18 Burst results for "tetracycline"

"tetracycline" Discussed on Invention

Invention

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"tetracycline" Discussed on Invention

"I think like a beer that had tetracycline content from from being cultured with bacteria like this probably would not be the as potent and focused ineffective as like the isolated compounds in the drugs you take orally or through injection would be today right but it would have some effect and it appeared that it probably was somewhat effective in fighting infectious disease right and of course they they wouldn't know exactly what they had here but they knew they had some sort of beer that seemed to <hes> some sort of holy liquid that that that had some sort of curative property to it exactly I mean if fascinating discovery from the ancient world <hes> another interesting in fact tetracycline is relatively unique in that it leaves clear signatures in the bones that can be discovered long after the person has died so other antibiotics. Don't leave these clear markers like this that make it easy for archaeologists us to detect so you have to wonder like are they were there other cases of ancient peoples in various places in times using some kind of antibiotics or bacterial or fungal cultures <hes> to treat diseases like these ancient Nubian people were <hes> but that we don't have evidence of because it doesn't show up in the bones like tetracycline does yeah it could've just been lost to history. <hes> I was reading an interesting paper from frontiers in microbiology in two thousand intend by Rustam Domino called a brief history of the antibiotic Era Lessons Learned and challenges for the future and Aminov points out this unique quality of tetracycline and notes just what I was basically just saying how easy it would be for evidence in other uses of antibiotics in the ancient world to be lost to us though he he also mentioned that there are other anecdotes from history about cultural traditions that show Proto antibiotic technologies in these other examples would include red soils els found in Jordan that are used for treating skin infections. It's been discovered these soils contain some antibiotic producing organisms though I guess they're probably also some major risks.

tetracycline Aminov Rustam Domino
"tetracycline" Discussed on Invention

Invention

03:33 min | 1 year ago

"tetracycline" Discussed on Invention

"Or to leukemia or even syphilis and tetracycline works primarily by binding to the ribe `ISMs of bacterial cells ribes oems or sort of the cellular factories stories they build proteins that are needed in order for organisms to live and grow and by binding to the Ri- Zome tetracycline makes it difficult for the bacterium to create new proteins it was patented in the nineteen fifties and became widely used in in the second half of the Twentieth Century <hes> so what was it doing in the bones of Nubian people who live like seventeen hundred years ago well <hes> Armagh Logos and colleagues followed archaeological clues to identify the source of the tetracycline which was Bashir. <hes> of course beer is another one of <hes> ultimately it falls under Doug Moi's domain. Oh yeah though this is different because tetracycline is not made from fungus it is actually an antibacterial that is a byproduct of some bacteria arterial. Oh okay so it's a bacterial byproduct but essentially okay so technically it's duplex okay point to jubilee this jubilee versus Jubilee Right. I mean that's going to happen with your demon. Lords introducing warfare so so beer is made from fermented grain of course and the fermented grain in this ancient Nubian beer apparently contained the bacteria streptomycetes which creates tetracycline as a byproduct but a question of course. So like were these traces of tetracycline in Nubian mummy bones a sign of like a bad batch of beer. The got contaminated by accident or were these people deliberately culturing their beer with antibiotic producing bacteria and so to look at a study from the American Journal of Physical Anthropology from twenty ten of which <hes> Armagh Logos was one of the authors <hes> the authors examined tetracycline in skeletal remains from throughout this period and the evidence indicates that the ancient Nubians were consuming these antibiotics on a regular basis and the authors suggest that these ancient people were intentionally producing this medicine and this links up with some evidence from other ancient peoples nearby such as the Egyptians that sometimes apparently apparently used beer as a treatment for conditions like gum disease and other types of infections in the authors even found evidence of a four year old child whose skull contained lots of tetracycline from this beer suggesting that the child had been fed high doses of of this like antibiotic beer. Perhaps in an attempt to cure an illness. Maybe the illness that killed him and so the levels of tetracycline residue found in the bones of these mummies is only explicable if they were repeatedly consuming assuming this antibiotic in their Diet and there are actually other archaeological remains that show evidence of antibiotic use in the ancient world for example samples taken from the era of skeletons from the Dock Co.. ACIS in Egypt <hes> from people bull who lives sometime in the late Roman period also showed evidence of the same thing of tetracycline and the Diet and this consumption of tetracyclene is consistent with other evidence showing a relatively low rate of infectious disease in Sudanese. He's Nubia during that time period and a lack of bone infections apparent in these remains from the this oasis in Egypt so it really does look like people in ancient Africa discovered a somewhat effective form of antibiotics attics centuries before the discovery of penicillin and the isolation and mass production of focused anti microbial medicines now to be clear..

tetracycline Armagh Logos Egypt leukemia Doug Moi American Journal of Physical A Ri Nubia Bashir. Dock Co penicillin Africa seventeen hundred years four year
"tetracycline" Discussed on Science Rules! with Bill Nye

Science Rules! with Bill Nye

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"tetracycline" Discussed on Science Rules! with Bill Nye

"You listen. He's back. So before we spoke with Chris, Dr Riley, you're explaining bacterial warfare. And how bacteria sins are like guided missiles, I'm sorry, but little. No. I knew that gets zoom. Do you know what happens when you presume Corey, I know what happens apprec- Persia Lewin me? But before we go there, I presumed that bacteria killing their own species. They might kill a sub species, or a nearby genetically nearby species, but you're saying it would be wrong with that. Presume that's why we're talking about this. So did they deploy directionally? So think about it this way. You have coli living on the mucin in your gut, and it's happily chomping away from Yusen. It's that lie MU McCoy lining of June. Cordy lining. Yeah. That's right. Got a little mucus just kind of flooring, all of your clippings, making it all nice and smooth and bliss, Andy and any colour just happily munching away. And let's say that at lunch, you ate some slightly raw hamburger meat and anew E coli entered. Your gut it has to do two things. It has to survive in your gut, which it's evolved to do, but also has to find a space in your gut. And if other e-coli are there it can't get in. So what it does is it produces a bacteria that will kill just those strains of e-coli releasing that environment for them to now, invade, and also, if you're going to if you're back, you're, you're gonna make a molecule, you wanna make an efficient molecule, you don't want you want to overdo it, because it takes energy, your bacterial resources, right? Exactly. And so these guys only do this, they only make these molecules when they're stressed out by their neighbors by their close. Neighbours stressed out. The neighbors are competing for the same exactly shorter. Whatever stressed the in the environment, they feel so it could be just nutrients are depleted, or oxygen levels are low or high whatever bothers them peg, I want to back up here for a second because you were talking about. You don't want to mow down your microbiome want. You don't want to clear out all these beneficial bacteria that air in your body, but that first problem, the big problem of antibiotic resistance to bacteria since help you against that. Don't do that. The bacteria then develop resistance to the bacteria as well. Absolutely. They will. And that's where we have to be a little bit smarter. Now, if you look at the evolution of bacteria sins, the bacteria have survived using these most every species, uses them, and what they do is they have a huge panel of them. And so you you're constantly selecting for a new protein that can do the job better. So in the human parallel, you have antibiotics and we have the first one penicillin great thing till. It's not ampicillin. Tetracycline Oxy tetracycline. And we invent or discover one after the other because of resistance the bacteria don't have to wait for that. They have tons of these proteins for billions of years. Johnny. Yeah. So what they do is they, they just cycle through them and it's actually Kintu rock paper scissors the bacteria play game where they bring in new protein resistance evolves. The producer disappears and now being resistant can be costly and so- sensitivity involves. And then a new producer comes in and it just cycles round around the premise of your bit. If I understand it is to addenda fi the bacterium with, which I am infected than show up with the proper bacteria Zain. That's right. We have another caller, Chelsea. Are you out there? Hello. Where are you calling from Chelsea? I'm calling from Minnesota. Well, that's a big place. Are you allowed to tell us specifically where in Minnesota? Thank cloud. Minnesota like central Minnesota like right in the middle not far from the source of the of the Mississippi River. No, I live right next to it. Next to it is, for me is a lot like not far so cool..

Minnesota Persia Lewin producer Chelsea tetracycline Yusen Chris Mississippi River Corey Dr Riley Andy ampicillin penicillin Johnny
"tetracycline" Discussed on Science Rules! with Bill Nye

Science Rules! with Bill Nye

04:13 min | 1 year ago

"tetracycline" Discussed on Science Rules! with Bill Nye

"Or are you feeling concerned healthy but I'm concerned because I am allergic to amoxicillin amoxicillin, penicillin and tetracycline. That's, that's another serious issue is people who have who have allergic reactions to some of these antibiotics. What, what is your specific question that you have here? Our work with copies all day. So I was worried what's the worst pathogen I could be exposing myself to on the copiers your copy machines? Is that what you mean me, like pressing the same button, ZIM, working the same machinery that another people do, and they might be infected and people take pictures centers? So we get copiers from hospitals and other places. And so we're opening them up to the internals, and the, the heated products that are inside the copiers as well. Okay. Got it. Well, Chris, it's great question, and I can understand why it'd be concerned because I personally try to avoid hospitals at all costs. That's not where I wanna go when I'm sick guys working for I know. And, and that's why it's a great question you have to protect yourself, but the good news is that most of the bacteria that you might be worried about aren't going to survive that process of transport from the hospital to your lab in, in any sort of environmental condition. But having said that are you a pretty healthy guy? Yes, I'm very holding then than I would chill out. And just enjoy your job because you have a micro bio of your own. That's powerful. And that's in part, what's keeping you healthy. It's also making you smarter and it's making you less depressed but those are other issues for another show. Bill. Cable have. Yes. Oh, yes. Another show microbiome in your overall health and happiness, shook depression. And I mean the important and quick point is that this environment of bacteria in your body is actually doing a lot of beneficial things you. They're very good reasons why you don't want to just take a broad spectrum antibiotic and mow them all down, because that's, that's part of the healthy you that you're getting rid of that's right. And the viruses as well. We would we've been focusing on bacteria, but the viruses won't last that long on that equipment either. So keep forging ahead and making those hospital copiers Cirque, Chris, do you feel like you have to wipe everything down with alcohol or something like that? Only when we get one with blood on it. Oh my goodness. Well, okay. Now, I'm going to take a step back. I didn't know that. But you step forward. Pay were covered with blood. Okay. I would talk to your. Let's see is the supervisor let's just say he's in charge, which as I would tell the hospitals to clean them before they send them to you. I mean, come on. That's just basic basic safety will time drivers. Sometimes drivers will cut themselves in transport. And I see. Okay. Okay. Well, Chris, you really, you really can rely on your micro by to keep you pretty safe and avoid into botox when you don't have to take them on, on another note, where do you get your micro-biology to start with? That's a great question. Chris. Good is microbiome. Well, if he was well, I don't know if we can go this way, but if he was born badgley, versus C-section. He got different Mike. You were c section. He's fine. Well, of course he's fine. But he's a healthy guy, but what we're now learning is that when you're born with a C section you don't gain the benefit of your mother's microbiome, that's passed onto you through. The birth canal. And so quite get over your skin infant, it just gets all over you. And you ingested. Jewison breastfeeding. I mean you get you get my vote if your mom is all smooch, Ian, cuddly, and so on, don't you get full of micro bio me, things, you, you do for sure. But it's those first few moments of life, that have a huge impact later will who gets in there. First and sets up house. So in, in a c section, what we're learning? Now is that quite often, you will have bacteria that are found in the hospital, rather than the bacteria found in your mum. Yeah. But does that affect your health long-term? It could now you've Chris's made it this far very healthy and graduates, light..

Chris Mike amoxicillin Ian Cirque supervisor tetracycline penicillin
"tetracycline" Discussed on On The Line with Estée Lalonde

On The Line with Estée Lalonde

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"tetracycline" Discussed on On The Line with Estée Lalonde

"So really, you know, there's lots of different ways, you can treat it on a lot of it essentially comes down to what the main issue is whether it's readiness whether it's spokes whether it's sensitivity of whether it's flushing. So I think it was any diet worth while speaking to adult Eurodemo biters. Okay. So I have one thing that I do kind of want to bring up. So you said tetracyclene which is an antibiotic. I actually was on it when I was a teenager. And I recently went to see a nutritionist and one of the questions she said was have you ever had tetracyclene because it can be such a strong antibiotic on your guts show. So this is a common concern, and one of the things I would say about the tetracycline onto politics that we use for Rosa. So I use them equal doxycycline, and I use in low dose, and what's interesting about the tetracycline antibiotics as a high dose they have an antibacterial or an antibiotic effect, but at low dose, they have an anti inflammatory effect. So in RAs Asia using it for its anti inflammatory reasons. So you'll using at a much lower dose than you would use it the other conditions. So I think that's a much more gentle on your guts. In response. The second part of your question about tetracycline 's and the effect on the gods. Well, I don't think you should be on antibiotics for prolonged periods of time. I don't think there's an issue being on the for about three months. Four months. I think any longer than that we do need to be reassessing what we're doing an ID normally lot prescribing for longer lengths because of issues with not just messing about with a gut microbiome, but also resistance as well. So then when you do need to use them. They don't do what let's post today. Right. And what about things like birth control? Does it really help with things like acne? Yes. So certain pills almost. Friendly than others, but the combined oral contraceptive pill so the pill that contains eastern and progesterone can be helpful acne. But it does take time to work. So if you've been put on contraception for your skin, you need to give it at least two to three months to see if it's what can so that brings me to my next question from mom Oko, and she says, I tend to get hormonal breakouts on my chin and neck area. What's the best skin care for ornamental breakouts? I get that as well. And it sucks. I hate it. Yeah. And you know, the worst thing about it is actually affects most women as a result of this song, Kohl's, and that's partly because as women we have lots of home as we have eastern and progesterone, but we also have testosterone, the male hormone and testosterone, the male hormone is what drives that game and just before period is ju- all levels of eastern and progesterone drop a completely plummets, but I'll levels of testosterone stay the same throughout the month, relatively speaking. So what happens just before your period is ju- is that relatively. Speaking, you'll levels of testosterone a much higher than the levels of your female hormones, and that's what causes people to break out in the run-up to basically cycles. So in terms of what you can do what I would say is that a lot of people find the skin can be slightly more oily from ovation onwards. So in the second half of this cycle. So from day fourteen today twenty eight and that might be the time, we're really you all taking extra cash using your alpha, and you'll be two hydroxy acids and you'll skin cat to make sure that your decongesting your skin. You're getting rid of any black heads on. Also, a soon as you feel a hint of any spots coming up. It's worth while using something like two percent salicylic acid product directly onto the spoils to shrink them dying. If that doesn't help then it might be worth Bo going to see your GP, and they'll be able to give you a prescription retinoids over peroxide that you can put directly onto the spots. So basically, Utah get them as soon as they come up. Okay. And this is a completely unrelated question and. Topic?.

tetracycline antibiotics testosterone progesterone tetracycline tetracyclene RAs Asia mom Oko doxycycline Utah Bo Rosa Kohl three months Four months two percent
US regulators OK updated version of decades-old antibiotic

Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

00:44 sec | 2 years ago

US regulators OK updated version of decades-old antibiotic

"Federal regulators approve modernized version of a decades old antibiotic used to treat a number of infections. Powertek pharmaceuticals Zahra was designed to overcome the problem of resistance to tetracycline abiotic widely used until recent years, the company announced that the food and Drug administration. Approved news era for treating bacterial pneumonia and severe skin infections Powertek plans to launch the antibiotic early next year initially for use in hospitals. It has yet to disclose the price Boston-based Powertek estimates its drug could eventually treat nearly nine hundred thousand patients hospitalized in the US each

Powertek Pharmaceuticals Zahra Powertek Food And Drug Administration Bacterial Pneumonia Tetracycline United States
"tetracycline" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"tetracycline" Discussed on Science for the People

"In the barnyard because it was winter in the insects when longer present. So suddenly there are it's possible to keep chickens year round Jukes is part of this. He's a rising star into the Agra. Cultural nutrition and at the same time after he's been doing that for a while, several other things are happening. The first is the start of the antibiotic era. So I think everybody is some point here is the story of Alexander Fleming with his dishes of bacteria. Something blows in the window. Mold grows on his dishes in he realizes that what is excreted by the mold is killing the bacteria in his Petri dishes. And from that we get the first antibiotic penicillin which is a compound produced by the mold. When what I think most people don't know is that Fleming does that in nineteen twenty eight, but we don't actually get penicillin drug until the early nineteen forties. There's a long gap in which slimming does really know what to do with this compound. He is discovered, and then he gets some collaborators who figure it out. And the advent of World War Two makes it urgent to have something to cure people, especially soldiers on the battlefield. So penicillin in the early nineteen forties suddenly changes the world. And at the same time, the war ramp. Up enormously, the need for protein. So there's there's huge new infrastructure built in cattle pigs and poultry production to feed the troops that are deploying millions of troops all around the world, and then the war ends that infrastructure isn't needed anymore. There's a crash in the protein markets so that they need to reduce their costs. It's the beginning of the of the wonder drugs. People other manufacturers are following Fleming by by discovering streptomycin tetracycline and.

Alexander Fleming penicillin Jukes Agra streptomycin tetracycline
"tetracycline" Discussed on #WeThePeople LIVE

#WeThePeople LIVE

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"tetracycline" Discussed on #WeThePeople LIVE

"So what end biotics are really originally is there the chemical weapons that bacteria developed to compete against each other for living space for food to protect their descendants long before we ever came on the scene and the first athletics the first generation which includes the tetracycline penicillin streptomycin those are all the original natural compounds made by soil bacteria we took them into the lab and we we elaborated them into synthetic compounds will the way the bacteria defended themselves against each other back before we arrived was to develop resistance to these chemical weapons that they were aiming at each other what resistance means is just the bacteria find away a physical means of protecting themselves against the the antibiotic compound the if if the antibiotic compound dismantles the cell wall bacterial valves in new wave knitting the cell wall together if the antibiotic compound dimes inside the cell to disrupt the dna in the bacteria develop little pumps that tossed the antibiotic compound and again and so it really was kind of any of us to assume that the the thing that had been happening when bacteria used these compounds against each other would not also have happened when we started to take their compounds and use them against bacteria and in fact alexander fleming but you know the father of antibiotics essentially the person who i identified the action of penicillin by leaving the widow of his lab opened in london in nineteen twenty eight discovering that something had blown in was killing his place of bacteria he got the nobel prize in nineteen twenty five and he warned in his nobel prize acceptance speech that if we did not very carefully conserve antibiotics we would lose the neural drugs through cysts.

streptomycin penicillin london nobel prize tetracycline alexander fleming
"tetracycline" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"tetracycline" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"You know hips knees i'm not sure they're all necessary those are probably not necessarily but that kind of operation if they didn't have any antibiotics you would you go under the knife and have that no absolutely not right you don't even a simple cut on your finger could once again be able to kill you so the pharmaceuticals are are slowly becoming ineffective is certainly the antibiotics are fortunately they're really still are simple ineffective herbal techniques that work and then that's part of what i was talking about in the snake bite book that i wrote so you think we can fight superbugs i do not think that the antibiotics i think antibiotics was a big diversion that we took that was really the wrong direction we do it naturally yes you can absolutely let me give you one example garlic for example so back garlic again you like garlic i'll tell you what here let me explain it to and you'll love garlic too so in penicillin what's the active ingredient penicillin it's penicillin right there's only one thing right so you got you know you're taking your penicillin you got all these bugs most of them die but some of them figure it out right and they get around the penicillin and that's actually penicillin the super the antibiotic resistance to penicillin is the project asus of mercy look you know the current mercer that we're having and the same thing like tetracycline right powerful antibiotic but it's only got one active ingredients tetracycline so eventually some dogs are going to figure that out and reproduce and then you know you're tetracycline there's no more you know no longer viable anymore well antibiotic garlic has at least twenty five to thirty five known antibiotic antiviral antifungal constituents and they're still learning more about it so when you get a bunch of bugs going up against that many things they never figure it out right i mean bug doesn't want to go by garlic i guess has been used for thousands and thousands of years and it has not you know become haven't had super bugs you they got some ice guy right and i forget what thousands of years old.

penicillin tetracycline
"tetracycline" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"tetracycline" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"The wrong direction we do it naturally yes you can absolutely let me give you one example garlic for example so we are back to garlic again karlic garlic i'll tell you what i'm let me explain it to and you'll love garlic too so in penicillin what's the active ingredient in penicillin it's right there's only one thing right so you got you know you're taking your penicillin you got all these bugs most of them die but some of them figure it out right and they get around the penicillin and that's i actually penicillin the super the antibiotic resistance to penicillin is the progenitor of mercer look you know the current mercer that we're having and the same thing like tetracycline right powerful antibiotic but it's only got one active ingredient tetracycline so eventually some bugs they're going to figure that out and reproduce and then you know you're tetracycline is no more you know no longer viable anymore well antibiotic garlic has at least twenty five to thirty five known antibiotic antiviral antifungal constituents and they're still learning more about it so when you get a bunch of bugs going up against that many things they never figure it out right well i mean even a bug doesn't want to go by garlic i guess you know i mean just been used for thousands and thousands of years and it has not you know become you know we haven't had super bugs have beat it yet they got some ice guy right and i forget what thousands of years old.

penicillin tetracycline
"tetracycline" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"tetracycline" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"But you think we can fight superbugs i do not think that the antibiotics i think antibiotics was a big diversion that we took that was really the wrong direction we do it naturally yes you can absolutely let me give you one example garlic for example so back to garlic garlic garlic i'll tell you why here let me explain it to you and you'll love garlic too so in penicillin what's the active ingredient penicillin it's right there's only one thing right so you got you know you're taking your penicillin you got all these bugs most of them die but some of them figure it out right and they get around the penicillin and that's i actually dennison the super the antibiotic resistance to penicillin is the project of mercer look you know the current mercer that we're having and the same thing like tetracycline right powerful antibiotic but it's only got one active ingredients tetracycline so eventually some bugs are going to figure that out and reproduce and then you know you're tetracycline is no more you know no longer viable anymore well antibiotic garlic has at least twenty five to thirty five known antibiotic antiviral antifungal constituents and they're still learning more about it so when you get a bunch of bugs going up against that many things things they never figure it out right well i mean even a bug doesn't want to go by garlic i guess you go has been used for thousands of years and it has not you know become you know we haven't had superbugs beat it yet they dug up some ice guy right and i forget what thousands of years old you know what they found garlic and his pocket basically you know humans that you've been using this for a long long time marjorie what would concern you the most about the medical field today the ma the biggest concern i have is that it really just fundamentally isn't about health and healthcare it's it's really a system that's designed i think to extract profit really at the end of the day and i hate to be so cynical but you know most of it is focused on on on relieving symptoms it's not really focused on any really treating core issues.

penicillin tetracycline marjorie
"tetracycline" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"tetracycline" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

"We do it naturally yes you can absolutely let me give you one example garlic for example so back garlic garlic garlic i'll tell you what here let me explain it to and you'll love garlic too so in penicillin what's the active ingredient in penicillin it's trying to right there's only one thing right so you got you know you're taking your penicillin you got all these bugs most of them die but some of them figure it out right and they get around the penicillin and that's i actually penicillin the super the antibiotic resistance to penicillin is the progenitor of mercer look you know the current mercer that we're having and the same thing like tetracycline right powerful antibiotic but it's only got one active ingredient tetracycline so eventually some bugs they're going to figure that out and reproduce and then you know you're tetracycline there's no more no longer viable anymore well antibiotic garlic has at least twenty five to thirty five known antibiotic antiviral antifungal constituents and they're still learning more about it so when you get a bunch of bugs going up against that many things they never figure it out right i mean even a bug doesn't want to go by garlic i guess you know i mean has been used for thousands and thousands of years and it has not you know become you know we haven't had super bugs have been it yet they dug up some ice guy right and i forget what thousands of years old.

penicillin tetracycline
"tetracycline" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"tetracycline" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"That kind of operation if they didn't have any antibiotics would you go under the knife and have that absolutely not right you even you know like a simple cut on your finger could once again be able to kill you so you the pharmaceuticals are are slowly becoming ineffective is certainly the antibiotics are fortunately they're really still are simple ineffective herbal techniques that that work and then that's part of what i was talking about in the snake bite book that i wrote so but you think we can fight superbugs i do not think that the antibiotics i think antibiotics was a big diversion that we took that was really the wrong direction we do it naturally yes you can absolutely let me give you one example garlic for example so back to garlic again you like garlic like i'll tell you what here let me explain it to you and you'll love garlic too so in penicillin what's the active ingredient penicillin it's right there's only one thing right so you got you know you're taking your penicillin you got all these bugs most of them die but some of them figure it out right and they get around the penicillin and that's i actually penicillin the super the antibiotic resistance to penicillin is the progenitor of mercer look you know the current mercer that we're having and the same thing like tetracycline right powerful antibiotic but it's only got one active ingredients tetracycline so eventually some bugs are going to figure that out and reproduce and then you know you're tetracycline is no more you know no longer viable anymore well antibiotic garlic has at least twenty five to thirty five known antibiotic antiviral antifungal constituents and they're still learning more about it so when you get a bunch of bugs going up against that many things things they never figure it out right i mean even bug doesn't want to go by garlic i guess garlic has been used for thousands of years and it has not you know become we haven't had have beat it yet they dug up some ice guy right and i forget what thousands of years old what they found garlic in his pocket basically humans that you've been using this for a long long time marjorie what would concern you the.

penicillin tetracycline marjorie
"tetracycline" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"tetracycline" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"We do it naturally yes you can absolutely let me give you one example garlic for example so back to garlic again you like garlic like i'll tell you what here i'll let me explain it to and you'll love garlic too so in penicillin what's the active ingredient in penicillin it's trying to fill in right there's only one thing right so you got you know you're taking your penicillin you got all these bugs most of them die but some of them figure it out right and they get around the penicillin and that's i actually dennison the super the antibiotic resistance dependent cylinder is the progenitor of mercer look you know the current mercer that we're having and the same thing like tetracycline right powerful antibiotic but it's only got one active ingredient tetracycline so eventually some bugs they're going to figure that out and reproduce and then you know you're tetracycline is no more no longer viable anymore well antibiotic garlic has at least twenty five to thirty five known antibiotic antiviral antifungal constituents and they're still learning more about it so when you get a bunch of bugs going up against that many things they never figure it out right well i mean even a bug doesn't want to go by garlic i guess garlic has been used for thousands of years and it has not you know become you know we haven't had super bugs that have beat it yet they dug up some ice guy right and i forget what thousands of years old right he's buried in the ice and preserve their and they found garlic and his pocket basically you humans have been using this for a long long time.

penicillin tetracycline
"tetracycline" Discussed on FM NewsTalk

FM NewsTalk

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"tetracycline" Discussed on FM NewsTalk

"Mineral um it's a it's very very important part of a lot of different physiological functions um things like structure of certain proteins and enzymes and they can it can regulate help regulate gene expression um it plays a massive role in immune function plays a big role in protein synthesis our bodies ability to make and manufacturer proteins um it's very important for wound healing dna synthesis or are a bodies bility to make our own genetic map um our own dna we've we make that stuff on a on a regular basis um you know having enough zinc to be able to make sure that we do that and then cell division cell division it is a huge we want our cells to be able to splitting divide um and make more healthy cells um but in the skin what zinc does as the help plus the proper structure of proteins and cell membranes it improves wound healing um which is part of that immune function it's it has antiinflammatory effects and it helps protect us against uv radiation so uv radiation is as stuff he get exposed to when you out near you have sun shining directly on your face right law in several studies indicate dietary thank could verdes acne as effectively antibiotics like tetracycline ends which is huge yes we at the institute we.

cell division tetracycline
"tetracycline" Discussed on People's Pharmacy

People's Pharmacy

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"tetracycline" Discussed on People's Pharmacy

"They can actually get bumps that mimic pimples but if you on closer inspection um alma mater montage montages we can see that they're not actual pimples and it can be highly inflammatory so inflammatory that we have to use oral antibiotics that have antiinflammatory properties to treat it and it can jobs such as the tetracycline family of antibiotics we typically reach for doxycycline are minutes i glenn these patients do not have an infection okay the anti um biotic properties of these antibiotics are not what improved their rose asia it is the anti inflammatory properties and that being said we oftentimes are able to use very low doses of these antibiotics to achieve excellent control of their rose atia because we don't need it to alter their acute kenya's flora if you will i don't have to use these strong into matic doses so presumably if you could find something that would calm the inflammation that would be just as good as an antibiotic that's right but when they get the pap fuels and sometimes nigel's this is such a robust inflammatory response we've not found any topical to be able to control at you really needs mood orrell's and you need to go to orrell's pretty quickly 'cause it can leave scars i do to ask about a topical ferruzzi should because it's gotten some attention uh the generic term is ivermectin and dog lovers may recognize that term because it's used for heart worm um but it's used as a topical named sue lantra tell us a little bit about that so there are mites that live in her hair follicles and i'm not trying to give everyone the he be jamie's but we really he again we are all covered in these things that right yes their normal that's right there called deemed ex mites and they live in the hair follicles and again they are are part of us that i i like to describe them as our symbiotic organisms just like the little fish that are attached to the whales than and all these other types of symbiotic organisms that we see in nature that those are analogous to these mites.

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"tetracycline" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"tetracycline" Discussed on 790 KABC

"He are well thought of intellect urgied known for writing garbage well a lot of the white house reporters or or i should even say established you now season reporters have been around for a long time say that he's a ha you know kind of a hypocrite that he he kind of uh was one of them until he was a turncoat going against them in supporting donald trump so that he could slip his way into the white house and gain access he started attacking his fellow journalists and writers for meanspirited coverage against the president unfair press coverage and of course that titillates donald trump and so that's how he kind of gained access to to be able to write this book and to be able to hang out in the white house in the early days and but now we're seeing i mean i'm looking on twitter a lot of these people are verifying his claims and he claims that he has what like 1200 hours of tapes or something that that document all of these things he puts in the book i event and again what are we really learning to frugal you know the you know what i mean of the room the ban of trump to boggle where to what they're sort of saying about each other uh because there anything else were really lorry that we really didn't cut already know ma i can tell you this ivanka trump has unfolded steve bannon uh caps it was because he held her a dumb brek a doctor did he's a dumb as a bit of a brigham brick now now that's of fish she's not those unfair to her she had a spelling problem doctor is a truth you read her tweet no yeah interesting renault cheese what actually doing them but i mean i must bella here and there too but it if i was wrong a truck i would have some one deal tetracycline the tweet than yet magno the dr the president that's interesting are is she did she go to borden graduate school of that the truth she do like donald trump just award underground your claim visits the cream look i think he is the smartest he us hands down here but he.

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"tetracycline" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

PBS NewsHour

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"tetracycline" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

"That means that that bacteria resistant to all those antibiotics you don't want to get infected with one of these and these are bacteria that we actually isolated from the food supply he sequences the genomes of e coli from food and from people comparing them to a database of seven thousand distinct types of the bacteria or trying to figure out hated this urinary tract infection come from the e coli from animals or from food he says there is a strong case linking the use of antibiotics in livestock to the spread of drugresistant bacteria in humans so on every grocery store shelf in this country i guarantee you you're gonna find drugresistant bacteria on the needs of the shelves and then they get in our guts when we consume the meat from those animals most of the time that's a dead end right we will eventually get rid of those bacterial shedom away but some times they'll take hold in the 1950s farmers discovered feeding livestock steady low doses of antibiotics made them grow faster but this socalled sub therapeutic use of these precious drugs raised concern in the medical community and the government it 19th seventy seven the us food and drug administration proposed a ban on sub therapeutic uses of penicillin and tetracycline in animal production but the rule was never enacted and the problem worsened he 1989 human and livestock usage of antibiotics was about equal today agriculture accounts for about three quarters of all the antibiotics used in the united states.

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