31 Burst results for "the New York Times magazine"

Unwanted Truths: Inside Trump’s Battles With U.S. Intelligence Agencies

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

04:36 min | 4 d ago

Unwanted Truths: Inside Trump’s Battles With U.S. Intelligence Agencies

"Us now is Robert Draper writer at large for the New York Times magazine. He's the author of several books including most recently to start a war how the Bush administration took America into Iraq Arbor draper has just published this landmark piece of reporting the Times magazine. It's called unwanted truth this inside trump's battles with US intelligence agencies among the scoops embedded here is news that. The. White House pressured the Director of National Intelligence to change and intelligence community conclusion that Russia wanted president trump reelected in two thousand, twenty, the intelligence director at the time Dan Coats said, no, he was then fired his successor signed off on the change, but he was then fired after one of his deputies briefed Congress that in fact, Russia is working to reelect president trump this year. Mr Draper I, thank you for this reporting for joining us here tonight to help us understand it. Thanks very much for your time. I've said a lot of words about the. Words that you have reported here and that you have printed. Let me just ask if I got anything wrong or if you think that I'm looking at anything the wrong way around. To actually think presences I did when issue two clarifications the I rooted in the most important is that I am not aware the Joe McGuire had anything to do with the alteration of the National Intelligence Estimate this all took place during his first couple of weeks on the job when his hands were very much full with Ukraine whistleblower incident as you correctly pointed at and so this really. Anthem it matter win the in I was approved on September the twenty six inch testifying on the hill all day long. So he wasn't able to cheer that meeting. So that's the first second thing is that You know they're a don't want the story to give anyone the impression that the intelligence community as a whole has been bent to the will of Donald Trump. There's still plenty of analysts in case officers who are doing very good work. The problem is that the people above them have been in the line of fire with the trump administration and had begun to water down such that the intelligence products do not have the integrity that they once did not mean saying black is why end up as down but they are saying things in a more equivocating fashion and we saw this most recently just out of this past Friday. On a no deny official release this election security report saying that for the first time did yes it did appear the Russia. Trump essentially the same breath saying that China in Iran. Favored Biden is if it were kind of a jump ball or something in that was working patient, you did not see before the trump presidency. I feel like I. Thank you for for those clarifications and for drilling down on those things in that way I feel like. When I read it, the beginning of your piece that Dan Coats was pressured to change the National Intelligence Estimate around Russia's intentions for the two thousand election and he said, no felt like, wow, that's that's really big news about Dan Coats to find out that that happened just before he was fired. Is itself a scoop. But then to find out that the National Intelligence Estimate. was in fact watered down in the way that the White House wanted under Joe McGuire. It it does seem like the sort of bending to the White House's will equivocating on things that aren't equivocal casting things in a way that doesn't you know is designed not to upset the president or put things in ways that he likes it does feel like it's not just pressure, but it's effective pressure that's actually working on the I say. Over sharing in. A. probably Rachel that the matter of. Russia in election security has been a sore subject since before trump's presidency and everyone knew I in the NFC in the West Wing and certainly in the intelligence community that to bring the very matter of Russia interfering in two thousand sixteen, it's likely interference patterns through the midterms and into twenty twenty an most of all that if they were trump would be to call into question the legitimacy of this presidency. That's how he would receive this and so because it was such an unpleasant thing as report out then chief definite Mulvaney and then national security advisor. John was a considerable lengths to to keep this completely off the agenda would get on the agenda for example, when it was a single in a seat meeting at relating to Russia in Election Security Pearson Nelson than the secretary of. Homeland Security didn't get five minutes into it before trump started interrupting her and asking questions about a wall along the Mexican border. So this has been a distasteful subject to him people around him have known that and they have adjusted themselves unfortunately accordingly.

Donald Trump Russia Dan Coats Joe Mcguire Director Of National Intellige White House Robert Draper Mr Draper President Trump United States The New York Times Magazine Writer Homeland Security Iraq Arbor America Rachel Biden Mulvaney Director
Can black journalists cover the Black Lives Matter movement objectively?

The Frame

05:01 min | 2 months ago

Can black journalists cover the Black Lives Matter movement objectively?

"Is a partisan for the press to say black lives matter news rooms across the country are debating the role that journalists should be playing and particularly when it comes to talking about race in America the twenty sixteen conversation with NPR's code switch then Washington post reporter Wesley Lowery had this to say about the idea of objectivity I don't like the word when we talk about how to be objective we begin the conversation with a lot like we did begin the conversation with the lie that we don't have biases and that we don't receive the welterweights right I strive to be fair and that means I have to interrogate my own biases that fairness means I have to go out of my way to make sure I'm giving a fair critique hearing the people who I know I disagree with journalists at The New York Times revolted over an op ed which many said threatened black lives that same week the Pittsburgh post Gazette barred some of its black reporters from covering the protests over fears that they'd be quote too biased and on the other hand just yesterday the news organization Axios announced that its reporters can participate in protests and that the company fund would cover bail for any employee who is arrested some news rooms across the country appear to be changing fast what could that mean for journalism as a possible to be fair and transparent without being objective I'll tell you this is a conversation that the one eighteen is having a lot and we should note that we reached out to NPR whose standards and guidelines we have bye bye but they declined to take part in the program joining us is Ricardo Sandoval Palos public editor for PBS Ricardo welcome to when I thank you thank you for having me also here is Nicole Hannah Jones reporter for The New York Times magazine covering racial injustice the call welcome back thank you the call start with you in the past couple of weeks past two weeks we've seen several incidents involving newsrooms scrutinizing journalists of color over their inability to be objective here's that word again talk to us about some of those incidents well we saying really three major incidents and and who knows how many others where journalists haven't spoken out about them but we have the case in Pittsburgh and that was where of course to black journalists wonderful one photo journalists want to print journalists were taken off of the beat to be able to cover the protests of the black journalist had posted on social media images of trash everywhere of garbage everywhere and said oh look at you know these looters and then said actually it's it's a Kenny Chesney the end of a Kenny Chesney tail gate and I guess her bosses thought that that was inappropriate to pull her off of the coverage we still have no explanation about why the photo journalist who is also a a black journalists was pulled off of the coverage and then go ahead of well tell me about what happened at your paper the senator Tom cotton's op ed sure so we ran online and op ed written by Tom cotton that was basically calling out for the U. S. military to be imposed on cities and states where the governors did not want that help in order to put down a protest that they felt were violent there was a huge pushback amongst journalists at The New York Times a book of more than a thousand journalists signed a letter put forth by our our our union I'm saying we oppose that in a lot of journalists went and spoke online about it and it was for it was for two reasons one this this editorial did not go through the proper normal fact checking process that any thing that appears in the time should go through but we also felt you we were getting kind of free space to a sitting U. S. senator to suppress their free speech rights of Americans and that that platform should not be given over in that way yeah that this would have been a news story and as a new story it would have been fine but not to allow to be a newspaper and allow someone to talk about using the military to repress free speech I was too far for many of us a lot of journalists were upset about that I remember waking up that morning looking at Twitter and just seeing the operate also the opinion editor James Bennet he resigned on Sunday how significant is that part local I'm you know it's complicated I I've worked with James Bennett and I certainly don't want to speak on kind of internal personnel matters but do you think that was necessary in resigning I I think he made the decision that he felt he needed to make we certainly we as journalists at The New York Times wanted this to be taken seriously yeah and it appears that it

Curtis Sittenfeld's New Novel Brings Her From Prep to Politics

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

08:53 min | 2 months ago

Curtis Sittenfeld's New Novel Brings Her From Prep to Politics

"I guess. Today is the author of the Sunday Times Bestseller American wife in which she painted a picture of an ordinary American girl a thinly disguised Laura Bush who found herself married to a president. It was long listed for the Orange Prize. As was her debut novel. Prep her other books. Include the man of my dreams sustained eligible and the acclaimed short story collection. You think it I'll say it. Her stories of appeared in the New Yorker Esquire Oprah magazine and The New York Times magazine her latest collection of stories to be published in the UK is help yourself. She's also the guest editor for the Twenty Twenty Best American short stories anthology. She lives with her family in the American Midwest. A brand new novel is rotten. And it's been described as bombshell while I couldn't agree more. This is a book that will demand. Attention Curtis Sitton fell. Welcome to meet the rices. Thank you for having me. You'll novel begins in one thousand nine hundred thousand nine. Is Hillary Rodham Graduates College? And it brings us right up-to-date in Contemporary America. But I'd like to go back to Cincinnati in one thousand nine hundred seventy five when when you were can you tell us about the second stance surrounding you alive? Oh my goodness it's funny. I'm so much in the habit of of talking about Hillary's lay right now. You'll warm familiar with that than with my own will. I'm the second of four children. I have a sister. Who's less than two years older than I am. And I would say a have not led a very personally dramatic life which might be why I'm a fiction writer instead of a memoir rest but yeah I grew up in Cincinnati. My parents are both retired but still live in Cincinnati and I have two sisters one brother my brother is actually holds elected office in Cincinnati. He's the he's a member of the city council in his third term. So so I guess. Different members of my family are interested in in politics in in different ways but I was very lucky to go to excellent schools in Cincinnati elsewhere. And I would say my family Sort of obsessive readers like we didn't it's not like we. All six sat around each of US feverishly reading a book of our own but there were lots of books in the House. We did sometimes read is a family. My mother was a librarian for a long time for you know middle school or junior high students so ages twelve and thirteen and fourteen and that strong feminist streak. That comes to your writing that being influenced by her. That's an interesting question. My parents have almost opposite personalities. From each other where. My father is very great Gary in very opinionated and my mother is you know I think she has strong opinions and viewpoints. But she's. She's not a very assertive per cent. And she's not she's not she's a very private person even even by saying this should not be. I think she'd rather that like I never talk about her. Other than you know maybe acknowledging that she exists described as relatively progressive. But you know I think there are some families where the children grow up going to protest rallies in that was not my family You'll schooling was obviously a hugely influential. In fact your first book prep which is I. Think long list for the Orange Prize loosely based on that. Would you say so? I went to a boarding school in Massachusetts. When I was I had just turned fourteen and it was sort of strange given you know the area of the country where I grew up. Which is the mid west and it was a little bit unusual to go to a sort of fancier elite boarding school on the east coast just in the sense that a lot of students who go to that school are more from that region and also the other thing is that. I was the only one of my siblings who went which I think sometimes makes people think that I must have been the most academically talented in fact. I was the least academically and by my siblings. Were all you know much more. Well rounded students like. I did well in English but I definitely struggled with other subjects so those a little bit. I feel like I certainly. It was privileged but it was also a little bit random or arbitrary that I went to boarding school and talking about coming from a different at least geographical background from the rest of the students. The story is sort of more than coming of age. It's it's more perhaps one could say it was about a study of of social class. Was that something that you found was very apparent there that it did feel different. This whole kind of I mean I think the thing that we all have this horror of being a teenager comes across in dairy well a particular field and that you didn't fit in that. I think I felt at times that I didn't fit in. Certainly I mean I would say that. It wasn't the main character in prep. Leave your experiences going to boarding school as more of a sort of class shock than I would say I did. And you know class is sort of the air. We all breathe. It's maybe especially obvious. Una Boarding School campus. But you know I think it's it's obvious everywhere you know. You can have a sort of exchange with a person like delivering a package to your house and the two of you could probably like assess each other's voices are accents and no things about each other's class or like defied that one of you is in a house receiving a package one of US delivering. The package also says things about class in our society. You know doesn't necessarily say very good things but I think the To like one yet like I was aware of class. And I don't think I was quite as much of a fish out of water as my protagonist. Although certainly I'm like erotic person was even more neurotic as a teenage you write about teenagehood again in in your next book. And I think we'll come back to that because it will say impacts on on the subject matter of Rodham but you went off to Stanford then and you studied creative writing night. You wrote the College newspaper. You registered magazine. What's being a writer? Always the the obvious career choice. Well I think writing was always really important to me and it was like from a very young age for about six or seven. I spent a lot of time reading and writing because I wanted to. I think it helped me make sense of the world and it held my attention and there weren't as many options on net. Netflix back. Then so entertain yourself a little more so definitely writing always played a huge role in my life. I don't think I grew up with the expectation that I would be a full time novelist. I think sometimes I thought I won't be a lawyer or as I got older. I thought you know maybe a social worker or an English teacher or something. I always the closer my adulthood. I think the more it seems like I would do something writing adjacent. But I just don't think anyone can count on being a fulltime writer as you know how they pay their mortgage and I mean going to someone as you did to study at the Iowa. Writer's workshop is no guarantee of coming out. The other end is a fully-fledged writer. But that does give you a better chance than most doesn't it's a huge success rate. It's a it's a wonderful program and I like I loved being there. I learned a ton but the the thing that people don't necessarily realize is not only. Can you go to an excellent writing program the Iraqis and after that you know not have a stable writing career you can be a writer who has had multiple books published in that. Still not the way. You're supporting yourself. And in fact new writing is my full time job. But that's that's an incredible privilege and it's not. It's not something I take for granted. It's very I know that it's very unusual on special. I feel

Cincinnati Writer Orange Prize United States American Midwest Twenty Twenty Hillary Rodham Graduates Colle Sunday Times Bestseller Laura Bush New Yorker Esquire Oprah Una Boarding School UK Editor Curtis Sitton Hillary President Trump America Massachusetts Netflix
I Live In A Slaveocracy

Toure Show

06:52 min | 3 months ago

I Live In A Slaveocracy

"Nicole Hannah Jones is a certified genius a spiritual warrior and a journalist. Who's trying to change America? She's the spirit behind the sixteen nineteen project at the New York Times which was a takeover of the New York Times magazine as well as an incredible podcast series as well as an upcoming series of books and Articles. All of which are meant to help us further. Understand the way that slavery and it's a long lingering effects have shaped so many aspects of America so widely so deeply that she calls America a slave. Crecy Nicole's also done extraordinary work exploring education and racism. She's an intellectual bad ass. Who's got a MacArthur genius? Grant and a job at the New York Times and a mind full of brilliant ideas. I mean I listened to her and she just blows me away. She's awesome and I'm so honored to have had her on the show. It's the Great Nicole. Hannah Jones on tour ACO when the sixteen nineteen printed project came out. There was this thrill among black people like walking around like caring and cling to it holding onto it and like is like so important. Did you feel that excitement when like people were finally getting their hands on it? And like this is so great. Yeah it was like most amazing thing my life really. I I mean I. I hope we were making something powerful. I knew it was important. But as you know that doesn't mean that people will respond to it in that way and The response far exceeded exceeded any expectation. We we had. What was the pitch that I made to the Times this because this came from you not somebody saying. Hey imagine something but you said No. Let's do something no I I I've been thinking about sixty nine thousand four very long time and I'd been on booklet for about a year and a half and The first thing I pitch when I got back from book leave in January. It was the project and The pitch was very simple We have I I I talked to my editor about it. And then we have a weekly ideas meeting For the magazine and I just brought it up at the meeting and I said that This August will mark the four hundred aniversary of the first enslaved Africans being sold into Virginia and that most Americans have never heard of that date and that I wanted to dedicate an entire issue the magazine to assess as the ongoing legacy whole issue. It's not an article now the whole thing because what I said was that the argument of the magazine would be that you can look across all of these aspects of American life capitalism democracy. Why would only western industrialized country without universal health? Care our culture our legal system that almost nothing has been left untouched by the legacy and I wanted the magazine to look at a modern modern phenomenon across America life and then trace it back to the legacy of slavery and that we were going to be able to make these connections in a way that they hadn't been made and really Do a project place slavery. Actually at the center of the American story and immediately Jake Silverstein. The editor in Chief of the magazine was Ike. Let's do it. That was it and I mean that has been took off from there. I mean what this specific project but it has been part of your genius at getting major media institutions to say yes. Let's do a major project on a very specific deep issue of racism. Right I I came to know your work with you to two major pieces of segregation for this American Life. Yeah and now this major multimedia project for the New York Times just for those of us who are in those spaces or entering those bases. How do we get a room? Full of white folks say yes. We will dedicate a ton of space to segregation or a ton of space to the Slovak crecy of America. When they know a lot of the audience will be like. This makes me uncomfortable. Yeah I think to be clear. It wasn't that big organizations always wanted to say. Yes sir working on these issues for almost twenty years and There were certainly times in my career. Where with a struggle to get my news organization to allow me to do. The work wanted to do. But I think what What I has the benefit of. I've been studying this for twenty five years. I'm obsessed with it. I read widely on the history of raise on the sociology of raise. I have always treated it as an investigative story. And Not Simply. Let me show you how black people are at the bottom of this indicator. Let me show you this Segregation exists because that's not interesting. People know that anything you measure black people suffer the most from it but I always make them. I'm GONNA show you the architecture of it. I'm GONNA show you the intention of it and it's going to be investigative and it's GonNa be surprising to people and I think that's what once you have success doing that. Of course it becomes easier to convince people to let you do it but I think what? My work is always surprising to. People like people are not surprised segregation exist but when? I show them actually. There was a thirty year decision by the Federal Government. Not Enforce Fair housing laws. You know when I can say actually. We don't have universal healthcare because we have fought back against social programs because we thought black people would benefit them for more than one hundred and fifty years. I think it's that of surprise but also really the rigor of the scholarship Racist one of those things because everybody has a race that everybody thinks they know dislike covering education. Everybody thinks they understand how public education should work. Because they've gone to school and when you can approach them With the argument that they never thought they never knew is shocking to them surprising to them. I've been able to to sell those arguments and then you also have to actually be able to deliver compelling narrative rigors scholarship Get people to talk to you. All of those kind of normal reporting things as well.

America New York Times Nicole Hannah Jones Crecy Nicole The New York Times Magazine Great Nicole Hannah Jones Jake Silverstein Virginia Macarthur Editor Grant Editor In Chief ACO Federal Government IKE
Science Is For Everyone. Until It's Not.

Short Wave

03:22 min | 4 months ago

Science Is For Everyone. Until It's Not.

"Way to support what we do. You're listening to shortwave from. Npr Brandon. Taylor was the kind of Kid who kept a rock journal and I grew up on a farm and so I would keep very detailed notes about my grandpa's like chickens that he was breeding I mean if this kid wasn't destined for a career in science. I don't know who some people go to college. And they're like what is my major. I never wavered The the biggest change in my life was deciding that I would instead of being a neurosurgeon. Studied Niro Chemistry like that was like the big gene wilder. I walked on the wild side so like for me my entire life. I thought I was going to be a scientist but today brandon is not a scientist. He's a writer. His debut novel real life came out this year and it was a big hit got written up in the New York Times magazine. So it's safe to say things are going well for him but Brennan says walking away from science was like walking away from religion science. Is this incredible amazing way of knowing the world knowing the universe unknowing meaning and in some ways? It's it's a Kenta faith in that way and it's also incredibly painful and fraud and difficult and so it is also a ken to faith and that Leaving Science was for me. It was a ken to burning down my life and trying to find a new world view because that is the thing that I built my entire life around. I didn't experience a single moment of doubt looking around the world right now. It's never been more important to have all kinds of good people in science and that's why we should listen to stories like Brandon's so today in the show. How years of being made to feel like he didn't belong forced brandon to make the tough choice to leave science. And why? That's not just a loss for brandon but for science itself. I'M MAT ISA fire. And this is shortwave. The daily science podcast from NPR. So Brandon Taylor wrote about why? He left science in an essay for Buzzfeed. It's a story that starts at the University of Wisconsin Madison where he went to study biochemistry. I got there in two thousand thirteen and I think from I mean from right away. It was again unhealthy situation Brandon was in his early twenties gay man and out of ninety or so students in his graduate program. He was the only black person I was staying with Three undergraduate boys and one of them kept using racial slurs with his best white friends. And in this like very casual way But then I also would be walking home at night and The the white boys on the on the sidewalks would also say the N. Word and they would like push me and say racial lights things so okay. That was in town. Science was supposed to be a refuge from all of that.

Brandon Taylor Brandon KEN New York Times Magazine Niro Chemistry Scientist NPR University Of Wisconsin Madiso Fraud Brennan
Emily Nussbaum: What I Wore When I Interviewed at New York Magazine

What I Wore When

09:34 min | 5 months ago

Emily Nussbaum: What I Wore When I Interviewed at New York Magazine

"For the most part all the women on this podcast were handpicked by me. On behalf of Glamour Women we find fascinating or nostalgic or brilliant or just women. We Wanna get to know a little bit better emily. Nussbaum was at the top of the list. Emily is the television critic for the New Yorker where she's worked since two thousand eleven and in two thousand sixteen. She won the Pulitzer Prize for criticism. Her voice is authentic and accessible and she's been described as a singular writer in two thousand nineteen. She released her first book. I like to watch arguing my way through the TV revolution. The book examines the changing landscape of television while effectively defending it as a medium with taking seriously it includes essays on everything from buffy. The Vampire slayer a show. That's been pivotal emily's life as well as the Sopranos Vanna Pump. Rules scandal true detective and sex in the city. Emily also tackles the question of whether a viewer can separate art from the actions of problematic creators in a timely me to ask a when I asked if she'd be willing to be a guest on the podcast. She seemed genuinely surprised saying she doesn't really consider herself a stylish person. I explained that the goal isn't to only feature quote fashion. He says that would be so boring. I'm so glad she agreed because our conversation was good so good in fact that we ran out of time and had to wrap it up just as we were digging into one of my favorite topics. Carrie Bradshaw not to worry. Though she still had plenty to say. I also asked emily to give her professional opinion on whether my mother and father were absolutely terrible parents for letting me watch twin peaks at nine years old which he happily did. Here's our conversation so I want to start by asking you. Which is what everybody that comes on this podcast. Which is what are you wearing right now? Oh I hadn't thought about this I I'm wearing black pants That fit well. Which is the difficult thing for me with pants. and I'm wearing some sort of gray tank top in a black sweater and a necklace that I really like that. I bought it a museum shop. That is where I generally buy jewelry And I don't remember where I got these things but they're kind of distinctive simple silver earnings during your earrings a lot. Yeah I like the erase striking. So I'm wearing good jewelry but I'm wearing completely neutral. What you wear to New York office kind of thing which is a black sweater and black pants. Oem Wearing kind of Nice sneakers wearing these these sort of Weird Green Corduroy Sneakers Love Them. And because the name of the PODCAST is what? You're going to talk about what you were when you interviewed for Your Job at New York magazine so I think this was around Two Thousand and three or two thousand four and at the time I was working as a freelance writer and I was writing for places like The New York Times magazine and doing both short pieces and long pieces. But I mainly thought of myself as a writer and Adam Moss who had worked at the Times was the new head of New York magazine and he was hiring new staffers and he called me to see whether come in and I thought they were gonNA call me to be a writer there which frankly and tells a different kind of clothing. 'cause writers are often shrubs But he actually wanted me to come in to interview to be the editor of the culture section. It wasn't something that I was sure I wanted to do. I was very ambivalent about it so I sort of winged it when I went in for my interview in a way that I don't normally for things and I'm convinced I got the job because of the clothes I wore which is true of almost nothing else in my life but I somehow put together an outfit. That was stylish showed my genuine uncaring about whether I got the job which is often the right combination for a situation like this and it was more stylish than I actually am so what I wore is dark blue jeans that fit right in for the period were sort of the right style gene because at the time they were kind of they had that sort of low weight but for for whatever reason I was actually pulling it off. Because I don't really have a body that works that great and that kind of jeans but I had good ones but the main thing is I wore. I had a a blue crushed velvet sort of waistcoat jacket that I had bought vintage that had silver buttons and my mom had given me these actually quite nice low ankle boots that were kind of a brownish yellow alligator skin or something that had stacked heels wouldn't stacked heels those two items actually looked good like they were distinctive. Strange Somewhat Bohemian. Downtown things and wearing pants always gives me a stronger sense of authority in a situation like this. I think I normally would have gone to a job interview honestly wearing an alien skirt a simple top jacket to try to look professional. But I think partially because I genuinely kind of didn't want to get the job or at least was doing it. I know that sounds almost disrespectful. 'cause it was such a good job but I was ambivalent embitterment about becoming an editor instead of a writer. So there's this part of me that was just like whatever like I didn't really rally right so I so I sort of magically managed to hit on this outfit. That kind of looked made me look way more downtown selective idiosyncratic and actively stylish and a young woman way and it went in and I have to say and like The other thing is Adam. My old boss and Hugo Lindgren. Who was also interviewing me They are guys who actually care about fashion in different ways and I walked in and I actually saw that they liked my clothes like this sounds stupid but the dumb way in which I was like. I've hacked this because so many things are stupid first impressions and there was this way in which because I looked kind of free wheeling and like I'm matched the part or something that helped anyway. I did get the job and initially said that I would take it for three months because we were just putting together the prospectus of the magazine and then ended up staying there for many years and Adam is an incredible boss. It all worked out. I never dressed like that again. I was GONNA say if he was hiring me in any way as you know perhaps delusional suspected that I was just sort of acting a role that worked for the job interview after that. I did not wear good clothes to the office. I did try to dress up a little bit. I went on a shopping trip with my I think he was. We were dating. I married my husband who's very stylish and has great taste and we were living in the West village and we went for this walk down. I think Greenwich Avenue had a couple of different shops and so I went out and I sort of went on a shopping trip to try to buy a few items. That seems like an editor at New York magazine would wear these items. When did you buy do any of the things were because I don't know brands but I bought some things that were kind of medium pricey and seemed like statement things I was never able to use them or put them together? But I do remember the first day I went in the office. I mean my entire impression of an office like that was like thirteen going on thirty hundred percent. I so I was trying to. I was trying to raise my game to ROM COM level which remind notion of medium also. Yes exactly the truth is I mean. People dressed in black in New York and a lot of people who are in fashion dress very neutral and the one time I ever wrote about fashion. I was really struck by the fact that I was like wait. This is not made up of butterflies like this is a lot of thirty to fifty year old women wearing black and like simple expensive chunky statement hearings or something. It's not a situation in which people are trying to stand out. Visually so are wearing off the runway necessarily says gallons and no. I think that's what people think of fashion back. I'm trying to remember what else I bought. And then at one point when I early in having that job I also attempted to have power lunch as a sort of a joke with a friend at Michael's and midtown because he's like a fun thing to do and on the way to that. I bought some bought some clip on earrings. That had on the way to the line. Yeah on the way to the lunch. I literally was like I'm GonNa like it but again it was sort of as a joke because my friend and I were like. We're now like media. People are power lunch area. They they were like strange. Chunky rhinestone earrings with red and blue stones in them that were round clip bonds rather than dangling or they were sort of you know punch in the face upper east side ish food jewelry of some kind so I remember. I stopped at the store. So those were my power. Close is basically what I'm saying for New York magazine. Are you somebody? Now that considers yourself AH shopper. No I actually don't like to shop. My husband likes to shop though so I often will go shopping with him and he will pick out things that are good and he's responsible actually for some of the best things that they own because I mean we'll go to a vintage store and he'll pick out something that I personally wouldn't have picked out because I'm just a highly pragmatic shopper. I just I find it boring. I don't like going through the racks. I don't like spending money and I also don't like searching for bargains so I'm like the worst combination of ten no India and I and I don't really enjoy changing and changing rooms and trying various things on and all of that kind of thing but I do like having some nice clothes so I go either with hammer or with my son. It's actually fun. I used to shop with my son when he was a little younger and then he would read things one to ten so that was fun. That's does he do that now? Yeah I mean he's he's we haven't gone shopping in a while I mean and also he's he's about twelve now so I don't think when he was eight he actually he's. He's much more interested individuals than I am so he he had a lot of opinions but he's also very enthusiastic so pretty much. No matter what I tried on. It was from eight to ten. So that's a good person to shop

Writer New York Magazine Emily Adam Moss Editor New York The Times Pulitzer Prize Glamour Women Nussbaum Hugo Lindgren The New York Times Magazine Carrie Bradshaw India Vanna Pump Michael
Leslie Jamison on Jenny Offill's Book 'Weather'

The Book Review

11:15 min | 6 months ago

Leslie Jamison on Jenny Offill's Book 'Weather'

"Leslie Jamison is here in the studio. Her most recent book is make it screen and make it burn essays which was reviewed in the book review last fall all but she's here now to talk about another book. She reviewed this week on our cover. Jennie O. Foles Weather Leslie. Thanks for being here. It's so wonderful to be here so you. Let's first talk about Jenny full. Who she is? Pearl Siegel staff critic for the Times. Were a profile of Jennie O.. Full in this this week's issue of the New York Times magazine but give us a sense of who this writer is. When I think about Daniel's work and why it matters and why I think it's really created aided the sense of excitement around so many readers I think part of it you know she writes about motherhood and marriage and things that can get lumped under the general neural umbrella term domesticity but she brings them to life in these incredibly razor-sharp ways and there shouldn't even be a but conjunction to that sentence right like wire wire those states of being not razor-sharp somehow but but sometimes they can get seen as softer sentimental and she brings both very different form and a very different tone to how how she writes about them and how she does justice to their emotional extremity? Now I'm thinking that we have to make a challenge to ourselves not to use the word but for the rest of this partnership. I think there we go that we're are GONNA fail so we'll just we'll we'll put that aside. This book weather is her third novel her. I was last things and then it took her fifteen years to write. Her neck spoke department of speculation which came out in two thousand fourteen and was one of our ten best books of the year. And I feel like that book really brought her to you. A wider attention perhaps not bestseller list attention but it was hugely critically acclaimed and beloved by readers. Let's start talk a little a bit about that book and why it struck such a chord and I think it's no accident when you said it was like fifteen years until the next book which actually sort of part of the plot of Department of speculation too. It's like there's a writer who is taking a long time to put her second novel. Part of I think you know my understanding from interviews. She's done. The story of that book has that it started as a much more conventionally structured novel and it sort of took her a long time to whittle it down to its really searing form which is a very a fragmented form where you feel like you're getting these absolutely essential bursts of exerience. I think her agent described at once as more like an x Ray than a body which I thought was such such an amazing evocation of how it works and so part of why it caught. Hold I think is that it wasn't it wasn't just very smart about feeling and it had this strong long hard and it's about a infidelity and marriage sort of preparing itself but it also it seemed to find a new language for feeling a new structure for feeling the guy I want to go back to that the fragments Manson the structure for people who've not Reggiani Oval. We should say this. Her books are really short. They're really really short but they are packed and yet they don't feel dense and part of that is due to structure and you use the word fragments. People use the word fragments or fragmentary or cones. Let's talk about a house. She structures these books because it is especially when department speculation came out in two thousand fourteen. It felt very different from what was being written and it felt very very different from the way in which a domestic novel was being written. You know it makes me think a little bit about the way that like Virginia Woolf would describe moments of being you know that somehow we have these moments where it feels like something about experience is intensified or crystallized on. I think Jenny has a real knack for like putting her finger on the pulse of those moment. So maybe it's just an ordinary moment like in this latest novel. where she comes home from the her narrator comes home from feeling this intense panic about climate aamot change and her sons playing minecraft noon? SORTA get like putty off of his fingers. Like it's not in a dramatic sense like it's that's not a huge plot point happening in that moment but she manages manages to find these ways that seemingly insignificant moments if you if you describe them so precisely and locate some kind of feeling what's happening in them quivering inside them. She does justice to it and the way that her books are structured. I don't think there are like us in this weather. There are parts. I can't remember if in Department of Speculation Stephen divided into chapters but it's these single paragraphs are a few paragraphs spaced apart on the page. So not not only. Is it a small book but it actually. I mean you could theoretically sit down and read it in a couple of hours I did. You did theory. You could sit down down and read it very quickly and one of the things that I think people then mistakenly assume is that. Oh you know sort of hastily written you get the cents though once you are reading it that not at all does feel something. That is very much labored over almost like poetry in terms of the precision of the ways in which the things that she's putting into those little sections as you pointed out it's often about the contrast in a given moment between something very granular and domestic and personal and then some larger thought. That's going on or something happening in the greater world. Do you think that was what was is so striking about department of speculation. The fact that she was doing not that she was taking something like a domestic novel. That was you know. Just as you said kind of a story of a Brooklyn Glenn Mother and infidelity and work life balance and these things that so many books are about but infusing in it these larger the issues. I think that's a really good point that so often. What makes these like short bursts? CLO- fuel incandescent our field. Charged is is that they're very granular. But they're also holding some kind of emotional intensity and I think when you're writing about something like infidelity where there's both the danger of somehow telling a story that people feel like they've heard before story that feels intrinsically melodramatic. It can really bring out the humanity of the story to pay attention to the granularity of of like a one scene. That's rising to mind from that novel is like the narrator after a conflict with her husband going to stay at a hotel overnight and and like preying on the carpet of the hotel floor. But it's like it's like that hotel carpeting that holds so much feeling rather than just like the larger obstruction of of infidelity per se. Or something and so I think it is that scale shifting that can happen in a space of a paragraph. Can that happen across the course the whole book. That's also really operative in this latest book. where the skills or even bigger because among other things about climate change is like one of the biggest skills yes yes yeah? Let's talk about weather and let's start start with what it's about even though you know as we think people are probably sensing when you talk about Jenny ovals work. It really isn't about plot. Yeah but what is whether yeah so the narrator of weather is a mother who years ago dropped out of a PhD program and it's working as university librarian and she takes a job job working for her former mentor. Who does a podcast about climate change? where she's answering all the letters that are coming in response to this podcast so there are a few different? There's the kind of plot of her I went to the overhauls narrator to answer my letters to this cast. I'm just kidding. I love answering your letters I would be. I thought you were GonNa even save answer my letters I was like I have a few letters. Live right Yeah I mean you know you have this narrators mother you have her as a wife wife you have her as a a worker and maybe a worker who feels a bit lost in the world. There's also for me. One of the most compelling plot lines in the book is about the narrators relationship with her brother. WHO's a recovering addict? He gets married and then has a a baby and her role in his life and her sort of desperate hope that he can put his life together. Other was a really moving strand among strands for me as well presumably. That's very deliberate. Bringing new life into a world that is in crisis crisis and feels like it's ending and I think that's one of the abiding emotional. Tensions in the book is like the the world is always beginning and ending at once. And maybe maybe there's something about that truism that has felt universal through time but it has a particular acuity now or the world is is it's ending he's send away by these factors that are at work but that dynamic of like yes the world is ending but also you wake up in the morning and you're touching base with your brother overtaxed to make sure he and the baby are doing okay that both of those are real on. Both of those are happening. I think we're seeing a wave of climate fiction and it's taking all of these different forms. Probably a most noticeably post apocalyptic and dystopia although there are also books like Richard powerhouses over story sometimes metaphorical Oracle sometimes very reality based feels different. Though I mean how does this differ from other fiction looking at climate and climate. Change for starters. You don't have that kind of like emotional. Buffer of the post apocalyptic landscape that emotional buffer mailing a strange way to describe a postal puck landscape. But it's like if the apocalypse is happening thing in Brooklyn Public School like that's the stage set for the book it feels more disquieting in certain ways because it's closer to home. It's not like Cormac McCarthy novel where a father and Zahn are like traveling the chart landscape like it's more immediate in that way and I think one of the challenges of writing about climate change is how to take this thing that is essentially on a larger scale than our minds can hold and how to make it a narrative we can hold. There's this moment early on in weather where the narrator is thinking about her son allies elementary school and she says the problem with the school is that it's not a bill on a human scale feels too large for these little children who are going into it and I I think in a way that lays out one of the aesthetic challenges the book right. It's like climate. Change isn't quite on a human scale but narrative is on a human scale. So how do you translate. How does she do it? Part of it has to do with what we're talking about a little bit earlier these questions of sort of scale shifting and simultaneity where you had these big questions of like the end of the world coming up either through the letters that are coming into this podcast or you know this narrator is doing what I think. We all do obsessive googling about lots of things where she's sort. I'm trying to see like how hot is it going to be in New York City and you know when her son is sixty years old or something like that and getting so freaked out by these numbers so you sort of have those larger questions that are always coming up against the interpersonal. TRAUMAS the books. So either it's like the obstruction of like how hot is the World GonNA get comes up up against the body of her actual son. She's imagining at age. Sixty or thinking about like the horsemen of the apocalypse. Coming in comes up against you know coming home ends ends giving the dog. His Lover Frog Toy. You know so the becomes on a human scale because we see a particular human with a particular life a particular brother who's giving bringing new life into the world that all of those abstract questions are hitting all of those granular

Jenny Writer The Times Leslie Jamison Jennie O Jennie O. Foles The New York Times Pearl Siegel Virginia Woolf New York City Daniel Reggiani Oval RAY Manson Cormac Mccarthy Brooklyn Glenn Mother Brooklyn Public School Allies Elementary School
How Could Hypersonic Missiles Work?

BrainStuff

06:48 min | 1 year ago

How Could Hypersonic Missiles Work?

"Today's episode is brought to you by the capital one venture card the capital one venture card you earn unlimited double miles every purchase every day and you can use those miles toward travel expenses like flights hotels rental cars and more just book and pay for your travel using your venture card and redeem your miles toward the cost capital one. What's in your wallet? Credit approval required capital one bank U._S._A.. An welcome to brain stuff production of iheartradio Hebron stuff Lauren Vogel bomb here at a meeting in Arlington Virginia in late two thousand eighteen. One of the Pentagon's top officials told an audience of defense executives that the U._S. is locked in a tight race with Russia and China to develop a new game changing weapon the could fly at many times the speed of sound in could be used to launch devastating attack upon an emmy in a matter of minutes these which was told by Michael de Griffin the Department of Defense Undersecretary for Research at engineering that of all of the technological marvels at the Pentagon hoped to create developing a hypersonic missile Dole was his highest priority. It's hard to understand why hypersonic missiles technology that could be deployed as soon as the mid twenty twenty s sounds like the sort of exotic menace that villain would dream up in James Bond thriller. We could get them to work. Hypersonic missiles could have the ability to fly and maneuver it speeds between five and twenty five thousand kilometers per hour at a range of altitudes up to one hundred kilometers above earth surface for our non-metric friends. That's about three to fifteen thousand miles per hour at up to. Sixty two miles high at the edge of orbital space these capabilities could make a nightmare to defend against them because they would be moving so fast that it would be difficult to predict where they were about to strike until the last few minutes before impact end because the missiles travel. It's such a high speed their sheer kinetic energy alone would enable them to wreak destruction without carrying any conventional explosives or nuclear warheads. There are different potential methods of attaining fantastic speed what approaches to fire conventional missile that would in turn release smaller hypersonic glide vehicle which would fly up into the upper layers of the atmosphere another approach would utilize a rocket or advanced jet engines such as a scrammed jet military visionaries have in contemplating hypersonic weapons for decades but it wasn't until recently the concept begin to see him close to fruition not due to anyone specific breakthrough in technology but rather due to a combination of progresses and political motivation. We spoke by email with Eon de buoyed a professor of airspace engineering at the University of Michigan. He explained to develop a missile. You I have to show that the platform can fly emission of interest that was demonstrated in the U._S.. In Two thousand ten to twenty fourteen by scrammed jet powered demonstration Asian flights while the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency or Darpa to flight tests of their H.. T. V. to boost glide vehicle ended in failure. Significant progress was demonstrated an important lessons learned in an overlapping time period the Pentagon and demonstrated longer range hypersonic vehicle capabilities and their conventional prompt strike program Darpa in the Air Force then partnered to mature many of the systems needed on a platform to make into a weapon as such as the guidance navigation and control materials. Dell's structures and rocket boosters but the U._S. wasn't alone. Interest in developing hypersonic capabilities Boyd said China was watching and learning and at some point started investing hyper sonics since two thousand fifteen it became evident that significant progress was being made that at least in numbers of flight tests conducted appeared to show China Outpacing U._S. efforts and in Russia where they've worked on hypersonic for decades like the U._S. also seem to have had recent successes but test flights in response to the Chinese and Russian progress the trump administration is pushing to develop hypersonic weapons as soon as possible and is requesting funding of two point six billion dollars for hypersonic research by the Air Force Navy Army and Darpa in its budget request for the twenty thousand financial all year the managing editor for National Security for the Center for Public Integrity. One are Jeffrey Smith reported in The New York Times magazine that spending on developing hypersonic weapons could rise to five billion dollars a year as the U._S. pushes to develop a deployable hypersonic or Sonic Missile System in the next two to three years though hypersonic missiles could carry nuclear warheads the missiles being developed by the U._S. will only be equipped with conventional explosives but they'll still be plenty fearsome as Smith wrote in The Times of quote the missiles function like nearly invisible power drills at smash holes in their targets to catastrophic affect. They'll impact their targets with a force equivalent to three to four tons of T._N._T.. According to Speth in some ways hypersonic. Like missiles presented different and perhaps even scarier threat to peace than present nuclear arsenals because they could enable a nation to launch a surprise attack and crippling enemies ability to retaliate leaving it helpless against the threat of nuclear attack. They'd be difficult to defend against I for a number of reasons their speed the fact that they fly in an area between aviation and spaceflight that we've never had to defend in and they're maneuverable meaning that have to be tracked throughout their flight with accuracy Boyd explained another issue quote put this class of missiles is not covered by any currently valid weapons treaty. This poses a number of concerns including the fact that the nation's primarily involved the U._S.. China and Russia do not have established protocols in place for the use of these systems finally only the potential for a hypersonic weapon to carry either a conventional warhead or a nuclear warhead means that a nation under threat wouldn't know whether a nuclear response should be considered that all means that in the near future hypersonic missiles could lead to a continuous atmosphere of hyper anxiety in which nations might be afraid to not strike first or to instantly launch a counter attack at the first hint of trouble or at the very least it could prompt nations to spend even more money on not just counter-attacks but defense measures. Today's episode was written by Patrick J tiger and produced by tyler playing brain stuff is a production of iheartradio's house works for more on this and lots of other military topics that are home planet has networks dot Com and for podcasts from iheartradio iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows.

China Pentagon Defense Advanced Research Proj Russia Darpa Boyd Arlington Virginia Jeffrey Smith Department Of Defense Lauren Vogel Dell James Bond University Of Michigan Eon De Undersecretary Speth Iheartradio Dole Air Force Navy Army
"the new york times magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:53 min | 1 year ago

"the new york times magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Welcome to all of it on WNYC. I'm Charlie Herman business and culture editor at WNYC filling in for Alison Stewart. Thanks for joining me today this morning. The New York Times magazine released its fourth annual music issue. The previous three versions featured twenty five songs at tell us where music is going. But this year, the magazine shifted gears a little bit to celebrate the top twenty five songs that matter right now and the artists behind those songs range from meek mill to Casey musk graves to Mariah Carey Grimes and Bruce Springsteen to break down the list, and what makes these songs matter. I'm joined by New York Times magazine story editor new baba who put together the magazines music issue that is out today. New welcome to WNYC, thanks for inviting me. So what does it mean for a song to matter? You know, that is that is a very general. And it was the same question with you know, when we used to sort of trying to prognosticate a little bit. And and look for trends, and where music is going. I mean, I think it's sort of a call that when we do this. We're trying to find things that that have some kind of grip on on on culture and in any number of ways. And that's sometimes a harder thing to find with music. It's like it's a very decentralized kind of world, but we're we're always looking for things that have have some sort of grip on the culture. And and when you say grip on the cultural, I is that the something about the music itself, that's tapping into something is it about political issues economic cultural. I mean, how do you define that in a way? I mean, I tell you any of these right? Some something that seems to represent something broader happening in the culture it always works. But you know, there's also, you know, when you say twenty five songs a matter right now, you wind up with like baby shark in there because it's sort of undoubtedly one of the things that is dominating. We're we're gonna talk about that one just a minute. But so here's one question. I have is that you started the this series a couple years ago, and you were looking at where music is going, and then you made this change to matter. Why why did that? Well, you know, I mean, I think the the the idea of sort of prognosticating, and like and picking out where things are headed is is always. It's a little bit of a risky game. Or it's very subjective. Right. As you're doing it. So I think we wanted to sort of hold ourselves to maybe higher standard of of like of isolating things that in the moment feel like they have some purchase on. But when you started into that your initial intent we'll look at where songs are going. And then as you started listening to songs this year, he began to say, wait, this is a theme. That's emerging more. This the artists trying to grapple with this with the things that matter in our society right now and everything that's going on. I think that's been there in previous years as well. Right. But there was something sort of pronounce this year that wrote about a little bit in the introduction of this issue that you know, it's become this sort of general tech for people of of all types and persuasions to just sort of acknowledged constantly that that thing. That things seem a little bit crazy right now. Save a little bit bleak right now. It. It's a thing that you deserve see universally this sort of sigh, and particularly I think among younger people who listening to a lot of pop music often the driving pop music. Who who have this ambience sense that things are living bit strange and bleak? These days. That's definitely something that you see a lot of grappling with. Yeah. You mentioned the word bleak. A couple of times there is at a theme. If I go through the list of twenty five songs that I might feel that that doesn't often sound very uplifting. But is that a theme you found a bleakness? Well, it's more like reacting to bleakness laying a theme in this because because the reaction for a lot of these artists, I don't think has been to say, let's make extremely dark or depressing or angry music or anything like that. A lot of them are really sort of looking for. How do you navigate a world that feels sort of high stakes and bleak and stressful and full of exile? There's sort of a recurring thing in here in some of the interviews especially that we did of people trying to figure out how do you create a space for yourself amidst that that feels like a healthy space? I mean when you look back on it. I don't how long did it take you put it together. I mean, you know, we spend months sort of gradually working up to it. And then a big big Russia. The big Russian. You have a moment to breathe and you look at this list of twenty five. Do you look back and say, wow, that's what we ended up with. Yeah. I mean, it does go through a lot of twists and turns in the process is you're figuring things out. So yeah, why the need to put together a list like this. Do you think? Well, I mean, I think it's a good tool for for looking across the world of music, obviously, not the world of music is an extremely Broadwood. But I think trying to sort of answer. This question is a good way to to see a good range of things and actually sort of take the temperature of a certain area of pop music without diving to specifically in any one thing. So let's let's take a listen to some of them. One of them is by meek mill it's called trauma. And I think this might be a good example of a little bit of this theme that you're talking about here about bleakness..

WNYC editor New York Times The New York Times magazine Alison Stewart Charlie Herman Casey musk Bruce Springsteen baba Mariah Carey Grimes Russia mill
Michael J. Fox reveals new health scare amid Parkinson's battle: 'It was such a blow'

KNX Midday News with Brian Ping

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

Michael J. Fox reveals new health scare amid Parkinson's battle: 'It was such a blow'

"Michael J, FOX has been talking about some new health issues. He's been dealing with Michael J FOX has been living with Parkinson's disease for close to three decades. But at some point recently, a new problem entered the picture with his spine. And he says he had to figure out what was Parkinson's. And in his words, what was the spinal thing in an interview with New York Times magazine Faulk says he started to fall more often doctors told him, even though the spinal issue was benign, if he left it in place, he could lose feeling his legs and have more trouble moving. So we have the surgery, but then he says he overdid it. After physical therapy fell and broke his arm. How'd you get nineteen pins and a plate put in FOX's fifty seven? Now writing a new book on his

Michael J Fox Parkinson's Disease FOX Faulk New York Times Michael J Parkinson Three Decades
"the new york times magazine" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

03:31 min | 1 year ago

"the new york times magazine" Discussed on WRVA

"So whether it's a physical, emotional or spiritual issue, you're facing Sherry will stand by ready to help sort things out. We'll be taking calls in this hour and next. Of you up old news this past week, which has been the pattern for the last year. Or so I saw several breathless stories about the secret Pentagon study project and the topics which were researched papers were written someone released a list of the thirty eight papers which were written by the team from bass part of the study commissioned by the DIA the Defense Intelligence Agency. And while I agree. It is big news and these topics invisibility wormhole star gates, and such those are fascinating subjects. They were equally fascinating. When the list was originally made public which was last July, July two thousand eighteen that's when the list was first released to the world confirmed by the chief scientist overseeing those papers and by the head of the Pentagon study. And by Senator Harry Reid who sponsored the whole shebang. But look if it gets another go round in the news media so much the better, maybe an eight months or a year or so it'll be news all over again, which is fine. With me. Speaking of Senator Reid. He's been battling some serious health challenges for most of last year as you may have heard. So he has not been available to speak to reporters about eight tip or al-sabah studies that were done for the DIA. But he's getting better contrary to what you may have read in the New York Times magazine. And as luck would have it. He gave his first on camera interview to yours truly couple of days ago to talk about among other things. UFO disclosure secret UFO studies, what the level of interest might be in this topic on Capitol Hill at a lot more in that news will be breaking here in Las Vegas in the next few days, including maybe a document or to to backup some of the things that Senator said. I will share that with coast to coast when the time comes and I'll tell you this much Senator Reid it said, he's pretty fired up about the larger issues involving UFO's and remains committed to reinvigorating the study of unknown aerial craft and related issues, which as we know go far beyond just the nuts and bolts of UFO tech, or even the so-called meta materials that are rumored to be undergoing testing as we speak our webmaster tonight, Gregg Bishop, and I have pulled together our usual assortment of items and oddities, we call it. Naps news and included in tonight's batch is an article which overviews the whole meta materials discussion underway now by a friend of ours dandy Silva. It's driving the D bunkers nuts. All this talk about meta materials that might be from somewhere else. So I take great pleasure in mentioning it every chance I get also on the list tonight. A scientist writes about aliens, and God is there a difference to us in the long run could one supplant the. The title of this is called advanced extraterrestrials as approximation to God. And I would think that that is kind of a presents kind of a tough spot for scientists those who don't give either one much credence aliens or got we also have a story about humans who seem to have their own superpowers. Another about the carnage experienced in the south west during the government shutdown glass Ken lane about that later that and more in naps news. You can find it on the coast to coast website. While you're there, check out how to become a coast insider, the cost as you know, is pennies a day. If you subscribe for a year gives you access to a vast.

Senator Harry Reid Pentagon scientist Sherry Senator Defense Intelligence Agency Las Vegas Gregg Bishop Silva the New York Times magazine eight months
"the new york times magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"the new york times magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

"I think what many of the editors many of the more seasoned. Journalists are saying like don't go to Syria to learn how to be a war correspondent, you know. You can work your way up. There are you know, there are wars where the the sort of hostility is not all focused on the western journalists. You know, that is a case like in Syria where it's very dangerous to be a western journalist. You know, there's ice operating al-qaeda. They're all sorts of jihadi groups that have said, you know, obviously have made it clear that it's more dangerous for western journalists. I think we do, you know, news organizations do reprint and use the work of citizen journalists in the absence of any other people being on the ground. I mean, if you look at for example, Yemen Yemen is a war. I was just in Yemen for two weeks in September for the New York Times magazine, it's a war that is grossly under covered because it's almost impossible to get in. And it's also very dangerous. You know, the the Saudis in the the. The coalition have literally cut off the airspace. So journalists can't fly into Sunol to cover northern Yemen. You have to fly into Aden and make this very treacherous drive all the way north which is almost twelve hours making it very difficult and very dangerous for journalists to cover that. So we have relied on whatever comes out, whether it's from the UN or aid workers or whatever information we can get out of there. So, you know, I think there's a compromise. If there's nothing else coming out of there. I think editors do consider who's on the ground. But we have to put a disclaimer, you know, this is not a trained journalist. It's not a staff journalist were not positive how this image was taken. Let's talk a little bit more about of love more at one time wants to get to reflect on force. If you can is the process will most of putting together a piece like this. It's very different than regular assignment. And you'll sort of curatorial I has been trying to think you right millions of images. But how did that start? Did you have a clear vision for you wanted to include? How you tell a title did you learn by limb by doing was very very difficult. First of all, I didn't really have a vision. I sort of thought. Okay. Well, I've been photographing for twenty three years. I've never done a solo book of photography. I've sort of given bodies of work to certain compilations of photography, but I haven't done a solo body. And so it was a bit overwhelming the whole process, you know, I over the years, I've sort of pulled photographs and bodies of work that have resonated with me over time that I that I always kind of referred to when I do public speaking, those are the bodies of work I show. So those were kind of the spine of the book. That I felt like would be in there. You know, Dr for the war in Iraq, Afghanistan, the corn gall valley, they're all bodies of work that are in there. But then there other bodies of work like the drought in the horn of Africa in two thousand eleven that is a very special body of work. Meet that fell out that didn't make the cut..

Yemen Syria al-qaeda UN Sunol Africa Aden gall valley the New York Times magazine Iraq Afghanistan twenty three years twelve hours two weeks
"the new york times magazine" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

WCBS Newsradio 880

02:48 min | 1 year ago

"the new york times magazine" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

"You're never more than fifteen minutes from the big stories on WCBS. Good morning. I'm Cheryl Somali. Three things smell at eight. Fifteen one Florida with a long rap sheet is captured and accused of sending more than a dozen mailbox prominent Democrats he'll appear in federal court in Miami. On Monday FBI warning. There may still be more bombs out there in the mail system. That was quite a game the longest World Series game ever with a leadoff home run in the eighteenth inning and the Los Angeles Dodgers outlasting the Boston Red Sox three to to pull within two to one game eighteen innings again, the longest ever in the World Series and three right now broadcaster. Megan Kelly remains a member of the NBC family, but that could change following the ouster from the show that bears her name after those black face comments this week one day after losing her gig as host of the nine o'clock hour of the today show. Meghan Kelly's future at NBC is still up in the air. Her attorney said Friday negative remains an employee of NBC news and discussions about next steps are continuing. Whether she moves into another role or as quietly pushed out with her sixty nine million dollar deal remained to be seen once on the covers of Vanity Fair. The New York Times magazine, she's now without an agent her now former show without a host the network saying other anchors will host at nine Monday. Matt piper CBS news movement in the case of a former apprentice contestant who accuses Donald Trump of sexual assault. A judge has ruled some reserve us who sued Trump for defamation. Cannot force them to turn over evidence. About other women who have accused him of making unwanted sexual advances. The New York Times reports the judge says Trump must respond to questions directly related to service this allegation that he inappropriately kissed and groped her in two thousand. Thousand seven but the judge also says service had not demonstrated that evidence related to other claims had quote, any legitimate legal bearing on services lawsuit against Trump. Serbo sued Trump for calling her a liar after she used him of the unwanted advances. WCBS news time eight seventeen wild scene in an upscale restaurant on the upper east side and quite a star to go with it rapper goes by the name of Takashi six nine was having a celebration of all things celebrating that he would not serve jail time for making a video of a thirteen year old girl having sex they got probation. He went to Philippe Chow on sixtieth and Madison with his manager. NYPD deputy inspector Kathleen Walsh, says part of his entourage. Eventually tried to join them some males tried.

Donald Trump Megan Kelly NBC Cheryl Somali NYPD Takashi Los Angeles Dodgers The New York Times magazine FBI Philippe Chow Florida Boston Red Sox Miami Kathleen Walsh attorney The New York Times CBS Serbo
Rick Pitino says in interview that "I'm finished coaching"

Tony and Dwight

00:22 sec | 2 years ago

Rick Pitino says in interview that "I'm finished coaching"

"Last a little clipper is just a few seconds. Rick Pitino talking to Doug Gottlieb on Fox Sports radio late last night about his life. Now the same question, I'm asking me before wouldn't the heck are you doing you're no longer coach? And so I get up in the morning at five thirty I put on my gym shorts. And I have no place to go. So I say that because I do miss it terribly says you'll never go back coaching.

Rick Pitino Michael Sokolov Basketball San It Doug Gottlieb The New York Times Magazine Tony Dwyer Louisville Fox Sports Tom Jerry Eight Forty W
Trump Stories: The Apprentice

Embedded

06:39 min | 2 years ago

Trump Stories: The Apprentice

"My

Donald Trump Mark Burnett New York White House Barack Obama President Trump NBC Amazon Kelly Mcevers Obama Administration The New York Times Magazine Manigault Newman United States Sarah Sanders Twitter Jeff Zucker Omarosa Washington
Pot Breathalyzer: California Company Creates THC-Detecting Breathalyzer For Safer Roads

Weekend Edition Saturday

07:33 min | 2 years ago

Pot Breathalyzer: California Company Creates THC-Detecting Breathalyzer For Safer Roads

"Is weekend addition from NPR news I'm Scott Simon The group Nexium says its mission is to quote raise human awareness and. Celebrate what it means to be human based in Albany it's attracted wealthy. Clients over the, years and promised personal and professional development. But federal prosecutors say the group is a criminal enterprise several members, have been charged with sex trafficking, racketeering and other crimes and, this includes the group's, leader Keith Rene and Allison Mack the actress last week four more women were charged and fluting an. Heiress to the Seagram's liquor fortune for. More about Nexium we're going to turn to Vanessa Gregorio she's been. Reporting on. The group for the New York Times. Magazine this Gregorios thanks. So much for being with us thanks for having? Me, so what are what are they promise which alluring well Nexium on the face of it is one of these intensive therapy outfits. That offers courses maybe. Last a. Weekend or several days twelve hours. A day very wealthy. People were involved in this rate you. Could spend too Eight hundred three hundred thousand. Dollars on. Their classes no problem they claimed that. They could help people. Overcome childhood trauma, a divorce by integrating? Is what? They, called it those experiences into their lives and they were using a form of hypnosis to help people see their way through these, terrible events in their. Lives and. It worked for a lot of. People by many accounts Yeah and, I mean? It's it's tempting to see if there any illusions? I, guess both, with s and let's say even Scientology do you see any I think this is squarely, in the tradition of on, self help, and certainly there's, a secret side to, it much like. Scientology where we are, now learning that there were some things going on in. This group that were. Extremely unsavory like what according to, the federal, prosecutors in your, own reporting. Well you know it's clear that the, group was demanding fealty not only to the ideas that they had but also to the leader, Keith Ranieri middle aged guy lived in. New York. All his life they called him vanguard and they believed. He was some sort of all being so behind. The scenes there was also, a lot of you know he had many many girlfriends and in the last couple of years he was using some. Of the women in the group to bring other women too His bed with what we think are pretty coercive tactics which, of course of tactic the women claimed to, other women that they could kind of move more quickly down their personal growth path if they joined this women's only international, self help? Group there was a man who is involved in. This, group and, it was the leader heath who knew much of what was going on he was in, at least one case if, not more, those women were, coming to his bed, and he was. Then seducing them additionally, of course the New York Times Brooklyn us that they. Were branded with a. Symbol that looks kind of like, a hieroglyph, indeed they actually, were his. Initials k. and r. and women were, not told that how how does this boorish in reprehensible behavior become sex trafficking sexual The argument that the prosecutors are making is that there, was coercive sacks here that. Some of the women were actually acting or specifically Alison math this actress she was coercing women into having. Sex with him and that she was indeed kind of, a Madam where she was bringing in these women and she was also getting some sort of financial benefit within the group from Keith. Himself to financial reward for sexual favors, financial reward for sexual favors exactly even after these charges, the group still operating well they've. Closed, down all, of their classes you cannot go to them anymore and try to work out your problems but even after the. News, came out of the New York Times about women being branded at least one hundred members stayed with the group they think that they have not Done anything wrong, and they believe that they'll be vindicated. Vanessa Grigory Addis contributing writer for the New York Times Sunday magazine thanks. So much for being with us thank you Scott police across the country are growing concerned, about stoned drivers behind the wheel thirty states and. Washington DC of legalized medical marijuana Nine of those plus the district have legalized recreational pot one California company now says it's made a major breakthrough in creating. What some thought of as a kind, of unicorn a marijuana Breathalyzer NPR's Eric westervelt has our story in, his downtown Oakland office Mike Lynn hold his creation in the palm of his hand device about the size of a large. Mobile phone with a small plastic tube and a slot for. A cartridge this is this, is a disposable cartridge. And there's a whole bunch of science in this in this Partridge but Lynn is not some, pipe-dream Stoner inventor the entrepreneurs also a. Practicing, ER, trauma, doctor in an active swat team medic he's seen. Firsthand sometimes devastating impact of drunk and. Drugged drivers. The CEO of hound labs the scientific device company he founded slips a new, cartridge into the pot Breathalyzer since starts to blow Indicator Barr show whether the machine detects any THC the psychoactive, component in pond tools now, on the market to German marijuana use tests blood saliva or urine. Those devices can take days for. Result and they can't tell whether a person has smoked a half. Hour ago or eight days ago THC dissolves in fat so it can stay in your body up to a month, after us but Dr Lynn says his company's device detects whether someone has smoked, pot in, the last two hours what's considered the peak impairment window it accurately does that he says by measuring the mere presence of THC molecules in parts per trillion in. Your breath and that's in contrast to, alcohol which is parts per thousand THC is something like a billion, times less concentrated than alcohol that's why it hasn't been done before because it really is hard the company hopes to have. The Breathalyzer ready for sale by early next year a handful. Of police departments including Boston, plan to work with. Hound labs to test the device starting this fall for law enforcement there issue Is trying to figure out who's potentially impaired versus hey. Who somebody who smoked maybe yesterday, is not impaired they're interested in it providing objective data for them at the roadside just. Like they have for alcohol but a big problem there's still no. Scientific or legal consensus on what amount of THC equals functional impairment that matters, to the courts only seven, states have set basic legal guidelines as to how much THC in. The system makes you dangerous behind. The wheel Harvest a stylish dispensary in San Francisco's, mission district David downs. Does some market research Roma which is really scrumptious the California bureau chief for the cannabis news site lethally has. His nose in a jar of Indika dominant hybrid buds.

New York Times Marijuana Mike Lynn Scott Simon California NPR Seagram Vanessa Gregorio New York Albany Racketeering Keith Ranieri Keith Rene Allison Mack Boston Vanessa Grigory Addis San Francisco
"the new york times magazine" Discussed on Keep It!

Keep It!

05:17 min | 2 years ago

"the new york times magazine" Discussed on Keep It!

"The busiest women in TV Marti. Hi, I think I have the distinction of being the oldest person you've ever had them. My references are older than you are. Don't worry. You win human. That's true with sharp objects. Yes. Diet land? Yes. Girlfriends at the divorce? Yes. Unreal. Yes. Code block. Well, cub black. I have the distinction of having the best kind of Hollywood job, which is that I helped produce the documentary that it's based on. So I did literally nothing. Ooh. Yeah, it's the job I aspire to. Culture of jobs. So what you're saying is you're lazy. And of course I have loved work since Buffy. Thank you. You've done so much work. You're like Ingley where it's just you're into life of pi and sense and sensibility. Everything. I feel like I did grow up in the ice storm. So that is a wonderful rep. Well, mistake. I'm glad you are here, and you said that your its verb has is well versed in the new New York Times magazine profile of Gwyneth Paltrow was she explained that she internet hatred of her and figured out how to turn it into cash. She calls these moments, quote, cultural firestorms, and she could monetize those eyeballs. How is the longest article is. I thinking, surely this woman has spent enough time with Gwinnett that you find a kicker end this and yet it kept going and going and going. And yet I devoured every word like it was like Chardonnay. And it's funny because we did we, we all were like, this is a must because in a weird way, like I feel like Paul tro is like the cross section of Adora and Verena like Madeira on sharp objects and Berina on diet land like she, she's just draped in Kashmir in such a way drives so many people crazy, but the fact that she's figured out how to make money from that, I think is real proof that when people say like a women should run the world, I'm always like, let's put a pin in that. Win. I always tell little, I knew about her did not realize she was with Brad vaults. Nick realize I think I forgot about the other kid. There was a bunch of stuff. I was like, oh, I have not been paying attention to what this woman has been doing. Congratulations. I love the small details of like one of her daughter's just sitting in the background Straubing Blackbird just like a course. She. It was very like her, like making the clams without an apron. And then Chris Martin just shows up, and then the kids are just now doing the instruments and Brad just walks in now and now they're having, I'm like, yeah, give me a break actually want a TV series of Gwyneth in her little viola Davis moment of like just striding into this college classroom. That's the thing about the goop brand for a while. I was tolerant of it because it's like, all right, look, somebody's gotta make seventy five hundred dollar risotto and it may as well be win of Paltrow. However, then when you get into the Jade vagina, eggs thing where she's just like advocating sexual health, things that are Kuku not even just like all kinds of health shit. She's actually someone who I think would die of capacity because yeah. Bee's sting her in this dive, I been to wait. One of the most interesting parts of this to was the fact that goop split with Conde nast. They were like, we're not gonna. Do Gook is to moral. Fatchett the articles. You can't just be out here like Dr Oz. All of these like doodads. Wire bras gives you breast cancer. Yeah. No. I mean, that is the deep theory of the room, which is I call this theory Donald Trump versus the sun, which is that. I think we're also afraid the climate is actually changing and we're all powerless which brings out the Luddite in everybody, and it brings out it's just like witchcraft. Absolutely. That's true. There's this whole section of like people a lot of money who are going to go crazy that way and be like, we're praying to our bras that don't have under wires, and then there's the people who are like Donald Trump is going to literally fly through the air and fight the sun with his hands and he'll win. We'll be fine. No. Splitting with Conde nast because they aren't committed to truthfulness. Like literally, it's like the white lady info wars. Which by the way it surprises me that she even wanted to be a part of Conde nast. It's like you're clearly your own ivory Kashmir juggernaut. Why do.

Gwyneth Paltrow Conde nast Donald Trump Brad Gwinnett Hollywood New York Times Dr Oz Kashmir Ingley Paul tro Chris Martin Nick Adora Bee viola Davis seventy five hundred dollar
"the new york times magazine" Discussed on Keep It!

Keep It!

05:17 min | 2 years ago

"the new york times magazine" Discussed on Keep It!

"The busiest women in TV Marti. Hi, I think I have the distinction of being the oldest person you've ever had them. My references are older than you are. Don't worry. You win human. That's true with sharp objects. Yes. Diet land? Yes. Girlfriends at the divorce? Yes. Unreal. Yes. Code block. Well, cub black. I have the distinction of having the best kind of Hollywood job, which is that I helped produce the documentary that it's based on. So I did literally nothing. Ooh. Yeah, it's the job I aspire to. Culture of jobs. So what you're saying is you're lazy. And of course I have loved work since Buffy. Thank you. You've done so much work. You're like Ingley where it's just you're into life of pi and sense and sensibility. Everything. I feel like I did grow up in the ice storm. So that is a wonderful rep. Well, mistake. I'm glad you are here, and you said that your its verb has is well versed in the new New York Times magazine profile of Gwyneth Paltrow was she explained that she internet hatred of her and figured out how to turn it into cash. She calls these moments, quote, cultural firestorms, and she could monetize those eyeballs. How is the longest article is. I thinking, surely this woman has spent enough time with Gwinnett that you find a kicker end this and yet it kept going and going and going. And yet I devoured every word like it was like Chardonnay. And it's funny because we did we, we all were like, this is a must because in a weird way, like I feel like Paul tro is like the cross section of Adora and Verena like Madeira on sharp objects and Berina on diet land like she, she's just draped in Kashmir in such a way drives so many people crazy, but the fact that she's figured out how to make money from that, I think is real proof that when people say like a women should run the world, I'm always like, let's put a pin in that. Win. I always tell little, I knew about her did not realize she was with Brad vaults. Nick realize I think I forgot about the other kid. There was a bunch of stuff. I was like, oh, I have not been paying attention to what this woman has been doing. Congratulations. I love the small details of like one of her daughter's just sitting in the background Straubing Blackbird just like a course. She. It was very like her, like making the clams without an apron. And then Chris Martin just shows up, and then the kids are just now doing the instruments and Brad just walks in now and now they're having, I'm like, yeah, give me a break actually want a TV series of Gwyneth in her little viola Davis moment of like just striding into this college classroom. That's the thing about the goop brand for a while. I was tolerant of it because it's like, all right, look, somebody's gotta make seventy five hundred dollar risotto and it may as well be win of Paltrow. However, then when you get into the Jade vagina, eggs thing where she's just like advocating sexual health, things that are Kuku not even just like all kinds of health shit. She's actually someone who I think would die of capacity because yeah. Bee's sting her in this dive, I been to wait. One of the most interesting parts of this to was the fact that goop split with Conde nast. They were like, we're not gonna. Do Gook is to moral. Fatchett the articles. You can't just be out here like Dr Oz. All of these like doodads. Wire bras gives you breast cancer. Yeah. No. I mean, that is the deep theory of the room, which is I call this theory Donald Trump versus the sun, which is that. I think we're also afraid the climate is actually changing and we're all powerless which brings out the Luddite in everybody, and it brings out it's just like witchcraft. Absolutely. That's true. There's this whole section of like people a lot of money who are going to go crazy that way and be like, we're praying to our bras that don't have under wires, and then there's the people who are like Donald Trump is going to literally fly through the air and fight the sun with his hands and he'll win. We'll be fine. No. Splitting with Conde nast because they aren't committed to truthfulness. Like literally, it's like the white lady info wars. Which by the way it surprises me that she even wanted to be a part of Conde nast. It's like you're clearly your own ivory Kashmir juggernaut. Why do.

Gwyneth Paltrow Conde nast Donald Trump Brad Gwinnett Hollywood New York Times Dr Oz Kashmir Ingley Paul tro Chris Martin Nick Adora Bee viola Davis seventy five hundred dollar
The Goop-iest Revelations from Gwyneth Paltrow's New York Times Profile

Lori and Julia

02:52 min | 2 years ago

The Goop-iest Revelations from Gwyneth Paltrow's New York Times Profile

"Thank you for joining us Laurie is promising us really UC vintage scandal at the bottom of. Our that she had to really clean up I. Did have to redact a lot of words I did have to redact a lot of words and about a movie, about, a book that we, had member Scotty Bowers the gas station guy That he's from, way, back when doesn't matter That's ever, been written about Hollywood and it really bestseller and it's a movie when it's out and I've got an. Exclusive conversation with filmmaker and just a rehash that's what you were doing earlier today All the sexual, stories that we learned from Scotty Bauer because virtually every story he told about on everyone had passed on. He's like ninety five great so anyway This, is a story. From the New York, Times they did, the New York Times magazine they did a profile of. Gwyneth Paltrow yes and it is not a stent standard celebrity profile it's all, about, goof the wellness wellness the pseudoscience and how Gwen it has monetize, her elitism, if you. Will. Be has Expressive yeah inherent, elitism and it, is a long and well ridden and Greenwich continues to. Be absolutely full of, crap Okay Okay here's few. Highlights she's no interest in making any group proud acts mass market to broad. Audiences she, says it's crucial to me that we remain, aspirational, quote, unquote outrageously, expensive. Yes And she said but the price. Point because content is always. Free ourself. Is. Beautiful our ingredients. Are beautiful you can't get a lower price point you can't make these things. Mass market, that's Bs some of her stuff you certainly, can, her, candles that's. Right Why her goop magazine didn't work out with Conde nast she. Only had one. Episode and it was she. Was. On the cover with Brad feld Chuck she to, the one she was covered in mud in the, second one with. Brad feld truck about. Yeah so she only had two quarterlies. She would make it through I know. It so here's what she said. Okay a company that's really. In transition And they do things in a very old school way? But. It was amazing to work with Anna I love her she's. A total idol. Of mine we realized we. Could. Do a better job in house Okay which means what She wanted to boss around Conde, nast to writer.

Scotty Bauer Brad Feld Scotty Bowers Conde Nast Gwyneth Paltrow Conde Laurie New York Anna The New York Times Hollywood Goop Magazine Greenwich Nast Gwen Writer Chuck
"the new york times magazine" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"the new york times magazine" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"The best deal in pittsburgh i got a lot to get to today we're gonna talk about tribalism you know what that is a great great story in the new york times magazine that i have to re we're gonna talk about antoine rose protests we've talked about a fireworks we're gonna talk about hydrating we're talking about leaving kids in a car eighteen so far left in cars this year we're gonna talk about a new center for dictated newborns how about they removed a priest after fifty years fifty years they waited fifty years not forty nine fifty what happened for fifty years why did it take fifty years fifty years they waited to remove a priest anybody else concern about that we're talking about medecin we're talk about the big dog yeah oh i want to bring tea on to talk about this concert over the weekend interesting observations she worked that's right she works three jobs both kenny chesney and luke bryan next folks traffic on the five powered by bowser nissan fifty one south on top of the hill not you back on the roadways right now i'm looking at the parkway east and we still have some traffic there from swiss fell into the tunnels watching the tunnels on the city side everything is moving pretty well parkway west has cleared out just tapping the brakes at the entrance to the tunnels and the outbound side looks good for folks that are heading out pittsburgh international this morning on the inbound side of the parkway north that continues to do pretty well no problems on the veterans bridge cross town boulevard has thinned out but we saw that disabled vehicle over on the isle ramp to the boulevard the allies aren't extrapolate traffic on the.

pittsburgh the new york times magazine antoine kenny chesney luke bryan swiss fifty years
"the new york times magazine" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"the new york times magazine" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Couple three days ago i mean it's amazing to think but it's only like wednesday or thursday of last week i was in washington interviewing here on tuesday and in my business in the magazine business it's just never happens like it was on the website on saturday morning right you know like usually it's weeks months and that's because the kinds of stories of the new york times magazine or other like long form non fiction journalism publications have is because you can predict events you know you can know in january that nafta's gonna be interesting in june and you can have a thoughtful piece about it but this was like choose data friday right so so they were hinting to me that there was going to be a big blow up on the weekend g seven so they they kinda new but yeah you know it's like this is america now this is not fifty fifty this is not you know when they go hi we go or when we they go go hi this is not relitigating twenty sixteen this canada does not make it a station and me when i say that i i mean i mean to say this very sophisticated government you know and unless maybe less the political side than the the the sort of the permanent so canada has a westminster system which is and the minister talked about this which is like a permanent civil class and they and they actually run departments so you don't have all these every four years you swapping out different kinds of people you you get different ministers but the what would they call the deep state is thing in canada and it's the thing that people really like.

washington the new york times magazine nafta canada america four years three days
"the new york times magazine" Discussed on 105.3 The Fan

105.3 The Fan

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"the new york times magazine" Discussed on 105.3 The Fan

"Thrilled if that's yours go seven if we could just see this titanic struggle between like i said greatest maybe the greatest player of all time against maybe the greatest team of all time let me about the new ones like i live on a coast but i'm really mid westerner you live in the midwest but you're really a coastal elite who's upset about x bicoastal bill man that's your nickname extent you're right you write for the new york times magazine and magazine mr every man every man you know brad stevens really well you knew a butler you actually in his office like two hours before danny ainge call them at butler and offering the job to be the celtics head coach and so few people have the answer but if anyone does that i know and maybe you how what are the limits of this guy's ability to take the players in front of him and over chief using analytics he was the head of the curve with analytics and using just i think great motivational techniques he gets more out of the players than any coach i've ever seen i i am so excited to see what that franchise will look like at full strength next year and i do not think it's crazy that that's we'd see a celtics warriors finals and i would absolutely consulting for chance at winning if you're on the show on twitter at read four grave on cbs sports h q the author of several excellent pieces of work and g q magazine the new york times magazine and the author along with me of the worst fantasy baseball team ever were playing actually another deal stand come on jordan dl james ward on that part of the show on the board not tonight playing against us i'm sure we'll go one nine this week read i want to tell you this national radio i blame you darling it was the mookie betts it wasn't very bad idea if you weren't my friend i would fire you you are my friend.

the new york times magazine brad stevens danny ainge celtics baseball james ward two hours
"the new york times magazine" Discussed on WXYT CBS Sports Radio 1270

WXYT CBS Sports Radio 1270

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"the new york times magazine" Discussed on WXYT CBS Sports Radio 1270

"Midwest but you're really a coastal elite who's upset about x bicoastal bill man that's your nickname bro extent you write for the new york times magazine gq magazine ms every man every man you know brad stevens really well you knew a butler you're actually in his office like two hours before danny ainge call them at butler and offering the job to be the celtics head coach and so few people have the answer but if anyone does that i know and maybe you how what are the limits of this guy's ability to take the players in front of an over chief using analytics he was head of the curve with and using just i think great motivational techniques he gets more out of the players than any coach i've ever seen i i am so excited to see what that franchise will look like at full strength next year and i do not think it's crazy that we'd see a celtics warriors finals and i would absolutely consulting for chance at one of.

Midwest the new york times magazine brad stevens danny ainge celtics gq magazine two hours
Activists Observe Inaugural Black Maternal Health Week

Her Turn

03:31 min | 2 years ago

Activists Observe Inaugural Black Maternal Health Week

"Currently organizing as of action on june first and june second called international day which commemorates a nineteen seventy five event which i believe over a hundred sex workers how cj church in south bench in the upcoming months people are planning to make these days of action to call their senators to do protests and demonstrations and really kind of raise awareness about south stunned pasta that was eaten newmar a sex worker and organizer and previous board member would swap of chicago thanks to w rt's labor radio for the audio used in this story tuesday marked the end of the inaugural black maternal health week a campaign founded and led by the black mamas matter alliance the effort was launched to build awareness and activism around the state of black maternal health in the us here are a few sobering statistics underscore the need for such a campaign the united states ranks thirty second out of the thirty out of thirty five wealthiest nations in infant mortality black infants are now more than twice as likely to die as white infants a disparity greater then existed in eighteen fifty fifteen years before slavery ended each year an estimated seven hundred to nine hundred maternal deaths occur in the us which is one of only thirteen countries in the world where the rate of maternal mortality is worse than it was twenty five years ago and according to the centers for disease control black women are three to four times more likely to die from pregnancy related causes as their white counterparts black women and babies make up a significant number of cases of infant and maternal mortality in the united states these statistics were reported in a powerful new investigation in the new york times magazine called why america's black mothers and babies are in a life or death crisis even more shocking is that according to the report and contrary to widely accepted research education and income offer little protection journalists and new york times magazine contributing writer linda baraza told democracy now this week that the answer to the disparity in death rates has everything to do with the lived experience of being a black woman in america when you go through the research and i'm very interested in data and research i you have to look at all the things that it is not so you start to think well is it because black women are not taking care of themselves.

United States The New York Times Magazine Linda Baraza America Chicago W Rt Writer Eighteen Fifty Fifteen Years Twenty Five Years Thirty Second
"the new york times magazine" Discussed on Bon Appetit Foodcast

Bon Appetit Foodcast

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"the new york times magazine" Discussed on Bon Appetit Foodcast

"Both sampled parks now it's the are or you're asking me you're asking me over saddam grade uni n frick in peppers and onion us get your adamantly vote for something i've never ahead competitors if it was the best thing i had last year that in the test kitchen okay well i don't i will also i can only speak for myself so there's no recipes people could search will propose arm so poor not true dot com is or one no you make the beau psalm any shredded up yourself and then you take the ginger scallions sauce from which sam sefton lovingly reproduce for the new york times magazine which sent a website yet and then you take that ginger scouting sauce and some napa cabbage and make a slow out of it and throw los racha drizzle travel martin's roles done shadow to sam sifting shadowing sam can i and i would like some can them i'm not you dumb hall a pain is carrying a quick pickle sharia critical we gotta with oils without at the aouzou quick break with like a cucumber or like cuba numbers can i do a saracho may hill yes please okay i'm deputy at ripe satellite rescued fast sounds good oh my god all opinion the helping is gonna be getting there all right so far guys on the swan sauntering up with us on those on those chips and block with them slowing through some vietnamesestyle wings with salon grow into the both psalms style polled pork oh look like the quick pickle that the ginger scallions law let's araya mayo could also take the let us that you would normally be your psalm rapper and no could have that as a part of your sandline opus orbit we got to break that we got a break with a lot of traditions in two thousand eight to the bell is has been wrong guy i've i've eaten iran's and a lot of food in a lot of salt so far in this in this competition on thirsty so remove onto drinks okay cold cheap beer versus cold craft beer.

the new york times magazine martin iran saddam sam sefton cuba araya
"the new york times magazine" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

Slate's Political Gabfest

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"the new york times magazine" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

"The following podcast contains explicit language dirt the dan hello and welcome to the slate political gap as for january fourth 2018 belt lost his mind addition i am cleared off the bat with obscure i am in washington dc happy new year to all we have been with you for two weeks them and been of john dickerson for two weeks but here he has hello john hi steve davis face the nation although i must say people feel like they've been with us made even more deeply them before sense of the response to the conundrum show has been really elemental elemental what conundrum most spoke to people that you heard about i heard from somebody who um i guess you applied on a on a different side the ideological spectrum from you but who found themselves constantly agreeing with you called you even your their spirit animal so i just you know i'm just saying i may not have been one individual element of the conundrum show but the entire that that listener you just know that as your spirit animal i am wearing a tale a very furry plotting entail also joining us hello emily baz lawn of the new york times magazine in new haven hello and happy new year happier does save added some of the beginning of danone did you guys have a great holiday i saw you briefly emily that was nice romney was you were in cold part of the country and so as david yes vermont lots of really really free saying but i still managed to go outside a chart the great victory to me since i am not someone who cherishes the cold on this week's gap fest the fee you the delightful feud exploding between president trump and his former spend gully steve bannon then more twists and turns and swerves and uturns and the russia investigations will talk about all of them and then a new report says that fake news does not exist right emily we will talk about that no doesn't really say that but it says it doesn't matter more maybe even say that anyway will deny it even be that fate it may not even be it may not exist cattle future may just have been a of a facebook posting about hillary clinton's one point eight billion dollar house that she was building.

john dickerson the new york times magazine danone romney trump emily facebook hillary clinton washington steve davis david vermont president steve bannon russia two weeks eight billion dollar
"the new york times magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"the new york times magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The part of the country that has a race problem and a very comfortable with that so the south in forest it's racial coal through laws in the north race and racial called a racial inequality was an force through housing so the north is the most segregated region of the country both for housing and for schools and the north is no better on race in the south it was just for most of the country the black population in the north of very small and as you start to see millions of black people migrating from the south start the end of the early 1900s suddenly the north is confronted with having to deal a black people and it doesn't do any better than the south um it creates ghettos it red lines it forces black people to stay in their small sectors on the city and so when you're looking at something like the fair housing at that is forcing northerners to deal with their race issue and than ours are not at any more willing to do that than southerners were when you look at how integrated schools are down south in it is true is because a court order you would not see why children in its red sea white children in the north in schools that integrated and that's the problem is that there's there's no there is no one who will be pushing for this nicole 100 jones i wanna thank you so much for talking with us thank thank you for your work thank you so much nicole hanna jones speaking to terry grows earlier this year she just was awarded a macarthur genius grant for her stories in the new york times magazine researching and uncovering endemic racism in education and housing she helped found the item be well society for investigative reporting which is dedicated increasing the ranks of investor gate of reporters of color we also want to recognize another macarthur genius singer and songwriter rianne annan giddens she received her award for the many decades of music she's recorded with the carolina chocolate drops and as a solo artist capturing africanamerican experiences and traditions and performing songs written from slave narratives and for.

court order nicole hanna jones the new york times magazine terry macarthur rianne annan carolina
"the new york times magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"the new york times magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

"China dot com act act bring shakespeare back to the gary is tony away nominee john douglas thomson takes on the iconic role in hamlet began september 20th act hyphen sf dot org snap judgment ahead of one o'clock this afternoon today the performer the hardest character to play is the character without a script featuring stories from a gay mexican wrestler and x sex worker and neil brennan a writer for the chapelle show that and mora's snap judgment coming up after this american life at one o'clock and again at eleven pm on kqed public radio eighty eight point five fm to smack knife meyer glass today's program essay be what happens when you create a project whose main goal is to integrate schools for the benefit of the weight students there as i work out for everybody if you're just tuning in we're in the middle of a story by reporter mostly secret yasser version of this story this week for the new york times magazine that's it ny times dot com slash integration and for the break mostly was explaining that a guy named johnny holloway decided not to return to be asked for their union for reasons of his own leslie he picks up the story from there a month before i got on the phone with johnny and pretty quickly he told me this um our took a lot of beating um oh no no proof for everyone else who spoke about our no they hadn't johnny told me he was beaten several times always by the same guys and he was certain it was racially motivated he said he never told the other black students about it said there was no point so i went to visit johnny of the search to talk more about this johny searches called couple of salvation it's a storefront church and dorm north.

shakespeare gary neil brennan writer mora reporter the new york times magazine johnny holloway leslie john douglas thomson chapelle yasser
"the new york times magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"the new york times magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It to slater's or for you know people to just worry about weather on innocent people are being convicted girls similarly thus lawn from the new york times magazine law school endlessly political gove first maybe you saw her article the new york times magazine this weekend guilt by omission when prosecutors withhold evidence of innocence so i mentioned that the top the cognitive dissonance that some people might have had reading your article just when the independence of robert moeller in the russia investigation is giving prosecutors the reputation of you know mr and mrs claim in or polarized political system have you thought about it in that light at all yeah absolutely i mean it's so a home tie lang that we are relying so much on muller's personal integrity and reputation right now and now has to do with the federal system the particular role he's playing and the fact that in some ways not as a law but i think as a norm the department of justice and the idea that it can investigate the president of the president in is not above the law that's become a part of our system of checks and balances that makes muller absolutely crucial right now it also spotlights how much power prosecutors have you know trump is railing against muller in part because muller's doing all this investigating and trump doesn't like it well the power of prosecutors can be used to great good and it can also be used on unfortunately in some cases in a way that is not fair and not good and that railroads people and and leads to a guilty verdict ex against some people who are innocent prosecutors would say that that rarely happens that doesn't describe you know most of their work and i think that's true the problem is how much are we willing to tolerate when we're talking about innocent people going to prison thinks about the moeller investigation or leaking out into the press things the we might say would recover dential in a prosecutorial system at a grand jury system the fact that he's working with two grand juries the fuck the grand juries herve subpoenaed evidence having to do with the records of michael flynn and may be finances i mean not to say the muller is leaking but prosecutors often leaked to the press specifically to put pressure on defendants in high profile cases delta that is something.

law school the new york times magazine robert moeller muller president michael flynn slater russia department of justice
"the new york times magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"the new york times magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"That if you ratchet up the penalties for violating the law equal shoes to leaf inward proven that they do that chris go back in 2013 with me now are ari bannon seeing a contributing writer for the nation reporting fellow at the nation institute author of the book give us the ballot the modern struggle for voting rights in america published last year and many of you may have seen the long oh file of coal back and his agenda in the new york times magazine that are berman wrote last month and also with us is veneto gupta president and ceo of the leadership conference on civil and human rights former head of the us department of justice civil rights division rem benita welcome to w when we see today had morning brian hi how can morning so arias this commission first of all failing to launch with all this opposition even from republicans states it's pretty remarkable i mean the commission hasn't even had an inperson meeting the first in person meeting is next week and already you have it's now up to forty eight states refusing to provide all of the voter data that chris kulbok asked for so basically on june twenty eight kulbok sent a letter to all fifty states asking for what he called publicly available voter information but then he asked for all of these things that are not publicly available like social security numbers criminal history military history at first a few blue state said no oh places like california then very very quickly opposition increased from red state as you mentioned places like mississippi louisiana arizona that do not usually criticize the trump administration i think people were concerned first off with giving the federal government the data and secondly what were they going to deal with it because either many republicans are skeptical of this commission they don't believe donald trump's claim that three million people voted illegally there's no evidence to suggest that three million people voted illegally but nonetheless trump has stacked this commission with people like chris kulbok that.

donald trump mississippi louisiana california social security chris kulbok brian civil rights us veneto gupta nation institute ari bannon writer arizona red state blue state the commission human rights president and ceo berman the new york times magazine america voting rights
"the new york times magazine" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

KUGN 590 AM

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"the new york times magazine" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

"For breakfast fair he does the all wise conversation right of with the bottom line is is that i would smell the fish okay what would happen is if the door came into the room dougie dog with some every ingredient separately that you put into making your fish and that's what makes them so incredible at sniffing out drugs and bombs and and now diseases as such as diabetes and cancer just amazing i think we're just touching the surface now of how important the old factory of a dog using and you can't fool you can form may be too careful with your cause your body chemistry changes and they pick up on that it is a story the new york times magazine this past weekend had a near their couple of things that i have found in there recently about dogs especially but to animals and whether teaching us about our health as you were just suggesting a one of the things that is highlighted here but also the history of dogs going back forty thousand plus years and how really when you get to this fist he added thinking of dogs even though their communication skills are different they are teaching us so much about ourselves that is is becoming really a very interesting study not only in veterinary schools but in psychology schools to let the psychology of the dog what they communicate through their smelling and there is it really is profound wine i've been doing this for lahti years that learning every single day every minute i spend with a dog or cat or any type of animal i'm learning something you people i like the other doused community with someone asking what is the most important thing that animals have taught me a couple of things number one is you know tomorrow's gone maria don't worry about yesterday be here now that's number one and number two is that you know you don't have to be a phony if you don't like somebody you don't have to buy them a drink i let them know you don't like them right off the bat neither on their shoes that marta when the guy that was that all china have you you what i learned from dogs if you don't.

the new york times magazine china diabetes lahti