables and you can prepare them in less than five minutes. That's right because I don't have time. Bill your backs with more than sixty five different options like ready to blend smoothies refreshing chilled soups and savory harvest bowls. Everything's days fresh in your freezer until you're ready to eat it. Each daily Harvest Cup takes one step to prepare with room room for customization at your favorite milk to S- movie you know that'll be almond milk and blend or heat harvest bowl in tap it with avocado or a fried egg. All of daily harvests ingredients are sourced and selected for maximum nourishment and peak season flavor the best part daily harvest a single serving cups are the ultimate grab and go Miller snack so you can get a dose of nursing fruits and vegetables at any time of day go

Athena Miller milk thirteen fourteen years five minutes two years
"thirteen fourteen years" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"thirteen fourteen years" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Lord and savior Jesus Christ and grow as a verb means to learn something, so but something in your head. That's what the show's about motivation inspiration education without any type of manipulation. That's right. No con games here. Not asking you for money not trying to solicit you for anything. Just give you some information. Pray you listen as verify indentify the plan of God for your life. And I certainly pray you orient and adjusted to the plan we've been on the radio for many years thirteen fourteen years now across the United States in select cities. And it's always interesting to get the letters and the people that are responding to the truth. Let me remind you that I'm not sure pastor, I am a window a door opening something for you. To show you where you can grow. There are men who are well qualified pastors that teach consistent basis more than just once a week. Like, I do on this radio show, and my prayer is that you will take advantage of their ministry, if you don't live in their area, you can get their DVD's or their MP threes or they're printed material, but they are solid sound teaching individuals that know God's word and do a wonderful job. So that's what your prayer should be that God would lead you to well-qualified pastor. So you could grow spiritually. And hopefully, I've given you a taste of what it means to grow spiritually today. We want to look at something very interesting. You know in your life from time to time, you may have some sort of criminal activity that you're exposed to. Severi possible that it could happen to you. And I'm going to dedicate. This message today to those who've been afflicted criminal activity it affected by criminal activity. Maybe you had your money stolen..

United States thirteen fourteen years
"thirteen fourteen years" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

04:55 min | 2 years ago

"thirteen fourteen years" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Tonight show is terrifying. The little girl saying that Momo talks tour is it was just too much. Let's go to Brian in Florida hybrid ground zero. Hey, how you doing good? Today. I was watching with my daughter. She's three years old octa, not Disney show about basically these underwater people who go on to say in creatures and stuff like that. I used to watch a big take with her. But after watching your show back in August. I don't way that show anymore. So usually like look for. Thing that I've been through you know, with kids you watch stuff like five hundred times. So I take the normal ones that we play. No sitting there watching it with her. And then the algorithm started to change. And then we started to get commercials for like. Girls. Etter twelve thirteen fourteen years old per like lime kits where you take it apart and there's prizes in it. And of course, I wasn't really cool with what figuring work because it was figuring and actually the young girl that was set up and it was in like set of daisy to captain uniform. You know, then the figuring that she busted out had like inappropriate dress for a woman in general, in my opinion. And then if flipped over and at the end of each awkward show, they do a creature report, which usually the show is about one particular creature, and then they show like the creature and what it's about and they get like a definition of it. And and what specific traits are. They were them flipped over into this. Where did nothing but Crete reports for twenty minutes, a twenty minute video of that? And my daughter picked up on. And she goes there's something wrong with the keeps on doing creature reports. Well, as it was flipping through the commercial came on for a lady screaming and the lady was screaming bloody murder, and it was a like an advertisement for like a horror flicks. Went ahead and turned it off. So this is because a continuous play. She was getting this type of shooting algorithm. The algorithm was pushing this actually a sex child. It also a woman screaming in horror film. Yeah. And if you kind of look at it from a different angle from spiritual angle. You got the year of the pig. You've got a pig hosting all this stuff. You've got all this stuff going on with these eggs right now. And you also, you know, when you go back to Texas, and you look at pigs. It's a big like signed for demonic activity. Right. When Jesus cast the demon into the pig or the demons into the of the legion, and they drown. And yeah, I forgot it is is the year of the pig. We did a whole show about the dark pig and the dark pig prophecies. Now, Pepe pig is the focus of Momo returning. This demon from the internet, I call the internet goule, certainly certainly measures up to being up for kids. And it certainly demonstrating that something is wrong with YouTube now, many people said, well, it's a hoax, but you know, there's plenty of video if you look hard enough that has been caught in shown of of the scary lady as Bella said, the scary lady with big is screaming saying that she talks to children and that she will harm families or kill kill families. If they lie and see that's a little girl saying that it will kill your family. If you lie. So obviously, whatever. Komo said to her said that said the, you know talking to little children telling him, I will kill your family if they lie. I really think this is a big wake up call for us because we've been going through all this stuff for years. And now, we have the, you know, some stuff coming up in congress with whether or not you can actually till tiled after it's been born. Yup. Remember, y'all wait y'all we ask people to repent over and over and over again, that's sacrificing their children to demonic idol. Eventually he said, hey, this is what you want. I'll give it to you. And then he gave it to him full-fledged. And then all the demons came in. They took everything over and then everybody was involved, man. You had so many terrifying. Pictures of of the demons, the pigs and think about this. What did Lilith look like, you know, she was a hag once again the hag factor. This is a hag it's on the internet that scaring little children. Usually the hag comes at night. Like a like, a suck you bus and sits on your chest. This is again part of the pig writing the hag or the hag writing the pig. This is exactly what you're painting here. And I think it's amazing dot connecting. It's really terrifying. I think we need to personally as whatever whatever you believe. And you wanna protect your family and stuff you need to stay off of these three entities Instagram Facebook and YouTube because those three are interconnected right now. And then we remember back that Facebook had.

Pepe pig Facebook Lilith Momo Disney Bella Brian Etter YouTube Florida murder Komo congress Texas twelve thirteen fourteen years twenty minutes twenty minute three years
"thirteen fourteen years" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

The Dave Ramsey Show

04:47 min | 2 years ago

"thirteen fourteen years" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

"Thirteen fourteen years. I've been there for almost seven. Yeah. And so what about you taking a different store? I thought about that. That's kind of that's kind of a tough one for me. We would both be in the same situation. We both are based in the same city. And they're they're both commutes. If we were stay with the company. Yeah. Yeah. But I mean, this is not your brother's fault. And he was he's been there longer than you. And. This is the company being stupid. They really is. So I would go back to your supervisor and say. I can't do this. I'm not gonna cut my own brothers throat. I'm just not going to do it. And so you guys need to make an exception to your policy in order to promote me. Why would and then I would ask him. Why would you want a leader running one of your stores that would kick his own brother in the stomach? I don't want that guy working for me. You know? And so you don't wanna be that guy. No, no. This is stupid. Corporate culture is what this is. And these leaders need the leaders above you need to make an exception to this to show that they have character. I mean, I get that. You wouldn't hire. I don't hire siblings. I don't hire family members here. And we have our policy is almost never because occasionally I do, but it's about one out of one hundred times because it's fraught with danger. It's very difficult for you to lead a a store with your brother there. I get that would your brother worked for you. No, he would not. He wouldn't want to know he wouldn't want to actually him being there twice as long. So this is going to hurt his feelings is what you're saying. Yes. That's percent. Correct. That's actually where I'm at. I don't know if I should do. What's best my family, or okay that that's a different discussion. Then. Okay. So. You know, your brother should wish for your success, not be envious of your success? And if he can't do that, then that's on him. But that's different than hey, we can all get along with this companies too stupid to make an exception. That's a different a different rant on my part. And that's now back on your brother. So, but I still even though it would hurt his feelings. I mean, if you could go in there, and he chose to not work there because you were the later then that's his decision, but for you to force him out because of company policy, I wouldn't do that. And so I tell you what I would do. Let me try. Let's start again. Then now that I've got this extra information again, go back to your supervisor and say, I think if you will make an exception to this policy that you won't have to when you promote me he will leave and go to another store or he will quit, but that's his decision. You didn't vote him onto the street. Do you see what I'm saying? Yes. He's got to decide he's going to man up and not be jealous. Little brat about his own brother succeeding, right? And if he didn't wanna do that if he wants to stick his lip out. No. Well, just you know, 'cause I've been around here breathing air longer than you. I should have gotten the promotion if you should have gotten the promotion that you would have gotten it. So that's not. But but you take that job with the option for him to stay there, knowing you and your supervisor knowing that he likely won't he'll likely move to another store or quit, right? Do you think you'll just quit? Yeah. I think he would he would just get mad and quit. Yeah. He he's kinda arrogant. Yes, this is the guy that burns down his own neighborhood to protest, right? Yeah. Yeah. I'm gonna show you I'm gonna quit. My job. Oh, lord. Well, that those are those are his problems you're not responsible for his problems unless you create them by putting him out of a job. But I wouldn't put him out of a job. If he choose at my even benefit my family..

supervisor Thirteen fourteen years
"thirteen fourteen years" Discussed on Skip and Shannon: Undisputed

Skip and Shannon: Undisputed

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"thirteen fourteen years" Discussed on Skip and Shannon: Undisputed

"But is he capable? He's kind of like a microcosm of the whole Texans. You see the burst. And you say, wow, he could do that. And I see Sean have a game. And I say he could do that. I see JJ a game or a sack, and I say he could be that. But they're not always that. And that's what you so hard to count for because Sean gave you nine rushes for seventy yards. So you have the thing work. What scares you about him skip? If you run past him as a as a Russia when you play these guys that are mobile when you play like Mahomes or you play a KM or Sean ever Russia. If you run past them, they will jump out the window, and they're gone. They're gone. So you have to be very cautious. How you right? You just can't run up the field, Tom, right? I'm not worried about it. Because even if he jumps I guess what I can back and chasing before this guy's going to go thirty plus. Yeah. And so the question is skip. Like, I said they can beat everybody, but they can San Diego could go there and beat them cans. Kansas City, San Diego has a type of office Philip rivers because think about what they're going to go against with the exception of Kansas City. All these quarterbacks are veteran quarterbacks big being thirteen fourteen years, Philly I've ever thirteen fourteen years. We know what Tom Brady represents. So. Yes, can they get to the AFC championship game? Absolutely. But they could also be like a year fast one in doing you get the right match up on the wrong day. I agree. But this doesn't feel like a one and done. This doesn't feel like your father's texts. Ryan, you're okay. Don't have case Yates or one of those guys do still have the same head coach Bill Brian. And I don't love him. And I'm not sure I would if he stays out of Shawn's way unless dish on playmate for him war. It'd be very interested skip if they get the New England Patriots because you're gonna patriots having won a row playoff games in two thousand seven when they beat San Diego lost their last will had all kinds of trouble winning playoff games at New England winning games in general the last place you wanna go. Yeah. Is New England in the playoff. Yeah. 'cause they don't problem. They don't lose very often in a team that to beat them you have to bludgeon them defense. Yeah. If you look at the teams that have had success. The Baltimore Ravens really the team that comes to mind. Yeah. And they play defense. They do they hit you in the mouth. Now, they have type defect can do that. They do at the question the way Honey badgers flying around. He can cover the sly, and he can do a number on your tidy. He can cut your tight end. He can do it. Yes. So that's the question skip. But when that temperature gets down to ten fifteen degree, are you still don't wanna put your hand of that dirt and come up on. Not sure is the X factor in AFC playoffs that are. Fascinating. I can remember in years load where it's loaded with X factors. Like, what are they going to do? Because we today if New England and everybody else right now, it's not like that. Because we we're talking about other. Okay. San Diego could do some damage. We know what the Steelers become they have a hotline offense Kansas City. Right. But you can't count the pain us pass the Texans and the Bengals were just fodder. Yeah. You know, they go around fodder one and done or unless they played each other. Then somebody had to win and go for correct, right? Yep. It's interesting. You mention the Texans. And who they've but first team in NFL history to start Owen three. And then when eight straits still. Yes. The Cowboys are rolling right now. I heard that Shannon, three straight wins. But they're still a seven and a half point underdog at home against the saints Thursday on FOX, and yeah, it doesn't help Dallas that the saints are the hottest team in the NFL with ten straight wins..

Baltimore Ravens San Diego Sean New England Patriots Tom Brady New England Bill Brian AFC NFL Russia Kansas City Cowboys Shannon Steelers Bengals Philip rivers Philly Yates Ryan
Bill Cosby appeals his sexual assault conviction, claiming multiple trial errors

Doug Stephan

01:56 min | 2 years ago

Bill Cosby appeals his sexual assault conviction, claiming multiple trial errors

"Of the sentence imposed on September twenty fifth twenty eight. Eighteen his defense team claims that the judge Steven O'Neill should have recused himself from the sentence hearing following the 2017 mistrial at ensuing retrial this spring. So they're looking to get this judge knocked out. They've taken issue with him publicly before because the judge which was sort of unprecedented allowed to pieces of information to be used against Bill. Cosby one of those pieces of information where the five women that testified against him to try to set up a pattern of behavior for Bill. Cosby that's typically not allowed in a criminal case, you have to take it for the incident that's actually being tried. And that's it. And then part two is that Bill. Cosby did he essentially testified against himself? He had participated in in sworn testimony. But it was two thousand and four and in it. He said that he had given women drugs. They use that against Bill. Cosby and so the the legal team for him. They're saying you can't do that. You have the right to remain silent under our system. Of law, and that Bill Bill Cosby, oops, slip shouldn't have been able to testify against himself using that testimony from before. So they're taking issue with the judge. We'll see if it works right now. Zarrella days in jail. Didn't he do part of a different case? It was from like it was from twelve thirteen fourteen years ago before they used it. And it was like a stretch to me, but the lawyers, you know, Manny go around. I know seems should all be allowed. But oftentimes, this kind of stuff isn't next person. In the news is Shawn Miller. Twenty four years of age resident of the city of San Francisco come up with a novel new way to help the city clean up a problem. And is a using the new media. It's the new in

Bill Bill Cosby Steven O'neill San Francisco Shawn Miller Manny Twelve Thirteen Fourteen Years Twenty Four Years Twenty Fifth
"thirteen fourteen years" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"thirteen fourteen years" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"I was reading this last night in preparation for this fan. Before I read this. I want you to understand the analogy that Paul is making about the church. He's saying the church is like a human body. And when you look at a human body every part of the human body has a specific function that it's the carry out. The I see the ears hear the hands grab defeat. Walk the leg. Support the body and on and on every part of the human body has a role to play. And you guys know I remember when I was playing football years ago, obviously many years ago, I was a thirteen fourteen years old. I was a quarterback for the football team. I've shared this before I was a quarterback for the team for one game in that particular game. I was three we attempted four passes. I pleaded three offer touchdowns for the other team. Okay. Not good. Could that wasn't my role on the team? But I can remember I entered in one particular game. And I went limping off the field, and I was living like this. You know, and the coach said what's wrong with you? What's wrong with you? Did your your ankle? No. Did you know what you hurt I elbow? Why are you laughing? I don't know that it really hurts. One one hurting. Harlan one part of the body human body. I'm talking about is not functioning. The whole body. Is.

football Paul Harlan thirteen fourteen years
Rose McGowan Opens Up About Being “Betrayed” By Asia Argento

Eddie and Rocky

01:01 min | 3 years ago

Rose McGowan Opens Up About Being “Betrayed” By Asia Argento

"Osceola is getting some flack from rose McGowan who is obviously one of the other metoo leaders apparently rose McGowan though had a hand in pushing the underage sex allegations to the forefront and into the, public eye because. Her boyfriend received a text from Ossetia that confirmed that, she did have underage sex with, the, boy, in question Jimmy. Barrett he's destroyed and that would be too but she was she told. This male model, named rain who is dating rose McGowan destroyed. That same rain rain, rain hipster named anyway she was apparently getting unsolicited nude photos, of this kid. From, the time he was twelve which send a nose picture which Senator Specter's so the twelve. Core, a. Twelve thirteen fourteen year old boy? Is sending nude photos adult woman woman well nothing about it Yes which is where did all the mom and dad

Debbie Levada Rose Mcgowan Roseanne Popular Senator Specter Montana Ossetia Kentucky Young Hollywood Tim Allen Barrett Willie Osceola Jimmy TMC Chris Panama Hannah Twelve Thirteen Fourteen Year
"thirteen fourteen years" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

02:42 min | 3 years ago

"thirteen fourteen years" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Is true, and again it's a big dilemma because what happens your dog is still. Alive dogs, twelve thirteen fourteen years old in desperate need. Of grooming what do? We do I don't know to the honest, with you you really have to play it. By ear you have to go by the individual dog in a lot of cases you just, have to, you know what's the worst of? Two evils the dog either doesn't get groomed or you risk. Serious injury does the dog really need to be cut or clipper burned? At, age fourteen you know what? I. Mean no, so again it's just it's a. Big dilemma groomers face this. Every day I want to address this problem because I know that we've gone, through many many times. A lot a lot of cases you just have, to, say, hey listen I can't do. It now even though I've been grooming your dog for for the past. Twelve years I can't do it and, you know maybe he could try some other. Alternatives, maybe You know. Some sedation you could try everything tried to get. Give the dog and aspirin kind of thing. Where you, know that they're not helping with their arthritis and sometimes these things do. Work but, all too often they don't so it's something. To keep in mind? When you're picking a breed to buy exactly, good point yeah yeah honestly because we see. It all the time and the day comes whether you like it or not it's how it, works you, dogs gonna get very old in? It's not gonna happen right away but you're bijon is going. To be awesome when you first get it and everything but it's gonna? Get, very old and you're going? To. Struggle with, the grooming and this everything that. We're talking about a lot. More with a dog that requires that much grooming throughout its life as opposed, to a short coated. Dog where down the line yeah he's going to, be, super, old but all we do. Is give him baths in clip his nails anyway both things you could. Do at home yourself and now your, dog's not leaving your house also just not I'm not saying don't you know I, love Jones, I'm not, saying go I'm. Not saying don't do any high maintenance dogs but just keep that in mind no it's it's a good point when choosing. A Doug personally I feel that, you know if if you are. Going to pick a dog like a bijon or a Maltese or a poodle. Standard. Poodle these. People. Need, to, more than others have some grooming skills if you're going to pick a high maintenance dog you. Should you should really. Have or learn some grooming skills if. You have a French bulldog or, you have a you know a whatever a boxer maybe you don't have to have, many grooming skills but if you are going to pick a dog that requires a lot of grooming you might want to just keep in mind hey maybe actually learned some things learned a couple of grooming techniques and against the purpose of our show we?.

aspirin Doug Jones twelve thirteen fourteen years Twelve years
"thirteen fourteen years" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"thirteen fourteen years" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"Hostile and a high consequence environments would be where i spend most of my time so that takes about i don't thirteen fourteen years of training and then at that point still not knowing anything really really how the application of things work so it took another ten fifteen years for me to sort out making lots of mistakes along the way unfortunately we all do to sort out how the mind works in hustle and rug environment so that's just a quick little snip of where my training comes from which is allowed me to ask questions based on research based on framework based on you know staying on the shoulders of literal giants in the field of psychology so that's why when you hear these questions they are coming from a place not just you know like a random thought like oh let me ask you about something there's there's a hopefully purpose behind what we're doing in the whole idea behind these conversations is to learn from people who are on the path of mastery to better understand what they're searching for to work the understand their framework like how do they make sense of the world how do they make sense of people around that what is their perspective important of you in their world view and then we also want to dig and make sure we understand the mental skills that have helped them refine their craft okay how are you doing on nutrition and in order to reach optimal health eating well is important period there's no to questions about it yet the foundation of all health and performance begins not just with what you eat but the nutrients that you absorb and that you keep so slight deficiencies in even one or two or a handful of essential nutrients or your ability to absorb them can have a massive impact on energy and performance and quality of life and long term health and you know.

thirteen fourteen years ten fifteen years
"thirteen fourteen years" Discussed on WSRQ Talk Radio

WSRQ Talk Radio

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"thirteen fourteen years" Discussed on WSRQ Talk Radio

"That's that was the origin of instability we've taken it and we've had it for gosh i guess what's going on fifteen or at least thirteen fourteen years now that we've had it and throwing a a real good job with it and it just keeps growing in popularity is people learn about it and that's been a real good product force up until insta buying art narrowly this type of technology carpet binding technology was reserved to the professional the professional people because of the expense of the equipment that you need it to do this now so right am i correct yeah yeah not only the expensively equipment but learning how to run the equipment and then stocking you know all the the tapes and everything you need to accommodate all the different colors of carpet and you know what are we learning and training installer you know how to use it or possibly you know it would be a store or like i said a big workroom that would install this onto the carpet and so now there's just made it a valuable to all the do i do it yourself is out there with the internet making available just a couple of blocks away really makes it for a very chronic for today's market now how is is to bind actually applied in a what do you need to do this stuff in the buying gotta take a break because the bills i'll stay tuned right here that's the cagey contract with michael king fully licensed tested contractor and this is home talk usa oh would support your local independent hardware stores and garden centers yeah.

michael king thirteen fourteen years
"thirteen fourteen years" Discussed on View from the Cheap Seats

View from the Cheap Seats

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"thirteen fourteen years" Discussed on View from the Cheap Seats

"Yeah it's so hang on let me try some of this hang on hang on because here comes a dumb joke he fell the natural spring by chopping into a mountain you know what tastes like christie brinkley home gym joke all right your sweat off the back of that weird machine the home jim this is the final clip that will show today before we do special phone call and this sport and you it definitely is a sport is called in you it the innu it your poll championships are all in you it people these are grown people who should know better and they're still doing put for those listen home they put a ban it looks like string or rubber mastering from a package that was sent to you by someone who went and bought it and had it gift wrapped they wrap it around opposite ears and then they lean their heads backward to see who has a stronger year loeb it's the in you it years jim should be a mean that just says don't call us eskimos by the way okay i've been married for i don't know thirteen fourteen years i've never been this intimate with my wife what's going on right now is a level of intimacy couple's counseling this is what i wanted to twenty fifth anniversary here's the best thing shaking hands seems like such a step back alfred scott every single person what is she thinking about how she's never going to marry.

loeb jim christie brinkley alfred scott thirteen fourteen years twenty fifth
"thirteen fourteen years" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"thirteen fourteen years" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"You going to take it i would allow the car so thirteen fourteen year of course you're going to take it i think one should were ball fierce right exactly so yeah the and that that you never going to take away from them but now we got caught up in the the conversation of you can't spell elite without eli and he ally referring himself report i'm on the same level is tom brady and jain fans defending am from now the kingdom come i mean he's just not that caliber player but that's fine you could still be franchise quarterback and alltime great giant and not be tom brady jeff in jersey city good morning jeff lord daniel knew money most yes body armor anyway three creek issues when you're and if you can response to me i appreciate their your expertise tom quickly four on the giants i think um uh you said so many things guy gary simpson my uh winning he also all and everybody will forget so he's i stay on the high road they health coach keno and david sweb and keep up the class act and the giants will eventually like you said winning well uh cure all all in pretty chest as you said also one game at a time out beat denver next week i think that could crush the patriots out the last game this season now have not quite want they should be a most smashed the patriots um my question for you move.

eli daniel gary simpson david sweb giants denver patriots tom brady jersey city jeff thirteen fourteen year
"thirteen fourteen years" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

01:58 min | 4 years ago

"thirteen fourteen years" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"Are there may not be a better job in all sports the plane quarterback the dallas cowboys and tony romo had that gig for what thirteen fourteen years but he may have an even better gig now than he did then he's part of cbs's topped nfl broadcast team lama gymnasts again being under centre with that star on the saudi your helmet is about as good as he gets out argue the best job in all sports but it's not forever it's not four forever andrew and a reality with tony romo hurt and dak prescott stepping in and killing it the way he did in fact did not only was not forever but it was probably over in fact was so if you're tony romo and you know you've got this ambition and you're healthy and you want to end your career on your terms what do you do do you stay in dallas and backup or do you take shot someplace else enshrined chase that ring in maybe jammed the cowboys we're not giving you an opportunity to win your job back and he could've gone someplace else there is no doubt tony romo had other opportunities waiting for him on the field but i would argue when i did then and i would now while he had other opportunities waiting for him on the field none better than the one he had off of it with cbs and again this is mijas showing for the company you know if you listen to me or have pretty period of time you know that's not what i do a much showing for the company that scratches by checks because it could be cbs or it could be fox or could be nbc as it relates to somebody like tony romo think of the guys who have those gigs the analyst gigs the top analyst gigs there are few and far between those jobs are almost impossible to get because the guys who get them generally are very good at them and will do anything they can and to keep them as long as they can because they're amazing jobs think about it troy aikman chris coghlan's worth john madden back in the day schedule very good what they do and.

dallas cowboys tony romo cbs dallas mijas fox analyst nfl andrew dak prescott nbc troy aikman chris coghlan john madden thirteen fourteen years
"thirteen fourteen years" Discussed on The Tony Kornheiser Show

The Tony Kornheiser Show

01:57 min | 4 years ago

"thirteen fourteen years" Discussed on The Tony Kornheiser Show

"Right and they choked rice heartburn i i tell the entrance probably better boxer based on what we've seen a harper uh that that may be the case now apartment by the way for for four last you had a great night he were not here the other day and i don't expect you to remember this but for those of you who are listening i went to celebrity turn matt williams in the other day about tennis and he he just he wiz hands emotion me away he said no i i have nothing to say zero which is great podcast to turn to somebody who's i what he is a baseball play yeah and in his lifetime woody twenty 21 twenty twenty one twenty one okay so in your lifetime of watching baseball which probably the last thirteen fourteen years of watching baseball seriously these two guys maybe the best players they maybe the best players you'll ever say who would you take harper or trout i i mean i agree that i think trout is a more like guys like him more than harper because you know he's not harbour he's merlin these right i mean honestly like you said like baseball's entertainment i would differ take harper like i think he's more fun to watch based on how we performs and why does yeah i do to deliberately throws off his helmet hair and slit his exciting to watch a you're always know that like he can do some great whether it's hitting or some in the field i said yesterday on the show that i think i'd rather have trout i'd rather watch harper i think that's right you know yeah yeah yeah i i think i'd rats that's why i'm saying that they're really clear distinction about whether you're talking about is the my is the metal exercise here i'm a gm and on building a franchise or is it i'm a fan which city why wanna live in if i have to watch baseball hundred sixty two games a year i'll rather watch harper hundred sixty two games you i'm just a fan but that's a different question that if you're building a team let me get to kirk cousin another big story how did you pronounce that work a r k i think it's kurt the general manager and president pronounces it kurd is deliberately and then says it's because of his accent which is ludicrous it's.

matt williams tennis baseball gm general manager president harper kirk kurt thirteen fourteen years