35 Burst results for "ten years"

NASA Announces Plans To Launch Chimpanzee Into Sun

The Topical

03:39 min | 2 d ago

NASA Announces Plans To Launch Chimpanzee Into Sun

"NASA is once again looking to further our knowledge of the universe and the effects. It has on life here on earth, which is exactly why the Space Agency is announced. It is now planning to launch a chimpanzee into the sun within the next ten years. The science world is calling the efforts a crucial step forward in solar exploration and better understanding how species react to being deposited into the sons twenty seven million. Degree plasma core for more on this monumental mission were joined by Opie our science reporter Rebecca Neal. Hi. Leslie Rebecca. How does NASA plan on pulling this off? Well, I, spoke with Nastas lead on the mission Tom Danes and he told me that chimpanzee will be put in a capsule that will contain several sophisticated instruments that would monitor how the animal reacts as it plunges into a burning ball of gas eight, hundred sixty. Five thousand miles in diameter. Here's Danes with some more details. The heat sensors to the chimpanzees body will provide us with real time data about what he's experiencing is he's in by the Sun's gravity as a close biological relative to our species. We believe his skin will react similarly to the sons extreme heat and aggressive UV radiation, and hypothetically his body will disintegrate at a similar rate to human beans right and if. The mission is successful. Hopefully, what we learned from this mission will pave the way for sending human astronauts into the sun on a regular basis. So is the idea here that there could maybe one day be a permanent colony on the sun for humans to get launch to in evaporate and a hellish fire on a regular basis well, Dan said that is a long term goal, but I they need to monitor how the. Chimpanzee handles the sons, ten thousand degrees, surface right patients whose key. Now, this is a bold mission but not the first of its kind correct. That's right a mission like this has happened before but on a smaller scale, for example, on NASA's first attempt to land on the moon with Apollo Eleven, the agency strapped and unprotected duck to the side of the space shuttle the duck perished immediately upon takeoff which helped NASA. Stand the benefits of being inside the capsule as opposed to outside of it. When shooting towards space, they've also experimented with abandoning several elephants on Mars and sending a capsule full of turtles deep into the void of space to be consumed by a black hole. These have all been instrumental to the revolutionary undertaking NASA announced today definitely what are the chances of something going wrong? Well, space travel is inherently dangerous as many Americans. Still, remember several horses never even made it into orbit aboard the space shuttle Challenger but Danes told me that they plan on testing their launch model thousands of times to ensure that the chimpanzee reaches the Sun's core safely before anything goes wrong on its way there there's no have any idea who will be manning this mission to the SUN NASA is keeping its potential chimpanzee roster under wraps right now but sources tell. Me The leading candidate is a seven-year-old chimpanzee named Bobo currently taking up residence at Lincoln Park Zoo in Chicago. NASA

Nasa Tom Danes Space Agency Leslie Rebecca Rebecca Neal Lincoln Park Zoo Reporter Chicago Bobo Nastas DAN
COVID-19 Vaccine Ethics: Who Gets It First and Other Issues

Science Talk

04:27 min | 2 d ago

COVID-19 Vaccine Ethics: Who Gets It First and Other Issues

"US government's. Warp speed is ambitiously trying to create test and licensed vaccine for covid nineteen in less than a year compared to the five to ten years typically needed for a new vaccine. The program is borrowing strategies from a crash effort undertaken in the nineteen fifties against polio. Arthur caplan was seven years old when that paralytic disease which had been terrifying parents nationwide came to his town. Last. People. In America. Get. Polio in the Boston outbreak of nineteen, fifty seven, that's where I'm from. Saw Kids in our loans on kids die in the floor. It's one of the reasons I got interested in medical ethics. The Polio vaccine developed in the fifties it saved millions of lives and brought us tantalizingly close to eradicating the disease altogether. But in the haste to produce them researchers and manufacturers occasionally made mistakes and crossed ethical boundaries. Experimental vaccines were tested on intellectually disabled children, for example, as well as millions of people in the Belgian Congo and the Soviet Union who were not given the option for informed consent that today we consider indispensable. Medical ethics come a long way in the past sixty, five years. The World Health Organization has already set up a working group on ethics and Kobe Nineteen of which Kaplan is a member. They have started thinking through many of the tough questions ahead as companies race to test experimental vaccines, and we hope eventually ramp up manufacturing of those who succeed to billions of doses. Worldwide these questions include how can we make sure vaccine trials don't exploit people or enroll too few participants from black native Latino communities who are disproportionately sickened been killed by this disease who will get approved vaccines I and who will pay for them and what if anything should we do about vaccines being sold on the black market? The most immediate questions involve large-scale clinical trials those trials will take months to produce results. Can says, one reason is if I give you the experimental vaccine. Then, I have to wait for the. Virus in nature to infect me to see whether I'm going to do better than a group that didn't get vaccine usually have a placebo control group were you don't give them an active agent and you sort of monitor one against the other. If, you're waiting for natural infectivity with Kobe we have a problem because the Degree to which the becoming infect is very slow. So you'll notice that people are starting to recruit subjects for trials right now in hot spots, they may be looking at Brazil. They may be looking at Atlanta it could be looking at a region of the country that has. A A big outbreak. But at the same time, morally we have to try and tell people who sign up for vaccination studies they should not get themselves infected. So it's a sort of moral catch twenty two, you can't really. Encourage people to be reckless and get themselves. In fact, an the problem is you're probably not going to take sicker people because it makes it difficult to assess whether a vaccine is causing an adverse event or an underlying illnesses causing events. Most of the people who come into these big vaccine trials are healthy volunteer still they're younger. Is An effort underway. In the NIH sponsor trials to try and get more diversity ethnicity and race but a lack of transparency in who is being selected for the vaccine trials has raised concerns that historically underrepresented communities may once again be overlooked. Kaplan says that the preference for healthy volunteers is also one of the reasons that vaccine testers probably won't turn to one otherwise logical place to recruit participants prisons where corona virus has been running rampant, you can't use a vulnerable population because you worry that they can't consent. They're gonNA try and say I'll do it because they want to get out of jail or get parole the other main reason why Is prison populations usually have two or three underlying diseases. I know MTV everybody's at the gym looks such Arnold Schwarzenegger. But in fact, hepatitis HIV drug abuse is a bunch of reasons why they're not a best subjects for for any beginning studies

Polio Vaccine Kaplan Polio Kobe Arthur Caplan Belgian Congo United States NIH MTV Arnold Schwarzenegger Soviet Union America Boston World Health Organization Brazil Atlanta
Insights on Financial Planning for Millennials in the Era of COVID-19

Manage Your Damn Money: The Podcast

03:35 min | 3 d ago

Insights on Financial Planning for Millennials in the Era of COVID-19

"Are some of the things that you're revising people? What are your thoughts around? You know tips for managing your money during this financial crisis that we're having right now? Yes. So again in the very narrow lane of being geared toward millennial. So folks in late twenty s early to late thirties We're we're we're really talking a lot more about like security and you know the fact that like we as millennials aren't super unique position that we live through what we thought at the time was once. In a lifetime financial crisis in two, thousand and eight. So you know a lot of us like myself and my clothes Ben graduated into that two thousand, eight financial crisis world where you know you got a person who's just now graduating from college with zero work experience and a bachelors degree. Competing for jobs against somebody's got ten years of work experience in A. PhD for the same position. Right that was like a mind blowing time and we thought that once we got to the other side of it. It would be something that we could talk about in the past in the rear view mirror and it would be something that like remember that time when dot dot dot. But here we go. Again, you know ten years later let's call it where all of a sudden we're in the middle of a health prices that turned into a financial crisis in the folks who were talking about were literally just now starting to get on solid ground, right? It took five six seven years on a lot of cases for folks to kind of find their footing and like feel like they legitimately had a handle on their finances and so a lot of the stuff that we're talking about now as pertains to millennials is about security. So like that Emergency Fund that you hear about the folks are supposed to. Have three to six months save depending on whether you're a single a couple, and if you're a couple whether the other person in the household has an income to. So those kind of things are the conversations that traditionally nobody wants to hear about it because it's not exciting it's not sexy is like oh you tell them me to save more money. Okay. I don't WanNa do that. But why people are like well, how do I do that Emergency Fund thing. I do I know if I have enough how much is enough like those kind of things of the conversations that are coming up a lot more now separate and apart from that for the folks that. You know they're high earning millennials what we in my business referred to his Henry's high earners who are not rich yet. For those people, there's opportunities to be strategic about how they approach the market and what is happening right now and one of the pieces I just recently wrote for business insider was about ways that hiring millennials can take advantage of the next financial downturn in one of the ways that that I mentioned in. There was having some cash available for when the market does fall again, like it did in March of of this year. So that means getting your 401k contributions into your retirement. Plan earlier than December because normally the way you allocate percentage of your paycheck to your 401k plan at scheduled out so that by December it all gets there but if you accelerate those payments now to make sure that you get the cash in there earlier today you might have an opportunity to take advantage of a down market. If one presents itself at some point, you know later this year heading up to the election. So things like that that a tactical simple that you can, you can take advantage of. Are a lot of what we spend time focused on.

Emergency Fund BEN Henry
Commit to Learning from the Greats on a Daily Basis With Erynn Bell

Daily Sales Tips

02:33 min | 3 d ago

Commit to Learning from the Greats on a Daily Basis With Erynn Bell

"Today's tip comes from Erin Bell. Aaron is the director of enterprise sales at degrade with ten years in both beat B. and B. Two C. sales she's lived all over the country and the world proving herself to be a go getter and a risk taker, a committed lifelong learner. She's always looking for ways to learn from others. But today we get to learn from her here. She is some of the best sales people. I. Now are the ones that are voracious in their everyday learning, foul thought leaders and organizations within the industries that you work with read listen and watch what they are. Talking. About daily for me, I go straight to the McKenzie's and Deloitte to the world. I'm constantly trolling through their websites searching not only for my prospects being mentioned but also what they are writing about in general about business, the markets what is going on in the world remember learning is not a journey with a start an end it is continuous. If you get your quote unquote reading at Baths in, you will actually train your brain to start to think in this way, you will also build up your confidence as well. You will begin to have conversations that matter and are informed. You will build up your authentic expertise and reputation as a thought leader with your prospects. Then start incorporating these nuggets of wisdom whether they be articles, blog posts, podcasts, whatever it may be into your outbound prospecting. Don't have an ask straightaway connected back to your research on the pain points at that prospect is experiencing start making some deposits. Especially if your ideal buyer is at the executive level, this will help to confirm with them that it is worth it to spend some time with you. An example of this might be I noticed in your company's ten report that you mentioned X. Y. Zad were strategic global business objectives into twenty twenty one as Mackenzie said in this Article Doing Avian. See are of the utmost importance in order to achieve x lines at or. Here's a staggering staff, Marie sent Deloitte Study Dot Dot dot but remember make sure their sources you're calling from are credible and carry a fair bit of weight in your industry or the industry of your buyer by elevating your own reading and worldview you level yourself up as a sales person. You do not need to know everything but being voracious in your own learning and awareness of the world will help you to level up as a salesperson exponentially

Erin Bell Deloitte X. Y. Zad Aaron Baths Director Mckenzie Marie Executive Mackenzie
Should You Offer a Lifetime Deal?

The $100 MBA Show

06:05 min | 3 d ago

Should You Offer a Lifetime Deal?

"WanNa. Start today's than by explaining why businesses consider offering lifetime deals. The bottom line is, is that lifetime he is often generate a large lump sum of revenue of cash. It's a cash grab really they might partner with a deal signed with large affiliates or they offer it to their list, and because such an incredible deal, it's a lifetime deal. They'll get lots of sales at the start people see this as a way. To Fund, their business at the star. So that's kind of the motivation behind lifetime deals outside of that. It also gives you new users, new customers, people to give you feedback the star and people that are invested. That's really the positives and and there's not really much outside of that. That's positive. Just being frank but for many people, that's a lot. You know making a lot of money at the start to fund the business. Can, really help them and really propel the business to avaiable full-time option for them and allow them to make some hires and scale quickly the issue is that most products and services have a running cost. So even if you say for example, sell a lifetime deal for a thousand dollars per customer yes. You'll earn a thousand dollars, but each customer will have a cost for each subsequent year to come. Agree. Thirty forty, fifty, sixty years for long as that person is alive right and some of us don't really do the math and that leads me to my I tip. You got to do the math. How much does it cost you per customer per year and a lot of people are like well, I sell my product it's course it's a forum it's something that really has a minimal cost on my end. And that's pretty much it. No you gotta dig deeper. You have cost Phantom costs that you're not counting like how much it cost you per customer for your web hosting to host your community to host your APP how much that cost on a monthly basis divided by the number of customers is cost more per customer. It's not a once in done kind of thing, the more traffic you have the more you have to pay what about customer support the more customers you have the more support staff you need the more time take from them you need. To factor that in, are there any other costs whether it's your time or money that's involved every time you have a customer, break it down because you might find out yes. This might be a very small amount per customer in it's worth to offer the lifetime deal but often more times than not when we do the math, you're like, wow, we start to break-even after five years and after five years we're losing money. Then after ten years, we're really losing money. So this really is a red flag that you can raise before you offer a lifetime deal. My next tip is you have to make sure that if you're going to offer a lifetime deal, you don't offer a deal or a plan or a product that they will not outgrow. The play of the lifetime deal is to give them something that is valuable, but is just to get them started. The point here is that get them onto your platform onto your product. And therefore get used to it. Love it enjoy it. But at some point, they're going to outgrow whether they need more contacts in your APP or the want to get access to more training. Basically, we're talking about here is you want to offer them the basic of basic plans. It's still valuable. It's still something that you would charge a monthly or annual basis for normally but. You, WanNa push them towards upgrading anytime. You're running a lifetime plan you should aim for seventy percent of the people that by will upgrade out of the lifetime plan. So lifetime is something that's basically temporary this takes a bit planning the six a bit of a branding and package INC when it comes to offering this lifetime deal so don't rush into a lifetime deal if. You're not ready. Make sure you're crafting the right one. So you know that people will be graduating to different plants off the lifetime. The third thing I want to mention is often in my experience lifetime customers in general, not all of them of course, but in general will tend to be difficult customers to deal with what you mean by that well, people that don't invest much. Will actually cost you more time and more headaches people that actually pay you a lot of money. They do the work that get the most out of it and they're professional they get it. They understand the onus is on them to make it happen. But those who pay the minimum and Gopher lifetime deals people that maybe don't really take action but they will complain about every little thing if they have the opportunity of course, I'm speaking in. Generalities of course, there are lifetime deal customers that are hard working that are serious about their business and they are great and they're not headaches. But if we're talking about a percentage or a majority of the users, higher paying customers are lower maintenance customers that's just the facts of business. So I want to give you some direct advice. If you do the math, you have a graduation plan a plan to get them to upgrade out a lifetime. And everything pans out and it's very, very minimal cost on you. Even if you stretch out of twenty thirty years of this customer being active, then go for the lifetime plan if not avoided if you can even if it means growing slower if you're still looking for that cash grab, my advice is limit the number of lifetime members whether it's one hundred or two hundred people Max and then you. Close it. This will create scarcity and it will also allow you to say, Hey, this is the amount of money I will get from this lifetime offer I can work with us the influx of cash I need, and from there you're only dealing with a minimal number of customers that are dealing with the lifetime planet you have to pay for for the longevity of your business in for their

Partner Frank Gopher Package Inc
Self storage units having a tough time

Clark Howard Show

03:45 min | 4 d ago

Self storage units having a tough time

"Americans love. Renting storage facilities. And it's something that the whole rest of the world shakes it's heads at because we have. Every square footage per person residential space that is the largest in the world the average size of a house has gone up so much over the last two generations even though the number of people per household has gone way down. But at the same time in addition to our places we live, we have all these self storage facilities and there are any of a number of reasons why we would have them. The industry historically has. Rented to people who are going through some kind of life change a relocation some as passed away could be a, you know a family splitting apart. There there are a number of reasons why people might rent a storage facility in addition to just having to might stuff and they store it. Well. One of my kids recently was. Considering renting a storage facility for six months and. Shopped around and found such differences from one location to another it was a stunner. And then. The places would not leave her alone. Once, she had contacted someone they were desperate. To have her rat. And we're offering all kinds of discounts and deals in free months and I was what's going on? Well. It turns out the big issue is the industry's gotten too big. According to industry data than number of storage places has gone up twenty five percent in about a ten year period and you look all around. Urban and suburban areas around the country in you see these much bigger storage facilities being built and many times at prime corners where they're visible Wada Times freeway exits, and so the industry has outgrown itself and then I I saw an eight M in the new. York Times. That Corona virus has made a difference and they don't really explain why they think corona virus has made a difference. My guess is that people are shopping less I mean one of the reasons people buy so much stuff is that we have historically had the greatest amount of retail square footage in the world three times larger per person than any other country in the developed world. So we Aben. Shopaholics, and is shared with you over the last several months. The amount of shopping doing has been going down down down. So if you have a storage facility. The you're renting at. I know it's a hassle to move your stuff. But go re shop what you're paying. You'll find potentially a much lower prices than what you're currently paying. You can go back to the people you're renting from and say, Hey, I'm going to bail on you because I found a deal. You know right down the street for half of what you're charging. And odds are they can't afford to lose you. And they'll offer you a deal to keep you

Wada Times York Times
Services sector index increases to 58.1 reading in July

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 4 d ago

Services sector index increases to 58.1 reading in July

"A new report finds activity in the services sector picked up last month most Americans work in the services sector and the institute for supply management says its index for it rose to a reading of fifty eight point one in July that's a full point higher than June the index had been in expansion territory for more than ten years until plunging in April and may as the corona virus pandemic hit the economy hard concerns remain about whether the service sector recovery will process with the recent resurgence of confirmed cases the report comes the same day payroll processor ADP reported U. S. businesses added just one hundred and sixty seven thousand jobs in July Ben Thomas Washington

ADP Ben Thomas Washington
Emily Gorcenski - Making Nazis cry

Made Of Human with Sofie Hagen

06:19 min | 4 d ago

Emily Gorcenski - Making Nazis cry

"People might not know who you are, which would be an awful shame because you one of the coolest people ever. Would you introduce yourself. Sure My Name's Emily Sanski. I am. Anything say work as a data scientist. But also activist and as many who? Studies on tracks modern white supremacy in hate movements. Technologist hockey player. All sorts of things. So I don't know what is what does it mean to be something where somebody? Wow, that's big. That's big from the from the very beginning. I think one of the things that when I was reading about you. A lot of places at set that you're a person who is known for making that cease cry. What does that stem from? That is true so As a little bit of background I'm from Charlottesville Virginia. or at least I spent. Ten years living there. And of course, Charlottesville was the site of the infamous neo-nazi rally in two thousand, seventeen where. A terror attack happened in the TIKI torches and all of that stuff right so sort of. Stuff that we've seen all around the world. And one of the Neo Nazis that was there marching at the rally was a man by the name of Christopher Cantwell and during Tiki Torch Rally, he pepper sprayed me. Along with several other people. And? End You know he was also at the time filming a documentary with Vice News And so what happened was after the rally in the? Vice and HBO. Race to put out this documentary about what had happened they had some very dramatic footage and. Christine was featured very prominently in in all of this and talking about. How he wanted to kill more people and you know showing off his guns and all of these things. Well, the thing is I knew who can't was and I knew that he pepper sprayed me because he posted a picture of himself pepper spraying me as his facebook header the next morning. So I went to the police and made the decision to rest charges against him. and. When he found out that there is a warrant for his arrest. This was shortly after the vice documentary came out with all of his bravado in his you know McKee's mount all of that. So this. News of this warrant comes out and he records himself in a hotel room somewhere in North Carolina or somewhere. Crying. On on this like stream because he's worried that he's got this this warrant for his arrest. And so this sort of very poor. Poorly intentioned little video that he produced. Of himself like sobbing, not quite sobbing but definitely sniffling. Earned him the nickname of decrying Nazi. So he became in within the span of just a few days he went from being this. You Know Big Bold Neo Nazi to this reduced hulk of a man. Who is crying because he you know got caught doing violence. And so that became a sort of a worldwide mean. And this happened because I was one of two people to press charges against him so. I've earned the reputation for making Nazis crappy, and since then I've also made several other Nazis cry for various reasons. And so I guess that is just now the reputation that I have. It's it's funny. You should say he was caught. Doing like very much promoted himself doing the line. You know it baffles the mind. This was such a bizarre sequence of events right because you know here he is somebody that went on camera and talked about how he wanted to be more violent. He was trying to be more violent. You know all of this stuff. and. Then when he acted violently, he bragged about it, you know Oh look at all the you know he calls everyone communists, of course, but all the commies that I guessed. And then he gets caught doing it and then he's like, oh no, there's consequences for my actions. Any cries. But it didn't end there right because. Sensible people when facing forty years in prison as he was. Would Shut their mouths but he did not know he started he continued recording his podcast from jail. And then when he was let out on bail. Despite having literally admitted to pepper spraying me. He then sued me and my co defendant or CO complaining rather in Federal Court. So there is a federal lawsuit against me. For claiming that he pepper sprayed me. Of courses lawsuit eventually went away. It was fine. But it I mean the tied up year life and as a result of this and as a result of his. Many. Attempts to to silence and intimidate me and I actually had to leave Charlotte. So I had to leave the country. In fact, I now live in Germany And so you know the sort of. End of the story or the maybe it's not the end. But the chapter that the story is now on is that Chris can't will plate pleaded guilty to. Two counts of assault. He was let out of jail. So he didn't get the forty years in prison. You got you know basically. Slept on the rest and sent back to his home but he was banned from the state of Virginia for for five years. Well, he didn't make it five years because now he's sitting in a New Hampshire. Jail. Awaiting federal charges where he is now facing thirty two years in prison for extorting. In violently threatening. Another fellow nutmegger.

Mckee Christopher Cantwell Charlottesville Chris Emily Sanski Scientist Hockey Facebook Assault Federal Court Virginia Christine New Hampshire North Carolina Virginia. Germany Charlotte
Abby Wambach: If you're not a good leader on the bench, you cannot call yourself a good leader on the field.

Skimm'd from The Couch

06:04 min | 5 d ago

Abby Wambach: If you're not a good leader on the bench, you cannot call yourself a good leader on the field.

"Hey everyone. This show might sound a bit different today because we're skimming from three different couches. The scam is still working from home for the time being because of covid nineteen. Today, we have a very special guest joining us abby Wambach is here with us on skin from the couch she is a two time Olympic gold medalist, a FIFA World Cup champion, and a member of the national soccer hall of fame. Also, she hasn't slowed down in retirement she is now a New York Times. Author and equal pay activists. We I had the pleasure of meeting abby when we spoke to her wife, Glennon Doyle on the show in March and we dragged her onto the podcast as well, and if you haven't listened to that episode, go check it out. It's a good one abby. Thank you so much for joining us today. Welcome to skin from the catch. Yeah. Thanks for having me. I'm so thrilled and honored to be with you all on three different couches. Thou-. Before. We jump into our first question I have to tell you I was looking at our prep for this and there was one bullet in here. That has really made me laugh as I have to share it, which is that you used to have a special card that got you a free Burrito a day from AAA but it stopped working when you're retired that seems passive aggressive for sure to Poli what the F.. Yeah. So when I first got this card, it was Gosh I must've been ten years ago now and you know like the gold cards portly for life like essentially my name is on it and you guys don't know how I go way back. From the early days and I mean I would get a Burrito. Day You guys we're both creatures of habits. I respect this. Yeah. It was crazy and this is before we really knew how many calories were in each burrito. Bowl that I would make or Burrito early days. and. So then yeah, of course when I retired, I was super excited to still be able to get one free Burrito a week for year, but they never really checked up on it but then I think when I got a family when I married Glenn and attained. That you know fifteen dollar meal. Turned into a sixty five dollar meal or seventy dollars meal for the whole family and pull was like I. Don't know if we're GONNA keep floating this for her so. It was a good run while it lasted I'm sorry that you've struggled with that but I did make me laugh as read. So, we're going to jump into our very first question. We'd like to ask everybody it just skim your resume skin my resume. It's so funny because when you retire, that's like that's essentially what I've had to do over the last four or five years of my life since retiring from playing on the national team, and if people don't really know I played for a long time on our women's national team. So Ski. My life I'm the youngest of seven children I grew up in Rochester New York, and I went to the University of Florida and played soccer there for four seasons where after I was drafted number two by the way just remember this folks you don't get drafted number one. You can still succeed I was drafted number two out of college to go play for a team called The Washington freedom the best player in. The world at the time. Mia. Hamm played on that team and it really changed my life because we were able to develop a connection that then transferred into me getting called into the national team and playing on the national team in scoring goals in the national team, and then I had a pretty long career representing his country won a gold medal. I want a couple of medals actually I won a fee. For Women's World Cup. World. Cup. I should say it doesn't matter if you're a guy or girl that's pretty awesome in my retirement I have kind of taken on this activism role that when I play ironically when I played I was a little bit more like just go and do my job and we were going to show our activism rather than talk about it. But when you quit playing, you gotta actually transfer that. Because I can't play anymore I can't show it in the ways that I used to. So I've transitioned into becoming a public speaker and an activist and apparent and wife, and that is my skin. Has a great skin? What is it like to be really good at something where young 'cause I have? No clue. Yeah I mean it's confidence building you know I felt like. Okay. I know that I'm good at this thing over here but I think you know all of us have our little things right? Like no matter what kind of. Place we grew up or family we grew up in or what kind of trauma we we experienced as a child because we all do some of US feel like we're unlovable my case in particular some of us were neglected. Some of us were over parented like we all have problems inside of our family dynamics that for me really allowed me to and gave me the courage to propel in this kind of an individualistic career. So when I was young I kind of was a very big risk taker. I was a free spirit is what they called me, I think that's what they call children who don't follow the rules as much as their parents want them to and I think that the other side of that coin is I was really trying to get the attention of my parents, right. So the very thing that might have felt trauma or hardship from in my childhood is the very thing that made me successful. So I have to always remember that like as much as I as young as seven children. As much as all of us wanted the attention of our parents, I do think that kind of parent team actually shaped me and and allowed me to explore this competitiveness inside. In this drive and this embiid to go after what I needed and what I wanted. So I give a lot of credit to that form of parenting into that trauma

Abby Wambach Soccer New York Times Glennon Doyle Gold Medal Fifa Olympic United States Washington Bowl Glenn Hamm SKI Rochester University Of Florida New York
Are Movie Theaters Screwed?

The Big Picture

04:48 min | 5 d ago

Are Movie Theaters Screwed?

"I'm Sean. Fantasy and Amanda Events, and this is the big picture. A conversation show about movies. There is a lot of news about movies in the world right now, but not so many movies, it is officially August which means three things one, it is hot as hell outside. To its Amandus, birthday happy, birthday Amanda. Thank you shot three a very bad time for movies and this year. Of course, it's unusually bad. Thanks to covid nineteen. So man, we have a lot to talk about today's episode a lot about the state of the movie business and more specifically about where you didn't spend your birthday, which is in a movie theater. Because movie theaters are not open and it's sort of feels like movie theaters are screwed. We're going to talk a little bit about some of the decisions that Mc made last week and the ramifications of that, and maybe some of the financial decisions that AMC made earlier today, and what that means for the future of movies. It's a very complicated time. Can you help us understand just a little bit of what transpired last week between? AMC and Universal Studios. Yes. So we got the ultimate resolution of the great trolls world tour fight of twenty twenty, which is that after much public negotiating and wild statements made on both sides, AMC theaters and universal came to an agreement and universal movies. Now will be shown in AMC theaters with a new theatrical window of seventeen days, which is notably shorter than the previous window that most that all studios and movies operated under in the United States. That window used to be in the neighborhood of between two and three months, and that meant films has a plan theaters for nearly a quarter of the year and sometimes more than that before you could find them at home and that's changing I sort of I. You know it's clearly changing for the purposes of universal movies. No other studio has come to this agreement and universal. Universal has only come to this agreement with one theater chain. Am See. So this is not a cataclysmic event, but it certainly seems presidential. It certainly seems as if it's something that is going to send shockwaves throughout the industry for the future. You know. Obviously, we spent so much time on this show talking about the slow atrophying of the theatrical experience. This feels as significant. A story has happened in that respect I was just doing some doing some Napkin math last night about box office receipts, and so over the past ten years, the annual domestic box office has averaged about eleven eleven, billion dollars in the United, states, and right now, it sits at about one point, eight, billion dollars with just about two plus months of true box office. So. These are really desperate times for movie theaters and so am see I. I'm trying to understand what specifically is motivating AMC's whiplash decision making because as you said, Adam Erin who is the CEO of AMC had some very strong words for universal's decision about trolls world tour about four or five months ago, and now they've made nice and in fact it it sort of feels like AMC took a hit here in this negotiation, what do you think is animating their their decision making deep financial desperation just this absolute total. What else can we do to keep the lights on? which I am not a do not have an MBA. Okay, and I'm not an economist, but there has a lot has been written. You know in deadline and in the Wall Street, Journal and the trades about the extremely precarious financial situation of AMC in particular, and obviously all of this is heightened by the fact that movie theaters have not been open for months now and they don't have a business model because of covid nineteen but I think you know covid nineteen has really exacerbated. What was. A A tricky situation for all movie theaters. But especially, it seems AMC just because of how it's business it structured and you mentioned today there assume news about AMC's restructuring in order to. Reallocate some of its debt, but it just all seems under the guise of we have to keep the lights on because we do not have cash on hand and movie theaters aren't open and we don't know when they're going to be able to be open most places, and if we don't have cash coming in, then our business no longer exists. So AMC it even it seems within the realm of the theater chains who are all obviously impacted by covid nineteen seems to be really motivated to figure out any income stream that it can right

AMC United States Amanda Events Universal Studios Twenty Twenty Fantasy MC United Journal CEO Adam Erin
Are Movie Theaters Screwed?

The Big Picture

05:26 min | 5 d ago

Are Movie Theaters Screwed?

"I'm Sean. Fantasy and Amanda Events, and this is the big picture. A conversation show about movies. There is a lot of news about movies in the world right now, but not so many movies, it is officially August which means three things one, it is hot as hell outside. To its Amandus, birthday happy, birthday Amanda. Thank you shot three a very bad time for movies and this year. Of course, it's unusually bad. Thanks to covid nineteen. So man, we have a lot to talk about today's episode a lot about the state of the movie business and more specifically about where you didn't spend your birthday, which is in a movie theater. Because movie theaters are not open and it's sort of feels like movie theaters are screwed. We're going to talk a little bit about some of the decisions that Mc made last week and the ramifications of that, and maybe some of the financial decisions that AMC made earlier today, and what that means for the future of movies. It's a very complicated time. Can you help us understand just a little bit of what transpired last week between? AMC and Universal Studios. Yes. So we got the ultimate resolution of the great trolls world tour fight of twenty twenty, which is that after much public negotiating and wild statements made on both sides, AMC theaters and universal came to an agreement and universal movies. Now will be shown in AMC theaters with a new theatrical window of seventeen days, which is notably shorter than the previous window that most that all studios and movies operated under in the United States. That window used to be in the neighborhood of between two and three months, and that meant films has a plan theaters for nearly a quarter of the year and sometimes more than that before you could find them at home and that's changing I sort of I. You know it's clearly changing for the purposes of universal movies. No other studio has come to this agreement and universal. Universal has only come to this agreement with one theater chain. Am See. So this is not a cataclysmic event, but it certainly seems presidential. It certainly seems as if it's something that is going to send shockwaves throughout the industry for the future. You know. Obviously, we spent so much time on this show talking about the slow atrophying of the theatrical experience. This feels as significant. A story has happened in that respect I was just doing some doing some Napkin math last night about box office receipts, and so over the past ten years, the annual domestic box office has averaged about eleven eleven, billion dollars in the United, states, and right now, it sits at about one point, eight, billion dollars with just about two plus months of true box office. So. These are really desperate times for movie theaters and so am see I. I'm trying to understand what specifically is motivating AMC's whiplash decision making because as you said, Adam Erin who is the CEO of AMC had some very strong words for universal's decision about trolls world tour about four or five months ago, and now they've made nice and in fact it it sort of feels like AMC took a hit here in this negotiation, what do you think is animating their their decision making deep financial desperation just this absolute total. What else can we do to keep the lights on? which I am not a do not have an MBA. Okay, and I'm not an economist, but there has a lot has been written. You know in deadline and in the Wall Street, Journal and the trades about the extremely precarious financial situation of AMC in particular, and obviously all of this is heightened by the fact that movie theaters have not been open for months now and they don't have a business model because of covid nineteen but I think you know covid nineteen has really exacerbated. What was. A A tricky situation for all movie theaters. But especially, it seems AMC just because of how it's business it structured and you mentioned today there assume news about AMC's restructuring in order to. Reallocate some of its debt, but it just all seems under the guise of we have to keep the lights on because we do not have cash on hand and movie theaters aren't open and we don't know when they're going to be able to be open most places, and if we don't have cash coming in, then our business no longer exists. So AMC it even it seems within the realm of the theater chains who are all obviously impacted by covid nineteen seems to be really motivated to figure out any income stream that it can right now. That's. That's at least my reading I. Don't know what you think. No I. think that's exactly right and I think it's notable that in this deal with universal in addition to clearing new cash flow from that debt restructuring the you mentioned there, the AMC is going to get money from universal when it takes its films to peavy od after that seventeen day window, and that's that's a highly unusual arrangement for streaming revenue to filter back into a theatrical a theatrical. I don't what, what would you call it? A tithing basket I'm not sure what does that. What does that represent to Hansie's business I? Don't I'm not sure I understand

AMC Amanda Events Universal Studios Twenty Twenty United States Fantasy MC United Hansie Peavy Journal CEO Adam Erin
Airbus Makes Autonomous Takeoff & Landing

STRUCK: A Lightning Protection Podcast

04:53 min | 5 d ago

Airbus Makes Autonomous Takeoff & Landing

"Airbus they sell flying plane just completed successful to act a taxi takeoff and landing. So this is not a small plane either this was the eighth HR fifty one thousand X. WB. And obviously. full-scale like commercial, Wayne which is pretty cool. So is this getting close to market is something that's in our near future autonomous or we still a ways away why I kind of wonder if this is driven by all the can I, fly the plane like just GonNa be pilot to push the button no. Undefined that will not happen for a long time but I, it's a large airplane, the three fifty, a bigger playing the dash one thousand is is a very long aircraft. I think. Airbus's flexing their muscle a little bit and I think Boeing would have done it already to if they could have they got other problems right now they're trying to deal with. The ability to. Fly An aircraft autonomously of that size, and particularly taxi taxis the place where a lot more difficulties it is not easy. So. You have to have a very, very talented engineering staff to even get close to do something like that and great software engineers and with all the ev to. Electric vertical-takeoff-landing aircraft talking by being autonomous and Honeywell and some others and Garm, and doing a lot of things that are nearly autonomous. I'm not surprised they Airbus's stepped up and say, okay, watch this. No way no way they went to show that yeah. Airbus isn't playing either they if they wanted to do it, they could do it but on the other side. Airbus has watched some of the problems that Boeing and Airbus as had with politics make mistakes in the air and I know Boeing this past week talked about the CEO was talking about. How the aircraft is, GonNa. Be More autonomous in that. They were GonNa let pilots make as many. critical decisions whether they could get their craft in trouble and Airbus has been down that path. His was done that long ago. So I'm not surprised that Airbuses doing it. How how would they would ever? I don't think wherever to the point in the next ten years. I don't see there's going to be autonomous aircraft in a commercial sense either cargo or commercial flight. But if it does release some of the burden on the pilots and make the airplane fly cleaner and smoother on all that I would expect a lot of those pieces of information that to Airbus has developed on this project will be integrated into the aircraft over time will be well, how does this affect pilots in the long term? So say you know ten years from now pilots don't have to take off they don't have to land. And they don't have to do that much. Do they become quickly out of practice like actually having to do these things to say the system is like not working one day and they have to land it and haven't landed a plane in a hundred flights I mean is this Nina I mean like if you don't Cook dinner every night, you get rusty at at whipping up of really nice meal. You know what I mean yes I think that's totally true I it's just a nature. Outcome that it's inevitable the the other side of that is. Companies like Airbus and Boeing. Aircraft Company have the ability to create simulators and put pilots in simulators into them. Quote fly the airplane. because the the one thing you don't want to burn a bunch of fuel getting a pilot up to speed if you don't have to And if there's any complacency. The regulatory bodies like Yasa and the FAA will be all over it. And the the first people usually complain about not getting enough lifetime other pilots quite honestly they wanna be as. As. Ever that's that's the big push by all the pilots. Unions is proficiency proficiency proficiency and proficiency means seat time actually flying the airplane in fact I remember flying on southwest. A couple of times this that's been tennis years ago maybe a little bit longer. Remember flying I remember the aircraft being hand flown. For landing I thought boy that is so it's been a longest time that I've been on an aircraft been hand flown because he just put the out how do you put on the flight path and it just flies it but the south I ask southwest pilot while was leaving the airplane you flew that you flew that by hand all the way down he goes. Yeah. It's it's he said it's good for US pilots to fly the aircraft. It just gives us more proficiency. So I don't see this is taking over. Time. But I do think there are when having redundant systems or helpful systems on aircraft and pilots out of trouble.

Airbus Boeing Aircraft Company Garm Wayne Honeywell United States Yasa FAA Airbuses CEO Tennis
Changing Planes and Plans with Jen Ruiz

Cafe con Pam Podcast

03:56 min | 6 d ago

Changing Planes and Plans with Jen Ruiz

"Jenin I talk about her life in Puerto Rico growing up in Philadelphia what it was like to go to law school. Then what a became not practicing law as she started solo traveling and we of course talked about what inspired her to travel, which was being thirty and not being married and having children and wanting that resonated with me as when she talked about letting things be when letting things happen and unfold as they are supposed to when you're a planner and I, think this is one of the things when we get into this topic in the interview that is going to resonate with you as we live through pandemic Jen. Also, shares with us about self publishing becoming a travel blogger and I talk about Australia at the trip that I was going to take to Australia that ended up obviously not taking because that was going to happen between March and April and and that was right when all the things went down. So of course, I didn't make to Ustralia but I did make it to speak at that conference. So I can still call myself an international speaker because I got to speak honest age in Australia while I was in San Diego huckle is that but a winner I'll leave that for another story I will let you enjoy conversation with Jen druce. Jan. welcome together on Prem. How are you? I'm good. How are you is So you are currently in Puerto Rico I. Am okay I'm in Sunny San Diego we are I guess coasts. So you're I'm the Atlantic. Ocean Yes but we both are blessed with beautiful weather I know I. Love Puerto Rican put her because one of my favorite places in the world I love Puerto Rico when I went outside Omega I was from the Caribbean in a past life. I felt home. I'm so happy to hear that I'm so happy to hear that I want more people to come and if they have been before to revisit and if they. Haven't come for the first time because Puerto Rico really is an amazing place and gets a little bit of a bad rep with everything that's happened in the last few years but it just is so resilient and it's such a beautiful island with a lot of natural attractions and you know metropolitan bustling area and a lot of history and culture, and it's just amazing. So I'm so happy to hear that you enjoy it as well for sure in the food I like food. I've had to work really hard to not gain weight while I've been here. Yeah. Go every day. You know it's good for the soul but not necessarily for the hearts up out of moderation I. Suggest let's explore your stories to tell us what's your background with your heritage. So I am Puerto Rican, I was born here on the island I moved when I was six, my family was looking for better opportunities like so many others in that generation I think from the island they just now have their children have started returning to the island and it's a nice thing to see because there is still remaining. Anybody. Who left still has a lot of pride and still loves to share and see things from the island and you know just a sensible Rudo really within everybody here, and so I moved when I was six I grew up in Philadelphia and then I ended up going to college in Miami which became like a second home for me I. Really Love South Florida I went to law school in Baltimore and then I was like, what was I thinking I should've just stayed in south Florida. So mmediately to law school at right back and I was living there for many years I guess ten years. Between School and coming back. Loved it was the one place that was very just like you said, just felt very like home like the people there. I could relate to them like they had delicious food that I liked eating every radio station and play to get the on. Just, a really natural fit and loved it and I still do and I still consider south Florida to be a second home but it's also very nice for me to have this opportunity to come back nappy areas Puerto Rico rather than just like from family visits and family trips and things like that. But on my own and really get an appreciation for the island

Puerto Rico Puerto Rican Australia Ustralia Philadelphia South Florida Jenin San Diego Sunny San Diego Jen Druce Caribbean Miami Baltimore
Interview With Carmela Wilkins

Revision Path

07:59 min | 6 d ago

Interview With Carmela Wilkins

"Now for this week's interview. I'm talking with Carmelo Wilkins a graphic designer at ab partners in New York City. Let's start the show. Paul Right. So tell us who you are and what you do everyone. My name is Carmel Wilkens and I'm a graphic designer ab partners, which is a digital strategy and creative storytelling agency that is black owned and founded Nice I. Definitely want to get more into that but before we do you know of course, we are recording this now it's in the middle of. Even to say, it's the middle because of the rising cases I feel like we're still somewhere in the beginning but how are you holding up during this time right now? Oh my goodness I would have to say the biggest struggle for existing in the same space in which I work and also live. Or I used to be able to leave my apartment, go to the office and then be able to come back home. You know my retreat my safe haven. But now there's no distinction between two because my desk in my bed are about I don't know a third of an inch away from one another. It something that I've experienced since working from home and having short from home that it's especially the first couple months was really difficult to to have that distinction to create space for myself where I can just rest be at. Men. Also explore my own personal pursuits within my practice. So that's something that's definitely been difficult and also having to support and maintain my family as the breadwinner, my family that live in Rhode Island, and during the beginning of the pandemic, the beginning of quarantine, I had to run around and figure out how to get my sister who studying abroad in Japan. While he was supposed to the umbrella in Japan this past semester from Tokyo back to the US. Yeah. It was. It was really intense. My greatest fear was number forty five was going to just block off all of East Asia including US citizens and that would cause an entirely new problem but are very lucky me and my mom are very lucky to get my sister over here as soon as we could very thankful for that. Haven't even think about like I knew that there were supposed to be some travel restrictions from I think some countries in Europe I hadn't even considered Asia. Although I think now, countries, WANNA keep us out like I. Think the just recently as like Americans y'all stay over there don't come over here. It's a real kind of interesting struggle I. Think a lot of folks are getting into you know I'll tell you I saw a few months ago I was working for a company and. right around like March the folks that were in the New York office they said, okay. We're going to close the office and you have to work from home and then they had to kind of adjust to. Kind of being in this sort of now space where you have to work in live in the same spot and. Work remotely for like over ten years now I, live in Atlanta so like for me wasn't a big huge departure in that like you said, like you're better your desk like a third of an inch away from each other same but. I think what's been the rough is like not having the option to leave like you could leave and go somewhere but it's just not the smart thing to do. So it's like this weird kind of push pull tension between. Wanting to almost want to say rebel and go out. But then there's also like the fear of missing out if you're staying inside being safe. So you're like Oh. What should I do? You know what's the right choice to make? So I understand that that was it been in New York? Has Been, very, interesting as had so many ups and downs are have had my. From all the stays outside of New, York contacting left and right from overseas just wondering if I'm okay. How am I eating how my paying my rent? Like how do I have a roof over my head and it's it's been stressful on to reassure everyone like hey, I'm okay. Responsible saying if I am leaving my apartment, I'm also coordinating with the three other people that live with. We have this rotating schedule of WHO's leaving the House to specifically for groceries not for everything else not like from going for a walk or something but. On the quarantine in New York when we were really confined to art to disarm apartment and we were concerned with if of our roommates were sick or not not knowing like having massive era of uncertainty with what was going on in the households on just how going to sustain ourselves. So we created those really awesome system of how we're going to get groceries who's going to get. It has greater safety net and why like physical safety? Not all's. When it comes to go outside and retrieving groceries and coming back and sharing that space in the kitchen and how to do that A. Mindful away. If we're cautious about, say one of our roommates being sick which actually did happen. One of my roommates were sick for about thirty five days and we were very confused and also scared honestly, and they were definitely as while if they were sick or not. If they had covert but we all got tested I believe last month while three under the four of us got tested last month and to including came back negative and then one of my roommates came back positive. So. What it means because it doesn't really mean anything the tests aren't hundred percent accurate sort kind of like, okay. We live together like we're gonNA continue watching for each other symptoms and see what happens. That is both confusing and scary. Yes exactly. I mean to take the test. I mean, of course to know whether or not you're negative or positive but then because it seems like well, the virus is mutating and you know the symptoms are changing and. I. Hope you're staying safe I mean I I don't really know what advice to kind of given that. Than, just to the vigilant wash your hands so Social distancing. Well, let's talk about a be partners. You mentioned that being a digital strategy firm, it's black owned. How has it been adjusting to working from home if they've been cool everything. AM So. To be working where I work book, we have had moments on a one to one basis with on the team recall said moments as full team to just talk about their current reality that we are all facing. The is impacting us in various ways that we either have chosen to spoke about or having spoken about one another, and this is also my first full time job before I was freelancing. So it's really comforting to know the management team and those are the overseeing everything have employers in mind like our health, our our mental wellbeing, our overall wellbeing in mind, and at any point during the last, I don't know how many months has been I'm like losing track of time at this point. Like. If at any point, we needed to just take a step back from all the craziness going on. It's okay to do so and they completely understand. So that was really really important for me because I really value work life balance I. Think they've done a great job at the beginning of the quarantine they're just like, Hey, folks. So we want everyone to be really comfortable and adjust themselves to work from. Home. Like here's some extra cash like on us to really make your `rumour habitable for working and living, and I was really I was really kind. They didn't have to do that but but they did and I really appreciate it out. So did everyone else

New York City Paul Right Japan United States Carmel Wilkens Carmelo Wilkins East Asia Rhode Island New York Asia York Europe Atlanta Tokyo
Bored and Uninspired? How to Get Unstuck and Motivated.

SoberSoul Recovery: Addiction, Sobriety, and Beyond!

06:05 min | 6 d ago

Bored and Uninspired? How to Get Unstuck and Motivated.

"Hey sober sellers. It's Lynn. Peachtree. City and today I am feeling man. I just came off two days of celebrating my sober bursaries. If you didn't listen to last week's PODCAST I. Kinda celebrate today's the day. I went into treatment were was still a little drunk and then the day after where I was freer of. The chemicals in my body, and now I'm coming up on Friday. This is Wednesday and on Friday I turn fifty six. So this often happens to me although not unlike most of you I think I'm having some difficulties in figuring out how I feel during the time of the COVID. So I'm going to share some of those feelings that I just started. Thinking about this morning with you here on the podcast guided by what I like to look at when I'm feeling stock and uninspired, and what that means for me when I do feel stuck if I'm thinking more deeply about it and possibly what it could mean to you. So fifty six years is not a short time on the planet, but I sometimes feel as if I've only lived for ten years kind of wider awake. So the patterns that I've developed in my life sure, I can go and take some looks sees back into my twenties and find patterns like I'm seeing today, but they're so much more profound now that I don't dowse myself with alcohol every single day. One of the biggest realizations is for me, I tend to get really bored. Three years of living a certain way whether it's in a certain place or doing a certain thing. But I really see this in myself and not to say, of course, I don't love what I do or love where I'm at. But I start to get a little wonky on the inside and I'm definitely going through one of those phases. I lived in Peachtree city for over three years. I've been doing sober. So recovery and Lynn Matic counseling for Awhile and I'm getting an inch. Not to mention I think a lot of us are feeling really bored because of COVID and I say board with a capital, B. Because we. Have really dug deep into puzzles and artwork and getting creative and yeah. Once again, my guitar sitting out in my living room, probably need to sell that one too because I'm not playing at ultimately, the drive is to get something coming in to our systems something new as I was waking up this morning I. Know I've felt a profound sense of loneliness. In probably the last four months more intensely. I miss being hugged. I. Have Said Numerous Times on the PODCAST and I'm an introvert that doesn't mean, I. Don't go out and get me some hugs every week. Just the tactile stuff that were used to a client and I were discussing this week. How we Miss Window shopping just go into TJ, maxx or wherever you have access to a lot of shopping and walking around uninhibited. Really Kinda just wasting time, but it was meaningful for me and this client that I was talking to I, don't know if that's something that you miss as well or other. Other things sped sure enough. We can't do even those things that we may have not done a lot of pre covid. We don't have a choice anymore. So this intense lonely feeling was coming over me and I couldn't quite figure out why I'm still seeing friends although I think in the last couple of weeks I've shown some signs of loneliness where I'm like, you know turning down those opportunities to be with people a little bit more which was kind of assigned to me that I might need some introspection really diving deeper into why I feel this. Stuck nece especially because I tend to enjoy the more mundane aspects of life I like to sleep I, like to rest I like good food I. Like just time. Things are teaching in me. So I wanted to get to the bottom of or at least somewhere near the bottom of why to take you through how this goes in my a little crazy brain. This morning as I was noodling this idea of what I wanted to talk about I started to I look at loneliness, and of course, type it in Cova with that while I'm googling. Up came tons of articles, mostly by the way from like march through may about how to deal and cope with loneliness in the time of covid. I read those back in March and May, and feel like I've done a lot of those things I've kept up on my connections via text and phone and Zoom I've you know gotten more involved in some groups on social media, I've reconnected to some of those healthier things romy and eating better whereas you know in the beginning I was kind of Etienne love ice cream. And I'm really worked to try and figure out how I can make it through these months of

Covid Peachtree City Lynn Matic Cova Romy Etienne
How to Create Legendary Content When Youre Short on Time

Marketing School

05:07 min | Last week

How to Create Legendary Content When Youre Short on Time

"I'm Eric Su and I'm Neil Patel and today we are going to talk about how to create legendary content when you're short on time. So this is something I've been thinking about for a while if you're busy, let's say you're a busy founder you're just starting up right now everyone's talking about Oh, my God you know. We're talking got to create content. You have people like Gary Con content's but how do you have time for contents redoing all these different things? Right you have other operational things to worry about. So I can kind of go over my process first and then this is what I've been thinking about recently, and then we can kind of go back and forth so. For me recently, I just kind of had this epiphany man. There's some leverage that's built maybe I should take advantage of that leverage and then right more. So you see a lot of people for me I look at the people that follow on twitter. It's a lot of entrepreneurs. It's a lot of investors as well, and their twitter game is just really strong and I'm like men I haven't blog for awhile talk into neo about this. I've been blog for a while but when I wrote my first blog post in about three or four years last week I felt really energized by I. Miss that feeling but I don't always have time to do that. But what I can do capture my thoughts in a tweet so if you're short on time. Start with a tweet I, 'cause years writing these tweets and if you WANNA come back to later to write legendary content, the tweet is the foundational piece that is your little sprout content, and then you can decide where you want to take that piece. Later because I have a couple tweets that I saved up after this recording, the reason I have my hair done. The reason why I'm actually dressed up time is I feel so motivated because of those tweets and let go make some legendary content go on Youtube. So Neil, what are your thoughts? So I liked that I have a simple process to create good content and a short period of time and I've been using it for years. So, there's really two steps in the first is finding the idea i. just go to all my competitors websites and most of them have solar sharing buttons on there and comment counts and some have up votes in down votes and I looked to see what's hot in my space because that'll give me ideas. All right. Once you have idea you don't WanNa Copier Competition. But if you know topic like on Seo or link building as you can create your own version of it, that's better more thorough. That's on a different viewpoint than there right again, you don't WanNa copy them. You WanNa do something that's better and then I just get into writing and the way I write is very simple. Headline I tried to vote curiosity or use a how to or lists based title than outlined I. Write the introductory paragraph with a Hook, right state some questions in their Hook Gum, and then for example, if I'm writing an article on Yoga be like. What would it be cool to do yoga like a advance Yogi? You know of course, it would. Who really has a patient's practice yoga for ten years? Why can't I learned the moves and get them done right now? Well, you know what I figured out a way one hundred and one ways to advance yoga as a Newbie and keep in mind I don't do yoga. So I have no clue what a Yogi any of that is Linda yogis postal teaches yoga. So my context is probably off but that. Should give you idea of how I hope people than I outlined my body. I list the main subheadings of all the sections that I want to cover, and then I'll put a sentence or two underneath each one. Then all right to conclusion and the conclusions that summarizes everything and then I end the conclusion with question that encourages more comments and then I go back in I fill up the middle I'll reread it. But that stuff on where pressure put my content up on wordpress are uploaded to your cms have editor some review it make sure you had your pictures from your stock targeted decided schedule it and boom. You're good to go like that. Literally is my process sometimes on writing and unsure some things all Google for the answer and then all linked to it within my article I'm deciding my sources but that really is my process. Cool. That's great process. I think by the way just because you know we're talking about tech space content on this podcast it doesn't necessarily mean you have to do text based right when we talk about legendary content, it could be at it could be a facebook ad it could be a youtube video it could be a podcast, right but neil touch on something it is. If you guys have in Glengarry Glen Ross, you have to watch that. Ad Section where he talks a idea just go find that one but this silly? Tent Patel So. A idea right. A is awareness interest D is decision as action right? The Hook that Neil is talking about you want to get them immediately. Right you want to dress Oh, while that's awareness right there right and then you want to get them interested right. Then in some cases when you're any educational content, you might not try to get them to make a decision maybe you wanted to opt into a your e book or get onto your mailing lists and then they can you know given decision there maybe to take an action, right but. Point here is human beings are still the same. You gotTa Hook, them, somehow, keep them interested because people's attention is so all over the place right and then the framework that Neil gave you or the one. I gave you a little earlier on how to start creating legendary content. Everyone has different processes but I think the foundational piece again is thinking about, okay. How do I get their attention first and how do I bring them all the way taking

Neil Patel Twitter Hook Gum Gary Con Founder Eric Su Glengarry Glen Ross Google Facebook Youtube Linda Editor
Anti Masker vs. David C. Smalley

Dogma Debate

04:26 min | Last week

Anti Masker vs. David C. Smalley

"One thing about having. A show for so long. As I'm able to build relationships with people. And many of you who've been along the journey with me for so many years know that we love going back and checking up on folks who have been on the show and I would say there's probably out of all the shows we've had this episode I think four, hundred, seventy, five. Holy. Moly. We can really close a five hundred episodes and now that I'm doing two week at least for the time, it's getting there faster. And over ten years out of all that time in all those hours, they're probably still only. Somewhere between five and ten guests that stand out as just the fans absolute favourite like the people that you just absolutely fall in love with. John. Christie, was one of those for sure Kathy Taylor has been one of those for sure the youth pastor John, Gerry has been one of those for sure and I can't name them all I. Don't have a top ten list in my opinion necessarily but the ones I just hear the most from the ones that the listeners really just sort of latch onto in an email me on a regular basis and go hey man, do you have an update on this person? How were they doing or what's going on with this person? Will. Today's guest is absolutely in that list. He's he's one of these guests who came on. And at first angered some people right but. At the same time just started to sort of stroke the heartstrings of so many listeners wanted to reach out to him and make sure he was okay and Sometimes they did it through me sometimes, they may have found on social media I don't know, but it was a very it was it was a loving moment and I even went on a comedy tour. And I was I was doing comedy in Arizona, and this was like last year brought me some time in summer. And a listener came up to me after a comedy show and was like man. That episode just changed my perspective on so much I need to know an update. How's he doing? And the reason it was so impactful because he first came on the show and I think the title of the show was ex gay Christian versus David Small. And he sort of gave the story of how he was no longer gay. He prayed about it God took the urges away and then he was on arguing the Christian. Position. And I just kept thinking was Man. I really hope you know that when the urges do come back or or whatever goes away that that he remembers this conversation and sure enough he did and six months later he came back on the show to inform us that when he did have the urge again and Saul Saul someone that we thought was really attractive. His first two words were damaged David and we had a huge laugh about that and I really connected with this guy, and then he sort of came around to say you know what really a choice. It's a part of who I am and he began challenging religion and in posting differently, and it was just an absolute transformation and I've really valued our friendship. and then he got really popular on Tiktok, and I mean well over two hundred thousand followers on Tiktok as instagram started to grow as well and I was really proud of him. He was taking stances about homework and public schools and he was getting more and more passionate and I love watching his audience grow in watching his passion grow and I just I'm really fond of this guy think he's an absolutely wonderful person and I've seen him go through their struggle and I'm have been proud to call him a friend. And so you can imagine. My absolute dismay. And heartbreak. When I opened instagram. And I see him post. This. I hear these left-wing authoritarian fascist say it's only a mask what you have to worry about. You know they told the Jews the same thing it's only tattoo. What you have to worry about. It's only a gold star. What do you have to worry about? It's only a work camp what do you have to worry about? It's only gas chamber what do you have to worry about? Make It make sense? Ouch.

David Small Saul Saul Tiktok John Arizona Kathy Taylor David Christie Gerry
20 Minutes With The Founder of Hyperice

20 Minute Fitness

07:13 min | Last week

20 Minutes With The Founder of Hyperice

"Any athlete understands recovery is essential an arguably just as important as the workload itself to achieve peak performance in recent years even among amateur athletes, we've seen a growth and acceptance to what's the necessity of taking the time to really focus on recovery. But what has actually entail for one year muscles require time rest and particularly plenty of sleet repair and grow, but taking the time for active recovery such as stretching. And Foam Rolling Yoga also play a large role in keeping the blood flowing and helping rebuild from intense physical activity. You're listening to twenty minutes fitness and I'm your host Martin caster twenty minutes fit is partly powered by shape scaled up and three d body scan that visualizes your body composition photo realistic three in recent years technology has rudy started to supercharge the fear of active recovery there methods such as icing cryotherapy. Percussion therapy also commonly referred to as massage guns, compression therapy. All the way to infrared sauna have been long used by various. Bro Athletes for recovery for today's show, we've invited highs founder and CEO. Anthony, cats hi FIS has been one of the leaders in the field is known for its iconic products such as the hype vote massage gone the Viper vibrating foam roller as well as the compression sleeves their products have. been used early on by NBA stop there such as Lebron James and the late Kobe. Bryant and today there aren't they use by pros and all the major us. Leaks the English premier league as well as Olympic athletes. We chat more about how he first got started with icebox neoprene and also take a deeper dive into the science and also some of the best practices behind some of these recovery methods and devices. Hi Anthony I'm excited to have you on the show today. Can you tell us a little bit more about yourself to kick things off? Yeah. So my name's anthony cats on founder pipe price. I founded the company about ten years ago it started out really just as an arm project like I was before this I worked in education was a high school teacher I was married to professional. Athletes and I was still really active and I still play sports and was sort of looking for ways to improve my body and sort of slow the aging process and I started my by started kinda get more soar after do things and you kind of start to see like the wear and tear you know grown up in the in the Dark Ages fitness in the ninety S. People used to basically do bodybuilding it wasn't very functional and that control my body in in. So I start looking at like, what would it winter pro athletes doing? You know because obviously they put the biggest premium on. Their bodies and sort of the new kind of things if there was anything new that they were doing that I can adopt and when I did sort of the research on, it was funny like the word recovery didn't really even a quiet sports like that. We use it now and there's a category now but they're back then. You know recovery meant like alcohol recovery or something you know. It didn't mean the same and so the industry was really dominated by like sort of these like medical device companies that would make products that would live in athletic training room for in professional sports and mostly what guys were doing for like you know just. To recover faster faster was was ice was ice tubs. Getting, getting a cold tubs and then, and then they were icing their joints and then if you getting a massage in athletes paper massage and stuff, and that was kind of that was kind of what the recovery will look like in two, thousand ten and so I figured okay well, you know if you can't really market a cold tub but athletes are icing their joints every day and they were doing it with plastic bags and ace route or Fight in every single day. Yeah. It's really wasteful and just like you know it's just not really convenient leaks in you know Dallas is kind of what they were doing. So it Kinda struck me and around this time two, thousand ten. So beats by DRE was relatively new. You know they debuted at the two thousand, eight Olympics and the Osa basketball guys were wearing them kind of adopted this idea that you if someone wearing something right and you know if I could make something that was good enough for like pro athletes to wear that people would see it on them and because it's on their body because it would be like wearing potentially like wearing them, you know on the sidelines or Photos, in your starting, it was Kinda before instagram. So it wasn't really the access to like the behind the scenes of what these guys do is not really the same level of now because I feel now we have a much better window into what what sort of the athletes are famous people do in their you know when the camera's not on. This kind of struck me. If there was a documentary called the last dance about Michael Jordan and it was showing how different famous then where he was the most famous person in the world and he'd get off the team bus and they would just be like a thousand people waiting at the hotel just like watch him walk in the door and we don't need to do that anymore because now everyone has we see what people do in the cameras. And we have twitter, right? Yeah and so people and and then there's way more content right? So there's just way more content of like, okay. What is sort of what is an athlete? Do? They're not court in got used to be pretty mysterious people in an intriguing so I figured that if I could make an icing product because athletes have to is every day people see maybe what sort of kind of catch on A in obviously not a school would beat because it's music that's universal but I still felt like young athletes might adopt it. So I had the idea to make like a really cool looking is compression device, and so I started researching therapy. The. Compression was import element of it and I had. A friend of mine who's a college basketball coach was regularly working out with Kobe Bryant and in Kobe was known as the biggest like that. He he is more than anybody and there was articles well-documented about how he really took care of his body. So I thought if I could make a prototype and I could show it to him and maybe you know maybe get into weirder sort of my thinking and I showed it to them I. so I literally was cutting up wetsuits and going into like wetsuit factory's GonNa live in a beach community southern California. So like there's some of the old Lexi factories that are still around back then so I was kinda compression sleeves and then taking ice bags from like you know from like rite aid or whatever, and and and just kind of like putting them together these compression sleeves. Trying to make something and you know he was really receptive to the idea that there could be a product that would make more efficient and it would actually look not just be so wasteful. So I a couple times in he kind of gave me some really good criticism that was constructive and what I realized like this can't be an art project like this is not how businesses have to like if I'm. GonNa do what I gotta do it. Right. So I gotta go get like. So I was calling manufacturing companies and it was during the recession and people weren't really interested in talking about no experience at all and just sort of this but one company believed like, okay. I kind of had proved that I was like interacting with Koby in the disciplinary doing for him and they kind of just took a flyer on. Maybe we'll try helping sort of developed sort of come the extra separable and so took about a year I. Got I, finally convinced him to do it. We took about a year to kind of develop the product properly I had the idea to put an air release valve at is bag because when ice melts, it creates like air pocket in compression doesn't work because it blocks a compression. So if You have a button that releases the air. The compression always makes contact with the ice and then you get your eyes compression therapy and that's that's the whole idea behind it was that I would watch guys ice and then I would see these like there's a big air bubbles forum. It's like because the heat from your body is exchanging with the ice and then that creates natural gas, which is A. Form of like air and

Kobe Bryant Anthony Founder And Ceo Martin NBA Rudy Lebron James Michael Jordan Twitter California Basketball Olympics Koby School Teacher Dallas DRE Founder
"ten years" Discussed on TechFan

TechFan

01:30 min | 6 months ago

"ten years" Discussed on TechFan

"And these companies that create these programs became very wealthy. I would submit that. There isn't any company a software developer. That's become. I'm very wealthy. Because of their success on the IPAD with one exception games I think gaming companies is on the IPAD or the only ones that are seeing any kind of big success. And even when I say big success maybe if it's an apple arcade otherwise I think most developers gallopers most developers ninety five percent of them are probably breaking. Even if that selling anything I would say most of the now. I'll probably making more money. Because they've been out to take those mobile games that run on the IPAD and Portland's an Nintendo switch can charge four times the price. Yes absolutely is that right. Did you see the switch just packs the Super Nintendo. It's now the number three selling in fact not only did it pass for Nintendo become the third bestselling and it will eventually take number one. It will pass any acid in the we will excuse me. It also passed the xbox one which has been out for seven years the switch has been out for three years and it just passed F.. There's no slowing down the switch. It's fantastic gaming. But the onto jr as I said for the developers that is the switch has a very active online store. Eric bledsoe apples and yet you can take your game you can put it and instead of selling it for.

Nintendo Eric bledsoe software developer apple Portland
"ten years" Discussed on TechFan

TechFan

12:38 min | 6 months ago

"ten years" Discussed on TechFan

"I am David Code David up and down up and down. That's not what challenges this week vacation. Coming up a couple of weeks leaks county Florida so looking forward to that Florida. Nice to come visit my mum. She winter's over here as you know because it's yours. It's your tools birthday as well as this year is mind fifty five Oh so is also my mother's seventieth so but we are going to have a joint family celebration shing. When is your birthday April April? So I've got you by a few mine was What what is it two weeks ago a week two weeks ago? Yeah weirdly enough some people saying hey timmy on facebook fifty s a new forty. No it's not it is not the new forty. Yeah because I just just from the the wear and tear on the body thing my body does not feel like eight did when he was forty no and when it was not it didn't feel like he was God. No no and I don't even remember the twenties so you know with this show started when we were forty. Yeah and now. We're both well I am and you're almost fifty so hey welcome to a decade of Tech Fan. Get getting gracefully gracefully grumpy adults get a little bit You know what else in. Here's how this is kind of funny a big topic this week as we're GonNa talk about pretty much the whole show. I think but we'll get to some other topics but big focus is going to be on the IPAD because apple made the announcement in. I believe it was January. Twenty seventh twenty ten a decade ago and then in April of that year They came out with the IPAD. Yeah go ahead. I got one for my fortieth birthday. My family and I bought one as well. How and I got the immediately I bought one and I knew I was going to get one The funny thing is this. This show is ten years old now or technically will be later in the year. But it's twenty twenty so it's Tanner's excuse me. I was actually doing autopsy radio at the time and I devoted a whole forty minute show to the IPAD. My first impressions and I haven't listened to back. I don't know if I will or not I was thinking about listening to it Priority recording this show so I can kind of refresh my memory a little bit of my thoughts originally an IPAD. But the I. I'm pretty sure I remember most of them But that was you know ten years ago. It doesn't doesn't seem like a yeah. Well that's that's when things by gang holders the UH you know I'll say as the years go by they tend to blur together. A little bit But actually the original IPAD. This is where Israeli realizes changed quite a lot has had got better. It got worse stayed the same. Is that fair. I think so but it has a relatively aggressive development particularly if you compared ed to what's happened in the in the Mac in the same period I would say the aggressiveness doesn't necessarily IPAD. I think it's Iowa's in mobile computing. Because if you look at the iphone phone and twenty ten in the iphone now it's the trajectories almost the same if not more aggressive with the iphone because iphones generally a year ahead of of the IPAD. Whatever happens on the IPHONE? This year is what you'll see next year on the IPAD. Yeah on the on. The iphone definitely gets oversee gets a regular upgrade. Every gave with the IPAD has been longer and then the MAC has been even long story. Mac is almost. It's almost a dereliction of duty at this point with the Makah an apple But let's go back ten years. I remember when the IPHONE was released. I I was at macworld Expo that year. Two thousand seven with me and a bunch of other The My crew which you report of them but you weren't actually at that San Francisco. It was the follow again the The MAC vocab enhancement The I've is there with you and so I remember when the iphone announcement hit and sitting there in the crowd and watching and it was. It was a seminal moment. It's one of those rare times that you can look back and go while that really did change everything that that announcement in two thousand seven changed Eh. Everything not just for apple and for people like you and I that were really heavy and attack but it had worldwide consequences And and we could. This whole show could be nothing but the influence of the iphone on what's changed. We could have multiparty to that series so the IPHONE was released. We got a couple of different iterations at that point. I think we are on the IPHONE. Maybe the iphone four because it phone three now the the iphones the iphone three Jay. And then there's a three. Yeah Yeah So. I think we're right between the three GS and the four. This is right in that timeframe when Steve Jobs took the stage and presented the iphone or the IPAD and it was It was an odd product when apple announced it. Uh a lot of people thought. We'll go ahead. I was GonNa say if you remember the time that was I. Guess from from the release of the three GS the previous year. I remember the four in two thousand and ten to four was actually announce a ww DC. So that was quite an aggressive times. Timescale timescale so that the iphone. The IPAD came before that I remember when the three GS came out. There was a massive rumor mill. that a tablet was coming from apple and by the made the announcement. It was well expected though. We didn't know what it was GONNA be. I remember the time everyone thought I was going to be. Based on the Manque. Your that was a big rumer. Everybody was like this is going to be a Mac based on that and everyone thought it was gonna be over at least over a thousand dollars. Yeah and and that's kind of what people were waiting for. And so when you said Steve came out I did probably a par beep. I would site behind the IPHONE announcement. Probably one of the best keynotes. He's ever done. Because I think this was a product that was so much in his wheelhouse. And if you go back I can read the history of the IPHONE development. They thought of the IPAD. I wanted to do the IPAD. I but the technology wasn't there to do it at the time. Something that large something that they could manufacture for for a decent price so they actually did the iphone. I so the IPAD was always the first idea behind this product. And so when he came out he did this you know remember. He did the the thing where he was just sat in a chair using it showing everything off on it and he was just kind of relaxing in a chair. which was the whole point this about taking computing off off the desktop and certainly even off off a desk off your lap into something you held in your hands And it was. Yeah I think it was. It was probably one of his best behind the IPHONE. which oversees is I think is probably the best one ever did and yeah we we were blown away by everything? He showed US especially when it came to the price because it was half the price we're expecting and we thought this amazing thing was going to the way out of range price was it was it. Was I forget I mean how did he confess. I think round about the same process an iphone. Yeah it was yeah But it was about half the price of the cheapest ibook at the time the cheapest apple laptop but yet it ran the exactly the same now. They've split over over time now the IPAD. Os in the in IOS have split the phone the IPAD OS are slightly different. There's the same code base. Don't get me wrong but it's different and because it was the same os then you could run. Every single iphone application application. Because remember the APP store was had been released. It was doing extremely well especially in games and stuff like that so apple says well this is gonNA run the IPAD or the irs from the IPHONE. It's the same operating system and you could use the iphone applications but remember number ahead that to X. thing that's right so you push a button and it filled the screen and quite honestly look like ass So iphone developers had had to optimize their APPs to run on the IPAD. And I remember that was there was every week there was some new application that you loved on the iphone that was released now for the ipad as well and Oh thank God because now it's going to be big it's GonNa be the graphics are GonNa Look Better. Yeah and this was the yeah when apple really push developers towards different screen sizes unraveling these targeting the standard iphone screen size because this was also so the year the IPOD iphone four came out which obviously had arrested the dispute so and a half times more pixels in the show so so everybody redo their programs anyway and this was really apple stuffed. It's a kind of build on the APP store as a as a as a multi multi he platform environment for developing APPs in which is another small feet. But I I think a lot of people don't when you're looking at the history of of IOS iphone and IPAD. They don't really stop and consider especially in the early days that it was really a complex thing. The apple was creating with worldwide developers to to support two different devices to have legacy support and to Google all this basically from the ground up within just three years and nobody else has pulled this. Nobody you look at what Google of tried to to do with android tablets and it's just been a disaster android tablet. I'll just not really a thing. Yeah I mustn't hasn't pulled it off because they've just got one tablet platform and and And so so it's easy for them because they're they're running a fork of android and they control control of that and it feels clunky. Yeah it's clunky. It is clunky. The the best APPs on the on the kindle fire tablets so the Amazon one because they're the ones specifically specifically written for it and then and then you look without a buck softest tried to move windows into this in trying to pull this off with windows these two or three times now and they're still trying to do it will surface with with yeah the surface devices and then these new things that are coming out this year that they would. They the folding screen. That's still trying to find a middle ground between a bridge between windows and mobile and of course they know actually in mobile labeled cells anymore. No no that's what. That's what Steve. How that's how? We presented the IPOD. These he said we felt we feel. There is a gap between aid the macbook and the iphone what could fill it and that was his kind of the structure of his presentation of Philip. I remember the big criticism. The big response from most of the tech press at the time when it came house wells. Well it's just a big IPHONE. What I remember talking about in that episode of ODBC ABC Radio? That I said it's just a big iphone as if it was going to be negative thing but I distinctly remember. You're saying really. And yes that's the best part it is. It's a big IPHONE. It does everything that the iphone Oregon does exceptionally okay. Well on the interface that you know most humans can you and it's not an actual phone. We forget it without big even without big funds. Nowadays we forget how tiny the original iphone screen so three and a half inches. I don't remember congressional have mine. You know what I mean..

apple Mac Steve Jobs timmy Florida David Code Tanner Google San Francisco Iowa
"ten years" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

02:15 min | 7 months ago

"ten years" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Everybody so this episode of stuff to blow your mind is sponsored by the all new Mazda C X thirty which I actually just got to test drive recently in the beautiful beautiful mountains of southern California and I will say as some. We've told you on the show before we're not really car guys. We don't know a lot about cars. I'm sort of an automobile Philistine. But from on this auto Philistines heart. I will say this was a really wonderful car to drive. I truly enjoyed cruising around the mountains. In this thing. It was very smooth. It was very stylishly sung to my non Kar Heart in a way that cars usually don't so what's actually in this thing details wise so it has class leading standard horsepower horsepower and is active all wheel drive with G. veteran control plus for ultimate control and I will say there is a very special thing about this car. I have driven another car like this. When you go around a corner in it? something about it feels almost like predictive like it. You know you don't need to do like jerking around trying to correct your turn like everything in it is extremely smooth and continuous. And I think that's what's going on here but it's also got a beautiful design on the outside. Yeah Yeah I mean basically. The thirty is size to be agile in the city while still having the interior space in utility to go anywhere anytime encouraging an active life style and to your point. It's the the idea that you're not having to to wrestle the machine to get where you're going there is a. There's a meeting of the man in the machine. It's also very nice driving experience in a visual way. Where like the car doesn't have a touchscreen and a you know we're like you can see those touchscreens? Come up and kind of distract you while you're trying find navigate the the features and stuff driving instead. It's more traditional kind of command controls that you go with buttons and Levers from the steering wheel but it actually makes for a much nicer acer less distracted drive. You've got your eyes on the road. Yeah you're not playing video game the drive the car. You're driving the car but it's also got connected car features that give you convenience at safety peace of mind Got An in-car WIFI option. Remote engine start stop and door. Lock Vehicle Status Navigation Service vehicle finder automatic nine one one dialing in the event of an accident So it's really got it all and I really truly enjoy driving this.

Mazda California acer
"ten years" Discussed on Taste Of Taylor

Taste Of Taylor

02:48 min | 7 months ago

"ten years" Discussed on Taste Of Taylor

"Then I thought Oh is thank thank God somebody else. I know that got fired. I love her sore soulmates. Because I know what that feels like and then you got cast in Summer House and I was just like. Oh she's back. You know after scone gate I called Michelle said how do you think I did. And she was like I think she can like I think you do well but you can tell that you agree and I want those for some ever did radio and I wanted to pretend that I do it all the time so you would have me back and she and I was like what gave it away and she goes. I don't think you're supposed to eat like dry patients and then choke on our for two hours straight into the Mike and I was like God. I just want to look like I knew what I was doing. So I'm GONNA casually discount really impressed this girl. I love you so much. Thank you for having pigmy on. I love you so much. I'm so proud of your career and you so deserve it Hannah. You're so fucking town too. You're so good on summer house so I can't wait for you are such you're growing and rising comedian. And you are. I mean the future is so fucking bright and also your Soga podcasting and you're so smart in the way you approach things. I remember when you came on the radio. Show you learned from me master. Thank you for my coach and then you like had this show but you were just like I'm just GonNa like sleep in and do reality. You're like no I'm GONNA have a platform. I'm going to start a podcast by the time the show airs. podcast up running you fuck an editor and podcast you book it. You work so hard you I mean. Gene millennials have a bad reputation. You are the shining light. That is the millennial. Molyneaux should all die you. I'll let you live now. I love millennials. Does I am not because I'm older I'm just pointing at me. I realize you don't fight the younger generation time this shit. I speak of silver climbing If you WanNa see me Andrew Collin who's been great on this podcast. He shows episode and he isn't Wa Gascoyne Puddles he We have a show that sold out at the sand and in January. Can I come back. I don't know it'll be tough to get you got if we show on Feb in February as well so you can get tickets with February show and I'm in DC This January twenty second. Get tickets there's a couple of left and also guys like I said burning in hell fantastic podcast and hunter Samir. She's hysterical at being burns. And you can catch her every Monday Albatross shirker show and you also need to start full co hosting more because the this is magical. I Love Review. Oh I love you because that's it for us to follow me on social media at Taylor's trucker and also make sure to rate review and subscribe to the podcast. Tell your friends. Let's spread this shoot. Shoot around the world help me get confident needs affirmation and like I don't know if the weight loss can happen and I definitely can't go back in time like Benjamin Button and get younger so the only thing you guys is that I have to be rich so help maybe rich I love you all. I'll be back next week bye bye..

Michelle Summer House Andrew Collin Molyneaux Benjamin Button Mike hunter Samir editor Taylor
"ten years" Discussed on Taste Of Taylor

Taste Of Taylor

16:11 min | 7 months ago

"ten years" Discussed on Taste Of Taylor

"Three zero at thirty six almost thirty seven. I don't Own a house. I don't have children. I'm not married I'm divorced. It's like it and I also feel like money wise career wise. I think everyone's like you're crushing and I'm doing great but like I want to be doing bad taste. Tae Is thirty two who I'm an older woman. Luckily she likes them old and she likes Chubby. Okay so anyway okay. So speaking of speaking of a jolly good christm- okay. So I'm thirty seven so when on instagram. The ten year challenge came out I was enraged and furious and but I just kept it all inside and I I feel. Society is always pitting all women against each other and I felt like the ten year challenge men first of all they really do get better with age. It's so fucking unfair most of them but like with women. It's like the tenure challenge. That's a fun game unless like you're Jaylo or fucking Jennifer Aniston. It's like in what world will any woman really feel like. She looks her best ten years later men years later. Okay okay so I was like really I was. I was against the ten year challenge. I ignored it. It's fun you should 'cause if something's triggering you online don't yes I I'm twenty eight. I look so much better than I did it. Here's the thing this is what this who tenure challenges for. It's for women who are in their late thirties. Early forties maybe even fifties who like our genetic aliens. Yeah and look better now than they ever talks or whatever or even just age gracefully. If you're tall and thin you kind of age fucking awesome. I because as I look at my friends now who are like really spectacular like Taylor will never mind girl from. We'll never be unattractive so she's elegant will always be and because so she's fucking six feet tall in like a string bean you know. I definitely peaked in my late twenties early thirties. I I have like a young face I have. I have like a like a feminine body so for me agents going to be rough. I'm just saying you know what's crazy. My mom had I'd like was a curvy woman had me and I changed her body. Type you bitch. She snow but she said that she all the Touching my network. And you don't have to do the sleep.

Jennifer Aniston Taylor
"ten years" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

05:37 min | 7 months ago

"ten years" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"Aw and why that was avenue in five bucks just decide to move real slow. So we'll begin. saw ratcheted second so imagine renton is causing statement where we talk about all these different sort things stories that are going across the world and how our lack of laws and enforcing those laws laws against people who walk around stores is causing chaos amongst the world and it was guys we'd be taking it a little more space but we can't even get gun control because why we never into control right so the tangible goals in one another tangible goals. I think there's a lot of these. Sores regulated get off the street people in impeach him some classes about how will the sword and real responsibly. Because right now you can go to any comic CON Convention. Whatever grab when he's quote unquote replica? Swords and just be walking around stabbing people within minutes. There's no registration there's no Task for proficiency We don't keep like a list of Mosey sores or nothing and I think that's a big. That's a big problem. Sneeze a seventeen year old mister threatening another team with a Samurai sword over one hundred dollars Singapore unhappy that an eighteen year old. Oh Oh okay let me scroll down happy that an eighteen year old. His brother a hundred dollars a seventeen year old confronted with Semi Sore One night last September Muhammad uh-huh Leaf Moustapha admitted to one charge of criminal intimidation on Thursday. The court heard that he or she the sword inside the victim's home jurong east threatening to slash lashed older boy with the twenty seven meter weapon. if he did not come out of the house his charge sheet stays that Zach. Words come down with us if not I'll stab. You did say literally elite. who was sent to a juvenile home and twenty seventeen for commission in House? Trespass and theft may face imprisonment for his current charge. We're giving his young age. Debbie Prosecutor Angela. Hang call for probation suitability ability report before making representations. I'm like I mentioned one dollars. That's a lot of money it is. I mean we were just stab someone number five. I could see why you would want to stab someone over one hundred. That's why you shouldn't have a sore elite who was not represented by a lawyer requested to be placed on probation instead of giving jail time. My mother's not working I. I am the only support from my mother. District Judge agreed to the probation suitability report to be prepared and journey for the man on January. Thirtieth finishing He also claimed that the soil was actually just scared of victim. which I mean? That's probably true. I'd be scared of Nagata. So but You know wasn't there was trying to scare somebody with it and trying to kill them with it either one I. I can't be assuming assuming when you pull out like Oh scary it. I can't be assuming you know So yeah somebody out his brother some money so he asked for his friends between the ages of seventeen. Twenty one to meet him at Was this this Jason Mohammad Yassin. Daniel Rosalyn to meet a Yeltsin's flat to support him as he planned to confront Yassin Seen he decided to bring along the source so that he could use scare. You're saying and repaying the debt while the void deck of Yassin's blocked the group spotted a friend of him to get you to carry down to come down to meet him the free man he's pretty duplicitous. That was involved in this. They should charge this back luring to do down the free taxi I said. But there's there's no reply so they went up to his unit shattering come out yesterday. Opened the gate to unify and a Ruckus at the time at that point two members of at least company and Seventeen hundred eighteen against shouting Yeltsin about their own personal grievances against him. Oh he oh everybody's money he's taken the money. What does she say about my sister son? What isn't it don cut in? A fit of anger leave then unsheathed his sword indirect today housing threatening to slashing if you did not step out of his unit to talk things out. Well I'm gonNA tell you the coming out. Yeah I don't come. Natural pulled a sword out. That's eighty hours. Yeah I'm a lot less likely to come out. I don't think you WanNa talk frightening. I title legal aid needed five minutes to use the WASHROOM. I Oh okay major. Let me take a real quick because my parents are full of shit frightened he say okay. So you're seeing the doors unit. Cada police like a smart person. The group flare when they notice police cars in a car parked nearby but they were later traced interested. Dale one hundred dollars I get it but hale all right. That's it for today. So thank you so much for listening. Thank you I'm glad I show can be anything you want it to be and ten ten years down in hold only like I think this is a great. Alcohol is a great episode to put the proof A we can do whatever we want to. Apparently because our fifty minutes of this was nothing but seriously thank alpha listener and we appreciate. Ah well wishes and condolences to Karen And Our thoughts and stuff. So thank you and we'll let you guys know Or if you don't see more shows during the wine maybe traveling and stuff so you know I until next time I love you I love you..

Jason Mohammad Yassin Yeltsin renton Singapore Debbie Prosecutor Angela Leaf Moustapha theft Nagata Dale Karen Zach hale Daniel Rosalyn
"ten years" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

05:19 min | 7 months ago

"ten years" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"We are friends now now and I got people like I have got people I talk to maybe every four to five years but we taught we taught hager how you doing. Okay how you doing click and we. We are who we see each other again and as I understand that's a different love languages and other people trying to invalidate holiday. They love what I'm saying is the lack of understanding to the fact that we don't all have to connect on that level. We don't we're not all going to have these grand rained friendships. You know I look at my facebook. Hey I don't have to have like five or ten. Maybe that's okay you know. It's not that happen. Awesome happened to me. That's five ten people might they will probably show up or at least college check on me or something right. They know something wrong. There's a lot of people that aren't that way and I'm not holding it against is there but when you see like people expect this shit out of people as other folks don't have fucking lives man. I like why aren't you dropping everything and reading eating my passive aggressive facebook status in stopping coming over my house. That's not what the fuck happened. Twelve I think a lot of people treat friendships like like they did when they was in school. We're best friends. We got to go together. Walk together talk together. We got to be up each other as time. And if you don't treat me like that you're not a friend right. People people have motherfucking lives. It reminds you of that. Yeah of like fifth grade when you get your first best friend. People's definition is you do is just being each of the time it's like Dr. I'm I'm not GonNa be on the phone with you every day and at the same time I understand. That's what you need is just can't come from me not not but it's the weird judgment entitlement that I am expressing of that that I do find lie down. This is really turned a lot of us in the like really selfish self absorbed people who are constantly. Try to put our own light loneliness on everybody else. I own like insecurities. It's all. Oh everybody else to fix input. I know and that book conflict is not abuse and talk about people that have been victims of trauma and stuff. And it's like look win once you've been in the traumatic experience you live with this trauma by people. We live with it all the time right trauma at some point though it is your thing to deal with yes. It is and so you can't always function or be trusted to lead and Shit if you lead from a place of unresolved trauma trauma I but we've been able to reverse the polarity on that online and be like the person does the most traumatize have the most power in the most. Say so we wouldn't don't do that any other if you work at a job and somebody was like. I had racism happen to me one day and I never got over it. They wouldn't be able to walk into your job and be Eli okay. So because some racist she happened to me one day all the white people get the fuck out. We've like what no you can't manage cannot but online you can you can do that. You can kind of flip it to be like you know this thing happen to me. I'll never forgive this group of people. Everyone needs to act accordingly. Hey anytime you guys bring up this topic. I don't feel good so you gotta stop talking about it like that's not think that that has enabled us to really be like these quote unquote friendships. We talk about two. They're not really Because when we get to these moments a conflict it's over you know and I think that's really not good. It's not good. It's not healthy healthy And people are not like I said if people are not checklist and people aren't like you could afford it up though in tragic trashed forget Just can't do that but people do this all the time and is devastated. These can be devastating to people like you you know and it causes hurt. People continue to hurt people like like. That's the two statement but that's a real thing Yeah says the way we talk about. Friendship depends ugly patriots of the new notion of relating one seeks maximum return on minimum investment and allies in our exit strategy. Anytime a friend for fill our fantasies. These post reveal more about the toxicity of our society than a negative describing is a friendship as a capitalistic exchange instead of relationships relationships involving people who care about each other hanging out a helping each other through ups and downs house is enough to make you wanna cry into a beer with a confidante close friend kind is going out of town. Yeah Yeah and also I think for me I don't know if it's a generational thing saying but sometimes is nothing like hearing somebody's voice because so many people do on Lonzo much. Nah sometimes let me are you okay. Let me hear Your Voice your options. They physically see your face was again different love language. Some people need that. You know. I'm not necessarily. You GotTa Call Me and be talk. I don't i. I think there's been some chances sometimes where I reached that level. I might well. Maybe if I talk to this person right I understand maybe proceed as person and you know what sometimes their trauma so deep. It wasn't even matter you know but you know different. Love languages. Transacting relationships take for example..

facebook hager Lonzo Eli
"ten years" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

12:53 min | 7 months ago

"ten years" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"Our female We don't have a non binary thing or anything on this one and is amazing. How a lot of the stuff? Asian in target date dare to embed about talk initiate towards women before why they act like women just fucking didn't exist. Yeah a lot of these. Ads Are Harry's razors razors and shit like that. Right Bevo was something where we had to be like. Hey women could use a student now. I work I shaved it before it was good. Good thirty four million women. Listen to podcast in two thousand. Eighteen is a lot of women is this is sixty eight percent more likely for podcast listening to have a postgraduate graduate degree. I mean mostly very highly educated. Yeah talk at forty four forty five percent more likely for podcast listening to have a college degree looking at gender differences in pockets of education female podcast users have a higher education and income than overall US population according to the podcast analytics newsbeat. So Wow Mormon. Listen and a lot of podcasts. Catered them in women are the ones with the money and education some shit yeah. Yeah did you audience don't exist. Yeah and he still was funny. Is that the decision makers Komo mostly seem to chase after the male demographic Because I think that's just tradition radio and TV so the decision makers there's Impact casting are quicker to give that like if I were running network. Okay let me reach out to a man who's GonNa podcast even if what the man does. It is something that pisses women off. You know. It's like okay. We want to be a network with Joe Button. We WanNa you know we gotta get Charlemagne we gotta get ti. See Ya and women might be like fuck them. I don't like them I don't WanNa but that's the people get the money behind. No normally you know not obviously not all and there's a lot of women at that. They've got it again too but it's just funny. How male dominated a lot of the official podcast are While women are the ones listening. Yeah and then you know podcast actually catered towards women feel like we're Goddamn Wad women. Didn't they get sponsors that catered towards women and everybody is Zahn was like almost like the thing with black become out and everything. Oh Shit Nigga movie yes women like this shit too and women's Bauer like you know. We get perks prowess ignorant to ignore this whole as audience. Yeah like obviously I see our donations. I see our premium listeners. And stuff like that and I don't. I've never looked to see like exactly what the percentages of women never done a survey or anything like that but I would say that is if not fifty fifty is like slightly majority. Women probably anecdotally off the top of my head and a lot of times. People will say. Well how'd you monetize. How do you how make money? How are we are able to do that? And I think a lot of shit really is because of our natural predisposition to be light light. We Love Women. We love black people. We love our people and a lot of that to me. And it's not vache putting on airs. It's not it wasn't like a branding decision where we say. We're going to get all this money like literally. I lost a job in cameras. We should try to make money so it wasn't like bydesign but I think by happenstance or whatever a lot of how we were able to monetize because of that type of inclusive cocoa just kind of like more fair minded thing now doesn't mean that these shows are very like women bash initiate and Black Women. This and all that those shows make money to do if you look at a lot of times. They make money off of like advertisers or someone coming in and and quote unquote pain them to do what they do right which kinda takes the listener almost out of the equation but as a listener funded podcast? I know a large part of this is because you know black women feel okay given us money as a point where we do you know because we're not just out here trying to like embarrassed embarrassing them but at the same time we're not our just pandering and you know at the same time you know to go. Listen to just be a pandering podcast as me and ain't Shit me and trash ask women. Is Everything please give us your money. Please gives you. You know like we just keep it real but it is also I think Not a coincidence that we're wondering if there's black monetize like this agreed. Forty three percent pockets. Man's use spotify to listen to podcasts. Yes spotify they are game changer for people and we we said years ago these music apps a like a into podcasting blend them and spotify lycopene now where anybody can get on and that change it because now you will allow people people when people go. I got a podcast. You can go as some of my podcast and then you go you gotTa spotify. Yes is this and they can just type into title. I don't have have to have a fucking separate. I don't have to Dalo nothing new. I don't have to take because once you start taking extra steps a lot of people fucking tap out. Yeah I it's also amazing because spotify hasn't been in the game that long no it hasn't because they both people get get their pocket is normally like a phone and stuff and apple was the first people that really put podcast into like the what they do into their phones and their ipads and stuff is interesting to see that like literally early. spotify came in and boom. Now we're doing podcasts. Their original stuff and just going and cherry picking the good shows from other places and now they can just you you can just submit your feet and they'll take anybody but yeah Forty three percent is a huge amount for somebody that just hopped into the thing and plus spotify advantage of being on android and right now all the other stuff right and also the thing particularly with the apple sticky keep dishes separate which is fucking dumb combined that Let's see thirty nine percent of smart speaker owners. Listen to podcasts. At least once week I know I do six percent podcast shows are downloaded from apple The average podcast listeners describes a seven different shows weekly. I stand stupid but yeah that that makes sense because you variety taste outage to fifty two percent or podcast scribes listen to entire episodes which is much higher than over fifty podcast consumers. Listen to between seventy six six to one hundred percent of all the podcasts downloaded devices. I will never be in that percentage. I have so many downloaded. I'll never get to a mom agreed around twenty twenty six percent of the podcast listeners. Speed podcast while listening. Yeah knows no say when a listen to this show and come in late day like a while. I'm so used to a union like speed. I just listened to the normal speed. I've never spared a slowdown. Anything like that. Yeah but that means somebody out there stores right now we are the chipmunks see eight RPM you Inca yes Alvin they do do do you welcome out there listeners. On three times speed or whatever Yeah podcast listeners. Being an average of six hours was in thirty seven minutes list the podcast every week Ninety percent of podcast consumers to listen to podcasts. At home I would think most people will probably. I be listened to on commuter style but I I was doing everywhere in the car at the gym. More than half of Americans do chair chores while listening to podcast. Ask Your cleaning up. Welcome to the fold. Okay I'm in hive. I'm in Chore Hive. I ninety four percent. PODCAST consumers are active on at least one social media channel channel which is a great way for most why we tell people between about to show us. TVD WT come follow us on instagram. Come be our facebook page. We love that stuff what have us. PODCASTS pay attention to the AD which is much higher than radio. Fifty four percent. A podcast consumers say they you think about buying advertising product and thing I said that one what was the other one that There was another one that that was interesting. I think about race But it might be down there AC- fifty billion episodes have been strained or download. It from APO Monday. Tuesday wins out our best as a release a podcast. That is so true because when we do the show I can watch our feedback in on our Hashtag I I we. Do you know Saturday Sunday Monday. And then you'll see like a boom boom boom feedback feedback but you get towards the end of the week. Our people want to get off work. Mark on twitter CASS. Now we gotta get you done a lot less Thursday Friday Saturday Hashtag like I'm listening to the show So that makes total sense Let's the Amazon. Prime podcast has one hundred and fifty million active users. What probably got August August? I don't I didn't know that. What all right tasers from June? Two thousand nine hundred. I ain't no problem. Had A podcast feed two percent in a survey to mega. Say podcast are too long because you know why Americans work too fucking much time. And that's why I always say don't make your show for for everybody because the bane two hours find interesting when people get podcasting advised they always tell you make it short. I always tell you not to you. Know don't go too long not too often not this. And I'm like Dr. If the person listening to you is like upset that your show is too long Dank. The one for you know gay not. You're title audience. They really ain't fucking what you anyway. Yeah because the thing is as a podcast listener they are short. Sure Park has its did are born is look and then there are long podcast. Is the entertaining. You normally is hard to have both you know. Most people don't do both so a lot of times. People don't WanNa admit I don't like listening because you're not entertaining Dr. I've heard the truth right light honestly if I roll my eyes podcast. I'm are is because I already don't really fuck with you and you know and I mean that's just an honest thing the people I'm not naming no names but I think and the same thing for us if people look at us and go oh two hours yet. They don't really talk with her right now. Because you know what. When I listened to the morning Jones I never once like three hours of this shit? I love the morning journals. I even longer better. Yeah I was listening to the commercials and Shit you now when you know win day. lebatardshow is on and he's GonNa be on effort three hours four hours out of the middle of the day. People look forward to that time and they don't. Oh you know the radios to me way worse than podcast throwing out his product placement advertising. And and you can't make everything confine you know yes so me personally like dogs. They spoke with us They GONNA fuck with us so it's going to be as long as it needs to be you know and also is one of those things where different people's lifestyle demands different types of podcasts. For Groping for change people leave all and you have some people who like you say I have three and four hour commute back and forth to work so they love. The traffic is going to listen to. I don't have to have fourteen episodes queued up because every ten minutes Gal finished and I've binged podcast before I have to have twenty thirty minute episodes. I just threw them because I you know I have the time and if if I like it I want it all right now. You know so you know we made our show it was you know we didn't set out with a go. I remember the first episode is US say Ashort it was GonNa be twenty minutes. It was how short it was GONNA be. We weren't gonNA talk about politics. Yeah we were just go have fun you know it and look at what the show came. Because you don't know you know another thing I would point out man be consistent. You know pick that thing you can do it when you pick that that thing that you can stick to..

spotify Black Women US apple Bevo Harry official Komo Joe Button Charlemagne facebook Zahn Bauer Sure Park twitter Amazon
"ten years" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

12:07 min | 7 months ago

"ten years" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"I listened to the Black Guy who tips podcast because Rawdon Karen Hearts for blacks widely assumed to be guilty of a range of promiscuity. Temperance was an issue that under my stereotypes for black women reformers their membership in such organizations as WCTC. You forget what this carbon women's temperance. I was all clues was important. For for another reason that public association Asian with elite White Women Reformer Sir to affirm their own true womanhood. It was no coincidence. That at the time of the night's meeting at W C T U organization Shelby Shelby County Attorney. General made a rare backhanded declaration of moral equivalency between black and white women. The precise context of the statement is unclear earlier but according to an article I wrote in a response the Attorney General had proclaimed that black women were no longer the Harlot S- they had been in the past they could. It'd be as decent or disgraceful as white women. Well not thought not. Not Appreciative of the positive sentiment wrote a mouse corrective active. That was published in the white-owned Memphis Scimitar a Republican paper as well as the New York Freeman black women. She said we're not consoled by the knowledge aristocratic circles furnished parallel examples of immorality the most disheartening aspect of race relations was the wholesale contention was defamation of black women. Me and the refusal to believe there are among us. Mothers wives and maidens who have attained a true noble and Refining Womanhood Ida added that she only wanted them to be given giving equal credit for their virtues. Hey welcome to the blackout test. PODCAST host rod carrying and we are alive on eight Monday sir. Of course you can find items stitcher. Paramedics searched the black guy who tibbs leave us. Five star reviews the official as a weapon of the show is take an unofficial sport. What about bullet ball And that expert that I read is from Ida sort among lions of which. I've read from several different times. And that's interesting that to me Eh. That that like that story is interesting because at once at the same time you're seeing that I And other black women are concerned about being respectable because I think one of the things people Always skip over his that respectability politics to be revolutionary politics. You know we can dress a certain way we can behave a certain way animals right. We can talk starting way because the prevailing theory was that black lack women were. I mean black. People were subservient and not just subservient but a subspecies of humanity white people being the standard and so a lot of stuff that we frown upon now and go we won't save you you'll respectability politics was stuff that literally. In addition to survival it was also like to approve. Appoint a hey we can be refined and even though you say we can't be these things and the reason. It was important because it will target in schools. That black people couldn't do it. They add sciences for -nology things like this. This is why black people are stupid and savage and and they'll never be like white people and so maybe be as of a vain attempt or maybe it was attempt in vain. It didn't work out but there was a there was a a lot of high minded people that we consider to be revolutionary. Louche Inari very forward thinking who had this way of believing at the time and I think is being glossed over. The second part is is is amazing. How okay a women's Tolerance Union or whatever it was called that organization was one narrows essentially trying to stop people from drinking this? They were the people that promoted prohibitionist auditions and stuff. Actually alcoholics anonymous still goes back to to this. These women STA and so Because of these these women they had just 'cause racism they split off into two different types of factors right. There were the white women and their racism. Were so strong they will i. Even if we you know until blacks were allowed to vote it was like even as places where we could use some black women's hell we're not gonNA take it because they kept making these assumptions that will white women will leave you know and we need the racist white women. That's more important than having more people even if because because then we you know we might have more people but when his black women some people leave and we can't have that that was a big excuse and all these white women feminist organizations for a long time so I just thought it was interesting because the affiliation and cooperation between White and black women at that time there was a mutually beneficial obviously to increase their numbers and was wacky will have the right to vote. Definitely why why we must are looking at you know because he ma uh-huh neither one of these groups could vote at the time right so white women startling in a black woman is we need this form some type of unity you know And all of a sudden you know they're they're they're allowed in there and these and these associations are good for black one because like you said they had one hundred million different clubs uh but being in a club where white women actually meant something to be like okay. You're now a member of this this this organization that's a bit more prestigious gets. It's a little bit more done. White women have the ear of white man. White may have the power financing things of that nature. So it's a really complicated thing and then for for that white man who you know. Essentially I'll share white. Women took offence to but essentially said well black women are now showing that they can be more more than just Harley. It's 'cause assumption. was that are black. Women were all overly sexually active and sexually available. It was one of the reasons that wipe me and with you know pretty much never be tried for assault of a black woman in the south. 'cause they would always argue you know no she jumped on me Janas another. I could have done nine. You know and it would and that was assumed to be common knowledge like okay. That's fine that's illegal defense. So in a way thinks he's complimented because he's never thought of black women anything else and so he's like Oh there proved and not just whores they can also be as good and as bad as a white woman. I wasn't you know they approved proved they could be virtuous they can prove. It's I'm sure white women were offended as what the fuck they're not equal to earth and I'm sure black like wildfire. Dr Even have to emphasize advertise on the bad. Why do you keep downplaying? Says it will evil creatures and Shit so anyway that was passed out maybe thinking about here in this case I want to because people still feel that way today which is really fucked up. They may not using language they might not say the same verbiage. Put it many way who feel that that same way today. Yeah it reminds me a little bit of like the organizing part of it And I I didn't obviously we don't really watch Golden Globes and pretty much any. Why award shows But I know there were Williams why actress she gave a speech at the Golden Globes and there was like a big deal. People were you know shouting Out and of course it fell into factions. Because I don't think this rift between white and black women has existed forever it will always exist yes And even and in the case I just right up once Once the vote for prohibition failed the White Women Basically turn on the black women kick them out of the organization white liberals blamed black people and and said that they're the ones who voted who didn't vote enough against prohibition and that's the reason it lost now turns out white man obviously would have wanted who wanted wanted to keep alcohol. I mean it's a huge source of income. They're the ones that most of that means of production products to more than any other group right now. The women injuring day consumed more than any other. As long as you have black people you always had escaped. Go reminds me of the vote for gay marriage or whatever in in California and how people blame black people for that white white liberal people blaming black people for gay marriage marriage equality not passing and California and you you literally had like million dollar funds from like the Jesus Christ's Church of Latter Day saints. Yeah and those white people who Raleigh had the power to end money to get the air politicians to go door to door spread the word. Somehow they let off the hook. Because you don't want to blame them and it's easier to blame black people as a scapegoat right As so what Michelle Williams speeds. I noticed about going all kinds of tangible shell when your speech last night she talked about how how you know women are powerful voting bloc and we all need to vote together and You know that You know she was saying it. Underlines along the lines of life the right to choose abortion rights and you know we asked if we vote star voting for why interest and not against the ball blah. And of course you know every personnel. To point out black women are at so you really only talking to white women and you're talking to fifty three percent now who are okay with losing their own rights who are with. You ain't talking to us. Their their bodies being policed there. Okay all of that stuff And so that's what it reminded me to like. You know this is from the past but all of is still relevant today all of still stuff that people are going through right now live and you know that all connected to me when and I was reading that just now so yeah and it's amazing how people can say those statements. When I realized doll you ain't talking to? Who Do you really think this message? Eight for us. Yeah and that's the other thing I always say man. I don't think you know and this isn't to be some people file. Feel like this letting them off hook but I I I really don't feel it but why people do not think about us. Not Don't you know and so sometimes we ascribe a maliciousness to them. In a way that I think is almost is almost giving them too much power like they just sit around and come balls and little rooms and every every white person secretly hates black people in like plot known us and they're thinking about how that's what I don't have the time they didn't even consider this year. Yeah like when you see these commercials IOS or something some tweet or something pisses Blackley Ball. I don't think why people I don't think fortune five hundred companies are sitting around in a room going. How can we piss all black people? I think they're just not thinking thinking about us. And you know the by product is that they pissed us off with shitting doing thoughtlessness right and Michelle Williams. well-meaning person gave a great speech. I'm sure black women or the farthest from her mind in that situation probably a good way probably because she don't need I don't want to you tell them black we wanted to do. They are doing the right things she really wanted to talk to our fellow white women and they always pull up a little bit short you know could have just say hey white women I'm talking to us is US fifty three percent of us you know she could have said that but is day women in general you know all the women are white. All the blacks are men. You know so apparently anyway today's rainbow..

White Michelle Williams Attorney US Temperance Karen Hearts California Shelby Shelby County Louche Inari W C T U Golden Globes New York Freeman assault official Tolerance Union Michelle Williams. Blackley Ball Raleigh
"ten years" Discussed on Cold

Cold

11:24 min | 8 months ago

"ten years" Discussed on Cold

"Podcast. I've seen a lot of young women who are seventeen. Eighteen nineteen years old. Who are listening? Because of their age didn't hear about Susan when this was all happening and they're they're hearing it for the first time and having a very different experience than Either of US right in in living that in real time but they're but they're learning so much from it and they'll someone your age age who is what would you be. Would you be Susan's ages head so since you three years you delve. Lv into it. Did you have any clue how sick and twisted this stuff was. Even even with what I knew about Josh and Steve which which was enough to know these guys are not good role when you really look at with the close focus It is I mean the word disturbing can't even begin to cover and has changed who you are. Yes and it changed how you deal with people people and you are now better. Qualified are better able to help people and there's decisions and seeing these things differently really the thing. I was with the reason the police released. The file is because we were going to sue them if they didn't so then they released a redacted. Copy though you don't have to sue US okay. The reason they release reset the unredacted copy because we were going to sue them. Because try and get this because I want more people to look at it and work on it and the thing I didn't want because has rejected files and and seeing their files is they had all steve's garbage and I didn't WanNa look at it and I don't want to look at it I didn't have have to look at it because everybody else look a few other people looked at it and I thank you so much for putting up with it and going to that and and stuff. So it's it's just something that needed to be done in a story told that I couldn't have told as Susan's bother. I couldn't could've toll it with any credibility or any objectively would all be a question where somebody else could. And that's that's you you show me things I had no clue about the depravity or the how bad it was and I'm glad I didn't. There was one time I went to the House House. Josh was supposed to take care of the boys and Susan. I gotta go out and do something. I don't remember what it was anyway. A but she She forgot something. I have to go back and come with me okay. Let's be quiet we don't want to the boys will WANNA I don't want to have to say no okay so we're going up the stairs to the second floor and she retrieves something but as soon as I got the top the store the stairs I she looked at me she goes. Do you feel it. I go what I go. I feel uncomfortable. I not exactly happy to be here. She goes you feel the evil. She kept things in perspective that was Steep House House. Steve Pals Yeah. They reached something at the top of the stairs. Dart at I thought that was interesting that she would say that to me yet. I'll bring that up in all of that really ugly environment that she found herself in through no action of her own right aside from meeting the wrong guys for initial mistake. Yeah for her to persist as long as she did in being the champion of her own value beak so much to her character. And I honestly believe it's an inspiration. Two people who hear her story myself included so I think the boys are lot big part of it so those kids meant everything to her and she was a real good. Mother need to learn from lessons from the past for the future. And this this is one of those lessons that can be repeated off and on S. needs to be. It'll be a little differently but you know it's still the same story good versus evil trying hard and you know and one of my daughters who has rejected everything. She was raised on We'll say leave it there but anyway he's okay. I WanNa talk to you and I need your help and everything but don't tell me to about prayer or God and I'm going pray when you have a question and that's what I've done so I don't understand how anybody can handle it without that kind of support include including Susan when when I was reading through so so much of Susan's writings and she's talking about going to her bishop asking for that council going to the temple and praying about it and it seemed very important to me that that part of Susan's life experience be presented so that people can understand Dan. It's not just what any one of US perceives about. Our our personal feelings about religion aren't was important. It's what Susan believed right and doing doing justice and honor to that. And when Steve and Josh who were Steve This openly that he wants to destroy the church. Jesus Christ latter-day Saints when they say well. She didn't really like it he was all well. Let's let that was ridiculous and you know she was trying to live it Josh. We're taking advantage that when he was looking for a woman within the church search. You know the very thing he saying that he didn't care about in the only waste reasons. He stuck around. As long as she did is she was trying to follow every everything along those that the church taught and she was not given up on him. Even though it was clear to me in the beginning of this there was nothing to be true to begin as soon as I started but but once it did she was going down that road and she kept investing time and energy and and love and stuff to try. Try and bring him back and save him and all that when he was a loss case from the beginning. I don't know I would never dreamed. Winded Steve was as messed up as he was their families as messed up his. I don't know how you would ever comprehend that I don't think anyone who's not actually lived it and including myself can really understand what the dynamics of the Palley were how how strange it was. We stayed away from Steve because we figured it. He wasn't good news and wasn't a pro. We didn't have to be there so we stayed away from it. Which as most people would you just avoid those issues? He's so it's opener is to that I guess I believe there is evil. And there's certainly good and there's gardeners there's a disc Satan and I think when you go down that pass here you're subject told that aren't making bad choices you make like the responsibility was on Josh to to not make those decisions right. But also he was. Steve taught him to be who he was. And Steve's parents affected MSU brought out in there and is that a terrible i. It's just a sad waste of life. Waste of time and tragedy that his time life his steve ruined his family and his but is he a victim. And who's going to judge judge stat by STAT I. I don't know what his life was like a child. I don't know what his parents lice were. So as much as I he was and what he did in the situation he did. Who can judge that not me? It worries me when I see people. People Focus too much on Steve Right when the focus needs to be on Susan. It's about Susan and where she is. I think the right time she'll be found and if not you know there's a whole lot of people in the world let her missing people will never see they're gonna get so at least not on this earth but to to your point I mean I have that house as well yeah. There's hope so if it's been ten years years we still haven't found her living day to day as we always do and every time every time there's Zabad pound every time there's a you know could ever found somewhere we start wondering is this. The one is our awaken. Be Over. We'll we'll be able to put her whatever's left to her to rest with their but were fateful or whoever is found even even though it remains. It's still good. Take matter how hard that has to be. It's hard but I think it's harder not knowing I mean we don't know yet or you know I love to be wrong and she blocking the door sometime or get a call. Hey there's this person you know I've had dreams. Were that has happened waking up thicky. She's home they'll dream. Aw but it was a good dream you know for that day. It was a piece moment. That was If Susan story sounds familiar in your own life in other words if you or someone you know is experiencing domestic abuse in any form. Please get immediate help in the. US support is a phone. Call Away at the national domestic violence hotline at one eight hundred seven nine nine seven two three three four online at www dot the hotline dot. Org My thanks again to chuck and Judy Cox for their candor and continued. Willingness is to share their daughter. Susan's story thanks as well to my colleague Nina Ernest for her work. Editing this episode Michael Bond Miller composed the music for cold old with additional sounds and songs by me. Cold is a production of K._S._l.. podcasts thank you for listening..

Susan Steve Josh US Steve Pals Steve Right Steep House House House House Steve This Palley Christ latter-day Saints Michael Bond Miller MSU Nina Ernest chuck Dan Judy Cox
"ten years" Discussed on Cold

Cold

09:16 min | 8 months ago

"ten years" Discussed on Cold

"While not explicit listener. Discretion is advised. I this is a bonus episode of cold. I'm Dave Collie it's been ten years since Susan Powell disappeared. If you've listened to cold up to this point then you are very familiar with her story. If you are just coming to this podcast I encourage you to check out. All of the earlier episodes they will help provide context to what you are about to hear but for summary Marie Sake. Here is a brief rundown on December. Seventh two thousand nine Susan's two boys. Four year old. Charlie and two year old brayden failed to show up for daycare. It soon became clear that Susan and her husband. Josh Powell had also failed to arrive at work. That's snowy morning. Josh returned that afternoon with the boys he told police he had taken them camping. He claimed to have no idea where Susan might be or what might have become of of. Her suspicion immediately fell on Josh from both police and the public but josh was never arrested and never faced charges. Susan's body has never been found. The investigation uncovered a disturbing dynamic within the Powell family. Joshua's own father. Steve Powell had developed an infatuation with Susan. He even propositioned her. An advance. Susan refused Steph's crimes including voyeurism and possession of child pornography cost Josh custody of his sons but in two thousand twelve during a court authorized visit Josh killed himself and the boys by setting fire to a home he had rented in Washington. I recently sat down with Susan's parents chuck and Judy Cox to discuss their daughters legacy. And how the past decade has affected them. My particular things to judy for taking part as this marks the first time she has shared her perspective in the cold. podcast there's been. Something of a resurgence surgeons in the public interest in Susan Story. When I I reached out to you awhile back to me it felt like the attention had very much faded faded? And we're seeing now. You know the cable shows the dateline the podcast right and it's kind of like it's almost reaching fever pitch again. It feels like how's that been for you to see this kind of brought up again. It was hard for me reliving. The most I mean the days came back in the day. The boys died or problems. Ah they're not pleasant but I'll get through this. It's okay. Her story needs to be Out there and I can deal with that and I'm not as spokesperson as much as it's I just don't feel that comfortable in front of cameras is easy for him and just kind of personal of the family but also want to help others and I want people to know the story so so it doesn't happen to them and as you look at that ten year mark from where we were when Susan I disappeared until now how has your life changed forever. Changed in one day is forever changed and and now we become spokespersons against domestic violence and and our our path is kind of set out before us. I wondered when I retire from the way. What would I do not have to worry about that anymore? I'm going to keep doing what I can to help other people and then help Keep looking for my daughter and keep Helping people that are in this situation. Escape domestic violence possible console the The relatives and of those victims and their families and stuff. So they are they can deal with the situation that they're coming to That's great you and I when we talked For the PODCAST. You told me you know how many people had reached Out To share those stories in and when you said that to me then I hadn't had the experience of having that myself exactly and now that I've had even just a small glimmer of what you've experienced with those messages and phone calls. It's it's inspiring but it's also a very for me draining. Oh definitely it takes so much energy to show that empathy does that. Does that affect you. I think it comes natural to him. It does but it's in a good way. Yeah 'cause you know you're helping that person and and I don't take their problems on myself because you can't help them and I can't help them. They have to help themselves selves. They have to follow the advice. You give them and get to the professionals who can help them. You can't take that on you or you would go nuts the real quick so it's draining in. Its you had to be attentive immediate. Do your best but on the other hand. It's gratifying that you can help somebody in an. I'm not going to give them false hope but I will give them a realistic view and some positive things they can do for themselves. I have experienced a what they need to be watching out for and what am I can give them a realistic look. What they're smoking at? So don't base. Is your whole opinion with the police file. said I mean that's a really great point right. One of the things that has been very instructive for me is trying to understand the situation from the multitude of perspectives. EXAC as you experienced differently than the friends here in Utah experienced than the detectives experience. Then we in the media experienced absolutely ooh I'd also disliked can't believe I'm saying this. I do believe the West Valley city. Police gave it their all and they tried real hard and they did a lot of searches and they did do a lot of work a lot of people while they messed up. We always always can mess up and Do you do you think they plan that no. They were doing everything they could think of that that made sensor and they wanted a happy ending. Well it hasn't happened but they tried and may be with others. You know other stories. Police aren't Miracle Workers Third Their police in. They're trying to do their job. But we also felt frustrated about things but I I knew they were working hard and doing their best. Can you see a point Where either of you both of you say I? I've done this enough in. It's time to to stop being in front the cameras in in talking like this. I don't think he'll ever stop me. I might stay off for a period retire or something because it took me a long time to be willing to get in front of cameras or answer questions because it it hurts hurts it was nice. Things quieted down. I mean it was okay but then I get calls from a few people all about their situation and We'll see where that goes for them and and see. Maybe we can make a difference because I think it's something that people will help people. I know it house and also if they're not in this situation hopefully they're listening because who knows down the Rhode King come up an accident or you know family issue or something to where they can remember something that he said that will help them. We're going to take a pause here for a word from our sponsors but will return with more from this special interview with Chuck Can Judy Cox Marking Ten years since the disappearance of their daughter. Susan Powell right after this.

Susan Josh Powell Susan Powell Judy Cox Susan Story Susan I Steve Powell Powell family Marie Sake Dave Collie fever Joshua Charlie brayden Utah Rhode King West Valley Chuck Washington
"ten years" Discussed on Start Today Morning Show

Start Today Morning Show

04:30 min | 10 months ago

"ten years" Discussed on Start Today Morning Show

"It's the morning show that no one knows no one is talking about is talking about Dated they probably the best way to start today eight gave welcome to Tuesday welcome I don't even know where to begin you know where I'm going to begin where will this morning because I am running in the evening I used my hour of getting up early to watch things that I had saved and my who Q. and it made me happy camp I don't watch things very often I was going to I was nervous they were watching things that were going to stress you out for the day no way any thing that pulls in politics news world information I was like this is a terrible way to start Friday I watched John Oliver who I I love I mean like satire he was talking about China's one child policy that's not gonNa make me feel anxiety today that's just gonNa make me smarter about the universe but it just I I don't watch TV almost at all and in the mornings I tend to be the one that goes out to the gym I would because I'm running in the afternoon I had this morning and I was like you know what leave me alone world I'm going to sit here and watch my who not an ad I did not start my day that way I started by day this way because that's what we're supposed to do I did not use this one but I use the blue one you do sound off a salad gives a heart worth of up if you've already done your start today journal work today double thumbs that we've been doing you know other people do fist bumps show them we do thumb bump O.'s very it's it's a technical term at that we've done since we first started dating and we did it at our wedding which is the lamest thing I've ever heard who we are worried about our wedding cool we are my gosh do you have that picture is now the time it's not the time it's not the time it's not yet when do you think I don't know our niece sent us a photo of us the day after wedding and you guys it's bananas you don't even know who you're looking at she said she did say I do appreciate this she said you guys glowed up well and glowing up means but I think it means that like we we got better with aiding up yeah there's a picture of me and I can show I don't Oh I don't know how well people are going to be able to see it it's try try try Hashtag worth the effort all right let's see if we can try it judges it's a thing it's a thing it is we are a yeah you're right I don't know how well people are Gonna be able to see this they're not my words are these default this is the day people day after our wedding all right I don't know if you're GONNA be able to see this well see that this can see in this and I think they can see that I am eight months pregnant but I'm so happy with I mean every what's happening here we've come a long way baby this is come a long way if teen years ago can you imagine what my metabolism was fifteen years ago wasted so many metabolism years on and looks like a crab it's a Scorpion sped Texas Texas think of what we could have done with the body that we had back we just here right now you're under the age of twenty five watching this program listen to it on Pie cast sister rather not waste he's years of a of a fast metabolism about this this is real no matter what age you are right this second the very best ten years.

fifteen years eight months ten years
"ten years" Discussed on Full Coverage

Full Coverage

04:36 min | 1 year ago

"ten years" Discussed on Full Coverage

"John ten years go slips deep. So that thing of like, oh, in fact, actually did wear a lot was nozzle blush are and then buying the sleep while that was rose gold. 'cause I this is way Cheever chivalry. It's not too. And I was thinking about actually the first flick. I have I used to wear if it wasn't the Joe I see working for them. I got it free was actually, and I still use them in my kit now because I love the full minute. Bobby Brown long Joan liner in the poll. Chocolate shimmer shimmery Brown. A love that. I there on my list as well things. I was wearing that. Yeah. They had the cream. I shut in two thousand nine would like the long way jealous. But they were long way Joel cream I shot. Oh, they will just also I'm looking at a list of software. I was saying that I was taking on holiday with me. I've got the prescriptive foundation screaming so much where you go to sell. They would make your exact skin color. I was devastated when they killed it back down in that recently income right now. Yeah, that's back back back certain stores. You can go to. To shake. Counter. I loved that. I do fantastic. Yeah. It's such a fun experience to you. I've got well. If I go on here got my two Chak law was all about two thousand nine and actually thinking about it. I was also to Chicago. And what was it clearly what was it called airbrush conceal? I love me some of that. Yes. That loved Caen. Yeah. I did chubby stick as well. Trump can Hazel. He's there is more. Like, the it was oh God. What was it called clinic Moscow? Or that you can still get dozen lacked power lash prowls. With worth. Yeah. Yes. I had which was so mazing, then the Steeler shadows. Steal Aisha's is like squares jam. Yes. Still lost. Massive jam. And I had this loud was like my absolute favorite, which is. So is because we would just playing with cloud in the new cream formula right now and cloud. I never didn't have it. And it was a silvery Tope Topi color. I would wear every day in a very share. And then I would just be like very Lii in mine is all over. No. It wasn't a then. Yeah. Then I go private koshen again in twenty four seven pencils in stash rockstar Earl slick and corrupt and again like I still have all those pencils. That's yeah. That's nice. When you remember the things that you've had, but you still use still have a love affair for. Now. You just couldn't believe how many was even going about looking at this thing. And I'm like, oh, I've just been using this elements rose collagen quartz, man. Which is the mossy just brought back yet. Collagen quotes mascots the say moody rounded, only, oh, my go- when that came out. And I was like, oh, this is so amazing. How wait I've been used? Ten years ten years ago. It's so crazy. How many things there are on this list of off and stuff that I just fiercely loved. Yup. Die. Hold. And now, I'm like, oh, yeah. I remember that still a lip glaze singlet pledges. Yes. Oh, there is a ruby. What was it could fire? The glazed one that you put up. It was a mini. I always always had like a five pound voucher way you'd buy something. And he was many. And I always bought I thought review many brushes were amazing. Yeah. That was how I started my kid a little time getting my five pound voucher. What I brought something from. I'm not keep. Yeah. Keep getting that. It's so funny 'cause I'm just remembering now, I think I was coming out actually when I was a coming out of phase of wearing quite fifties clothing. Actually, I was going to phase of that. I used to draw beauty spot on Marilyn place. I used to do I think it was an eyeliner pencil that I would shop really Shaw and then just always late round. Yeah. I always stayed because I ain't wearing that wanna met Dave 'cause I met David too. So. Yeah. Just one of my favorite things about looking at the old blow boasts is products that don't exist anymore. Jemma can't Jeb kit kit. Of indicate lip envy here, which looks the nail polish pod. Cam danger of Hodge now in WalMart here. Different. Yes. I still remember as well back in the day when boots used to have a makeup forever..

Earl slick Trump Cheever Bobby Brown Caen John Aisha Joel Jemma WalMart Shaw Moscow Chicago Joan Hodge Dave David five pound ten years Ten years
"ten years" Discussed on Full Coverage

Full Coverage

04:29 min | 1 year ago

"ten years" Discussed on Full Coverage

"I didn't I didn't put any pencil when he color in. I think I just left them as they were sorry member. That's a big difference. Now is trying to add a little bit extra. Yeah. I think I was gonna come. We'll Dacian that much. I mean, even now I don't always westbound Asian. But I think as well now, I'm more. I know the foundations I like to go forward. I think back then I was sort of like, I remember I worked with Paul and Joe for little batch lay while I was doing assisting like a part time thing as a freelance, and they did this amazing primer. Dave not still make it was called. It was just the shade to. And it was like golden tint, I would wear that. Instead of foundation always gave me a lovely glow that because it was a primer. You could see my skin through it. And I guess that's the me. My real shocker days worth of like the age the so I feel like I was quite lucky. There's nothing I look back and feel like all that was crazy crazy because I think it was quite minimal. But I also think interesting for me as we look at the whole tenure challenges like where my kit was props ten years ago, you know, and also how my friends were wearing makeup and stuff because I think I was actually quite born with my makeup. I just did a flake or. Mochi? I if I went out, you know, it wasn't pretty nice to me give it it wasn't. I see these photos of people. I'm like, and the funny thing is even when this ten year, I didn't have Gordy. Of how many I couldn't? I mean, look, you know, it sort of. Yeah. It's fun. I so I yeah. It was a big year. On forever and ever and ever and a right before turned twenty eight so, you know, beginning of two thousand eight just before this. I decided to go Brown because. Because it's actually all logged in BT mecca. I'd go face event, which was brand that That was. was. She was the creative consultant on it. And that's what's in the blog is Charlotte till we telling me to die my hair Brown because I blew is how to promptly did. So I my head onto my hair was pretty dark Brown. It did look good in famous like, I'll give her a juicy. So she was right. All this no color in my skin. I have any. Aikman mois again. It's my I was really Brown. I'd really heavy buying 's. It was so short. But then is really interesting. So I had a list my top picks of two thousand nine that was on BT mecca. Number one was Ellis pro college marine cream, which is bunkers. I'm still using that. Yeah. I was talking about I've had knee, and I talked about, but my skin was really dry, and so on this was amazing. Like that agree with that Clerel perfect ten which is what I used to die. Just like oh Martin. Unless you do which case go crazy, but it didn't go wealth management. We wait much pigment in the. Are you going get old strip? But that's fine. And then my and this was a real flashback because I totally forgotten about this. Now as soon as I read it I was like, oh my God. I never didn't have this with me. There was a smash folks lip ball lip gloss on. It's still I think it still exists that was glow plump, and they were shifting where we know. I've had like water color glow. Do you lip glow college football? But it was the smash box. On glossy pink adjust to your ph and I loved it. The plump was Bosa plump untangle. I don't really agree that any of those things do that loved it loved it. Then the MAC Hello kitschy range. I was obsessed. I've still got two of the bushes. I think it's called tippy could blue pink eye stunned by it being a hourglass ambient blush. I use to all of is the only blush that I've ever hit pound on. Yep. Too. Big deal. Lindsey. Urban decay twenty four seven pencils. Yep. One of my not using those now and decay primer potion, and they were the make. Even the Lori L true match foundation. Yep powder. Compact. The I still love. I couldn't believe it. I couldn't believe it. How many I'm still using? I was definitely still using L'Oreal mabley miscarriage predominantly. I'd say drunk..

Brown BT mecca consultant Aikman Lindsey Ellis pro college Bosa Gordy Dave Lori L Clerel Paul football Joe ten years ten year
"ten years" Discussed on Full Coverage

Full Coverage

03:17 min | 1 year ago

"ten years" Discussed on Full Coverage

"You can still go and see it. Yeah. I saw it in two thousand seven according to the. On two thousand nine I was so posting. So I was in the BBC world as a blogger. So I was trialing stuff. But I will say even though I was a hardcore blogger at the times postings every day every other day. I was still. I never wore a ton of makeup. I was doing very very cautious with what I will. I knew I liked what I knew always go to events and people like, oh, it's so funny that you come to make offense you never wear makeup wearing so much my face eats make off it's not I don't translate to wearing a lot of makeup. And then if I'm wearing a lot I suddenly looked like a Wayne, I think you'll make well, I I've learned, but it was really interesting because of BBC mecca I was able to go back and actually look at the products. I was writing about 'cause I looked at photos a diary mono who didn't love Tope silvery. Nine because every Jovan Topi silvery. I. So it was interested to go back and see what actual products. I was writing about using a lot. And it was fun to see those diary out. Just great. So I do actual specific product remember forgotten about which exciting. But then they're also I'm still using interest to yes, ten years. So tells about what you were up to like I said I would have been finished university. I was living in London. I was assisting another makeup artist. I was working with him fulltime pretty much. I'm that was the today. So I was what TV shows expecting the makeup various different. I think it was it was very early on in my career. Getting into the industry. And again, I think at that time beauty blocking it wasn't a big thing. So it's funny. Even looking back. I guess the biggest thing was all my inspirations coming directly from print magazines. They will wasn't the emphasis on the internet. It was the mice base air Lindsey. So it really it was the both of. But I feel like, you know, back then I didn't have the portfolio. I have. Now, I didn't have the clients. I have now. So I won't be gifted. Aw, everything was being scraped and saved, and you know, if a friend hustle, and they didn't want any more. I'll have that. And yeah, it was expiring and also to understand products. I was having to go into department stores and play with everything on the back of my hand. So even if I couldn't have it in my I knew how it worked or how it felt recommending people. And I guess a lot of it when I look back. Yeah. Probably mostly go friends using it was not more word because blogging and it was the beginning. Yeah. It was really go friends friends saying you really should try this or you know, when I would work with other Macra and seeing that kit and being inspired. But will they have and funny again, let you set the makeup thing even back, then I don't feel like I. All different types of makeup. Really? I I've always wanted flick. I've always done some kind of flick because that's just what my eyes shame. If I didn't even really do my eyebrows for years. Squeezing. Well, I used to tweet the living crap about two minutes. But I definitely wasn't doing anything to them. Yes. Allies or anything funny?.

BBC Jovan Topi London Wayne Macra two minutes ten years
"ten years" Discussed on Full Coverage

Full Coverage

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"ten years" Discussed on Full Coverage

"And for me. The I quote they made that will let the Mucci texture fall into that category. But then they also have the new I shutters. They made like the ones that in the squeezy cheese, a really full pigment and very much encourage I would say play and experimentation with a makeup quite creative in their shade choices. So I kinda feel like milk is a good one. Because there is something for everyone. It's a fascinating brand. I've watched it since it started. And I have to say it's very similar Jacobs line to me when it first came out. I was really disappointed. There wasn't much. I thought was very exciting or fun or actually that good. I just felt kind of rushed and a lot of style over substance. Yeah. What I will say since then moved into something that I really love to be with those cheek six say all Kroger's good. I big huge new. I love it. Really love the highlight sticks. I love the super iridescent glittery ones. Yes. Miles is gorgeous as well and color bones party time that so much even you can rub it in your hand and put it through your hair. It's really really pretty. I like the gel eyeliner pencils yet. A recent discovery that came second my. Tested, the blow of foundation, I didn't get along with me too. But it felt kind of like the flower to me it was quite a heavy cream. I thought it was going to be a lot lighter than it was. But I think view looking for full coverage the tube, patching great. Yeah. So give if you're looking for mobile coverage foundation. I just wasn't. I'm trying to think. Well, I don't think there's anything that's out in the current range. Don't lie. No. I love all the sticks. I like the tone of stick. I like the cool. Yeah. I like the Sarah's innovative technology on the Kushner scar. Again, I think we see Christmas ARA introduction as CD oil reviews of that people grew into dot com as well and lip gloss in the Cush line now as well, which really lovely of Catholic loss, and it's very nice. Wells does the the sun oil is really skin oil is just so so pretty gifts to beat sfu finish on the skin. I just I'm very excited. This finally out. I think people have been waiting for so long way. Ju it's very exciting. And yeah, I mean, we could carry on all day, so many there's been talk about really ought to because we've been talking for eighteen years or a day. So we're gonna talk about a bunch of things in our highlight of the week because I think a highlight might be some highlights. Most importantly now is all main feature which would be ten challenge. So tell us about this for the people that don't know if so if you're not on Instagram there has been a hashtag going around hashtag year challenge where people have been posting a pitcher themselves ten years ago, and then a pitcher now, and I guess generally having a bit of a Lawler props equality head to also very Steiner shout fits stylish, inverted commas. We've all those days is important that so million thought we take a trip down memory lane. You want to trip? It was we would have reminisce. I mean to clarify way saying we're trying to work out. I was like wait ten years back is that hard to do. I need to run. A how old are right now. How would I would have been twenty two? So I would have been just finishing. It would have been when I was living in London. And I would have just finished university about a year or two ago. So yeah. No, I would finish university. I would have been just starting. I've been assisting that was assisting days. I took my wisdom, Twenty-eight dot e Ben. Ben it's on now. Twenty to shut up. Twenty eight. And actually two thousand nine was big if me because that's what my moved to America. So I moved to the to New York in July. So it was a big transition phase for me. I was BT blogging. OJ OJ. Daddy. My daddy. Mac. I was blogging. My blog beauty, Meca dot blog. Spot dot com. It's still out there..

Jacobs sfu Instagram Miles Kushner Mac Sarah Wells Lawler America New York London Steiner ten years eighteen years milk
"ten years" Discussed on Full Coverage

Full Coverage

04:06 min | 1 year ago

"ten years" Discussed on Full Coverage

"Fan and beauty gigantic addict. Yeah. Because beauty goes out and buys a new pilot. And as my God, which I do get very excited. If you've got a problem in the style of us, it's when you go out and buying empty pellets to fill up from your own style. It's when the woman at the checkout is saying are, you sure you want the sixteen. Are you one hundred percent show? You do know you sixteen again Icee she should get ten and then Lindsey goes, oh, maybe twelve and then we look each other. We'll take all. We didn't just get those either. We. Tiny pocket-size five palm pallets which we're gonna fill whether and stuff and make our own makeup lesions, Jerry that you moron collection. And then not literally our full coverage. Announce it out of all of our shit. But then I also you vote more of other policies. Empty pilots are the gateway drug to excite whole fun, and you outta gloss red wine, and you live in Jesus you live in. I mean, I think it's very good. And it's inspirational of us from our it's very shop pure stash. It's very good for no by by. Yeah. Yeah. Loving what you've already gall, but making it more new forefront. So you actually a use it more often mix and match, and you remember what you've got an put it into something that makes you use it so excited so excited miss as get and there's no other word, Dan giddy giddy episode, I can feel it. So we've got news of we've got highlights the week. Obviously our main feature this week. We should say wasn't by by someone in the Facebook group Instagram in general. Yeah. One of our Facebook group friends suggested that we talk about the ten year challenge happening over Instagram. But with regards to our makeup, and what make up we were ten years ago versus what we wear now, which we thought was awesome. So that's what we're going to do. We're going to get into news. I because says l'idee lords of it all there's a lot also table covered in Mako. We do have a table covered a makeup. And I thought we've got something from every price range, which we've done everything for you. So don't favor if you are no by January. Well, probably. If you're a low by January or in need, a payday Trie, that's not gonna break the Bank. We've definitely go up. If you I need a patriot is going to write the Bank. I'll go to that got. We've got every two we got you so start with new news. This is something a lot people ask about as well. So actual news is actual news. From the news business news, one of our favorite brands elements. Everyone knows what big elements fans we've had no other Gabriel the founder on the part. We had lovely interview with Noah, we talk about their new product all the time. We actually got more talk about as well after we talked about this. But as some of you will seen elements has been sold the company itself husband sold who looks interesting for nine hundred million dollars. Not one million dollars. Nelia billion nine hundred million dollars business is big business to lock the time which I think surprise people's kinda surprising. No they were buying. I didn't know they owned anything other than themselves pretends out they do so that sex citing people of our stars. I who message is on the Facebook group and on our Instagram. What this would mean for elements for them as a consumer short story as it went mean anything. Yeah. Especially right away. Because you probably don't even know elements has been bought and sold a couple of times over the last few years. So it was sold to I'm trying to find almost starts, but it was so to Steiner leisure who owned bliss, and then that Steiner was sold to L catoon. It's will be moved around this happens. I think a lot more than people realize bronze get bought and sold and packaged moved around. Big news because elements was sold just a couple of years ago as a bundle of brands on that sale was something like nine hundred and twenty five million..

Facebook Steiner Bank Icee Noah Jerry Instagram Dan Lindsey Gabriel founder billion nine hundred million d nine hundred million dollars one hundred percent one million dollars five palm ten years ten year