40 Burst results for "the new york times"

Fresh update on "the new york times" discussed on AP 24 Hour News

AP 24 Hour News

00:42 min | 38 min ago

Fresh update on "the new york times" discussed on AP 24 Hour News

"The kinds of voter fraud. That are alleged as their justification. Garland says he will double staffing within the Department Civil Rights division and said the department would send guidance to states about election related activities. The A P 12 polar Surprises in photography for coverage of the racial injustice protest and the coronavirus is toll on the elderly. The New York Times received the Public Service award for its reporting on the pandemic. Big milestone in the coronavirus fight. Chicago is the largest big city in the country that's fully reopened. Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot made the announcement. It means an end to a requirement that people in Chicago wear face masks and most indoor places and lifting capacity limits. Stocks finished higher. The Dow up 13 points. This is a P news There's a new winner of Colorado's $1 Million Vaccination lottery. Stephanie Ward, come on down. We need some, you know, cheesy game show music or something. Governor Jared Polis made the announcement. Stephanie Wade says she, her husband and two Children had been talking about getting the shots. It started out that initially we were not all in agreement with getting the Covid vaccine. They talked it out, weighed the risk and the benefit. And, um You know what was appropriate for our family, and ultimately, we decided that, um, the benefits outweighed any fears that we had the decision to get vaccinated paid off for Stephanie Ward. This money is going to take a huge burden off of the both of us so that we don't have to continue to work two jobs to help support our family. There will be $51 Million winners. The state of Colorado is also offering 25 scholarships for students 12 to 17, who have received at least one vaccine dose. Ed Donahue. AP NEWS Spying on Congress. I'm Tim Maguire with an AP News been a Justice Department inspector General Michael Horowitz is investigating the department under former President Donald Trump for reportedly seizing phone data from at least two House Democrats in a search for leaks Amid House Intelligence Committee investigation of Trump's ties to Russia AP correspondent Mary Clare Jalonick. It is not common. At all for the Justice Department to be seizing data privately and secretly without the member's knowledge of members of Congress, And that obviously raises all sorts of questions about the branches of government and potentially a president and his Justice Department spying on members of Congress. Senate Democrats, one former attorneys General Bill Barr and Jeff Sessions to testify. A Chicago police officer has been arrested on federal misdemeanor charges for being involved in the assault on the U. S. Capitol. Carol Cheswick texted photos of himself inside the building while wearing a Chicago PD sweatshirt under an open coat. I'm Tim Maguire. Coronavirus update. I'm Ed Donahue with an A P news minute stocks finished higher. The Dow up 13 points. Illinois is lifting all capacity limits on bars, restaurants and other businesses. It means Chicago is the largest Big city in the country that's fully reopened. Mayor Lori Lightfoot credited the people of Chicago for getting to this point. You master, you got backstop, and now it's time for you to get up. Get out of the house this summer and fully and safely and enjoy the events of the best city on the planet. Data shows more than 68% of Illinois residents, 18 and older have received at least one dose. 51% of adults are fully vaccinated in Tennessee and North Carolina. Demand for vaccine is slowed down so much. Had given millions of doses back to the federal government, even though less than half of the total populations are vaccinated. Oklahoma has not asked for new doses from the government for more than a month. I'm Ed Donahue. AP News for Friday June 11th I'm Tim Maguire. A Justice Department internal investigation is underway into the actions of the top officials in the Trump administration's Justice Department as they targeted Democrats on the House Intelligence Committee in 2018 Soccer. Madani has more. The department's inspector general is investigating after revelations that the Trump arid Justice Department secretly ceased phone records from at least two House Democrats in a leaks probe. Intelligence Committee chair Adam Schiff and panel member Eric Swalwell say Apple told them last month, the department subpoena their metadata and received it three years ago as the committee investigated Trump's Russia ties subpoenaing lawmakers, Private information is extraordinarily rare. The Senate's top two Democrats are demanding former Trump attorneys General Bill Barr and Jeff Sessions testify. The Chicago police officer is charged with taking part in the attack on the U. S. Capitol in January, including part of a group that broke into a senator's office. Chicago Police Superintendent David Brown says the officer's name is Carol Cheswick. The fact that Chicago police officer Has been charge in that attack on American democracy. Makes my blood boil. Makes me sick to my stomach Jesuit, was charged with five federal misdemeanors. His lawyer says he's on desk duty after being stripped of his police powers. Nevada wants to be the first state to hold a presidential contest in 2024. A piece. Jackie Quinn has this governor Steve Cecil AC signed the law that would bump Iowa and New Hampshire from their leadoff spots in presidential voting years. Nevada wants the first Tuesday in February, but the other states would likely change their dates and the national political parties have to agree to the change. Nevada is sweating from an in person caucus system to a primary election day. This is a P news. Two people are dead and others on board a Greyhound were injured in a crash this afternoon on I 65 in northwestern Indiana. Police say the driver of a south beyond Chevy Tahoe lost control when the SUV was sideswiped by another car across the median and collided with the northbound bus to people in the Tahoe were killed. State police say some 50 people were taken to local hospitals with non life threatening injuries. Atlanta police chief Rodney Bryant says police departments across the country are seeing a wave of Retirements at the same time that recruitments are dropping, law enforcement and public safety coming under so much scrutiny and having so many challenges, Uh, we so significant exodus throughout this profession. The rate of retirement at some departments rose 45% over the last year as according to new research on nearly 200 agencies. By the Washington.

Carol Cheswick Mary Clare Jalonick Stephanie Ward Stephanie Wade Ed Donahue Jeff Sessions North Carolina 45% Tennessee Friday June 11Th $51 Million Tim Maguire Steve Cecil Eric Swalwell Jackie Quinn January 51% Congress Adam Schiff 12
Early Voting Begins in New York City's Primary

Purity Products

00:54 sec | 5 hrs ago

Early Voting Begins in New York City's Primary

"In New York City's primary election for mayor getting underway For the first time. The ranked choice voting system is being used with each vote are able to vote for up to five candidates in order of their preference. The city's current mayor, Bill de Blasio, says he's still undecided as to whom he will vote for as his successor. After the Democratic debate Thursday night. The mayor on his radio show says he's watching carefully, but thinks he and the vast majority of New Yorkers will not decide on who to vote for until the last minute. Most of the mayoral candidates say they do not want de Blasio endorsement. Meanwhile, the mayor does not think the residency controversy over candidate Eric Adams, who owns places in Brooklyn and New Jersey, is an issue in the race. He's a Brooklynite. He's a New Yorker is served the city in many different capacities. I'm Scott Pringle, double D. O R dues. In addition to the race for mayor, voters are also

Bill De Blasio De Blasio New York City Eric Adams Brooklyn Scott Pringle New Jersey New Yorker
Fresh update on "the new york times" discussed on C-SPAN Programming

C-SPAN Programming

00:42 min | 42 min ago

Fresh update on "the new york times" discussed on C-SPAN Programming

"That satisfaction with my own work. It's never something that I have felt. I always have a sense. That it could be a lot better. And that I really try harder. But I can say to you that when I was in Moscow for the first time as a reporter Which was in May 1960 I did feel a coming together. Of the knowledge that I had accumulated about. Russia. The language of the history, the culture, the economics all of that stuff that I have been picking up in college and in graduate school and working at the U. S embassy in Moscow in 1956 7. And the requirements of taking that knowledge and putting it into a minute radio spot a minute and a half television spot. And somehow I know that despite the compression Still to conveyed the reality. The substance honestly. To the American people is district. Good, so in a sense The two did come together. But never to my total satisfaction. I'd like to read you something and get your view of it are wonderful mutual friend and colleague Richard C Hotel. It offered the following description of Ed Murrow, Dick said. Even now, many years later, I think of Ed Murrow and superlatives, a skilled, tenacious reporter and a brave man, a fine human being. As a boss, Merle laid down no rules make no suggestions. As to style or content, he demanded only a clear and where appropriate, colorful presentation of fact, he was scrupulously fair, and his colleagues accepted his choices without complaint. He led by example, not command, Moreau's usually furrowed brow expressed a pessimistic side, perhaps to guard against indulging a nationwide audience that wanted good news. Yet when he smiled, it was like a sunrise. He knew his own worth, but was not arrogant or overbearing. He had a sense of theater, as in his stress on this is London as well as a Churchillian sonority that often marked his speech. Whereas physical bravery was matched by his moral courage that rang out in his television documentaries. His style was serious. Long experience at the microphone did not make him casual. He saw his broadcast as a service to the American people. An accurate depiction. Marvin absolutely that that is so beautifully. Stated only by somebody who worked with Morrow for a long time, which is certainly would take model that did he started with Morrow. We're back in 1944 in London. He was a Young, eager reporter who spoke German. We read war with Germany. And he wanted very much to persuade Morrow, who was sort of the bureau chief of CBS in London. Um, to hire it. And Monroe had a doubt about his Broadcasting capability. But he eliminated that immediately because he said to a friend. He knows What the story is. He knew the story. Like I can tell you that the first time I met Maru. Was in May of 1957. I have written an article for The New York Times Magazine, the best Soviet youth. I was in white a library on Monday morning in the library. You came over to me and said more than there's a guy on the phone named Ed Murrow. And he would like to talk to you. Returned to the library in and one of the stupidest sequences in my life and said Ed Morrow is not calling me Forget about it. It's obviously some quack. Just hang up on him. I want to know whether she actually hung up on him. But late that afternoon, she came back to me and said Barton It's that same ban, and he still calls himself admirable. And maybe you want to pick up the phone and talk to and so I didn't believe he was calling me. But when I heard his voice That magnificent voice. What a total jackass I had been. How could I not pick up the phone the first time? And I apologize to him repeatedly. And he said, Don't worry about that. Can you come and see me tomorrow morning in New York and my office at nine o'clock? I said Yes, sir. I'll be there and he answered, Professor. I'll see you. And that established that Professor, sir. Relationship that we have with each other. I was there the following morning, Mike, his secretary said to me is that walked in Mr Miller was very busy. You know, he's only got about a half hour. I said absolutely fine with me. We stopped for three hours. Beau asked me Question have to question about the Soviet Union. That Soviet youth Religion, their education. When they got married. Did they have an apartment? What was it like within Lewis? He wanted to know everything. About the Soviet Union, which was our principal adversary in the midst of the Cold War. Assignment. Russia is the second installment in the autobiography of journalist Marvin Kalb, and after we spoke to three was he put his arm on my shoulder as we walked out. They said, Oh, by the way, How would you like to wet proceed? Es It took me all of three seconds. I think that law to say Yes, sir. I'll be here and that is the way he hired me and takes description of him is so perfect. Because he did often look As if you carry the weight of the world on his shoulders, and he probably felt that way too. But he also felt that he had an obligation..

Marvin Kalb Ed Morrow New York CBS Maru Mike May 1960 Ed Murrow Monday Morning May Of 1957 Moscow Tomorrow Morning Cold War Richard C Hotel 1944 Barton Miller Dick Monroe Nine O'clock
New York PD Arrests 2nd Suspect in Shooting of 10-Year-Old Boy

710 WOR Programming

00:22 sec | 1 d ago

New York PD Arrests 2nd Suspect in Shooting of 10-Year-Old Boy

"R news second arrest as being made in the killing of a 10 year old boy in Queens last Saturday night 26 year old Ashram Loken is facing weapons charges in connection with the fatal shooting of Justin Wallace. He's not facing murder charges. Currently, meantime, 29 year old Joven Young was charged with murder in the case. The shooting appears to be over a dispute involving a shared driveway with a

Ashram Loken Justin Wallace Queens Joven Young
Fresh update on "the new york times" discussed on Bloomberg Politics, Policy and Power

Bloomberg Politics, Policy and Power

00:41 sec | 53 min ago

Fresh update on "the new york times" discussed on Bloomberg Politics, Policy and Power

"Of the Client Solutions Group over at Dell Technologies, Tim on whether we are continuing to use more PCs, laptops and tablets. As we increasingly moved to the other side of the pandemic, and some of us getting away from working from home, some of us still staying there. Well, speaking of what's going to happen in the future, we're also going to speak with Jamie Metzl technology futurist on a new fund in town, tracking the biology revolution, plus the Margaritaville lifestyle, courtesy of Jimmy Buffett and cultivated and followed by the disciples of Parrot Heads, You know who you Are. It's all now come into New York's Times Square. So to have a Margaritaville in Times Square and having had the Broadway experience. This is kind of the icing on the cake to take in New York today, the truth. First up this hour, though this is a voice we've checked in with several times throughout the pandemic. Yeah,.

New York Jimmy Buffett Jamie Metzl Times Square TIM Dell Technologies Broadway New York's Times Square Today First Margaritaville Group Parrot Heads
Revisiting The 1977 Dutch Train Hostage Crisis

Today in True Crime

02:11 min | 1 d ago

Revisiting The 1977 Dutch Train Hostage Crisis

"It was just dawn on a pleasant spring morning. When dutch marine commandos crept up to a motionless train. The cars had been the home of fifty one hostages for the past twenty days self malone gunmen guarded their captives who they hope to use as political leverage. The terrorists demanded that their pacific island home formerly dutch colony and under indonesian rule be given independence while the marines began boarding the train. Five jet airplanes dropped smoke bombs from above a journalist with the associated. Press was reporting from about three quarters of a mile away from where the train was located. He described what he experienced. The ground is trembling. They're firing a lot of firing. Everybody reporters photographers police. Army men are ducking down behind armored personnel carriers later it was estimated that over fifteen thousand bullets had been discharged by the military at the train. One of the hostages ought to j. tweaked woke up two gunshots and tried to take cover tweaked described the ensuing chaos to the new york times. We heard machine guns then. A horrible noise. I thought they were burning their way into the train. With acetylene torches or flame throwers later. We realized that they were planes. Flying over at the same time. Additional marines driving a tank stormed a small village school twelve miles away. The terrorists were holding another four hostages there between them. The two parties of more than two thousand soldiers and law enforcement officers freed fifty five hostages. The fighting six of the terrorists and two of the hostages were shot and killed. Some citizens wondered if such a dramatic show of force had really been necessary to finish the standoff but prime minister yoked and oil defended the operation in a radio broadcast claiming the government didn't have any other choice.

Pacific Island Malone Marines Army The New York Times Government
Bipartisan Senate Group Reaches Tentative Infrastructure Deal

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:36 min | 1 d ago

Bipartisan Senate Group Reaches Tentative Infrastructure Deal

"Group. Of centrist senators says it's reached a tentative deal on an infrastructure bill. A statement this evening from the five Democrats and five Republicans says it is in their words are realistic Compromise framework to modernize our nation's infrastructure and energy technologies. And it comes days after the White House ended a weeks long effort to reach a deal with Senate Republicans. The New York Times. Emily Cochran joined us earlier on w. T O P to answer the question. Is this the deal we've been waiting for? I think there's a lot of skepticism about this plan. Certainly it's a sign Of progress that they have reached a tentative agreement. The president had reached out to a couple members of this group to encourage them to continue the work. And it's important to note that the amount of spending that we understand that they likely agreed to about 579 billion in new spending is a lot closer to the one trillion number the president has pushed for. But in this Congress, you do need to see at least 60 votes in the Senate. But alone in the house, where there's a slim slim margin, and it's not clear that enough people will get on board because there is such deep divisions over how big this package should be. And how do you pay for it? Is it safe to call this infrastructure in the traditional sense, roads, bridges, airports and none of that human infrastructure that President Biden and some progressives really wanted. Yes, so that the group was careful not to go into too many details about the plan. They didn't give specifics. But my reporting shows that this will likely be focused on the core physical infrastructure that has traditionally been supported by members of both parties. I

Emily Cochran Senate White House The New York Times President Biden Congress
Trump Secretly Subpoenaed Records of Democrats on House Intelligence Committee

All In with Chris Hayes

01:38 min | 2 d ago

Trump Secretly Subpoenaed Records of Democrats on House Intelligence Committee

"Breaking news tonight about the trump justice department's abusive power to investigate its enemies new york times reports. Prosecutors subpoenaed apple for data from the accounts of at least two democrats on the house intelligence committee aides and family members. One was a minor all told the records of at least a dozen people tied. The committee were seized in two thousand seventeen and early twentieth eighteen including those representative. Adam schiff of california then the panel's top democrat and now it's chairman katie. Benner covers the justice department from your times is one of the bylines on this story and she joins me now on the phone and thank you. Katie on short notice for joining us. Just walk us through what we know here. Sure the investigation really begins in two thousand seventeen soon. After donald trump became president as we all know there were several stories very unflattering to him also involve the leaks of sensitive or classified information. Jim komi talking. About memo's how. The president had pressured him to drop an investigation to michael national security adviser news about michael finn in michelson conversations with the russian ambassador and whether or not there's a questionable story after story basically detailing things about the trump administration that were highly questionable stories about the ongoing russian investigation which about with new to the public and the white house was determined to figure out who was the source of these leaks. Now people in the all the time administration's best all the time but we also saw as as these leaks were on and prosecutor started to think that they were hitting dead ends that they just never really

House Intelligence Committee Justice Department Adam Schiff Jim Komi Benner New York Times Michael Finn Apple Katie Donald Trump California Michelson Michael White House
Did Attorney General Barr Expose Hunter Biden Story to Devalue China Blackmail?

The Dan Bongino Show

01:57 min | 2 d ago

Did Attorney General Barr Expose Hunter Biden Story to Devalue China Blackmail?

"We have the potential for an incoming government. With a prominent member of Congress. And his bosom buddy Nancy Pelosi. Along with the now president elect of the United States. We cannot allow the Chinese government to have a stack this high a cornucopia thanksgiving feast of blackmail material on them. Because ladies and gentlemen the whole essence of black males, you're going to leak information Other people don't have and you're going to embarrass them. Well, you can't blackmail somewhat about leaked information if it's already leaked it out there. You know if producer Jim and I were planning on robbing a bank and emailing each other and the New York Times got a hold of it, said Dan, We're putting these emails out in public unless you do x Y or Z. It's no good. If the emails are already out in public, that's not how blackmail works. So is it possible someone in DOJ bar someone else? I don't know. I can't get in their heads. But is it possible if not likely? Someone in DOJ said. We're going to have a big China blackmail problem from a nuclear powered enemy, the United States. If we let this stand, we better put this out right now, before these guys swear it again. Folks, these dates can't possibly be a coincidence. Read the headlines. Bill Barr is gonna going to leave the administration. December 14th exclusive. Chinese spy Targeted California politicians, notably Democrats, December 8th. Federal criminal investigation. 100 Biden focuses on his business dealings in China. December 10th. There's no way that's a coincidence. No way. These events had to be related bar had to see what was coming that we had people in the government and entering into the government, Joe Biden, who were compromise How do you get rid of the compromise? You put the information out there you reduce its value. I mean, you wipe its

Chinese Government DOJ Nancy Pelosi United States Congress Bill Barr New York Times JIM DAN China Biden California Joe Biden
The Tradeoffs of the Substack Hustle

Reset

01:45 min | 2 d ago

The Tradeoffs of the Substack Hustle

"So as you mentioned in one of your newsletters. You're sort of in the creator economy. Now which is kind of funny 'cause from by one version of it you've been creator economy pretty much entire life things and sell them and and do different gigs. I'm interested in your thoughts about it. Because i on the one hand think the creator economy is something rob walker's but doing a most of his his life and on the other hand Seems seems like a very cynical way to talk about exploiting teenagers for a couple of minutes on tiktok or selling you know. we're crypto projects. But that idea that the internet can allow people to make a living doing stuff. They're interested in by reaching an audience. That couldn't reach on their own without the internet is pretty appealing. And i'm wondering. Do you think this is a real different version of what you've been doing in. The passers is sort of a natural progression in. This just goes along with book writing and teaching in magazine article. Writing that you've been doing pretty much all your life. Well i think what i of also. I've my context coming to this both as a some longtime freelance writer. But also someone who's written a number of stories. About like i wrote some of the earliest back kickstarter nazi and of written about youtubers. And and all that stuff so it's been Subject of interest to me professionally for a long time and everything he said is true and like it's sort of all of the above. It's always all the above there. Are there are real success stories so what it comes down to him when it comes down to me what i think is somewhat different is just the control you know when you are a freelance writer. Even if you have a call in stretches on my life where. I had him for the new york times and another one for the new york times magazine.

Rob Walker The New York Times New York Times Magazine
The Aftermath of That Global Internet Outage

Talking Tech

01:59 min | 2 d ago

The Aftermath of That Global Internet Outage

"Listeners. Mike schneider here i'm brett. Molina and welcome back to talking tech. If you were up early tuesday morning than likely noticed. Several big websites like amazon read it twitch even usa. Today were down as part of a massive global internet outage the roughly hour-long disruption has been linked back to the cloud content company. Fastly saying it was caused by service configuration. That they've since disabled. That's right bread so most of us have not heard of fastly. But it's a san francisco based content delivery network or cdn now. Other big cd ends are amazon. Miami cloud fair and what they do companies such just the new york times. Usa today get hub. Pinterest and others is a thousands of computer servers around the us and around the globe where they cash or store content so when you click and want to read a story or page or watch a video. It's faster than if you had to go to new york or wherever the online site is in the physical world now. It's likely interruptions like this. What happened again and again. Because so much of what we do now involves cloud computing with everything from the software with which we communicate with our coworkers to our entertainment systems to on online delivery. And all these things we do on our phones now redundancy of networks having backup systems probably prevent outages from happening more often in the experts. I talked to about the situation suggest. That's a lesson we should all take personally for instance. If you only have important files on your computer or they're stored in the cloud you might want to add. Another layer of redundancy. So maybe a second computer holds copies of the files and they're encrypted or perhaps you store them on an external hard drive or usb memory stick and keep them somewhere not at your

Mike Schneider Amazon Molina Brett Pinterest United States Usa Today New York Times San Francisco Miami New York
The Dangers of Stupid Smart People, Demonstrated by New York Times' Mara Gay

The Dan Bongino Show

01:56 min | 3 d ago

The Dangers of Stupid Smart People, Demonstrated by New York Times' Mara Gay

"Mary gave us on with Brian Williams, and they had a really difficult time at math proving my point again. That stupid smart people are the most dangerous people in the world. He may have read a lot of books. They may have solid achievement, aptitude in their lives. They may have scored well on the s A T s. But at the core, they're really not that bright. You doubt me? Check this out. You see it as a possibility. If he wants to spend a billion bucks beating this guy, he could do it. Absolutely. Somebody tweeted recently that actually with the money he spent, he could have given every American a million dollars. Let's put it up on the screen when I read it. Tonight on social media. It kind of all became clear. Bloomberg spent 500 million on ads US population 327 million. Don't tell us if you're ahead of us on the math. He could have given each American $1 million and I've had lunch money left over. It's an incredible way of putting it. It's an incredible way of putting it. It's true, it's disturbing. Uh, Listen, I was not a math major in college. I actually thought pre calculus was pretty easy. I thought calculus was difficult. My wife has a reverse. She thought pre calculus was hard and calculus was easy. I'm not a math major, but I'm reasonably confident that Bath is way way off. Way way off because you could give you gave each American a million dollars. I promise you It's not 500 Million, unless you think there's 500,000,500 Americans. I mean, that's not the kind of math that should be really complicated, but they couldn't quite grasp the whole arithmetic concept on the air. These are the people out there clamoring for critical racism theory and more. Again proving to you the dangers. Stupid,

Brian Williams Mary Bloomberg United States
The Non-Fungible Photographer

This Week in Photo

03:01 min | 4 d ago

The Non-Fungible Photographer

"This discussion is about this weird thing. That's been in the news and all over the place called enough tea or non fungible tokens. So we're going to figure out we're gonna do a kind of a who. Why win thing around that and talk about and and let's with the grain of salt in the room right now just a year on a journey as well. You're learning more and more about this stuff and you don't purport to be an expert you purport to be someone who has made them and have more your further on the journey than probably the most the rest of us so we're going to pick your brain and figure out how it is where you are. You're essentially are canary in the coal mine. Right now acidly federick. Yeah happy to be happy here. Happy be happy to be your canary. Good good welcome. Welcome to the to the show. Man this is a lot to squeeze into about an hour here so let let's kick it off with just a little bit of background on on who you are as of taga for for folks that may not have seen any of the other interviews that we've done who is jesse dittmar and then we'll jump into. Nf tease after that for sure. I'm portrait photographer primarily celebrity portrait photographer working for the new york. Times washington post l. a. times i've been published in every major magazine publication. That's out there. And i'm working for other brands like hulu and apple for advertising as well and i photographed some of the. You know most influential and interesting and you know. Difference makers of our of our current culture from politicians to actors to authors and artists sends kind of anybody. You could imagine You know some of the big hitters like denzel washington and tom brady and serena williams injury yang last last week and You know all all kinds of people. Yeah so anybody can speak to this. You know you've got a lot of stuff floating around out there. A lot of a lot of images that are famous images that are inherently non fungible. Let's start there. Just the term non fungible token right. So you know my my. And i'm i'm playing the layman in this show right. I've done word or amount of research. So i i kind of understand a mask questions. From a layman's perspective. So non fungible is kind of the way. I see it correct me. If i'm wrong is something that is unique right so i am inherently non fungible because i am one of one frederik van johnson. I think on the universe right. If you believe in if you believe in multiversity there's infinite numbers of me but you know this in this reality. There's only one frederik van johnson. So i'm non fun learning as you're alluding to federick spacey real quick get get out there real quick even in the even in the first sentence of trying to explain yourself as non fungible.

Jesse Dittmar Times Washington Post Every Major Magazine Hulu Denzel Washington Frederik Van Johnson Serena Williams Tom Brady Yang Apple New York
CNN, Amazon and Other Major Websites Down After Global Fastly Outage

Wake Up Call

00:46 sec | 4 d ago

CNN, Amazon and Other Major Websites Down After Global Fastly Outage

"The New York Times. CNN Twitch British government. Hulu HBO. Max Amazon, You name it. They got various error messages this morning like Unknown domain. No, those domains are out there. But dozens of websites around the world went out this morning because of an outage at a cloud servicing company called Fastly. Fastly says it's investigating the issue and as of right now, Well, Fastly says. It's a technical issue. They still haven't said No, it was not some sort of cyber attack hack. So that's what we're going to be watching all day was. What was this? And how could one single company get hit? Take down all of these information sites will be following up on that right now Jim Ryan. And speaking

Max Amazon Fastly Hulu HBO The New York Times CNN Jim Ryan
Swaths of internet down, outage at cloud company Fastly

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 4 d ago

Swaths of internet down, outage at cloud company Fastly

"Numerous websites when offline today after an apparent widespread outage at the cloud service company fastly dozens of high traffic websites including The New York Times CNN twitch reddit and even the UK government's home page could not be reached San Francisco based fastly acknowledge the problem this morning and said and repeated updates on its website it was continue it was continuing to investigate the issue and then an hour and then an hour later and then an hour to investigate the issue and then an hour later the company said the issue had been identified and the fix had been applied but customers may experience increased Arjun lotus global services return vastly provides vital behind the scenes cloud computing services to many of the web's high profile sites by helping them to store or cache content in servers around the world so that it's closer to users I'm Julie Walker

Reddit The New York Times CNN Arjun Lotus Global Services San Francisco UK Julie Walker
State and Local Republican Parties Are Turning Ever More Toward Trump

This Week with George Stephanopoulos

02:03 min | 6 d ago

State and Local Republican Parties Are Turning Ever More Toward Trump

"January six dr day history of the united states cap president trump is spoken many times since we left office. And i don't know if we'll ever see. But i will always be proud of what we accomplish for the american people over the last four years in new hampshire this week downplaying his differences with president trump Over the course of their partnership president trump of course returned to the stage last night as well with that speech in north carolina. Talk about it on our roundtable. We've got rahm emanuel donna. Brazile wall street journal columnist jason ryan riley a senior fellow at the manhattan institute and author of new book. Maverick a biography of thomas sowell and former libertarian member of congress justin amash and carson let me begin with you. The new york times is an interesting analysis of president trump this where they call them diminished but dominating at the same time of course. He had to give up basically his blog this week. He's still has a hold on the republican party. You serve with a lot of republican members of congress. How do you explain it. What republicans do about it well over the last couple years. I've really seen it. Take off. When i first got to congress. I could see this nationalist sort of starting to swell and by about two thousand fifteen. It took hold of the republican party in in a pretty big way at first members of congress when donald trump took office were doubtful about him. They would make fun of them in private. They'd criticize him They'd insult him. Even i thought they going too far and i was a big critic of donald trump and i couldn't believe some of the things that were said about him and then around two or three years ago around the beginning of twenty nine or so. I saw people really start to shift and the party really became donald trump's party completely and that's going to be the way it is over the next few years. I don't think. I don't think we're going back to a different kind of republican party.

President Trump Rahm Emanuel Donna Brazile Wall Street Journal Jason Ryan Riley Justin Amash Congress Manhattan Institute Thomas Sowell Republican Party New Hampshire Donald Trump North Carolina United States Carson The New York Times
Wet Notes - 6-6-21

Scuba Shack Radio

07:23 min | 6 d ago

Wet Notes - 6-6-21

"This is wet notes. Scuba shack radio's news and information update for sunday. June sixth two thousand and twenty. One first up. I like give you a quick update from stewart. Coves dive bahamas stewart. Coves has moved to new location. In coral harbour. Coral harbour used to be home of dive dive dive in nassau scuba center. Both are now gone. Stewart just moved to this new property in the last month and he has bought and he has big plans for the place right now. The main building is under significant renovation. So he has constructed some temporary structures to accommodate divers while things progress. I had a nice chat with stuart on his plans to build out the facility. And make it a great place to do your diving. When in nassau we are really looking forward to seeing how everything evolves move when we get back there next year. Good luck. Stewart as you begin this new phase. I'm sure you will make it a world class diving operation in the may two thousand and twenty one edition of the divers alert network. Safety stop newsletter. They introduced the return of the dan tags. So what are they will. The dan tags are small round crafted aluminum tag. That can easily attach to your. Bcd you tag will be laser engraved with important emergency information. That will help in the event that something happens. The dan tag will include your name date of birth. Your dan membership number any specific medical information. You'd like to disclose like allergies or other medical conditions plus contact. They're pretty attractive. Bright red and are easy to order from the dan website. The cost of the dan tag is twenty dollars. Check them out at divers alert network dot org and go to their online store in personalized. Your tag a couple years ago magazine. Podcast did a series on ballast and it was hosted by allen. Kelsey well ellen is back with a new five part series called the sound aquatic the ocean and the antra pause the first episode debuted on may twenty fifth and will run each week through june twenty-first. This series is about the sound scrapes that scientists are recording the surprising ways that animals talking. Listen and how the cove nineteen pandemic triggered a quietness in the ocean that is renewing commitments to lower ocean noise. The podcasts are quick moving and entertaining. You can find them at hawkeye magazine dot com or on any of your favorite podcast apps. Oh and if you wanna know what andro pause means. The term refers to a global reduction in modern human activity and it was coined by researchers in june. Two thousand twenty article in nature ecology and evolution. Guess she learn something new every day now. Here's some discouraging news out of grand cayman and it doesn't have to do with the covid nineteen pandemic but rather about another disease outbreak among coral the stony coral disease or sc td. According to an article in the came encompass an isolated area containing disease was spotted at life off a smith cove. And that's along the south west coast and that's not good. The came in department of environment also reported infected sites amal along grand cayman's east coast the now suspects that divers and boat operators be spreading it although scientists are still not exactly sure how stony coral tissue disease spreads. If you look at the outbreak map you get the feeling that it could be divers or boat. Operators there are new disinfecting guidelines for local divers. Not sure how these will translate to us when the caymans open back up again as if we didn't have enough to contend with with covid nineteen now it stony coral tissue disease and our dive gear every day. Now we're learning about more destinations for diving opening up around the world. One of these locations is bon air. There was an article on dive. News wire from the bon air tourism department. That indicated that. Us flights will resume. On june fifth and the country is launching an island-wide health initiative american and delta will be resuming their wednesday and saturday flights from miami and atlanta. Unlike the bahamas of it appears that you'll still need an antigen or pcr tests even if you are vaccinated before entry and of course for returning to the united states. It sounds like you might be able to get these tests at the airport or at three other facilities on the island so even though bonaire will open. Be sure you're properly prepared. Hopefully in the near future you'll be able to travel without restrictions if you're fully vaccinated and finally here on wet notes. I just saw that. Bob ballard has a new book out and it's titled into the deep and memoir from the man who found titanic a couple of years ago. We met doctor ballard at the sixty fifth boston. Sea rovers clinic and his presentation was fascinating. Some sure the book will be equally fascinating. There was an article on cnn where they interviewed bob allard. And according to this article the book delves into some of the most defining moments of his personal life including the tragic death of his son. Ballard turned seventy nine in june and he said that depend pandemic. He had a lot of times on his hands. So he teamed up with christopher drew the new york times who's an investigative journalists to write the book into the deep by robert. Ballard would be a good one to add to your summer reading list. Well that's it for this edition of wet notes here on scuba shack radio

Bahamas Stewart Coral Harbour Nassau Scuba Center Stewart Hawkeye Magazine Smith Cove South West Coast Department Of Environment Nassau Tissue Disease Spreads Stuart Tissue Disease Kelsey Bon Air Tourism Department Grand Cayman Ellen DAN
Justice Dept. Says It'll No Longer Seize Reporters' Records

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | Last week

Justice Dept. Says It'll No Longer Seize Reporters' Records

"The justice department says it's going to stop trying to secretly obtain reporters records during leak investigations president Biden has said it's simply wrong to seize journalists' records and had pledged last month that his justice department would halt the practice the tactic has been used by both democratic and Republican administrations in efforts to identify the people sources who reveal classified information to journalists the policy received renewed scrutiny over the past month as justice department officials alerted reporters at three organizations The Washington Post CNN and The New York Times that their phone records had been obtained in the final year of the trump administration Ben Thomas Washington

Justice Department President Biden The Washington Post CNN The New York Times Trump Administration Ben Thomas Washington
NYT Reporter Said Americans Acted Like ‘Selfish Pigs’ During COVID, Unlike Chinese

The News & Why It Matters

01:54 min | Last week

NYT Reporter Said Americans Acted Like ‘Selfish Pigs’ During COVID, Unlike Chinese

"A new york times writer called Americans selfish pigs. In comparison to average chinese citizens speaking of china of who behaved heroically amid the pandemic this a former veteran writer for the new york times. Not and this was in an email to anthony fauci in february twenty twenty as the coronavirus pandemic was just beginning to become An international news stories so By the way this is he was fired from the times but he worked for the paper for more than four decades. He wrote to anthony. Fauci and sad Let's see i was just watching the hhs briefing online and thinking about an article. I read this morning. And bruce aylward description of what he saw in china and a lot of videos. I've watched on the south china morning post website they're doing great coverage he puts in parentheses And then he says you know to china. They behaved incredibly heroically in the face of the virus. Twenty-five thousand doctors nurses went into wuhan to help knowing they might die and by the way meanwhile in america people tend to act like selfish pigs interested only in saving themselves. How can i afford a mask. Where's my vaccine this morning. I read an appalling article from alabama and He says this behavior is unacceptable from From americans it's interesting. I don't think it matters much. And i know we only have a couple of minutes left. I don't think it matters much from this. Nypd for you know. it's like okay. He wrote for the new york times now he doesn't anymore. But i do think it is indicative of this greater push that we have seen during the pandemic that i think will linger on which is to call americans who want to prolong their freedom. Who wants to make sure that they don't see their freedoms go away to call them selfish and they want to condition you to think that oh well just engaging in your own personal freedoms that you have. Because you're an american is in fact

The New York Times Bruce Aylward China Anthony Fauci Fauci HHS South China Wuhan Anthony Alabama America
Etsy Buys Secondhand Clothing App Depop to Tap Into Gen Z

Techmeme Ride Home

00:43 sec | Last week

Etsy Buys Secondhand Clothing App Depop to Tap Into Gen Z

"Fz announced this morning that it is buying the london-based fashion resale app depop. I was not familiar with depop but apparently it is very popular with gen z. And apparently it was worth one point six billion dollars to quoting the new york times the cash deal which is expected to close by the third quarter of this year underscores the growing influence of clothing resale platforms more. Shoppers are turning to the second hand market for something cheaper and potentially greener as the overproduction of clothing increasingly adds to landfills. The trend appears to have been accelerated by the pandemic as more shoppers. Look to declutter wardrobes. Earn cash by selling their old clothes or set up fashioned customization businesses from their bedrooms

FZ The New York Times London
Kentucky Derby Winner Medina Spirit's Failed Drug Test Is Confirmed

Tony and Dwight

00:41 sec | Last week

Kentucky Derby Winner Medina Spirit's Failed Drug Test Is Confirmed

"Winner Medina Spirit may have to surrender is title after failing the second drug test. The New York Times reporting the horse was found to have had in the illegal amount of a drug used to reduce pain and swelling that test coming after the initial positive test post derby. The lawyer for the horse's ownership, telling the Times he's hopeful further tests will reveal the positive is due to other factors such as cross contamination. If Medina spirit is disqualified, it would only be the second time in the 147 year history. The Derby, a horse has been disqualified due to a drug test.

Medina Spirit The New York Times The Times Medina
Happier No Matter What With Tal Ben-Shahar

Live Happy Now

02:27 min | Last week

Happier No Matter What With Tal Ben-Shahar

"Week. We're talking with new york times. Bestselling author tau bench shahar. Who's new book happier no matter what looks at how we can cultivate hope resilience in purpose even during the most difficult times of our lives. Let's hear what he has to say. Thank you so much for coming back on. Live happy now. Thank you paula. It's great to be back. Well we had a wonderful reason to have you back because you've got a new book out and it's called happier no matter what one thing that i really like about this book. Is that right up front. You talk about covert and quarantines and how that affected us. So why was it important for you to write a book that specifically spoke to this time in our lives would happen soon as covert hits and new social unrest seemed like a world was or we were losing control over our world. Many people approached me and said you know what is the relevance of science of happiness now. isn't it a bit redundant. One of my friends went as far as suggesting that we quarantine happiness for awhile and in response to that. I wrote the book and the basic argument is that not only is the science of happiness still important. It's actually more important than ever. Yeah and so. Many people are thinking about survival whether that's their physical health. Are there mental health and you point out that happiness and those things are not mutually exclusive. The happiness plays a big role in that. Have very much so you know what would help to me articulate initially for myself and then for my students the importance off the signs that the relevance is actually a concept that was coined by seen. Todd in a seem is a professor at new york university and he writes about the concept of anti fragility anti fragility in other words the opposites affair fragility and what he does is essentially take resilience to the next level. So residents two point. Oh if if you wish specifically you know resilience is about the ability to bounce back. It's going back to where we were before to our original state anti fragility or resilience. Two point oh is bouncing back higher not going back to where we were before but going to a place that is higher better stronger than it was before. This is what resilience to point. Always

Shahar New York Times Paula New York University Todd
New York Times Columnist Invents False Moral Equivalence on Bill Maher Show

The Dan Bongino Show

01:03 min | Last week

New York Times Columnist Invents False Moral Equivalence on Bill Maher Show

"Again. Christoph is really not a bright guy. I mean, if you followed any of his work and all the propagandizing and nonsense, you wonder how these people candidly still are employed in the journalism field. But you see what Christoph does their creates a false moral equivalence. Well, you know, the Israelis have the Defense Ministry. The civilian area to Hamas intentionally fires deadly rockets into densely packed Israeli cities with no warning to kill innocents, people. There is no moral equivalence whatsoever between the Israelis that then fire back areas were rockets are coming from and give the people their firing back at warning so they can leave so that military targets are not killed. There is no moral equivalency there whatsoever. But notice how he did that. Another argument for propagandizing because all people remember is Yeah, but the Israeli theater, too. Fake argument. Fallacy.

Christoph Defense Ministry Hamas Israeli Theater
"the new york times" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

03:36 min | 4 months ago

"the new york times" Discussed on Acquired

"Yeah yeah. They need to prove that people your two and three are willing to make and that's a big jump to it's not a little introductory pricing is way cheaper than your two and three bracing so we think the f. cases how do they. How does this not work. They re by the red sox a reasonable way that this could go super south. Let's see. I mean. I'm tempted to say that they get their value aggregated arbitrage. Whatever you wanna say by aggregating and social networks. But i feel like everybody's learned that lesson like that's unlikely to happen very unlikely facebook's even paying them for content now they do have a deal. Yup i guess an f. scenario for the future for the times could be that like the hyper partisan environment that we've been in that this is just the beginning and it gets worse and worse and worse and worse and worse than there literally. Is you know no room for anything in the middle even whether you think in new york times is the middle of the not. It wants to be the middle right and that is just an untenable position. It's so funny like even today. I always thought it was a widely held belief that the new york times at least during the trump presidency was moderately that a common perception is that it's left leaning in this person who is left leaning was like what do you mean like they publish that terrible op. Ed with that Because tom cotton op ed. And they did all the stuff with hillary's emails. They got trump elected. Like they're not live. Why are you kidding me. And so like. I think there might be more and more a david. Exactly what you're talking about. What if the you gotta pick and there is sort of less room to be a or at least have a large addressable market as someone who's trying to be a centrist. Yep i hope that's not the case. Yeah me too for all of our sake. Yeah one thing. I do want to point out. That i thought was pretty interesting. Because i i got pretty deep down netflix's rabbit hole on. What do you have to believe to believe. This kind of looks like netflix trades. Around ten times they're trailing twelve month revenue and the new york times is only trading at about four point eight x trailing twelve months. And certainly if you look at revenue growth. A new york times doesn't have to be anywhere close to net flicks but if you're looking at digital subscriber growth and a very similar business model albeit probably smaller tam. It is interesting to see that the new york times is on a relative basis definitely undervalued Flex would assume the subscriber growth rate is higher than flakes good question. I think if i remember right. Netflix tries to grow revenue thirty percent year over year. And so i'd probably charts exactly to subscribers and times grew last year the lakers forty eight percent. Yeah so if you really believe that like you just ignore the rest of the business and you believe that revenue will catch up. It's a much faster growing distance than than net flicks with a very similar cost structure. Yeah interesting just just thought that was an interesting one to point out all right. Carl routes yeah carve outs. We haven't done carve outs in a while. We had we such super log episodes now like people..

Netflix netflix facebook twelve month trump forty eight percent today last year hillary twelve months three two thirty percent eight one thing four point Carl tom cotton Around ten times new york
"the new york times" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

02:57 min | 4 months ago

"the new york times" Discussed on Acquired

"Know you're just like dripping to talk about that. And i'm gonna talk about branding because rarely do. I think that a business has brand power. Ooh i like it. I like it like most of the time because it takes so long to build up brand power and so much trust and so much repeatable years and years and years of convincing customers like hey. I keep delivering on what i say. I'm delivering on that rarely. If you hold out you know the bottle of advil versus the generic like has invested a ton of money and time into winning that battle but like most companies especially tech companies that we cover on this show. Just don't actually have brand power. The new york times has incredible brand power. They can print things that i wouldn't even believe if some blogger printed it but it's literally the exact same story in the times one hundred percent. I will take that as truth. Yup well it's Tests is the same product. If it had a different name on the masthead. In this case would you value it differently. Yeah hundred percent. There could be the exact same words article In different places and it would be valued differently. Yeah this might be the clearest. I think example of brand power that we've had on the show far right like i pay for the new york times if it was a different mass and it was all the same articles like i probably wouldn't be paying for it. Joe totally okay. Scale economies interesting. Like i think the business has probably both iterations of the business had scale economies. Certainly the old school print newspaper business. Did because you need president distribution that worked to get your paper out. There does scale to support that you know good like printing paper and sustaining it. And then as we've talked about in the new school business You know this we keep harping on it but the salaries that they pay reporters in the number of reporters and journalists they employ By being able to amortize that across much larger subscriber base can certainly outgun any other organization out there yup total classic example is real else in here. This is Going out on a limb and may be tenuous as so often with this power. But i'm just wondering if maybe we might finally be able to make an argument for process power and my thought on this is that there is literally one hundred seventy year tradition and institutional knowledge of how to do high quality journalism in this organization started by family by like a single sort of you know shared value set people yup and could you say that that is so wrapped up in the organization that it can't be transferred out..

Joe hundred percent one hundred percent one hundred seventy year new york both iterations money a ton advil single
"the new york times" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

05:24 min | 4 months ago

"the new york times" Discussed on Acquired

"My verdict is still know that the new york times is not a tech company and even though the business profile and the the sort of dynamic that we just described definitely make it look that way the power inside. This company is still in the newsroom. Much like facebook has sort of products apple has designers. microsoft has pm's. Google has engineers. The new york times has journalists at its core with all the power and they've sort of brought in lots of people to be a part of the news room but like when we talked earlier about the business side being all non-journalists there still something to the fact that like the most important thing to the times is their brand their objectivity their ability to sort of like be discerning in this world..

Google apple microsoft facebook new york
"the new york times" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

02:19 min | 4 months ago

"the new york times" Discussed on Acquired

"Plus another one point six million to the standalone products digital revenue surpasses print revenue for the first time ever. They've retired all the debt. They buy back their headquarters. They have no debt on their balance sheet at twenty nineteen completely debt. Free completely debt free. They have all of this. Incredibly high margin subscription digital subscription revenue. That no other deuce organization in the world has they have multiples more subscribers than the wall street journal which is when you say that no other organization in the world has so that the new york times i think the today i think it's seven and a half million new subscribers. V closest one is the washington post was somewhere like two and then after that it drops real far the l. a. times has like a half million or less and like it goes on and on down from there and when you look at the number of subscribers that they ever had in print like ever in two thousand and two they had i think one point one million. The new york times was the number one print circulation newspaper at least in america only a million subscribers to the print edition so like they figured it out and just at the right time and then had this frigging unbelievable tailwind happen with with the trump presidency. Yeah and in the meantime like you alluded to in the hook at the beginning of the show they're hiring like all the best journalistic talent in the world to come right at the times and they're paying them more than anyone else because they can afford to because they've got essentially a netflix. Like business model at this point. Did you know that new york times average salary for a journalist is over twice that of the industry average. Yup i think the i think the average starting salary is over one hundred thousand dollars. It's like who thought in ten years ago that a news media a newspaper would be paying over one hundred thousand dollars starting salaries to journalists. Yeah it's definitely be to be congratulated before we dive into today and then get into the of this episode. Which my gosh. How are we not. We've brought a lot of analysis forward we want to think vouch..

america trump two thousand netflix today ten years ago one point new york twenty nineteen first time six million one million over one hundred thousand doll two a million subscribers seven and a half million new s times half million over twice number one print circulation
"the new york times" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

05:08 min | 4 months ago

"the new york times" Discussed on Acquired

"Effectively like free call options at whatever. The strike price is on the company for the future. And so how long does he wait before then deciding i am going to go pick up another ten percent of the time. Yeah i think he. I think he waits until the expiry dates which is a few years later but he does he exercises them and and he becomes the largest individual shareholder in the new york times owning about seventeen percent. He since trimmed steak a little bit. I think he's still owns thirteen. Fourteen percent right around there so kind of like a warren buffet. Type deal that that. He does Although i would say unlike at this time when buffet was investing in goldman and like harley davidson said and the like like those were solid companies. Like there's some real question marks around the times at this point in time february next next month the eliminate the dividend altogether so men family members must've been pissed that like doing buybacks for the last few years and now you just eliminated the dividend to save money In march they announce a two hundred and twenty five billion dollars sale and leaseback of a portion of the headquarters buildings so they just built this dam headquarters building and they sold it to w p carey and agreed to lease it back fifteen years with an option to buy back the portion they sold twenty nineteen for two hundred and fifty million dollars which they exercise so they now own the building again which we should say. This is actually like one of the savviest investments of all time by the times. Like if you think about this think about how much new york real estate especially class. A real estate appreciated between two thousand nine hundred twenty nine thousand nine hundred and the new york times sold these floors four only two hundred and twenty five million and they said a decade later in two thousand nineteen. We have the right to buy it back for two hundred and fifty million. That's really not much appreciation. I think. I think i found a source that said that they essentially bought seven hundred and fifty thousand square feet of prime new york office space at three hundred and thirty three foot..

thirteen harley davidson new york Fourteen percent ten percent twenty nineteen two hundred and twenty five bi two hundred and fifty million seven hundred and fifty thousa two hundred and twenty five mi three hundred and thirty three march two thousand nine hundred two hundred and fifty million new about seventeen percent fifteen years a decade later two thousand nineteen twenty nine thousand nine hund
"the new york times" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

05:23 min | 4 months ago

"the new york times" Discussed on Acquired

"Thousands so in nineteen ninety three. They purchased the boston globe before one. Point one billion dollars for the globe and i think they got a couple of small regional papers as well with that In nineteen ninety four they did. This is the other thing they did get into the cable network industry by buying a forty percent interest in the popcorn channel. If you've ever heard of the popcorn channel bed and we all made some mistakes in the ninety s dino was now seems okay well. That's i thought like popcorn channel. Maybe it's like an hbo knock offer something. This is a cable network. Its sole reason for existence. Was it showed previews like movie previews and displayed local movie times. Why the new york times invest in this is beyond me then in two thousand one. They team up with john henry in boston to buy a seventeen point. Seven five percent stake in the boston. Red sox so the new york times owns closed percent of the boston red sox. Yeah that's a good idea. i think didn't they also take a minority interest in fenway park itself. Yeah there was also part of the madness madness. I think there was like some kind of nascar team that they owned. Half of think they They bought golf digest. Golf world like a bunch of magazines like family circle snow country. I mean it was like yeah this is like what were they thinking. And and really like fifteen to twenty local papers. The santa barbara news press the press democrat gainesville 's paper i. It's like cap. Cities gone wrong. The amount of fees that investment bankers must have been making off the cells burger family at that point in time. Boy who in march was it was juicing the stock and it was jason revenue to be to be totally fair like the times today has less revenue than it had during this. Go go era hundred percent. They also acquire about dot com for four hundred ten million in march two.

forty percent march two john henry one billion dollars nascar Seven five percent fifteen hundred percent two thousand seventeen point march new york fenway park today democrat sox four hundred ten million nineteen dot com Red sox
"the new york times" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

04:19 min | 4 months ago

"the new york times" Discussed on Acquired

"Then flip it and start All the carriage debates and whatnot and you know. Hey we're gonna fox news from dido comcast if you don't write in and tell them veto upset you're going to be cetera. So this isn't credible. I i i knew this from working at news corp like that fox news was a great business. It is an incredible business so by two thousand two. So that's eight years after launch. Fis news is the number. One news. Work network on tv becomes number one passes. Cnn it remains number one every single week from then for literally nineteen th straight years until january of this year after the capital riots when they lost a lot of years like literally nineteen hundred eight years. It is the most watched news network ought american television. That is unbelievable. Yeah so whatever you think of fox news as an organization like for we're not here to judge one way or the other it brings in so this is fox's total cable network segment of fox. News is by far the lion share in twenty nineteen generated. Five point four billion dollars in revenue and two and a half billion dollars of so. That's like a fifty percent fifty percent ebitda margin. That's facebook good. Yeah i just found this so interesting lake in so many ways now. People think of the new york times on one end and fox news on the other end like even the new york times would absolutely assert. We are in the center and we are in in on no end totally but this is like an espn level business. That the times would have built something different. But i think they got into broadcast television. They're getting into the internet missing. The boat on the opportunity for cable news was huge. Here yeah it's interesting. I never if you would if you hadn't told me about all the diversification that new york times had done and you knew of it today just the way they are sort of single brand single pseudo. Single product company and said should the new york times. go into cable or should they have gone into cable. I'd be like no. That's not what they do. Is their core competency like barely do video on their website and their mobile app. Well they definitely shouldn't do that but clearly they were trying stuff and they were willing to do stuff like this and just it yup. Yup they frankly just missed it and d- did they miss it like one question i have is the times. Doesn't have it in to do something. Outwardly an intentionally partisan and so maybe they saw the opportunity but didn't believe that it was there for a centrist that good existed in does very well So i think it could have been different and it would. I think be very unlikely that the times would have said okay great. We're gonna make a cable network but we're gonna target liberals specifically right so it's certainly complicated but i just like i wanted to go dive into.

fifty percent fox facebook dido comcast today two thousand four billion dollars twenty nineteen two and a half billion dollars Cnn january of this year one question Fis news nineteen hundred eight years new york nineteen th straight One news one way single brand Five point
"the new york times" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

05:33 min | 4 months ago

"the new york times" Discussed on Acquired

"Nothing would crumble his foundation faster than family squabbles. Selfish ambition or short-sighted goals his successors would have to make money but not be enticed by would have to keep up with the trans but not be carried away by them would have to hire talented people but not people so talented or you go centric that they could become too specialists. Writers are indispensable as editors or or else they'll go start a sub stack. Yeah exactly thank god. Subject didn't exist in her. What would have done the times. We've go on indefinitely. He hoped towering over all individuals and groups in its employees and his family would work together. Repressing any personal animosity. For the greater good and if possible choose mates in marriage who would also be wed to the times. So how does he set this up. He creates this trust. That goes to if you gene and arthur and their descendants so we don't have the details of the legal documents of the original trust but it was recast a few times as generational transfer happen and i was able to get a hold of from the Proxy statement. I think from the nineteen ninety maybe ten k. Of the new york times. The proxy statement the some of the language in the nineteen eighty-six trusts there were then several trust amongst branches. The family but they were all linked together. This is what it says in the organizing documents of the trust. The trustees of each one thousand nine hundred six trust subject to limited exceptions described below are directed to retain the class b common stock held in the trust and not to sell distribute or convert such shares into class a common stock and to vote such class become common stock against any merger sale of assets or other transaction pursuant to which control the new york times passes from the trustees unless they unanimously determine that the primary objective of the trust which is to maintain the editorial independence and integrity of the new york times and to continue it as an independent newspaper entire here. It is entirely fearless free of alterior influence and unselfishly devoted to the public. Welfare can be better achieved by sale distribution bob block wait so it's it. It's primary purpose. The primary purpose of the family trust is to ensure yes then commission times to ensure one that the family continues down the new york times and two that the mission of the new york times to continue as an independent newspaper entirely feel is free of ulterior influence and unselfishly devoted the public welfare data is the purpose of the show so he sets this up so that all of his descendants in perpetuity the only way they can maintain the wealth associated with the times and their ownership of the times and all of the the dividends at the time but wealth. That comes with it is. I'm not selling it and by supporting this mission and so like anything that goes against..

nineteen eighty-six trusts two new york ten k. each one thousand nine hundred six trust one nineteen ninety
"the new york times" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

03:52 min | 4 months ago

"the new york times" Discussed on Acquired

"Set it up this way that each of the three of them had a vote because he wanted if a gene he wanted to essentially make sure that arthur was a good husband to her because she had the deciding vote between him and crozon to be a publisher which is like really weird and sexist and kind of strange but also like super crafty style building up of ox. we've done. This is not the only time throughout history but it will be the first sort of part of the new york times history where you sort of have to look at it with a squinty eye and go. Ooh that's a little bit of a black mark. Yeah so if it's so. She went to barnard and was college-educated. See double majored in economics and history. She was super super smart. As you would expect of like the only child of adolph ochs and it's hard to tell exactly what she wanted but some accounts say she did want to take over the times and become the publisher. Unfortunately that wasn't in the cards but she remained on the board of the company for pretty much her whole life. She lived to be ninety eight years old. She didn't die until eighteen ninety. And there's some debate on this people might know Audience does sort of nickname of the times is the gray lady. And there's multiple sorta origin stories of degree lady. Nickname wanted meat. Did it later become the good gray lady or where does good come in. Maybe that's part of it So i think the origin is the bank of england was called the good lady or something like that and so it's sorta borrowed from that. Some people say the gray came from like looking at the patriots. Bunch of gray data. Do sprayed it's a great paper. Became the gray lady. Alternatively if gene is the gray lady she was a presence on the board and sort of the link to ox and the Moral fiber if you will of the company for ninety years until nineteen ninety. It's crazy and this is really introducing the very first of many not necessarily outwardly contentious but inwardly contentious succession decisions. That happened the new york magazine quote continues from earlier. If gene being the deciding vote supported her husband thus cleaning a fault line in the family that was never repaired and that you can imagine generations. Go by this thing really starts to compound because there starts to be massive numbers of cousins. Who are you know the same way related to adolf that the people who ended up sort of succeeding adolf and you know five generations later. They're sort of the same amount related but there's not sort of the chosen bloodline to pass down the paper through and it has always been a male air that has become the publisher now to five generations. Even though there are plenty of daughters in the family so ox crafty lake. He is he sort of his. so gay. Talese the great writer from the fifty sixty s seventy s who actually worked as a reporter at the new york times for a while. He wrote sort of the definitive Book about the new york times in in i think he came out in nineteen sixty nine called the kingdom and the power which. I don't think the family loved like this one. I was reading the the trust from about right around year. Two thousand refers to the kingdom of the power. And i think he was always after we released. That kept it a little bit of arms length. Yeah so he writes about this. He says how long the times would survive would depend largely on. How will oxy's airs got along in the decades ahead..

ninety years five generations crozon each adolf arthur Two thousand ninety eight years old new york fifty sixty s seventy s nineteen ninety first first sort five generations later nineteen sixty eighteen ninety barnard three adolph Bunch of gray
"the new york times" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

05:30 min | 4 months ago

"the new york times" Discussed on Acquired

"The time until this. I'd apparently i did find this. The trask and the rest of the committee that was dealing with the bankruptcy of the times was in favor of a different plan to merge it like to basically unload the assets merged into a different paper. Wipe their hands clean and say look we got something for it and instead adolph's walking in here with like a whole different plan of like i am going to figure out how to revive this thing and make it great and of course. There is some wicked financial engineering. That he promises a that he really has to make the case of like you. Don't just it's not a cash by here like you're going to have to believe in in order to make this work. Yup so cleveland writes back with like a letter of endorsement and he walks in there with a letter of endorsement from the president of the united states. Incredible so the bankruptcy committee accepts his plan. He pays seventy five thousand dollars up front to the creditors which he also scraped together with borrow money because remember he owes one hundred thousand dollars right. This is the craziest thing. This guy buys the new york times he will eventually have a controlling interest in it and as it says in the trust. This is my passage. The yoko from tennessee had accomplished the impossible. He had bought the new york times using none of his own money. Amazing this the minnow swallows wail from when cap cities body bc hundred percent. So how does it work exactly. There's like seventy five k. that he quotes puts up. Actually he goes in like gets people in tennessee to put an upright. He'd like rounded up the money from some people in new york. Some people in tennessee. I think he waved around the letter. From cleveland to a bunch of people so that was a small part of the consideration. The other part is he uses salaries notes again of six hundred thousand dollars in debt to owed back to the creditors that they will pay off over some number of the coming years from prophets. He'll generate by running this paper. That has nine thousand subscribers in his bleeding. I think on the order of about half a million dollars a year at this point in losses. You can see why if you're trask or the existing bankruptcy committee. You're like i think we'll take the merger like this doesn't sound like any kind of guarantee this guy that no one's ever heard of. He's coming in from tennessee. Like you gotta sympathize with the original plan. Yeah totally but somehow he gets it done so he emerges with the new york times and he has just like one problem which is okay. How are you gonna are. You gonna turn this thing around okay. So what's the plan. What what's the play on..

one hundred thousand dollars seventy five thousand dollars adolph new york six hundred thousand dollars tennessee nine thousand subscribers hundred percent one problem about half a million dollars a seventy five k. cleveland president united states
"the new york times" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

03:48 min | 4 months ago

"the new york times" Discussed on Acquired

"Chattanooga times but he needs one hundred k. Like faster than four years. He's not gonna cut it. He does know he can turn around newspapers though so he starts putting out some feelers traveling around the country looking for another newspaper that he could buy and take over just like he did with the chattanooga times and we should say a key component to the success of him turning around the chattanooga times comes from the fact that chattanooga was this sort of melting pot of north and south and adolf really believed in that and he really believed in the chattanooga times as unbiased paper of the people representing a balanced view of the world and chattanooga was sort of the perfect place to pull that idea from totally very very very much. So that's when he hears he gets wind of the bankruptcy proceedings going on in new york for the new york times. And i he's like supposedly he's like. That's too big. Like i can't go. You know adolph ochs from chattanooga tennessee. I can't go like take over the new york times and at that point even though it was in dire trouble the brand of the new york times it was the best newspaper brand of the country. Still it was total definitely thought of as like the the paper but some mentors convince him that that he can do this so in eighteen ninety six. He packed up his bags. Hops on the train goes up to new york. Leaves his family behind running the chattanooga times and he scrapes together so the times in bankruptcy proceedings. He scraped together a plan to the creditors and to the receivers bankruptcy to take the paper out of bankruptcy and take it over. This is incredible. So he's like this this. I think he was late. Thirties at the time from tennessee shows up in new york. Kinda walks into the bankruptcy court has like believe me. I can do this and two convenient the thing about the the interbank transfer who no i. Don't he convinced a chattanooga bank to wire money to a new york bank so that if in new york people check to see like. Are you wealthy. He had a bank account with money in his name and to the chattanooga bank who he knew well he wrote them a personal check and said look. I'm good for it. I promise wire the money. I i don't intend to use it. That's a vase it's like there's incredible huckster stuff going on that he. He's sort of pulls got entrepreneurial. Hustle so did you find. Did you read about the other thing. He did to convinced the creditors of his legitimacy. You know this is amazing. so president. Grover cleveland the time like you as president had come through chattanooga. I think on his while he was campaigning. And as the leading newspaper publisher of the chattanooga times ox was on the welcoming committee so he got to meet grover. Cleveland was campaigning at you. Know he he kept his address at sixteen hundred pennsylvania avenue where to find him so he writes to the president while he's going to new york and he says he writes cleveland. He says i am negotiating for controlling interest in the new york times and have fair prospects of success. I write to respectfully ask that you address by return. mail a letter to mr spencer. Trask chairman of the new york times publishing company giving your opinion of my qualifications. Newspaper publisher general personal character. My views on public questions judged by of course the chattanooga times in other words say what you can have me as an honest industrious and capable newspaper publisher this incredible and he needed that support..

new york spencer grover adolph ochs Grover cleveland adolf one hundred k. Thirties four years chattanooga eighteen ninety six chattanooga bank two convenient tennessee times ox pennsylvania avenue sixteen hundred new york times Trask cleveland
"the new york times" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

05:57 min | 4 months ago

"the new york times" Discussed on Acquired

"York daily times Within two weeks of starting they hit ten thousand copies in circulation which is pretty great. Twenty six thousand in the first year then in september of eighteen fifty seven so six years after they start they dropped the daily and shorten the name to just the new york times still with hyphen. There would be oxygenated removed. The hyphen later but things are going well by eighteen. Fifty-eight circulations up to forty thousand. And then by the time. The civil war starts with the attack on fort sumter in eighteen. Sixty one circulation is at seventy five thousand. That's pretty good. Like that's i don't know what the population of new york was. At that time. I think it was maybe about a million or so maybe a little less so the ten percent plus of the city is taking the times at this point. Totally at this point to the new york times was a a little bit highfalutin like it was a. It was a newspaper for people who are tuned into business and politics and particularly more sort of politics so it wasn't necessarily for the every person yup and in particular in the north abolitionists in what would become the republican party. So okay this moment. This is like maybe the craziest founder story that we've had On this show in our five years of doing this so on july thirteenth eighteen sixty. Three the civil. War's been going on for two years since for sumter. But there wasn't a draft for the army and in july. The union government declares a draft and draft. Riots in new york city about. This people are really upset. Lots of people have family in the south. They may be sympathizers with the south This is This is hugely hugely controversial. And the mobs target the newspapers that are sorted the mouthpieces of lincoln and the republican party through the war. So a mob descends on the new york times headquarters building and raymond. Because he's buddies with lincoln he gets the war department to ship. A bunch of rifles and two gatling guns to to the times because they know this is going to happen and he'll like leads a defense of the building in the company. He hands out rifles to the whole staff. He's manning one of the gatling guns himself and he gives the order that if any of the mom tries to break into the building to fire it. Will these people. it's crazy. Nobody is no shots are actually fired but they do successfully defend the building The mob instead sends up the tribune in storming tribune's building totally totally crazy time. We hear about like a taxi doing something. That's seems a board. Think of henry raymond back in the day and for anyone who's seen gangs of new york. I think this is sort of that scene toward the end of the movie where the that is the scene. You can kind of picture where there's the frequent publisher of the new york times. Strapping a gatling gun to the front steps and protecting the paper like yet protect completely. That's after the civil war ends. Raymond passes away not long after eighteen. Sixty nine partner. George jones than over as publisher and continues running it in a fine fashion..

Raymond five years two weeks ten percent George jones july thirteenth eighteen sixty Twenty six thousand july about a million two years seventy five thousand republican party new york Sixty nine partner Sixty one circulation Fifty-eight circulations ten thousand copies two gatling guns Three up to forty thousand
"the new york times" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

04:19 min | 4 months ago

"the new york times" Discussed on Acquired

"In all cases where we think conservatism essential to the public good and we shall be radical in everything which may seem to us to require radical treatment and radical reform. We do not believe that everything in society is either exactly right or exactly wrong. What is good. We desire to preserve and improve and what is evil. We want to exterminate or reform. Of course. he's talking about slavery there. I love this piece so much. I think it is just not only. Is it an a beautiful little piece of writing but is pithy like at it captured so much of what their intent is in creating this this would become an enduring institution and sort of how they view it in such a pragmatic way. I'm excited listeners. We will link in the sources to to sort of where we found this. Or if you're listening to this more than a week after it comes out you can check it out in the transcript. But it's just like i want to have it framed and put on my wall. It's a wonderful is a beautiful statement. I think so. It's probably worth pausing here for a minute before we get too much farther in the story and explaining what exactly is it. That happens at a newspaper early. What are the various sorta departments here. There's really kind of two and a half pieces of any news media organization. Deuce papers included cable news television networks which we will talk about as we go along here and of course internet media news networks as well. There's the content side of the house sometimes called editorial which includes both news and opinion. And then there's the publishing side of the house. Which is the business side of the house. Advertising the circulation the managing of the organization and the company. So where does the publisher fit into this right so then the publisher so now back in raymond's raymond is both sort of executive editor. He's managing all this and publisher so the publisher is the running of the business managing subscription circulation advertising..

two and a half pieces Deuce papers both news raymond both
"the new york times" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

05:37 min | 4 months ago

"the new york times" Discussed on Acquired

"C could reach a whole new mass market so here we are in september of that year of eighteen fifty one the well-known new york journalist and politician henry jarvis raymond and his friend and former Banker and merchant. George jones embark on a new venture new newspaper venture in this brave new landscape and they published the first edition on september eighteenth. Eighteen fifty one of the new hyphen york. New york daily. All right rosenthal. You've made your point hyphen with hyphen. So who are these guys. so jones. As we said was a former banker he had also though worked as business manager at horace. Greeley's new york tribune which was then sort of premier paper in new york and that was where he had met raymond. Jones had family money and lots of connections about town from his wife's family. Do you know his wife's father's name. Ben you're not gonna get this. But i had to put it in here. His wife's father's no. I have no idea. Benjamin gilbert the well no. New york's really yeah really. I saw that it was got got. Include this here this research this so he puts up twenty five thousand dollars of his own family. Money to to finance this new venture they want to get to one hundred thousand dollars so he goes and he raises the other seventy five thousand dollars. This is a lot of money in eighteen fifty one from just you know some like casual family connections. He has like you. Know several members of the morgan family and up financing this like j j. Pierpont morgan yeah exactly. Wow as you do this shows up in like all these old stories like. I feel like everyone somehow was getting financed by j. p. morgan and these days totally so that's jones. He sort of the the business guy. He brings brings the capital. But it's really raymond. Who's the real force behind this. So who is who was henry. Raymond he was quite the interesting character as we mentioned he had worked at the tribune with your own switched where they met and that was the premiere sort of respectable penny paper out there as they were known for the one sent papers He had also been very involved in politics. And when i say very involved. I mean very very involved. Ben do you know what other organization henry. Raymond is well known for co founding. Besides what would become the new york. Times i feel like i should remember this from ap us history. But i do not. A little organization called the republican party of which he was a founder. What five founding members kind of incredible like this is this blue mind doing the research literally. He's known as the godfather of the republican party is also the founder of the new york times and all of this was happening concurrently. So what's it like a mouthpiece for the republican party in the early days well not quite okay. So before he jones decided to start the times raymond had actually left the newspaper business and he was a politician. He was a member of the new york state legislature where he was a member of the whig party at the time the precursor to the republican party. But he'd step down and then he decides to start with jones to start the times which they do but then shortly after raymond is running the times he is managing editor. He's the publisher like jones. The money but raymond is really running it While he's still running it. He goes back into politics leading up. To abraham lincoln's presidential campaign. And that's when he. Along with lincoln and also along with horace greeley from the tribune they in a couple of the people. Start the republican party and of course is abolitionism and the abolition of slavery in the united states..

raymond George jones Benjamin gilbert Raymond september eighteenth j. p. morgan one hundred thousand dollars twenty five thousand dollars Jones lincoln seventy five thousand dollars abraham lincoln new york Ben Eighteen New york first edition york united states five founding members
"the new york times" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

02:32 min | 4 months ago

"the new york times" Discussed on Acquired

"San francisco and we are your hosts for over one hundred years. You would have been hard pressed to find a better business in the world than an american newspaper. Each one had a local monopoly. An incredibly profitable advertising business and it was one of the earliest examples of a reasonably low marginal cost business. It's cheap to just print another copy of the paper. The newspaper business was for a long time. Warren buffett's canonical example of a franchise. Like the best type of business. You can possibly own indeed and this today listeners is. The story of the paper that loomed large over all the others the new york times today we peer into what i think is the oldest company we've ever done on the show founded over one hundred and seventy years ago before the civil war the times has seen the majority of american history and for the majority of its life. It's been controlled by a single family and for many of you a family you've probably never heard of. This is a family whose paper shaped the american perception of current events through world war one world war two vietnam. I mean really their newspapers shaped your perception of america itself and your parents perception and your grandparents perception you get it. It is probably safe to say that the five generations of the oxo's burger family has been the closest thing that america has ever seen to a dynasty after a century of near continuous prosperity. The new york times has seen an incredibly dramatic fall and then rise just in the last twenty years the internet and social media on top of it brought ruin to the entire traditional journalism industry in the late two thousands the new york times got to such a low point that they even sold their office building to free up some cash while they rented it back from the buyer roof. I can't wait to talk about that part of and yet somehow today they've been accused of being an -opoly in the journalism industry and they have more digital subscribers than they ever did in print and they employ the former editors in chief of buzzfeed recode and. Vox as columnists. So how did they turn it around. Who is this mysterious family. And what does the future hold for the new york times. Today we dig in if you love acquired and you want to be a deeper part of what david and i do hear..

world war one david Today Warren buffett five generations civil war San francisco today new york buzzfeed one over one hundred years Each one america one hundred and seventy years world war two vietnam american late two thousands single family last twenty years
"the new york times" Discussed on Skullduggery

Skullduggery

09:46 min | 1 year ago

"the new york times" Discussed on Skullduggery

"Editorial page as well or opinion pages well like I, don't see an incredible array of wild leftists and incredibly hardline rightwingers. They're like it seems to me to be pulling people gravitationally towards. What it uses a reasonable center now, no, I agree with you one hundred percent on on the way that Fred Hi although. He, did I think get a lot of criticism from the left for being a neo con, or for that for those pages to reflect the views of neo conservatives, which I think was unfair so I mean. Even. If you push toward the center, you're to in some ways you're going to get. You'RE GONNA get. You may get hit even harder by both sides. Let's talk about just for a moment as we wrap up here. The Philadelphia Inquirer because they're the offense was running a piece under the headline. Buildings matter to and look the point. Leave aside the headline for the moment which you know may not have been the most sensitive headline writing There was I. mean the point of the piece was there was indeed violence specially those first few. During these protests. To say that is not in any way to take away from the fact that there was legitimate outrage over what happened to George Floyd and legitimate outrage over the way African. Americans have been targeted by police, but there were I mean I live. I live in Washington that the on Sunday night a week ago. You know there was a burning. Nursery at Saint John's church. There were stores broken into not far from my home and looting that took place and I guess the concern is when the executive editor of the paper gets. Out Over perhaps infelicitous headline, the concern is that reporting core facts such as yes, there have been violence at some of these protests becomes expendable that perhaps that doesn't get reported because people are too intimidated about offending the woke brigade, so Richard totally reasonable for people to cover the idea that you can't cover the beyond vandalism at times, destruction of property, the idea that businesses and communities have no stake in the question of whether storefronts or shattered and inventory looted is wrong. It has to matter it has to be covered. It's part of the community and you see that. That not only from columnists in the Philadelphia, inquirer or stayed pillars of the establishment, but also some of the protesters themselves people who have fought for years to build up their communities to establish strong foundations on which to construct a strength particularly for people of Color, particularly for people in working class communities in neighborhoods, often ignored by politicians, they understand that the destruction of property and the the hitting businesses can have a real repercussion and last and endure, and we saw that in cities across the country in you know more severe and sustained rioting in say, nineteen, sixty eight. After the killings of the killing of Martin Luther King, for example and other places so. And other incidents I should say so. This is an important thing. They headline did suggest in the minds of reporters in the enquirer that somehow the paper was. Equating destruction of property the loss of life, but usually editors don't lose their jobs over a single mistake. Ben Bradlee fortified by Watergate. Doubt didn't lose his job over Jimmy's world in which Janet Cooke. invented. A A a a US tiny you know I think he's supposed to be seven years older something who was a heroin addict and built a huge project around this fictional person. That won a pulitzer that had to be returned about as big as a global embarrassment. A newspaper can get into Bradley. Had Reservoir of goodwill Bradley had A. You know a record to stand on? It rally also incredibly for about returning thing and and being contrite, even though its top leaders had essentially warned him ignored some warning signs that have been. Set off by some of the editors who had interacted with her on the project so I think in this case the question is, is this just some sort of French revolution where people who are being taken out to the Guillotine or You know an individual circumstances. Did people not have effectively the political capital and I don't mean ideological, but the the goodwill reservoirs of goodwill and trust within their newsrooms to survive the these controversies on this subject, and at a certain point, even beyond the merit if you can't. Read your newsrooms. It's not going to be useful for you to do it. That's different than saying that you should be fired or forced out over a single. A single mistake, the publisher Philadelphia said that she wanted to set the enquirer on a new course. Rethink the way in which the newspaper dealt with issues of race in light of the convulsions that the nation's going through for the past. You know weeks. And that probably This editor wouldn't be you know a a white male in his late fifties. I believe wouldn't be the best one to lead the paper this time well, I was GonNa say it is also the case with James Bennett who is otherwise an excellent journalist, did a terrific job editing the Atlantic magazine, and did a lot of good things at the Times magazine, but over the course of his years as editorial page editor. At The Times, there were a number of mistakes. There was Sarah Palin defamation lawsuit. There were a couple of columns by Brad Stevens that were controversial, so he may not have had the kind of certainly didn't have the kind of capital that a Ben Bradlee had. Probably is part of the story here. Cure I just think there's. A lot of this is generational journalists, instead of things evolving over time at the panel discussions that schools of journalism and public policy are sort of arguing things out in slack channels on text and on social media in real time, and you know I covered a story in Pittsburgh this week about a black reporter who was sidelined for a tweet, she did that sort of was flippant about the effect of looting in Pittsburgh comparing it to the aftermath of tailgating parties. That kind of trash the area around Kenny Chesney concerts. Pittsburgh and she was told by her. She couldn't cover the protests because she. She had shown her hand now turns out. She's the daughter of a retired State Trooper and retired probation officer, so it's hard to make the prima facie case that obviously she's pro looting, an anti law enforcement, but she's one of the very. She's one of a relatively small number of African. American journalists at the Pittsburgh Post Gazette. She was sidelined that same day. A white reporter was about a tweet. He sent out calling a man accused of looting by police. He sent out a tweet tagging and story. He wrote about this in which he called the man who had been accused a scumbag. And is that her said don't do that. We don't think that's appropriate, but he was not pulled back from covering issues, leading to protests, violence and vandalism in the wake and two days later. The Union pointed out this disparity thing. A white journalist was cautioned, but not punished. A black journalist was preventing prevented from covering issues about race and justice in her hometown. Pittsburgh and then what the newspaper decided to do to prevent the white reporter from covering the protests two minutes after the union left a meeting with top editors so. You're seeing you know that's an instance in which you know. These two journalists, one, twenty, seven, one, twenty, eight, both of them from Pittsburgh. Both of them felt free to sort of maybe show a little bit of where their heads are added a moment in a way that. Before social media, they couldn't do, but a reporters who had done so saying basically, Hey, there are times where people do violence and. y'All. Don't get that upset about it. Let's at least think about it. She was sidelined and remained sidelined a week later and I you know I, think that newsrooms are that newsroom is in tumbled as a result of this episode as well and newsrooms are kind of grappling with this issue in the leaders. Don't have control of the narrative I. Think is what I take from this rather than right or wrong is that leaders don't have control of its social media is giving an outlet for journalists in the rank and file to speak out and to find support. And I think it's very unsettling for those who seek to run these major institutions at this time. Well, it does sound like newsrooms across the board are a engulfed in tumult. Although I should probably say it's, it's virtual tumult since. Most people actually aren't in newsrooms these days, and it does make me wonder if that's a factor here. The fact is that nobody is actually sitting next to each other anymore. Talking these things out, but just hurling Bromides as we are, all want to do on social media might be contributing to it, but David I really WANNA. Thank you for your always helpful insights, and it sounds like you'll have lots of media issues to talk about on your next on point God knows. Thank you always a pleasure to join you. THANKS TO NPR media, correspondent and host of.

The Times editor Pittsburgh reporter Ben Bradlee vandalism Pittsburgh Post Gazette Philadelphia The Philadelphia Inquirer George Floyd Bradley Union Martin Luther King US Sarah Palin Kenny Chesney executive editor Saint John Brad Stevens
"the new york times" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

Slate's The Gist

07:05 min | 1 year ago

"the new york times" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

"Fighting with each other the place is a reflection that fight the same way that the Internet is this Weird Amalgam of the military industrial complex. Hippies like what like? They're sitting there protesting each other but quietly they're building this new thing. That's coming out you know and so I think that when you look at the tender rights fights you look at the gym be movement you look at all these different things happening in cities whatever the whatever the like trajectory will go on next is gonNA be. I think we'll look at this time as being like. Oh Oh wow that's how we got that thing but it'll be something when you and I can't even imagine right now because it just seems to strange so my point is I actually think that forty years from now somebody hopefully me can go. We'll go back and look at this period and the bay area at that time because I mean all the implications for democracy I mean who even knows the hall of these companies that are being created there and the effects. They're having on voting and social all. The stuff that were reconciling with every day. Whatever future we're going to have a horrible future. It might be a better future. I feel like we could see the seeds of it in this story. Yes I was thinking futures Better than you fear but worse than you wish. Well it's been my you know there. There are definitely points when you'd have been wrong but in general that's how it's worked out. The name of the book is Golden. Gate's fighting for Housing America. The author Connor Dougherty. Thanks so much connor. Thank you and now the Spiel man. Does THE NEW YORK. Times hate west side story when producer Scott Rudin announced. He was bringing the Leonard Bernstein and lyricist Stephen Sondheim musical Broadway in a new production directed by Ivan vanhove. You figure that everyone in the Times would give big cheer but everyone. There gave a huge sneer. Could it be yes? It could a new production. That's not very good but the thing is it is pretty good. According to most people have seen it other than New York Times not everyone but man does the times hated. I mean the New York Daily News called the show a gripping west side that you watch with both appreciation for the power of the young in love and a profound sense of all American doom. This is what Broadway can do when it focuses relentlessly in how it wants to make its audience feel the La Times said west side story blast back to Broadway kinetic bloody and modern to the core entertainment weekly gave it a b but the times critic Ben Brantley ripped it which is fine others did too. Anyway there's a new Spielberg movie coming out so if a show like this will give sorrow. You'll meet another one tomorrow. But it wasn't just the critic the main Broadway critic his appraisal. The new show has been subject to a torrent of negative coverage rotten reviews and outraged op eds. They've written to stories about the protests outside the theater aimed at the productions Bernardo Amare Roma. Sorry Roms are. When with the New York City ballet received naked photos of a company members? Girlfriend The New York Times ran and OP ED. That was against not this production specifically but the very idea of west side story being performed at all the headline let west side story and it. Stereotypes Dye sub. Had the latest Broadway. Revival can fix the painful ways it depicts Puerto Ricans the author their lights into this or any other revival of the show arguing quote these continuous revivals. Reinforce America's colonizing power to determine who Puerto Ricans get to be the Times Ran Brenton's main review calling the show a curiously unaffected reimagining of a watershed musical. And then it keeps. The drubbing wasn't complete and from all corners. They ran a dance specific review by Jia corless which decried the productions dancing as operating quote to varying degrees like wallpaper. Choreography doesn't make this west side story. Breathe there are other questionable moments. The review goes on as when the sharks jets position themselves on either side of Maria. Tony to pull them apart after the couple meets the gym it's an image embarrassingly more suited to an instagram post which is sad but fitting. This is an instagram show. The review which actually was I liked it was an insightful piece of criticism but I did think it also trying to start a rumble with a few of the other times critics. Who As documented? Load the show for other reasons. Jia Cordless wrote the production seems to be aiming for that cheesiest of words gritty cut to the Brantley review the irrepressible iconoclast van. Hove it was said would be taking a grittier roller approach. He wrote Gritty cheesy gritty. That's not witty. But shitty at you right by the way that diddy I feel pretty is not in this version of the musical. The opinion of the New York Times is obviously vital to a Broadway show so important that the publicity machine for this west side story took a straight news article written about the show and cobbled together a Frankenstein's monster of disconnected thoughts than bought a print ad which gave the impression that the New York Times said the show was quote gravity defying Daesh uncompromising passionate and beautiful. Some of those words are actually in many cases. Variations of those words did appear in the original times article but they were not applied to the show or the quality of the show itself. That ad did run in the New York Times lying about the New York Times and today the New York Times announced it was pulling that ad I guess. The producers of the show were desperate to see something less than scathing about their product in the paper of record and if they had to buy their way in with lies well they still thought there is a place for us. I'm not sure what's really happening with this. One Institution The New York Times on the corner of Eighth Avenue and West Fortieth and this other institution currently playing on the corner of Broadway and West fifty third. Is it a turf. War Isn't a culture clash. All I know is there seems to be a lot more to this west side story and that's it for today's show. Priscilla lobby is the associate producer of the gist. Where she's drawn the line so keep your nose is hidden. She's hanging signs saying visitors forbidden. But don't worry she's kidding. Oh wait hold on. And she ain't kidding. Daniel schrader just producer knows a boat. You can get on the gist. We ain't no delinquents. Were MISUNDERSTOOD DEEP DOWN. Inside of us there is good for a Debra do Peru and thanks for listening..

The New York Times producer New York City NEW YORK New York Daily News La Times Ben Brantley Puerto Ricans Connor Dougherty Bernardo Amare Roma Scott Rudin Jia corless Debra instagram Leonard Bernstein sharks Daniel schrader Ivan vanhove America