35 Burst results for "ten ten minutes"

Carr Throws for 382 Yards, Raiders Top Steelers 26-17

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 14 hrs ago

Carr Throws for 382 Yards, Raiders Top Steelers 26-17

"Derek Carr passed for three hundred eighty two yards and a pair of touchdowns as the Las Vegas raiders beat the Pittsburgh Steelers twenty six to seventeen car second touchdown came on a third and ten with under ten minutes to play as he found Henry Ruggs for a sixty one yard bomb can be so fast speed kills and that's one of the advantages of his speech showing up to where he could get open like that so fast and so quick the the bliss you know they didn't even know really I mean it got there but I had time to throw rugs hauled in five passes for one hundred thirteen yards and the score Jon Gruden's raiders are now two went out for the Steelers Ben Roethlisberger pass for two hundred ninety five yards a touchdown and to pick Dante Johnson hauled in nine passes for one hundred five yards Pittsburgh's now one and one Josh Rowntree Pittsburgh

Derek Carr Las Vegas Raiders Henry Ruggs Pittsburgh Steelers Jon Gruden Dante Johnson Ben Roethlisberger Raiders Pittsburgh Josh Rowntree
Facial Recognition Tech: Open Your Eyes to Radiation

The Darin Olien Show

02:51 min | Last week

Facial Recognition Tech: Open Your Eyes to Radiation

"So infrared radiation. Which is the thing that we're using the tool that they're using for this facial. Recognition is thermal radiation is more electro magnetic radiation spectrum and a certain wavelength above red visible light between seven hundred nanometers and one millimeter. That's the wavelength and then there was a study done on and this is brutal. I'm sorry that this happened to the rabbits. However i am anna site. This study in service of the rabbits that unfortunately were brutally killed in this process. A hate that studies are still doing this. But this is something that was done study was done in new zealand to look at potentially harmful effects of this infrared radiation. This i are standing. For infrared radiation on the either rabbits were exposed to varying amounts of the i. r. then were unfortunately. This is where it's brutal. I'm just telling you they're heads. Were cut off. So then they were able to look at the lenses and the retinas and all of that stuff immediately after that and they concluded that the protein of the islands is very very sensitive to this infrared radiation. And that's the difference. Infrared radiation really doesn't do much in this form to the scan into the body but when it's directed at the i that's where things can go sideways and actually can contribute to cataracts. The exposure of the rabbits was up to ten minutes and keep in mind that that is not the exposures usually ten seconds for the phone. But what we don't know yet is how little and how much will create the damage. But if you're opening your phone multiple times a day than that adds up and then over time over length of you using your phone and weeks months and years and decades. Now you're starting to get the hint. That infrared radiation going into your eyeball is not a great idea. According to the international commission on non ionizing radiation protection is c. n. i. r. p. They made a statement of the i. r. energy from ira an i. r. b. poses a risk to the human eye the penetration depth of these. I are bands varies from one point. Two and three micrometres therefore the corner the lens and the retina can be damaged due to the thermal effects associated with the i. r. exposure

Anna New Zealand International Commission On No
Secretary Antony J. Blinken's Remarks on Afghanistan

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:04 min | 2 weeks ago

Secretary Antony J. Blinken's Remarks on Afghanistan

"As we are preparing for the show just a matter of ten minutes ago. We were witnessing the press conference from tony. Blinken that beta male pathetic. Excuse for a man from the state department literally. Use it again again. The phrase the inclusivity of the taliban administration hoping that they'll be inclusive. What do you think those women have in terms of expectations for the inclusivity of the taliban regime. What would the react. What would the mainstream media headlines evening. Tv shows incessant drumbeat be if the trump administration had left tens of thousands of non white afghans in afghanistan who worked for us the turps interpreters. The siv's the special interest visas

Blinken Taliban Administration Tony Taliban Afghanistan
Iron Maiden Find Eastern Muse

All Songs Considered

02:06 min | 2 weeks ago

Iron Maiden Find Eastern Muse

"This is iron maiden the new album is called. Sent jitsu this is the song days of future past and here to talk about what is An absolutely epic album from iron maiden his npr music. Lar- scotch which. I have two full disclosure. I was listening to iron maiden maybe forty years ago and they've been together longer than that you know and if you told me we'd still be talking about new music from them this far along. I probably wouldn't have believed that like you said. Listen to that rift guitars on this. The songs their vision. Everything i think our i. It's just all fully intact seventeenth album in forty six years from one of the greatest heavy metal bands full time. That's not hyperbole. it's a fact. Album is ten tracks over eighty two minutes so it is long and at times help lead but this has been iron maidens mode lately these grand sweeping epochs that tell these larger than life stories are made may arenas but their music lightly has been more tailored to concert halls. Most of these songs are like eight ten minutes long. Each vase sprawl had many movements. I can. I can imagine like quite a stage. Production for whenever iron maiden contura gone. They do use a lotta runway to get these songs going but but it works. So i think it's still pulls you along. I never found myself feeling tired or like the sound was getting tired. And there's also an assist something has been doing a little bit more lately but there's also a little bit nostalgia. My favorite song written here by the basis. Steve harris is called the parchment. But it's a song that gnaws to the egyptian themes of iron mates nineteen eighty four album power slave. So that's like a nice. It's a nice little easter egg for iron maiden fans and also kind of ties into kind of like a broader idea about iron maiden that history mythology and religion have always played the matic roles in their

NPR Steve Harris
The Disappearance of Ryan Shtuka

Crime Junkie

02:49 min | 3 weeks ago

The Disappearance of Ryan Shtuka

"It's mid february two thousand eighteen in beaumont alberta a town about forty minutes outside edmonton and heather. Stupa is enjoying her saturday night at home with her husband's scott and their two teenage daughters. They have one more kid ryan. I mean i say kid but actually is twenty and he doesn't live with them anymore. He's out chasing adventure with a friend. Working at a ski resort called sun peaks for the winter now about ten. Pm and heather is in the midst of texts conversation when a notification pops up on her screen. From one of ryan's friends. This guy. james sexually the friend that he went out to sun peaks with for the winter and kinda registers at the messages. From james. And things you know. I wonder what he wants but before she gets to that. She wants to finish what she's doing so she just kind of like swipes up to clear the notification finish her thought or her little tech chain or whatever and then clicks back and as. She's reading this message from his friend. It's almost not registering. What james is saying. Which is basically like heads up. Ryan didn't show up for work today. He's not answering his phone. And we're worried so we just went ahead and reported him missing to police. So you're probably going to be getting a call just like f. Why heather immediately gets james on the phone. He's like okay. What the heck is going on. Start from the top. Tell me what happened the that maybe she can just help. Take the temperature down. A couple of notches like problem. Solve this mom style. Yeah is this just a couple of friends freaking out over nothing right. Yeah get him involved. I totally support us. James says that he and ryan and group of other friends had gone out on friday night. I see this bar on the resort called mommas then according to jean strong's reporting for the sun peaks independent news to another place right next door called bottoms for this like silent. Disco thing that they had going on silent. Disco is like when everybody gets their own pair of headphones. And that's how you hear music that the dj is playing right. Yeah okay well in true twenty year old fashioned. James says that no one was really ready to go home when bottoms close for the night at one. Am so they decided to all head down the hill and off the resort to this like little get together that they heard was going on. This was happening at a house. That was just around the corner from where james and ryan lived anyway so they figured like okay. We're gonna head down there. Maybe have another drink and then we'll just go home. They ended up catching a lift down from the bar to the bottom of the hill and then they were walking the rest of the way to the house party and listen to me. This whole trip took like ten minutes tops by one thirty. Though james was ready to go home he tells heather that he saw ryan stand up and he thought that he was right behind him. In a couple of other people who had left the same time but somewhere during their walk home i guess they looked around and realized he wasn't

Heather James Ryan Beaumont Edmonton Jean Strong Sun Peaks Independent News Alberta Scott House Party
Voice Technology Provides the Near-Equivalent of a Hospital Room at Home

Project Voice - Healthcare Summit - 2021

01:04 min | 3 weeks ago

Voice Technology Provides the Near-Equivalent of a Hospital Room at Home

"I'm so glad to be part of this opening message at the voice of healthcare to try connect the dogs across the voiced technology community and if your healthcare provider if you're a hospital administrator if you run an emergency department or physicians gruber perhaps an insurance payer. There are solutions now. That are ready now. They can work today. That can deliver the very near equivalent of a hospital room at home thinking that real time vinyls like you just saw ability to deliver virtual video telehealth solutions and if it's a real emergency with just their voice they can be connected to first responders can deliver them to the living museum within ten minutes for emergency triage to that is available now during the pandemic and we need our the voice communities partners on the event today and out there watching could be part of that solution so we hope to connect with you about amazing care

Gruber
This Cult Haircare Company Has Launched a Beauty Line

Art Beauty

02:54 min | Last month

This Cult Haircare Company Has Launched a Beauty Line

"So i do wanna talk now about your be attended cosmetic live because we all know and love. It's a ten hair care. What made you say. Okay it's time to get into cosmetics in color you know what it's a natural progression for me. It's a natural listen. Beauty is head to toe and I really wanna create additional products with underneath the. It's a ton umbrella so to speak. That really creates anything that a woman is going to need to get ready so be a hair extension. it can be The makeup it can be obviously be attend. Has the same type concept behind it. Simple easy to use multifunctional makeup. That you don't need youtube tutorials you don't need a million brushes. Have the applicators really built right into the makeup itself. It's kind of you pick it up. It's self explanatory. you use it. And you get those fashionable grade beautiful results. We go holy smokes. I can't live with this product. Those are the kind of products. I like to create and i want to do it in the color world is well obviously so i love it too and i have to say when you say the word color like. You've got some really bold bright colors. do you think that your inspired clayton lori. Okay florida by puerto rican woman. And we just you know we can do. We can do muted as well. But honestly i'm all about the pop and especially now listen. We're still mass occasionally. We're still like having to make our eyes pop and and when you take your mask off we have beautiful lip stains that you still have some lip on even if a little bit came off in your mask instantly. We have a brown scare boom a little little applicator. You have a popping brow at a great dual chamber mascara so things that are just gonna make it really easy for people to really have those professional grade results without you know a lot of work and that's all about. We need a ten minute face nowadays. You know what are you. What is the lip product that you're using right now. Your lips look gorgeous. Thank you so that is definitely one of our. It's our lip gloss And it's it's the one that was in the new beauty box literally. The beautiful thing about it is. I'm pretty dark skinned i. I can get very pale as well but no matter. What whether i have my summer tan. When i have my really kind of winter skin this color goes with so many different skin tones. That's one thing. I'll as well a b. Attend makeup is literally all the way from say. The palest appeals to the darkest darkest everything from our foundations to our our lipsticks to our i colors. They really are super diversified. And so it's really about being all inclusive with beauty Bracing your own natural beauty. We don't have this cookie cutter kind of a Type of you know. It's only for this totally for that.

Clayton Lori Puerto Rican Youtube Florida
Interview With Joel Beasley From Modern CTO

Developer Tea

01:44 min | Last month

Interview With Joel Beasley From Modern CTO

"So i met this gentleman named at pnd bruin. Who owns seven cto's and he said you know do like executive peer groups for technology leaders. Vp's engineer cto's there on me. More like premium side or people are paying twenty thousand dollars a year and it's facilitated by a professional facilitator. You have to pay all that. So it's definitely good value. But he wanted to create something for the mid level of the market. Like you know people that are you know. They're they want to become a manager for the first time or they wanna move from manager to director in that was at a price point that was like much cheaper than that like super affordable even if they wanted to pay for it for themselves so i said okay because i have the audience and you have the knowledge of how to run these communities and the staff and the support so we created elevate one fifty dot com and the idea was elevate. Bring people up to the next level and then one fifty was like one of dunbar's numbers of community size. So we cap the community at one hundred and fifty people and so we have a hundred people now and We've grown over the past eight months and every week we have speakers and then the it's like a ten minute topic of conversation and then you go into a small group of like three to four people in that. That speaker has set you up with something. It's not like a generic cycling of speakers that are doing sales pitches like they have to adhere to our format. And so what it does is it gets you in these communities having these small discussions and building relationships. And that's been like unbelievable. So now i've now i've got this community where i can go and then every every week or every other week i'm getting introduced three or four new peers and were having legitimate conversations.

Dunbar
Venture Capitalist Keith Rabois Describes His Typical Cardio Workout Routine

Ben Greenfield Fitness

02:01 min | Last month

Venture Capitalist Keith Rabois Describes His Typical Cardio Workout Routine

"What would typical work look like for you like if you were going to do specifically a cardio workout designed to enhance two-minute recovery or or some flavor of interval training whether whether you want to describe what you're doing a barry's bootcamp or what you might be doing on your own. What loaded typical workout. Actually be for you. Sure capable workouts not fifty minutes. And it's probably subdivided roughly half into cardio in roughly half into resistance training with weights. And the i'd swap back and forth every called every six to ten minutes between the two so imagine two or three sets of each the cardio component would typically be a mix of jog runs. Sprint job runs french jog run sprint. So during the heart rate up. Max bring it back down not all the way but to you know so where you can breathe normal rows of normally and then spring back up and then bury the incline. Sue tried to the same fight on a plot ground surface and you guys sprint faster. Typically but then increased incline and try to maintain as much of the speed. And then there's different cycle is sector qatar's up and down. You can bury adler thirty seconds. Thirty seconds at the highest intensity or sixty six high-intensity mean or if i i kinda rotated that around somewhat for mental variety unless you're how much physical training really requires us but Up in synchronized to music. So i think music is gonna be darius active from premium performance. It also is very effective for improving Emotional tolerance of intensity training which is related on a lot of good studies. Deflecting in a nice book written by Professor mcdougall at stanford called the joy of movements out of the research on the fact of music on a particular kinds of music athletic performance. So i this is. My workouts are synchronized with like. Eds style music.

Sprint Barry MAX SUE Adler Qatar Professor Mcdougall Darius Stanford
The Great Lisbon Earthquake

Everything Everywhere Daily

01:45 min | Last month

The Great Lisbon Earthquake

"Population of lisbon in seventeen fifty five was approximately two hundred and seventy five to three hundred thousand people. Lisbon was the capital of the portuguese empire which held territory in europe south africa africa asia and many smaller islands in between this made lisbon one of the most important cities in the world at the time at nine thirty a. m. as people were going to or attending church. The first tremor struck they were loud and noticeable but they didn't cause much in the way of destruction the console from the city of hamburg. Germany later reported quote. We i heard a rumble like the noise of a carriage and it became louder and louder until it was as loud as the loudest noise of a gun immediately after that we felt the i tremble unquote based on what happened. Modern estimates are that there was a slip in the azores gibraltar transform. Fault this fault line that runs. Approximately from the strait of gibraltar. to the a'sore islands. One tectonic plate was thrust over another and the movement of land might have been as much as one cluster. The epicenter of the earthquake was believed to have been just off the southwestern most point of portugal near cape saint vincent at nine forty a m. The main earthquake hit church bells ringing all over the city and just as quickly buildings began to collapse. The churches which were full of people were the largest source of casualties for a period of ten minutes. There were three major quakes that shook the city to its foundations. It's estimated that the earthquake measured eight point four on the richter scale just to give you an idea of how much the ground moved in the middle of lisbon city center. There were fissures in the ground. Five meters or sixteen feet wide. The earthquake was the first of the three

Lisbon Azores Gibraltar Earthquake Cape Saint Vincent South Africa Hamburg Strait Of Gibraltar Asia Africa Europe Germany Portugal Lisbon City
Tips for Developing and Keeping Healthy Habits

A Healthy Bite - ThatOrganicMom

02:20 min | Last month

Tips for Developing and Keeping Healthy Habits

"I have all of these habits. That i want to make sure i do but sometimes like you said i struggle with consistency. And you said you know that a lot of times people will try to depend on willpower or determination alone to make these healthy habits. What do you recommend instead of this. You know determination because a lot of people think. Oh i just you know if i just really have strong willpower. But that's not the case so tell us what you've found to be. The case for forming help healthier habits. Well a big one is to not rely on motivation. So you know. Everyone has start monday. But really what's going to change like if you've had thousands of monday's in your life and nothing has changed so we tend not to rely on motivation. And that's when we talk about a lot so my biggest piece of advice would be to use something called implementation intention so it's basically a way to help you plan which has been scientifically proven to work So goes like this. I will behavior at time in location. So an example would be. I do yoga six. Pm in my living rooms or i will meditate for ten minutes on my couch at seven. Am so you really need a plan. That's that's a big thing and this implementation intention also makes it can concrete and it's also kind of embarrassing yourself if you don't do it because you know you taking the time to write it down so you know it's kind of embarrassing yourself in a way and it writing it down is super important An accountability partners. Of course if somebody's looking for to start from habits were obviously big accountability partners. So find someone who you can text every day and so that you know like when i don't work out in the morning i know that if i don't do it i have to tech sneaky that i didn't do it yourself but even better seven outside or don't want wanna disappoint me account with count ability partner commu ability group. So that's obviously what we're trying to create and we started a slack group for this reason so we say our habits every day. We hold each other accountable. We kind of put ourselves on the podium. We tell everybody what we wanna do them. You know we all eleven. Make sure jerry each other on meccan

Commu Ability Group Jerry
Space Tourism Blasts Off

The Ten News

01:57 min | Last month

Space Tourism Blasts Off

"The world has been buzzing about space lately as more and more rockets take off from our planet but the latest launches aren't from governments or organizations that you used to like nasa instead. Several billionaires and their companies have gotten into a bit of a space race on july first richard branson who owns space company. Virgin galactic became the first person to get to space in a rocket that he funded cool ends on july twenty first amazon founder. Jeff bezos flew a few miles higher than branson and a rocket called new shepherd nice. Each flight was about ten minutes long. Both virgin galactic and bezos company. Blue origin have stated that. They're looking to popularize space tourism. But right now they're charging big bucks for the privilege. Virgin is currently charging two hundred fifty thousand dollars a seat and while blue origin. Tickets aren't opened for the public to buy yet. One of bazo seat meets ponied up. Twenty eight million dollars for the first ride. These flights represents a new era for space travel. But they've also been controversial. Critics have questioned the amount of money being spent on this endeavor instead of donating to causes and solving problems here on earth especially in the midst of a pandemic but besides being joyrides for the rich and famous experts. Say that these space vehicles could one day have something to offer the science world. Scientists who want to conduct experiments in low. Gravity haven't been able to go aboard flights at all. The ships are unmanned bummer. That could change in the future scientists. Hope that they could study questions. Like how living things respond to the move from. Gravity to

Virgin Galactic Richard Branson Jeff Bezos Bezos Nasa Branson Amazon Virgin
Celebrity Fitness Trainer Don Saladino on Taking a Minimalist Approach to Workouts

The Model Health Show

02:30 min | Last month

Celebrity Fitness Trainer Don Saladino on Taking a Minimalist Approach to Workouts

"Stronger is like a big part of our longevity now allow the scientists point to even a muscles are kind of like a reservoir for aging hormones. And this is so great to have you here to talk about this because you know right now in our society. There's a lot of challenge with our health. And i think that it's routinely unfortunately kinda downplayed. How important work is that. You provide which is helping people because functionality. Physical literacy is such a part a big part of our longevity and our survival as a species right in so the the tool that you bring to the table. I feel like we need to have a renaissance or and i it can be happening right now hoping that it's happening right now towards looking to how can we become more physically literate and also just overall improving our strength as species. So how do you see that playing into things right now with all the issues going on wall. It's interesting because i look at what you talk about is the i. It is the most important stuff from the sleep and the Nutrition and all. These other things for me exercises is somewhat. It gets complicated. Sometimes because i'm not expecting people to be the way that i am like a shot a content with a friend this morning we train for probably two and a half hours. Which is excessive. I would never expect anyone do that. But we got to muscle beach then. Be trained in gold's venison did all this old school staff and we had fun. But i'm not expecting anyone to do that nor my even telling them to do that. I'm just asking them to move ten minutes a day or five minutes a day. And if they're one of these people who are like donna. Just i want to want it. I just want to be able to get off the couch. I want to just start with something very a take. A minimalistic approach break sweat move. Get your ira pumping allow your body to just gain a little elasticity and let's build some confidence and an in time. Maybe the question is who let me. Let me try ten minutes today. The problem that i have in our fitness world is that it's becoming very fluffy and even though we're getting people off the couch and we're getting him to move it's all about on. What new sexy exercise can i show. And then people are looking at this and they haven't really earned the right. Even i mean most people don't earned the right to do any of the stuff being put on social. Unfortunately but when you take someone who's not used to moving sitting for eight to ten hours a day and they're trying to do A headstone bosun ball. Something bad it's going to happen. It's a bad example. But i think you get where i'm getting at. Is that what. I'm trying to do with the people that i work with. I get them moving

Donna
How Amtrak Developed New Social Media Marketing Strategies During the Pandemic

Social Pros Podcast

02:20 min | 2 months ago

How Amtrak Developed New Social Media Marketing Strategies During the Pandemic

"Do you show people at amtrak. Examples from your riders and or do show them examples from other brands airlines or or some other kind of of travel related organization to say. Look how they're doing. How do you sort of make that case in and put together the presentation. If you will sure yeah. I think i think there's the qualitative and the quantitative of in the you know the quantitative is just like look. How many messages were getting in just raw numbers. This is how much you could break it down to. You know we're getting somebody messing us every ten minutes or two minutes or whatever you know whatever you can break it down to And just say like that's the that's like the raw numbers but here's the actual quality of the message. Here's the types of messages and we have we tagging and we look at different ways to categorize those so we were taking really that raw feedback coming in and just saying like hey Here's a way to. Here's a way to actually see what customers are saying. We actually brought tweets. We had a leadership meeting one time and we did a tweets where we did it like a jimmy. Kimmel mean tweets style. And you know where he had. We had essentially like different people in the company reading tweets that we actually get and we had groups in the leadership summit talking about like. How would you respond to this. What would be your response to this. Really video of that will put it in the show notes yet probably not a. I don't know if that was ever made public. But but it was. It was a really eye-opening exercise for our executives in this league. You know all these leaders across the company from every division every you know people that work in operations on the you know to our senior leadership so they were seeing There were seeing what people were saying so it was always interesting to me to see like how each group would respond to that because it was always a different. And then we'd think about okay. We talk as a as an organization. Okay is that where we'd want to you know. Is that how we should handle is that who would you go to. Is that where you know. So that helped a lot without relationship building that i was talking

Kimmel Jimmy
The Diet Soda of Poker

Poker With Presence

02:24 min | 2 months ago

The Diet Soda of Poker

"Even though it's zero calorie drink it actually does end up in long term leading to you. Consuming more calories more processed foods more refined sugars than you would. If you just didn't have it at all. So this idea of empty calories is one that i think is really interesting because i find that in poker these mindset platitudes that we put out. There are essentially the empty calories of poker. So when you are stressed when you get into spots where you're buried you don't feel good. The game is really overwhelming. You're having all these emotions and you lean on a mantra-like don't be results oriented or just be happy that you're getting it in good. These are ideas that you can fall into the trap of thinking okay. I've got it down now. Because i said my mantra. I said the thing that i need to say. I heard what i needed to hear when in reality there's all this other stuff going on inside you you've got all these big emotions you're angry or you're sad or you're scared about what's happening to you right now in this game and you're skipping over all of them just because you want to get to the end result of reminding yourself to not be enough feel the things that you are feeling right this moment and so this very much can lead to this response where maybe for the next five minutes or ten minutes or if you're particularly strong maybe an hour or two hours you're gonna feel okay you're gonna feel like okay. I've got it under control. Because i reminded myself of how i need to be approaching this mentally but it's empty because what's happened. Is you have not acknowledged the emotions that exist. You have not felt those feelings and so those emotions are just going to burst through and break down that wall and it's going to be even bigger and even worse than if you just felt those emotions in the first place so when you go straight to the mindset the framework the theory in the idea of what you think. You're supposed to be doing when in reality. What you need is presence and connection. You're actually just making things much worse in the long run and it's never going to take you to the place of being a person who can perform at a high level no matter what's going on around you you might be able to perform at a really high level when things are going really well or going pretty neutral but when things go terribly you're never going to be the person who has the level of emotional

Rivian Shuttle Bezos & Co. To Space

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast

02:06 min | 2 months ago

Rivian Shuttle Bezos & Co. To Space

"Good morning good afternoon or good evening wherever you're listening in the world. Welcome to the news daily. It's wednesday twenty first of july. I'm martin late through every story. You know the score you don't have to and when i was putting together today's podcast just sitting down to the first tentative notes on youtube. Maybe i missed the jeff bezos flight into space. And i hadn't it was team. Ten minutes i was watching it. Live very fatuity timing. I couldn't help but notice they were shuttled to they're playing. That was showing some replays. But earlier in the day shuttled to the launch pad of course in ravines and i guess you know if your amazon company owns a big chunk of ribian the vehicles you going to choose Of one hundred thousand electric vans coming from ravin for amazon parcel deliveries over the course of the next nine years hundred thousand But also what was interesting if you haven't seen it by the way i you know. It's not space podcast by very quickly recap The rocket blasted them into the atmosphere hundred kilometers. Plus up at past the recognized line of of what is being in space and then detached the captial at the end. The booster came back down. Fell back down to earth and landed back on the launch pad. So impressive how do that and spacex to as well. It's just i it's incredible and then jeff bezos is three fellow astronauts also. How few minutes in zero gravity in-space looking back down on the planet and then it fell gradually back to earth at a leisurely sixteen miles an hour. The lost thousand feet as the parachutes were deployed. I tell you that story. Because they didn't know where the she was gonna land just somewhere in the desert. They knew it wasn't going to hit anything. Plenty of land for its land on But i suppose they had an idea but they weren't exactly close several minutes Of just them strapped in the captial. Come come back down. landed safely Until they got rescued by the ground crew and they all turned up at speed in review in One ts

Jeff Bezos Amazon Ravin Martin Youtube Spacex
Megan S. Smith on the Inspiration Behind Her Film "bOObs"

Breast Cancer Conqueror Podcast

01:38 min | 2 months ago

Megan S. Smith on the Inspiration Behind Her Film "bOObs"

"Lead you to create such a controversial film like boobs. My my husband passed away from cancer. Twelve years ago and i had three dear friends die of breast cancer and i started to make a film about alternative cancer therapies and when i noticed ten minutes of my ninety minute film whereas on breast cancer screening mammography mostly on what we could be doing instead. I stopped editing other film and put out this one a short and then it got this one got picked up as a by a distributor out of la they said expanded into ninety minutes and will distribute it for you. So so. that's what happened awesome. That's awesome now before this whole issue with cancer came into your life. Were you like the average woman who would go for mammograms and screenings like everybody else. I was idea. Remember the last time i had a mammogram. Which is probably before. I started filming probably about seven years ago now in a standing there and getting breast radiated in it's hurting lang cac. Is there squishing it. And they're like. Oh we have to keep squishing a little bit more on like no. Don't this is really painful. And they kept compressing. Unlike that's it. I am done. I gotta find some way. And luckily i was talking to ben johnson now deceased unfortunately but Ben was the one who said yeah. Mammograms nanna now more radiation than they're letting on and look at this democracy for an ultrasound together so i did really

Cancer Breast Cancer LA Ben Johnson BEN
Pope Francis Makes First Appearance Since Intestinal Surgery

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 2 months ago

Pope Francis Makes First Appearance Since Intestinal Surgery

"Pope Francis made his first public appearance Sunday since major intestinal surgery last week from a hospital balcony the pope greeted well wishers as he stood for ten minutes smiling waving and offering thanks for the prayers for his recovery equities only the bonus bizarrely calling health care for all oppression is good he also prayed for the people of Haiti following the assassination of their president the Vatican says the eighty four year old is on the road to recovery following July fourth surgery to remove a portion of his colon which had narrow due to inflammation but it hasn't said when he'll be discharged from the hospital I'm Julie Walker

Pope Francis Haiti Vatican Julie Walker
"ten  minutes" Discussed on Ten Minute Medic

Ten Minute Medic

04:17 min | 1 year ago

"ten minutes" Discussed on Ten Minute Medic

"The amount of kinetic energy increases to almost one hundred, twenty, thousand K. You. And when they say speed kills the really do minute. American energy increases were the white as a person goes from one hundred and fifty, two, hundred, eighty pounds. But really not quite that much. Understanding the anatomy of the human body coupled with basic grasp of Connecticut Energy You can begin to develop type six cents about the things that are going on with your trauma patient. Keep in mind outside out of mind, can often caused some real issues as far as having an effective assessment towards a patient of trauma particularly, any type of internal injuries we are looking at her patient and we begin to compare what has happened with the mechanism injury with injuries that we're seeing as well as the potential for injuries that are unseen we call busy index suspicion. Is Index of suspicion or your gut feeling will become much more accurate as you get more experience understand that early on your basic mistakes as far as what your gut is telling you. But that's okay. That's all in how you get your experience in your education as far as you're moving along and as you see more patients and USS more patients, the better off, you will get it this to understand the Bob Mechanics of trauma. We need to settle upon just a few definitions as we're moving through here. Now, for some of these definitions are going to be a no brainer. There may be others that you may or may not be familiar with it. That's that's okay. So, say penetrating trump penetrating trauma happens when objects such as a knife or a bullet or any other objects for that matter Pearson Protective Barrier of the skin and enters into the body. Any subsequent injury may be caused either directly or indirectly by the spin attraction will. Particularly Take A stronger deeper look at this type of injury causation. Particularly, we take a look at gunshot wounds a little bit later on. Compression happy injuries happened when a body stops abruptly while the internal structures are still moving forward. Now. The most common type of injury that we would see this in is a head injury with a coup contract injury to where the brain sloshes forward. You have an injury about the interior and sloshes backward and you have an injury on the post here. Stretching injuries are just opposite of compression these occur when part of the body is pulled away from from another in particular, you can see these types of injuries when you have sprains. In particular the ankle and the knee win differently, ovens and tendons begin to get stretched a porn. Now, a very medieval example of this occurred people were stretched on the rack is a type of punishment or torture or to exact a confession. In a share type of injury, the internal organs continue to move forward at varying rates Speedo. We talked about this while ago. When we were speaking about the car that stops the body shop's internal order themselves are still continuing to to pass on forward as the as the body of stopped. Win The body itself stops any type of limit or tendon that crosses the Oregon will cause it to be lacerated this quite frequently with liver lash rushes do the foul. Some four ligament crosses the interior surface of liver, as well as with injuries too theoretically or particularly within the lever. This fast inform legemaate acts much like a cheese cutter and that is very tough. It's very. Fibrous and it literally, the liver will continue to go around it on both sides until Liberte south could can become lashing right in the patient of lead to death. There are three phases of a traumatic event that we're GONNA take a look at in depth here..

penetrating trauma Speedo Liberte Connecticut Oregon
"ten  minutes" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

15:56 min | 1 year ago

"ten minutes" Discussed on Little Atoms

"We need to understand and we need to recognize that they saw themselves as terrorists. That's what they saw the violence as and we have to allow them to be what they were. We can't sanitize our history. Just it makes us feel more comfortable and happier with idolizing women who have committed incredibly violent and dangerous actions for us to have the rights. We have today when these acts of happen. Then how does kitty start to be treated at the hands of the authorities? Well she's been arrested in force-fed a number of times before the violence as so many of the suffragettes were and I think what few people have have really understood because we haven't talked about the real violence and horror. Is that what it really pushed them to? Was that this the process of force feeding and government torture was a huge moment in the radicalization of a lot of these women that push them towards the extreme violence of their acts at one point in one single sentencing. Kitty as force-fed two hundred and thirty two times in one single set of four months and it destroys a singing voice. And you know when you're reading kind of her firsthand accounts or any firsthand account of the experience forcefeeding. It is torturous together. And you just you always have to carry in your mind that the whole reason why was happening was because she wanted me to have the rights. I have today and we wouldn't have them without her. What's also going on at this? Time is the First World War and Kitty obviously of German extradiction. She's betrayed by somebody. Basically reported there's women start that she's a German spy. It's you can't you can ask for a better story than the life story of this credible woman because it just goes from kind of one amazing extreme to another and the joys of being a historian is you get this autobiography with this amazing tale in and you then spent years going off making sure. It's all true because you quite suspicious because how can be true and yet it is. It is all true. It's all there so kitty. Because of her German blood it turns out that someone from her past decides to seize on the moment to. We don't really know what her motivations were. I think she was probably just mad to send a letter to the Home Office proclaiming that Kitty is at suffragette and a German spy. Now by this point kitty has been in England for over half her life. She's lost any trace of her German accent. She Nagas speaks German. She has no German friends. No German family. She you know she has no connection to Germany whatsoever. It is the distant dream of a child immigrant. A memory yet. Of course the government sees on this opportunity to try and get rid of them most dangerous woman. I find this to sort of things that happen at once. Kitties already on the run underneath the cut in mouse act because this is the moment where the first world war is breaking out the suffragettes on the run. They don't know still from all of the things. The amnesty hasn't quite taken off the what's going to happen. So she's hiding from the place already and she his reports that they're searching for her under this accusation of being jammed spy and she's trying to figure out if she can get out of the country or what's going to happen whilst the government's investigating her and trying to piece together if they can actually throw her out of country and one of my favorite bits of archive was sitting in the National Archives in Q. Reading the government reports of this investigation which are all in the you kind of all drawn from an important to the bank. But the moment when they realize there's literally no way of being able to accuse her of being gems spy for because she she has. She isn't one and that kind of gut isn't and they're like there anyway. There's all this kind of little scribbles in the origin of like. Is there any way we can do anything we can get rid of? And they realized that they can't and they will also fear terribly that because she so influential and important in the suffrage movement that if they do trying to pull her that the this suffrage at will kick off and might even stop bombing and by that point per society cannot take a domestic campaign again but while they are concluding this. Kitty is being kind of. Hof escorted by the police who've now found her and by the suffragettes who are trying to rescue her to the Docks Liverpool and they managed to put her on a boat and sent it to America to just get her out of the country and keep us safe and she arrives shortly after that into New York whilst the wars breaking out and from that moment on her life is again changed forever and so she's she finds New York and eventually will become involved. Margaret Sanger and the organization that becomes planned parenthood and she remains involved in activism for large parts of life. I WANNA pass over that period of time. It's a major part of a libraries. Want to get to like where she ends up. Where does where DOES KITTY END UP? After this what says she becomes a hugely eventual. Part of Margaret Sanger's control movement working between the US and the UK until really had death as birth control activist and kind of sneaking into churches. Live leaving bombs. She's leaving birth control pamphlets which I just love disrupting society wherever she can but she ends up back in New York in her. Seventy s in the forties and. She sits down to write autobiography because she realizes that won't her? Life is unique and yet shared then needs to be a record of it. She desperately wants people to know who she was. And the role. She played as well as all these amazing women around her and so she kind of sets down to kind of write it all out and and leave it to everyone and then dies as we're in the middle of Kennedy going into the Second World War and I really I when I was writing the book. I really struggled with that moment because I had no happy ending. Inequity dies surrounded by friends and family. But she's never married she's never had children. There's no record part from her words of life and who she was and I desperately wanted to find a way to have a positive ending I. I couldn't because everything that had happened to her. You Know Society hasn't changed and I was writing this in kind of August. September of last year thinking. Nothing's changed and thinking of my own life and thinking over the experiences of very good friends of mine and being angry and frustrated that nothing had changed. World is not different and ISO sitting down to chapter. Ten metoo happened and it was insane and I had to write to my publisher and Guy. Please can you. Can you just give me a couple more weeks so I can watch this happen because for the first time it feels like we might finally one hundred years after? Kitty was fighting for the same thing. An actress fighting against sexual harassment. Trying to change her world we might fund be getting somewhere and I was very lucky. They gave me the chance to watch it. Come out and say the whole of the last chapter is capturing that moment of history as it was happening which was an incredible thing to be able to do as a historian to start with. Mary wollstonecraft to tell US AMAZING. Life and then of Kitty Marian and then capture a moment of our own social revolution. The very end. I still can't get over that. That is what happens that I was there at that moment. And that is is how ended and it finally gave me a not so much a happy ending but a hopeful ending the buck because we should have one we should. I get really angry when all we do is portray women in the past victims. Because they're not they're so strong and they're so determined to change the world for the better and often that gets lost in kind of stories of just slowly of abuse or just of death or the end or an ending. That isn't quite what you want so to be able to end the burke today with where we are now felt incredibly powerful. Now I was gonna say changing the subject. Of course it's not really changing the subject. I'm not sure yet when this is actually going to broadcast but at the moment that we're recording it over the best. You've started a bit of a movement on the twitter. I think it would be very proud but I just home so last week. The Boston Globe and Mail decided that it was going to remove title of doctor from its interviews from anyone who wasn't a medical doctor and of course. I have quite an iron in the fire of this because I have I am Dr Edward L. and I work in the press. I work as a public expert. You know I do. Tv AND RADIO. The whole point having hd is so that people know. When I right? When I talk when you him speaking I'm doing it with authority. I know I'm talking about. I am not going to lie to you. I am telling you what the years of my career and research have shown me about our past and I I really do resent massively the world. We're in at the moment. Where style guides are removing expertise from the public domain? What is the point of journalists coming to speak to me my expertise if they are not going to acknowledge that because how else people know who to trust so I get very wound up very angry about this and I saw was happening online and I just added of my voice too many voices of academics talking about how that was wrong and so stating that I had my you know I am not ms? Oh Mrs I am Dr Andrew Del. That's my title and I've earned my authority and that's what I want to be referred to and did quite well and a lot of people kind of a lot of women kind of react to this and then almost instantly with sending that out a man slid into my mentions to say I think. What you've said is legitimately modest right. That's ridiculous because working on sexual culture we sexual MARCUS TO REMOVE. Women's voices from the domain. All the time I've been told I'm vulgar immodest I need to learn humility simply stating that in a public setting. If you're talking about my expertise you should state my title to show. I have expertise and I just sent off a Hashtag which I made this modest women as kind of an afterthought and over the next forty eight hours I had ten thousand ten thousand new followers and Hashtag went completely viral and in most insane an incredible way and he we all six days later and it hasn't stopped on. Twitter is full of absolute incredible women adding their titles to their handles to take home of the authority that they have. And I think that's an incredibly powerful and amazing thing you know so many kind of one of the awful things about it with so many women coming to me and saying I have I have my title but I never use it or I always downplay it because it felt like I was bragging and A. PhD. Is Plenty hard work? We work really hard as anyone does to add something original to the world around us to be part to show our case our expertise show why we know what we're talking about and yet women and solely women consistently felt that they should restrict to when they use it to say the simple moment where they might give a talk or lecture which is ridiculous because when women's marriage you don't call her ms time unless you ask you to refer to her as Mrs. It's because it is simply. Her title..

Kitty Marian twitter New York US Margaret Sanger Mrs. It England Home Office Germany Mary wollstonecraft Dr Edward L. Docks Liverpool harassment publisher Mrs I Kennedy
"ten  minutes" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

11:15 min | 1 year ago

"ten minutes" Discussed on Little Atoms

"They is little atoms radio. Show about ideas and coacher with me. New Danny sweet dumped activist Austin and suffer. Jets Kitschy Maria in book in ten minutes doctor. Fernando Dr Fan. Redel is a historian specializing in sex suffrage and coach in the Victorian and Edwardian errors. She appears regularly on TV and radio and writes for The Guardian Huffington Post Telegraph and The Times Higher Education among others. And he's also a columnist for BBC magazine. Fern is also the author of death in ten minutes. Kitty Marian activists arsonist sopher jet which we're going to be talking about today Fan. Welcome to little. Thank you very much. This is the story of Kitty Marion. As a says on the cover and but for contacts you start looking at Mary Wollstonecraft. Unlike how some days were perhaps a bit radical for the feminists that came later in this era in the early twentieth century. So tell us why you wanted to start with. It's not so much. Just her ideas. It's also her life. You know we have so we struggle so much with women who do not fit a certain category were just supposed to be well married virtuous and thinking things and Mary. Wollstonecraft wasn't like that a tool. Shijo number of children out of wedlock and I was fascinated as to why this woman who was so influential in her time and so powerful in her time wasn't used by the Victorian period where I focused as I kind of a stepping stone to start off a really powerful feminist revolution. Because she wasn't an I was kind of investigating three and I realized that it's it's down to her life. It's to the fact that she did have lovers. And she did have children out of wedlock that Victorian feminists or at least the kind of dominant Victorian at that time really struggled with. And it's a very personal reaction. I think to kind of the world where in today I I tend to use my history to or at least my research to try and understand better why we have the world we have now why we have so many problems with sex why we have so many problems with women and going back over. The last hundred and fifty years is really what gives me an answer to that 'cause remarry and when did you first come across her? So I was working in the archives at the Museum of London I was doing research for my PhD. And I was researching Victoria kind of nineteenth century women in the music holes and kind of musical in general. Because that's what I was. Fascinated in my family were trick cyclists and the nineteen eighteen ninety s until the nineteen thirties. And so I grew up with a lot of stories about that and a little photographs. And I found that time really fascinating. And I'd always been told and I think a lot of people have the misconception. That music hall is own kind of knees up mother Brown and very stereotypically male and not a good place for women and my family were a troupe of predominantly female trick cyclists so. I already had this kind of background. Knowledge that the world wasn't quite what history had told us it was and I was fascinated by that and I was sitting in the Museum of London. Archive and the amazing curators. There who's wonderful woman? Go Beverly Kirk said Fern. I think your you're GonNa really likes something. I've got this unpublished autobiography of musical artist. That I think you're gonNA like but just see no she was also suffragette and I kind of massively roll my eyes at that point because I didn't want in that very millennial kind of Oh I know what my rights are. It doesn't matter to me anymore. I didn't want to fool into the trap of studying suffrage because that feels like if you're a female historian the first thing people assume about you as you're going to be doing gender studies or you're going to be doing suffrage. It's like the biggest kind of assumption female historians face and I find that very frustrating because we have incredible political and military historians. Who HAVE FEMALE. And they never seem to get the airtime will the exposure that male historians do so. I. I was very kind of anti being painted into a box. But bear gave me this kind of typed manuscript pages and I remember sitting down and opening up and kind of starting to read and within five pages on your wasn't GonNa leave because this absolutely incredible voice just leapt off the page and told me things I never knew I had no comprehension of about women about sex and about the fight for the vote and I realized very quickly that if I didn't know a someone who is studying history no one knew like the public don't know and that's the purpose of history for me and the purpose of being a historian making sure everyone has access to the research we do from this was unpublished most affair which you use in the books so how much of that is due to tight bound volumes in the Museum of London and Kitty left copies to the Museum of London to the women's library and to the New York Public Library where which is where she to life which is in New York in America. And it's kind of a bow. It's kind of two volumes. That are about three to four inches. Thick of this typed manuscript. And I just used to sit with it and just read and read and read and read these incredible firsthand accounts of life in the music. Halls and life is a suffragette bomber and then life is a birth control actors in the stories and and people and an a memory that as historians you dream of finding you dream of finding voice like this from the post that is so complete and tells you everything about the world they are and not just how they feel but how the people around them feel and I knew in that moment from kind of the I read that I had to spend the next two years of my life finding away to get her into print because everyone should know and so she's presently all those moments of history that you just almost movements that you just mentioned also of course I guess we could say to begin with to is also something of a minor celebrity. Why has she been forgotten? I this is a question I kept coming back to. You and I was really struggling to understand as a young researcher and in the end I found two reasons one. The suffrage s themselves really in the nineteen twenties with the connection some suffrage as kind of the main ones to the connection to you. Saxon Birth Control that was seen as of actually an anti feminist thing as it had been throughout the nineteenth century. Which is another thing that. I uncovered in death in ten minutes that I was fascinated by and so that kind of tainted I think her memory secondly she was exposing the stories of the bombers is that in the Nineteen Thirties. The surviving suffragettes did not want exposed. And when she sent her autobiography to them to be conserved to be protected it got put away and hidden and historians. You came off to that. Can only really go on the archive that they given. And if something has been hidden way it's not surprising that it hasn't come to light because we're talking about history that is ninety years old you know. We've only had democracy in England since nineteen twenty eight as less than ninety years so it is hardly surprising that we are finding so many new things now and yet to some people. It is a total shock that this has been hidden on this husband forgotten. It's kind of my mission where this Birkin with a lot of their kind of public idea to change people's minds. Let's talk about her early life. Because there's a couple of incidents that happened to her before she's involved in the self-rule movement particularly the acute influence on. You know home how she thinks going forward. She actually comes from ears initially. Yeah I think this is one of the things like under love Kitty. She was a gem child immigrant. She came here when she was fifteen years. Old came here completely alone because her her uncle had realized that her father was being incredibly abusive. We believe sexually IDA believe sexually abusive. 'cause he doesn't talk about that at all but physically abusive incredibly physically and emotionally abusive. And I think her uncle removed from that situation at the moment where potentially that violence could have become far worse and get far more towards the woman she was becoming and e basically packs are onto a boat with no warning and her to an aunt. Who's living WHO's emigrated far earlier and is living with her husband in Just outside the east end in London and Katie arrives in England. Kind of at the age of fifteen this kind of beautiful redhead young girl who has no idea of what the country is that she's come to know ability to speak English and she's kind of she was sort of coming into Liverpool Street and hearing English being spoken and thinking my God I am never ever going to get a handle on this language because just noise but she's still kind of the next few years. She teaches herself. English through deadwood deck journals which are kind like penny dreadful American stories of the wild west and her nieces and nephews Kind of schoolbooks and just ping up snatches in the street. And she has a few kind of accidents where she's picked up say swearwords language and she sorta gaily greets a neighbor or her aunt with this with this kind of swearword thinking that is just an everyday term. Says she's go to learning. She's learning about language and she's leading England and by the age of nineteen. She knows more than anything. What she really wants to do is be on the stage and it causes a lot of problems with her aunt's family. This idea that to be an actress is disrespectful and women who want to do that Bad and wrong. But she's determined now over through this book there are residences things that are going on today and the content of the feminist movement today and so of course kitties. You want to get into the music. All she's just start now so she leads an agent says she has a meeting with this guy. What happens Says she goes. She's very naive. And she's nineteen years old and she goes for her first agent and she's really excited and it's an agency on York Street. Just fortunately road just down by Woodley station I. It goes very well. The meetings fantastic. It's the offices full of acts and bustle and noise and she comes out kind of thinking. My God my life is made. I end zone catch. Is that the contract isn't ready quiet. Then and she needs come back the next day at five pm and I can remember reading that in the archive and kind of my heart sinking. Because I am I was by that point in my mid twenty s and had had enough experience with the world to recognize a trap when you see one and my heart just sank and.

Museum of London Mary Wollstonecraft Nineteen Thirties England Fern Kitty Marian Kitty Marion Fernando Dr Fan Redel Jets BBC magazine Danny sweet Victoria researcher Brown New York Public Library Austin New York Beverly Kirk
"ten  minutes" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

Terrible, Thanks For Asking

02:29 min | 1 year ago

"ten minutes" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

"But he didn't <Speech_Female> get over it. <Speech_Music_Female> That's not how <Speech_Music_Female> it works. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> It's been twelve <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> years and talking <Speech_Female> about Jamey <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> still makes Oliver <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Smile. It still makes <Speech_Music_Female> him cry. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> I thought about their <Speech_Female> theme songs. <Speech_Female> How their <Speech_Female> relationship began <Speech_Female> with a request <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> for Oliver? <SpeakerChange> To <Speech_Music_Female> Be Jamie's for <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the next ten minutes <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and ten minutes <Speech_Female> more <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and how <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> grief is one of those <Speech_Female> things that feels <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> as big as love <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> just <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> is immeasurable and <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> just as hard to explain. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> You can't <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> outrun it but you <Speech_Music_Female> can live with it <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> ten minutes at a time. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> That's the way <Speech_Music_Female> through those intense <Speech_Music_Female> early days. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> It's the <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> way through the disappointment. <Speech_Female> The people <Speech_Female> you'd hoped would comfort. <Speech_Music_Female> You cannot <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and the <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> anger that you've been left <Speech_Music_Female> out of remembering <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the person who's love <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> has meant so much <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to you <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> because twelve <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> years later <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> the pain of losing. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Jamie is different <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> and so is the pain. <Speech_Female> Oliver felt <Speech_Music_Male> from Jamie's <SpeakerChange> mom. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> And the <Speech_Music_Male> thing that I realize <Speech_Music_Male> is that <Speech_Music_Male> people need <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> the <Speech_Music_Male> condolences <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> that they're used to. <Speech_Male> They <Speech_Male> need to <Speech_Male> be reassured <Speech_Male> of <Speech_Male> the person <Speech_Male> they lost <Speech_Male> was who <Speech_Male> they wanted <Speech_Male> them to be <Speech_Male> more than <Speech_Male> the person they <Speech_Music_Male> were <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and I think I came to terms <Speech_Male> with it <Speech_Music_Male> that <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> there. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> They're suffering <Speech_Male> in their own way <Speech_Male> and they're <Speech_Male> allowed to do <Speech_Music_Male> that <Speech_Music_Male> and <Speech_Music_Male> if they're <Speech_Male> portrayal <Speech_Male> of him <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> didn't include me. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> That's also <Speech_Male> okay <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> and I don't WanNa <Speech_Music_Male> take that away <Speech_Music_Male> from them. <Speech_Music_Male> I <Speech_Male> know how much <Speech_Male> hurts to lose <Speech_Male> someone <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> you try to come to <Speech_Music_Male> terms with it <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and I was okay <Speech_Male> with it not including <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Oliver <Speech_Female> did <Speech_Female> eventually <Speech_Female> get to <Speech_Female> Utah <SpeakerChange> to say goodbye <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to Jamie. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> finally found his <Speech_Music_Male> grave and <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> put the flowers <Speech_Music_Male> down in that <Speech_Music_Male> little <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> flower <Speech_Music_Male> thing they have <Speech_Music_Male> at the thing <Speech_Music_Male> and <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Music_Male> sat <SpeakerChange> there and <Speech_Male> I thought <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> okay <Speech_Male> great. <Speech_Male> I got to see <Speech_Music_Male> his tombstone. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> I

Oliver Jamie Jamey Utah Jamie.
"ten  minutes" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

Terrible, Thanks For Asking

03:39 min | 1 year ago

"ten minutes" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

"Alone grieving a man that nobody really knew he loved even his really good friends. You know when you're in a relationship and he don't really know where it's going and you don't really know what the outcome is going to be any. Don't really you know you don't necessarily want to put yourself out there and be like guess let I am with this great guy and we love each other because what if it doesn't work out and I think that it was the mind space I was in I didn't want to Want to ruin it. I didn't want to jinx at In any other circumstance says if Oliver had lost a boyfriend of many years one who had met all of his friends one. He had a photo of on a station at work. If he lost a wife a fiance. The grief industrial complex would roar to life. There would be cards. Leaves of absence from work a memorial for him to plan friends making sure he wasn't alone but this thing disquiet thing he's lost. His own is now a quiet ache. A quiet grief to share it with his family means coming out to them to share it with his friends means trying to catch them up on years and years of slow burning loved that just finally burst into flame but Oliver Tries. His parents are still in Switzerland too far to come scoop him up from the floor and hold him and let him weep and too far to physically turn a cold shoulder so oliver emails his father and he tells him everything about. Jamie and their relationship about Jamie's death of course we're Mormon so we don't swear but I remember the very last sentence I wrote that email was. I'm hurting so fucking bad. Oliver does not know what kind of replied to expect. He's just fed his father to huge pieces of information that he's gay and that he's grieving. It takes a few days to hear back from his dad. Oliver opens the email. There's no anger but there's no comfort either. It was this Very Mormon sort of. You're gonNA see him again. He is in a better place now. His his challenges are taken away. I forget the words they used but it was sort of along those lines and And the more was reading this. The more was heartbroken because I knew it came from a very very loving space. A very loving intention was hurting me. It was hurting me too. I knew that when these said that Jamie was freed of all his challenges that in their Mormon way they were saying Jamie's no longer gay and I was thinking he's dead again. Do.

Oliver Jamie Switzerland
"ten  minutes" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

Terrible, Thanks For Asking

03:48 min | 1 year ago

"ten minutes" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

"Officially taking a commercial break And we're back Jamie. Oliver are in love and they're together after five years they're going to make this work the next day the first of two thousand eight. Jamie and his friends or going out to a house on Long Island before Jamie flies out to Utah to see his family. Oliver can't get time off work so he tells Jamie. Go with your friends. I'll see you when you get back from Utah. He even books trip up to Boston. The first trip where he'd efficiently see his official boyfriend. Jamie heads off to Long Island and Oliver goes back to his apartment. I just fell to my Inflated Mattress and that moment of realization that everything that I thought would never happen to me is happening to me now. I was so happy I started crying and it didn't make sense like why am I crying? If everything that I want to happen is happening I went back to work. and I didn't tell anyone yet. I didn't know I didn't know how to process it really. I didn't I don't know what to do with it. It was so foreign to me. It was so new to me. It was so strange. I didn't know what to do with it and a few days later. Two three days later Jimmy called My phone I was at work so I he left a message and he said he was at the airport flying to Utah and the message said he was so happy that he'd seen me in that we have been able to be open more each other and sort of like make decisions. I forget exactly what words he used but he said that you would see me soon. A few days pass an oliver is missing Jamie. Usually he tries not to reach out to him when he's with his family. But hate this boyfriend now so on his way home from work he calls him. He calls his boyfriend has mother answered and she knew who I was. Jamie's mother had never met Oliver but she told him. We've heard so much about you in the past few days. Which wow that feels amazing. It's real older. Just didn't want to interrupt family time I was I would call back later. And if she could tell Jamie I called and the phone one silent and she said he passed away this morning Jamie had suffered epileptic seizure. He'd been rushed to the hospital. He'd been in a coma and he didn't wake up Oliver's shocked genie's.

Jamie I Oliver Jamie Utah Long Island epileptic seizure Boston Jimmy official coma
"ten  minutes" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

Terrible, Thanks For Asking

09:09 min | 1 year ago

"ten minutes" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

"Beautiful relationship. It's such an intense emotional relationship. How at all do you define it or not define it and and what is Jamie to you? Well he was or is what I firmly believed throughout my Mormon mission and beyond. He is what I thought would never happen to me. It's like I mean as stupid as it sounds he was. He was the miracle that I thought I would never be allowed to experience. And when something like that happens to you I'm assuming you sort of shouted on the rooftops. You're so excited you WanNa talk about it and tell everyone all my friends would tend to like. Oh I just got this new girlfriend. I'm so excited or oh I just got engaged. And let's go shopping for the wedding list and whatever but to me. It was like this. I always had to sort of keep it very quiet and I think it sort of what may Jamie more meaningful it was. I mean again. I always go back to show tunes. Because that's an but there is a show tune that Liza Minelli things and The lyrics from the song are when it all comes through. It's a quiet thing and when everyone was shouting how they were seeing someone that they got engaged that well everything's turning out for them for me. Jamie was quiet thing. A quiet thing is so beautiful. Something you keep just for yourself. But it's quiet for another reason to be as Oliver's parents still don't know about Jamie and Jamie's parents know Jamie is seeing someone but Jamie was like we'll oliver and I had a bottle of wine at his house and we just cut it on the couch watching a movie and I was just like Jamie shut up like can you. Just tell your mom. I hung out over his house. That's enough that's all the information she needs. But Jamie sort of Always felt that need to sort of like. I'm going to provoke them. It's two thousand six now and Jamie. Oliver have known each other for three years. Oliver has graduated from college and he enrolled in beauty school so he can support himself as a stylist when he eventually moved to New York City. But for now he's still in. Utah and it's Christmas and Oliver can't get time off of beauty school to visit his parents. In Switzerland I ended UP BEING STUCK IN UTAH My last Christmas of beauty school and I couldn't I normally would have gone to be with my family in Europe But I was stuck at home and Is the first Christmas except for the? Christmas is on my mission where I was going to be by myself and it was very sad about it and I I tried to think of things to do in whatever and Jamie said that he was going to be visiting his parents and he was going to talk to them and He talked to his parents and he said well. Oliver is going to be all alone for Christmas. Can invite him over and his parents said No. Your siblings are going to be here. All your nieces and nephews are going to be here as going to be too awkward into strange. No we're just not okay with that and that started this argument with well. We're not making out on the couch. This is someone who doesn't have a place to go for Christmas can. Can you come over? And His parents insisted no. It's not going to happen and And I understood. It's not personal. Because they don't know Oliver so Oliver Understood. The Jamie did not. Jamie was upset. Jamie said that well if If Oliver is not welcome here that I'm not going to be here either. And he came to my apartment in Utah. We made made some dinner. We went to a movie that we both didn't like and it was fun because got the joke about it and he spend Christmas Day with me and again it was one of those magical moments were like. Someone loves me enough to do that for me. And for most people. It sounds like something so normal. I mean for my siblings. Maybe it sounds normal for their for their Spouses but for me which is so special. It was just so like it was just so unique. And so valuable. Their relationship is like this big meaningful displays of love and then time apart. They still live in different cities. A few months later Oliver was done with beauty school and moved to New York City to pursue his dream. Jamie was still working in Boston and they were still in touch. They talk to the emailed. They see each other when they can and they also see other people. I mean there was such a real relationship that I was able to tell him like. Oh well I met this guy and I went on a date with him and be able to tell him the details or like this is what we did and this is how it ended and there were a few people that I went out with where it didn't end the way I wanted it to end and I was heartbroken so to say and I was able to call j. knee and tell him. Yeah so I went out with this guy and I'm really disappointed because I really liked him and it didn't work out and Jamie always said well didn't didn't work out because this guy wasn't me and someday we'll be me and it was just the most healing words the most soothing words and how going through life's disappointments and rejections. He just knew how to take it away In December two thousand seven. It's Christmas time again. Oliver is in New York. Jamie is in Boston for the holiday but he tells Oliver that he's coming to New York City for new years and he wants to spend it with Oliver. He wants Oliver to come out with all Jamie's friends and celebrate the New Year. Oliver hates new years but he loves Jamie so he says yes. I will go out on the most annoying night of the year for you at this restaurant and his friends and we had just really great time. Just catching up looked so gorgeous. He was wearing white button-down shirt and I always told him like. Oh we should let me cut. Your hair would be cuter if it's a little shorter year little more style this way and he never did. Let me and again. This is where it goes back into type. It's like oh I wish is haircut. Were different but I remember because it was him. I just I loved his haircut. They passed some Bubbly around midnight and Jeannie hated sparkling wine. He was actually a very snobbish red wine drinker and he poured it into my glass and he was saying like. I know you like it. I hate it you can have. It was shortly before midnight. He recalled the time when we were driving in my car. That was playing the song by Jason Robert Brown the next ten minutes and he said.

Jamie Oliver New York City Utah Liza Minelli Boston Jason Robert Brown Switzerland Europe Jeannie New York
"ten  minutes" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

Terrible, Thanks For Asking

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"ten minutes" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

"And normal that. I didn't I didn't care I didn't care because it just so much felt like it didn't matter like it was just going to be what it's going to be and so we went and drove in the Canyon and We parked somewhere With a beautiful view and he kissed me and I was just perfect and we cast for five hours. I think it was. I mean. We didn't KISS FOR FIVE HOURS. Straits but Again it was this thing with like. Let's take a break and just hold each other or let's just talk for you. Know another half hour and I was five o'clock in the morning when he drove me back to my apartment and he parked on the curb and kissed for another three hours and it was eight o'clock in the morning and I thought. Oh Shit I have to go to class so I went inside and shower and changed in got dressed and went into class and I was so tired but I just felt so happy and I felt so happy because it was something that I had never experienced before but I felt so stupid because this is what my roommates do all the time..

"ten  minutes" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

Terrible, Thanks For Asking

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"ten minutes" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

"Ooh I'm Nora mcnerney and this is terrible things for asking in this family. Love a love story and we love a story and every grief story is a love story. You don't grieve what you don't love but for now this is a love story and it starts in my favorite place for Love Story to start the point where you're sure you just cannot will not could not possibly ever find love. That's exactly where Oliver was his Sophomore Year of college. I know his Sophomore Year of college. Really that was when Oliver was sure he would never find love. Sounds a little dramatic but at this point? Oliver has never dated. He has never kissed anyone and the people he goes to college with our pairing up and maybe even mating for life. He goes to a conservative college filled with people who share his Mormon faith. It's absolutely not weird for him to feel like by now he should have found his big true love. I saw two of my siblings. Meet their Well my brother met his wife. My sister met her husband I saw get married. I saw my roommate's Mccall remains Fall in love and Or have crushes or whatever and go on dates and My missionary companions from my more mission. I was starting to get wedding invitations. I started going to weddings and it sent me into like this. I know this. I guess what I would call depression. But you know you go through these steps of you know and so after the mission for quote Unquote Normal People After the mission you get married you have children. You know you have your corporate job you pay for orthodontists and whatever you know but those steps don't apply to Oliver. Oliver has completed one year of college and his mission trip where he traveled to the Netherlands to spread the word of mormonism and on that mission. He had realization not that he's gay. He's known that forever. I've always been very honest about my identity or about a not to other people but to myself as like I know like men. I know I'm attracted to men and I always thought well if God is the Mormon God. This is going to be taken away from me. And I'M GONNA be okay and there was on my mission when I sort of had this moment like this lightbulb. Going up where I realized this is not going to go away and I accepted it. I was like you know this is this is just who I am. And so on my mission. Add this moment where I realized that of all the checklist steps that you go through a Mormon. This is the end of it. I'm going to go home for my mission and I'm not going to do anything else that other people do. And at the time it didn't realize how obedient I would remain or whatever and since I was still at Byu to remain obedient because you have to abide by their code of conduct abiding by the Code meant going back to. Byu finishing his degree going to church and it meant not dating. Men Not expressing that attraction. Oliver's family doesn't know that he's gay. They expect him to study law to find a girl to get married and settle down. But there's another path that is calling to him the musical theater program.

Oliver Nora mcnerney Byu Mccall depression Netherlands
"ten  minutes" Discussed on Ten Minute Medic

Ten Minute Medic

03:15 min | 1 year ago

"ten minutes" Discussed on Ten Minute Medic

"Do not live a low blood. Sugar sneak up on you. As the child is compensated shock respiratory rate is going to naturally go up this may result in a transient period of respiratory alice. Carbon dioxide is blown blown off as a child against tire from the SANTITA. The rapid breathing in breathing begins to slow. She made transition over into a state of metabolic. Pollick acidosis now. It might seem logical to administer sodium bicarbonate offset versus but this is not indicated. The key here is to use fluid lewd resuscitation restore perfusion body is designed to tolerate metabolic acidosis for a short period of time and the administration of by car would be harmful for your patient strays Asian over discussion of distributive shock. And what it does to the body distributive shock. You may hear a call. Visiting shot comes. `Bout Win The dilation and constriction of the vascular has been impaired. The big issue isn't so much that the arteries dilate because they do they're simply unable to constrict as a result. You have a much larger container with less lewd pressure inside the pathophysiology of this is something like this I I because of the massive Basal dilation peripheral vascular resistances decreased often drastically. This results had Poli- within the veins. Import tissue perfusion because of this pooling Venus return to the heart is reduced as well is the cardiac output the three primary causes of distributive shock include. NFL Alexis an injury. The central nervous system or sepsis sizes simpleton distributive shock can be misleading in that in the case of a nervous system. Injury your patient maybe in compensated shock yet had a normal or Bradley carded heart rate heart. Association's Pals Course Discusses Three types of distributive shock. Septic Genyk the single brief look at all three of these now. semper shock occurs because of a reaction to it infection that at least an instability in the perfumery status of your pediatric patient. It is the most common type of distributor shock senior children earlier that you diagnose sipped shocked the easier. It is to deal with and leads to minimize of organ damage. Septic shock tends to occur in a two phase process beginning any with peripheral Basal dilation. The first phase is often referred to as warshaw this comes about toxins. Caused by the infection. Prevent the catecholamines immune system from inducing vase on construction the heart rate increases in order to maintain cardiac output. The capillaries will also begin to become permeable allowing in fluid. Move into the interstitial tissues. Essentially shock continues unabated. The patient enters the second phase known as coach on the heart and respiratory Tori right will still be elevated but cardiac output continues to decrease at some point bodily systems began to fail affecting the kidneys and liver early on the goal of treating. Septic shock has identified the columns and eliminate. Obviously that's not going to be possible. Pre Hospital perspective. Our primary focus this will be the support perfusion for the body by giving them..

metabolic acidosis acidosis SANTITA Pre Hospital Poli Tori NFL Bradley Alexis
"ten  minutes" Discussed on The EVRYMAN Podcast

The EVRYMAN Podcast

02:41 min | 3 years ago

"ten minutes" Discussed on The EVRYMAN Podcast

"Yes. So we've been doing something. We it and doing some coaching of young, Mike, you're not that he's young. But yeah, so Mike is just on the on the verge of launching a new career as an entrepreneur. And we've had some pretty pretty awesome natural organic conversations the past couple of days as we've been out here sitting in camp and looking for deer. So I wanted, I just want to invite us to sort of like open some of that stuff back up here in in this can be less interviewee, but but more just drop into the same stuff that we've been talking about is three something because I, we'll hear more about your story Tom and we'll hear like, we'll get to it. I know we will. I. The. I think that is a good to be a big part of this. This episode is like, I think there's a lot we can learn from how you raise your sons from how you've been a husband. I mean, just the whole thing you just you just like you. You kinda done a lot of life. So. But yeah, let's I don't know. I think maybe we need to make fun of Michael little bit or something to take get back with been. It's been fun for the past three or four days to if I I, we're like testing the waters and seeing what kind of guy. Mike is because Dan, I knew each other coming into this and I kind of weasel my way caught me at chicken Tom. Well, I did because after so first day I out. Six thirty in the morning. We walked. Ten minutes and we saw this amazing buck hundred ten yards away. And of course I'm dislike the nerves and freaking out. I'm like, you know, this is it's been decades since I've hunted and you know, usually you get to your spot. Nestle land. You get in in the in the mood you get in the zone I didn't. I was like, just slammed into this like. I got a. Stay on. I'm gonna stand up. I mean, hope he doesn't move. You know, I wanted to tell you guys, I close by, I pulled the trigger. Well, actually slept in, wasn't there like we just hiked in in the dark went to bed. I was fucking tired. I can't fucking believe you kill the deer ten minutes on the what? The hell, what the hell? Yeah..

Mike Tom Michael Dan hundred ten yards Ten minutes ten minutes four days
"ten  minutes" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

03:04 min | 3 years ago

"ten minutes" Discussed on Little Atoms

"Man slid into my mentions to say i think what you've said is legitimately modest who is like right that's ridiculous because working on sexual coacher we use sexual marcus to remove women's voices from the public domain all the time i've been told i'm vulgar in modest i need to learn humility simply stating that in a public setting if you're talking to me about my expertise you should state my title to show i have expertise and i just sent off a hashtag which i made a modest women as kind of an afterthought and over the next forty eight hours i had ten thousand ten thousand new followers and hashtag went completely viral and in most insane an incredible way and he we are six days later and it hasn't stopped and twitter is full of absolute incredible women adding their titles to their handles to take home of the authority that they have and i think that's an incredibly powerful and amazing thing you know so many one kind of one of the awful things about it with so many women coming to me and saying i have i have my title but i never use it or i always downplay it because it felt like i was bragging and appear is plenty hard work we work really hard as anyone does to add some original to the world around us to be part to show case our expertise and show why we know what we're talking about and yet women and solely women consistently out that they should restrict to when they use it to say the simple moment where they might give a talk or lecture which is ridiculous because when women's marriage you don't call her ms the rest of the time unless she asked you to refer to her as mrs it's because it is simply her title doctor is simply my title and it is how i should be reflected that simple that's all it is an i i just got this i got kind of divided into two things of all of these incredible women which has now modest women as a hashtag has now become an international movement which is insane but also incredible and i'm so proud of and it just has a life of its own i can't stop watching it and kind of being away by it but also this overwhelming number of men who immediately came to me and said your modest this is well you need to need to have more humility and i i have always been a friend of tommy over terrible feminist in i i don't like to see the world as a sexual i like i like to see it that way and i don't like to set men women against each other but having experience experiencing it completely shifts kind of your of.

twitter tommy forty eight hours six days
"ten  minutes" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

04:21 min | 3 years ago

"ten minutes" Discussed on Little Atoms

"Compile your tax and right one single journal article on it that's all we have to talk about this about this quinton history which to me seemed insane we should know everything we should know about this so i started jalen myself and kind of the the things that i struggled the most with often worthy descriptions of bohm's because they are kind of large sort of seven inch by four inch by four inch deep kind of canisters often packed with either gunpowder nitroglycerin on a time device that then has been packed around with shrapnel nails bits of metal and when you look at the photographs of a lot of the bomb at the optima of the bomb attacks especially on the trains you know it's literally explode it's exploded is destroyed and the most incredible photos of one of kitties attacks is the inside of a house of the mp arthur d crowe which is in is in the images in the book that is this huge ly ornate home that has been completely got it and it's you can't kind of get away from the impact of the bombs once you see the actual visual evidence and i i have had a lot of in kind of feminist historian circles and really only there a huge pushback from bringing this history to light and from exposing it and that really surprised me also unfortunately makes me even more it an even more determined to kind of bring it out because i think it was just just the way i am i just thought we had talked about it and we have to know about it one of the most kind of the moments where it really brought home to me is you know i didn't use the word terrorist lightly i grew up not going to london because the ira would bomb it at christmas that's what you didn't do in the eighties and i had friends who regularly used that bus route for seven seven for their studies so i know ferry well as many do what terrorism means and the reaction you feel when you hear the word when you're thinking about it but you cannot get away once you look at what was actually happening what they were actually doing which is intensity toting book you can't get away from that what it was and also the suffragettes themselves owned it in a crystal pankhurst with print double page spreads of all of the photographs and every single report of every bomb attack underneath the headlines of reign of terror emily pankhurst states in her own topography of this period that the home purpose of the bombs and the arson campaign which to throw the british public into a state of deep terror and insecurity and fear we need to understand and we need to recognize that they saw themselves as terrorists that's what they saw the violence as and we have to allow them to be what they were we can't senators our history just because it makes us feel more comfortable and happier with idolize housing women who have committed incredibly violent and dangerous actions for us to have the rights we have today when food acts of happen then how does kitty start to be treated at the hands of the authorities she's being arrested in forcefed number of times before the violence as so many of the suffrage etes were and i think were few people have have really understood because we haven't talked about their real violence and horace that what it really push them to was that this the process of forcefeeding in government torture was a huge moment in the registration of a lot of these women that push them towards the extreme violence of their acts at one point in one single sentencing kitty is force fed two hundred thirty two times in one single full months and it destroys a singing voice and when you're reading kind of her firsthand accounts or any firsthand account of the experience forcefeeding it is torture together and you just you always have to carry in your mind that the whole reason why this was happening was because she wanted me to have the rights i have today and we wouldn't have them without her what's also going on this time is the first world war and kitty obviously of german extraction she's betrayed by somebody actually reported there's room start that.

four inch seven inch
"ten  minutes" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

04:29 min | 3 years ago

"ten minutes" Discussed on Little Atoms

"You're listening to little atoms i'm nailed any today i'm talking to dr phone redel and we took it about her book death in ten minutes kitty marion activist arsonist and yet and fan i guess we should talk about how to marry okay so jet we've talked about a few of the things that have influenced her away upon her joy in her early life how does she encountered the jets basically and how did she become one i love kissy story of how she became his job because i recognize it lot at this idea of i'm not actually interested in this feminism i don't want to be part of it oh gone to a meeting oh god i'm now committed i have to do this this is everything to me is that kind of moment of feminist piffle that i think many people recognize in their life's west suddenly something changes for you and that shifts your home worldview and she's been working the musicals for about twenty years by this point desperately campaigning to try and get protection for women in the industry and not getting anywhere and number of acting friends say we're going to march with the suffering jets in this huge hyde park marched hyper was happening and it's going to be amazing we're taking the banners of dentures franchise league come with us and could he goes no no i don't want to do those hooligans suffrage i've read about them terrible people i don't anything to do with it he's kind of convinced to go and she walks in this march hearing the women's march as seeing all of these banners listening to all of these lectures of all these women who want exactly the same thing as she does which is either protection in their industry the right to be heard the right to have a voice in government and the right to have a say in control of your life she saw disintegrates at that moment going oh my god where these women ben on my life this is everything i want an i need and she after that walks into the kind of the headquarters of the wspa which is the woman social political union who are the suffragettes that's the only people that we should be calling suffer jets at the members of the espn and so it says what can i do i'm here i will do anything and she gets kind of put to work as a magazine celera's telephone answer and then as the suffrage acts move into a very violent campaign she ends up becoming i kind of term at england's most dangerous woman so also today let's talk about some of the outrages as they were called in those days this me with something that just blew my mind because growing up i never heard about bombs again what does so many public talks and now people come up the first thing they say is i had no idea but kitty was part of a nationwide bombing an awesome campaign that really hit it's peak between nineteen twelve to nineteen fourteen that involved bombs on commuter trains in mp's houses in public parks in churches in theaters acid attacks chemical attacks asthma attacks in sundry devices left across the country from glasgow to put smith to ireland dublin angle i all the way through london they tried to up some polls they brought the tobacco they blew up lloyd george's house you know this is an ex exceptional absolutely exceptionally violent domestic terror campaign that we have never acknowledged before nothing what's really fascinating is again so the parallel to modern times i guess i naively imagine them going around with like you know round things we've fuses coming out of these literally pipebombs terrorists us now with bits of random metal put inside them to cause more damage again exactly the same as somebody blowing up something nowadays us i really struggled with that say this this became then of course my obsession my phd and i started compiling huge databases of every bomb attack that happened across the country that i could find through newspapers through office reports three police reports sort of visiting local archives national archives and just trying to mind data from wherever i could to create maps of the bombs to china identify the bomas all of it i really became a huge thing because in the entirety of our historial graffiti only one other historian has ever looked that let's mangled cj gammon in detail oh and he started to.

twenty years ten minutes
"ten  minutes" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

04:03 min | 3 years ago

"ten minutes" Discussed on Little Atoms

"The age of fifteen this kind of beautiful redhead young girl who has no idea of what the country is that she's come to know ability to speak english and she's kind of she remembers sort of coming into liverpool street and hearing english being spoken and thinking my god i am never ever going to get a handle on on this language because just noise but she's still kind of the next few years she teaches herself english through deadwood deck journals which like penny dreadful american stories of the world west and her nieces and nephews kind of school schoolbooks and just picking up snatches in the street and she has a few kind of accidents where she's picked up say swear words and language and she sort gaily greets the neighbor or her aunt with this with this kind of swearword thinking that is just an everyday to so she scoped learning she's learning about language and she's landing by england and by the age of nineteen she knows more than anything what she really wants to do is be on the stage and it causes a lot of problems with her own family this idea that to be an actress is disrespectful and you know women who want to do that bad and wrong but she's determined now all the way through this book there are residences with things are going on today and the concerns of the feminist movement today and so of course kitty she wants to get into the music all she's just starting now so she leads an agent so she has a meeting with this guy what happens say she goes she's very naive and she's nineteen years old and she goes for her first agent and she's really excited and it's an latency on york street just off of water lea road just down by wortley station i it goes very well the meetings fantastic you know it's the offices full of acts and bustle and noise and she comes out kind of thinking michael my life is made i and only catch is that the contract isn't ready quite then and she needs to come back the next day at five pm and i can remember reading that in the archive and kind of my heart sinking because i'm i was by that point in my mid twenties and had had enough experience with the world to recognize a trump when you see one and my heart sort of saying can i turn the page and kitty describes going back the next day discovering that the officers mt and yet her agent is there with the contract and she signs it and he moves around the desk deposit to her and attack sir knocks are unconscious and often that she staggers out and she staggered onto the bridge don't totally bridge and she looks down at the water and she has this moment where she decides am i gonna throw myself in or am i going to pick myself up and make the life i want and i think many women it's very recognizable moment that first time someone takes something from you that they have no right to and it was incredibly powerful to me and she kind of faces that for the next twenty years because it's twenty years until the suffragette show up she's in her forties and every time she goes to work if it's with an agent or a manager this keeps happening and it's happening to other actresses that she knows she's trying desperately to get the government to listen and change its mind and protect women in industry and they won't and it's incredibly frustrating to her you know you said that there's an awful resonances in the book i didn't write it that way that's just how it happened in this is our history it has taken us one hundred years and the reason why why i think it's such a powerful story and so many people seem to connect to it is because what happens to kitty whether it's the awful tax or her resilience and hurt and to change the world around her so many people recognize still the sightsee we have today one moussaoui through the the musical world and the theatrical world now obviously what could you experience him was what most women would have been experiencing at the same time they're all of these amazing women characters in that world the as one of eking out some sort of.

twenty years one hundred years nineteen years
"ten  minutes" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

03:43 min | 3 years ago

"ten minutes" Discussed on Little Atoms

"In the museum of london and kitty left copies to the museum of london to the women's library and to the new york public library where which is why she ended her life which is in new york in america and it's kind of about it's kind of two volumes that are about three four inches thick of this typed manuscript and i just used to sit with it and just read and read and read and read all these incredible firsthand accounts of life in the music halls and life is a suffragette bomber and then life is a birth control act with the stories and and people and on a memory that as historians you dream of finding you dream of finding a voice like this from the post that is so complete and tells you everything about the world they are in not just how they feel but how the people around them feel and i knew in that moment from kind of the i read that i had to spend the next two years of my life finding a way to get her into print because everyone should know and so she's presently all those moments of history that you just those movements that you just mentioned also of course i guess we could say to begin with to his also something of a minor celebrity why has she been forgotten i this is a question i kept coming back to and i was really struggling to understand as a young researcher and in the end i found two reasons one the suffrage s themselves really struggled in the nineteen twenties with the connection some suffer just kind of the main ones to the connection to your sex and birth control that was seen as ev actually an anti feminist thing as it had been throughout the nineteenth century which is another thing i uncovered in death in ten minutes that i was fascinated by and so that kind of tainted i think how memory secondly she was exposing the stories of the bomas that in the nineteen thirties the surviving suffragettes did not want exposed and when she sent her autobiography to them to be conserved to be protected it got put away and hidden and historians who came off to that can only really go on the archive that they give him and if something has been hidden away it's not surprising that it hasn't come tonight because we're talking about history that is ninety years old you know we've only had democracy in england since nineteen twenty eight as less than those ninety years so it is hardly surprising that we are finding so many new things now and yet to some people i it is a total shock that this has been hidden on this husband forgotten it's kind of my mission where this book and with a lot of the kind of public stuff that i do to change people's minds let's talk about her early life because there's a couple of incidents that happened before she was involved in the suffrage movement particularly the a huge influence on her house she thinks going forward so she'd actually comes from germany irish initially yeah i think this is one of the things i never loved that kitty she was a gem child immigrant she came here when she was fifteen years old can hear completely alone because her uncle had realized that her father was being incredibly abusive we don't believe sexually ida believe sexually abusive because he doesn't talk about that at all but physically abusive incredibly physically and emotionally abusive and i think her uncle removed her from that situation at the moment where potentially that violence could have become far worse and geared for more towards the woman she was becoming and e basically packs her onto a boat with no warning and sends her to an aunt who's living who's emigrated far earlier in his living with her husband in just outside east end in london and getty arrives in england kind of at.

museum of london kitty ninety years three four inches fifteen years ten minutes two years
"ten  minutes" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

04:20 min | 3 years ago

"ten minutes" Discussed on Little Atoms

"Is the story of kitty marian as says on the cover and but for contacts you start looking at mary wollstonecraft and like how some of her ideas were perhaps a bit radical for the feminists that came later in this era in the early twentieth century so tell us why you wanted to start with her much just her ideas it's also her life you know we have so we struggle so much with women who do not fit a certain category he would just supposed to be well married virtuous and think good things and mary wollstonecraft wasn't like that a tool shijo number of children out of wedlock and i was fascinated as to why this woman who was so influential in her time and so powerful in had time wasn't used by the victorian period where i focused as i kind of a stepping stone to start off a really powerful feminist revolution because she wasn't an i was kind of investigating growth ring and i realized that it's it's down to her life it's down to the fact that she did have lovers and she did have children out of wedlock that victorian feminists or at least the kind of the dominant victorian feminism at that time really struggled with and it's a very personal reaction i think to kind of the world we're in today i i tend to use my history to or at least my research to try and understand better why we have the world we have now why we have so many problems with saks while we have so many problems with women and going back over the last hundred and fifty years is really what gives me an answer to that truth remarry and when did you first come across her so i was working in the archives at the museum of london and i was doing research for my phd and i was researching victoria kind of nineteenth century women in the music holes and kind of music hall in general because that's what i was fascinated in my family would trick cyclists in the nineteen eighteen thousand nine hundred until the nineteen thirties i so i grew up with a lot of stories about that and a little photographs and i just kind of found that time really fascinating and i'd always been told and i think a lot of people have the kind of the misconception that music hold is own kind of knees up mother brown and very star typically male and not a good place for women and my family were troupe of predominantly female trix ike lists so i already had this kind of background knowledge that the world wasn't quite what history had told us it was and i was really fascinated by that and i was sitting in limbo museum of london archive and the amazing curator those are wonderful woman go beverly kirk said fern i think you'll you're going really like something i've got this unpublished autobiography of musical artists that i think you're gonna gonna like but just see no she was also suffragette and i kind of massively roll my eyes at that point because i didn't want in that very millennial kind of oh i know what my rights are it doesn't matter to me anymore i didn't want to fool into the trap of studying suffrage because that feels like if you're a female historian the first thing people assume about us that you're going to be doing gender studies or you're going to be doing suffrage it's like the biggest kind of assumption female historians face and i find that very frustrating because we have incredible political military historians are female and they never seem to get the time or the exposure that male historians do so i i was very kind of anti being painted into a box but bev gave me this kind of type manuscript just pages and i remember sitting down and opening it up and kind of starting to read and within five pages on your i wasn't gonna leave because this absolutely incredible voice just left off the page and told me things i never knew i had no comprehension of about women about sex and about the fight for the vote and i realized very quickly that if i didn't know a someone who is studying history no one knew like the public don't know and that's the purpose of history for me and that's the purpose of being a historian is making sure everyone has access to the research we do unpublished both vergara fe would you use in the books of how much of that is though i say there's too tight bound volumes.

mary wollstonecraft fifty years