35 Burst results for "ten percent"

S6 E5 - How do I maximize my VA disability benefits? - burst 1

Courage to Fight Again

34:04 min | 11 hrs ago

S6 E5 - How do I maximize my VA disability benefits? - burst 1

"Hey just a quick before we get things kicked off here. I do want to let you know that. There is some strong language throughout this episode so listener discretion is advised. If there's five step process but there's indefinite general over overarching rules that she must consider but it is very procedural. It's they're not looking at compeer in the wall and analyzing while i'm analyzing the case law even the references to it. They're not opening pay. Everyone welcome to season six episode. Five of we served now. What it on this podcast. I do my very best to answer the questions. That veterans and their families are all ready asking my name is aaron perkins on the host of this show and the founder of courage to fight again an hour parent organization. I'm also the author of resolve. Which is a step by. Step guide for q the veteran to help you rediscover purpose meaning and passion and your post military life. Today's topic when the show is via a disability. What you need to do to submit it and not just what to do with. How do it bright outta appeal it. Should you appeal that well. That work all those things and more in today's show. I had a chance to sit down with a couple of really great guys who have done their homework on this. They do this kind of thing. Every single day. Greg colton and will simmons and we set down and chat or mojos that hour and a half i had to cut out unfortunately a lot of that conversation but the week to that full interview can click on the link in the show notes. And that'll take you to a form review request access to that whole uncut interview. And you could watch that in its entirety video interviewed. Please please take advantage of that. But for now i'm going to get out of the way. Make this intro as short and sweet as possible and let you hear the part of the show. The part of our conversation that i was able to stick into this episode here fleas. Enjoy my conversation with greg. Colton and wilson's check it out. Well i am here today with two honestly powerhouses in this field talking about increasing eight disability benefits. I'm here with gregg golden easy. Us navy veteran. This guy has twenty five twenty five years of sea level experience in financial technology compliance security investigation. All these things he's worked with numerous law firms used his own experience with the va to build something really cool. And i know he's gonna wanna talk about that more on this show but it's very good to have you on the show today greg. I'm also here with will simmons. He's a us army veteran former va founder. And managing attorney at simmons law. And i gotta tell you. I could not have asked for a more knowledgeable. Duo to answer veterans questions about va a disability benefits. So i want to just say to both you guys. Welcome to we serve now. What oh thank you very much Very happy to be here with you. you know my own experience of five years in the navy and thinking i came out and was was everything was great. You know always young. And i was happy in that aitken painted matter a whole lot. You know then. I got my late forties and early fifties and realized yeah does kind of hurt a little. Bit so yeah. I'm happy to be here with you and Look forward to the conversation. Will everybody will simmons Absolutely happy to talk to you today. About incentive Something near and dear to my heart. china passion play for me Having gone from ten percent disabled the a lump sum of less than eight hundred bucks and a holy shit. Now what am i gonna digress. My life to one hundred percent permanent total my law degree and my mba so There are programs out there to better your life and puts you in a position to dramatically. Change your life for the better and happy to talk about that too. That awesome awesome. Well let's start our conversation today guys with the transition out of the military. Maybe greg we can start with you. Tell me a bit more about your own transition story what you did right what you wish. You would have known things like that sure. Well you know when. I got out of those one clive in the military. I went through paramedic school in my last year in the military. So i was busy guy for you know. Fourteen sixteen months in the last days in the military. I was also going to civilian paramedic school. So i didn't sleep in as i got out. I worked as a paramedic and did fine. And then i realized that really didn't make a whole heck of a lot of money for all of the responsibilities that i had and that i wanted to do more but i wasn't quite sure how to do. And if i if. I known then what i know now. I would have in fact on to law school however i was a single parent of a two year old and a five year old and i did that for more than fifteen years and i can assure you that. There's nothing fun about going full time college and also trying to get You know to be a good parent and to provide the income necessary and i had that entrepreneurial spirit and i wanted to grow in in and have a big business that that was bringing the wealth i wanted and building it from my retirement and it just There wasn't a lot of of a maps out there. Do this do this do this do this. And through twenty five years of experience. I figured it out and and we've done well and i'm in. I'm thrilled with my past. The navy taught me so much about responsibility and accountability and and those are certainly tenants to be an entrepreneur. No question about it but there was no road map. There was no getting out of the military. Didn't here's your step plans being successful on your own It was it was really hard. So i'm glad to be your health. Talk about that in the journey Will tell us about you and your journey. It was definitely a different Yeah absolutely so i was. How do i even begin this When i joined the military. I joined in forty days. Forty five days before nine. Eleven and I was an architecture student at the time. Indiana national guard kind of do a my weekend. Warriors thing and In after nine. Eleven i i just couldn't physically sit there and design buildings that we're gonna be used to blow people and caused devastation. I wanted to change that. And so i went active duty and went to school and in sadly my entire time in the military was was spent in school one school to the next and in one of those schools. I got banged up. Injured prior to going getting acceptance to west point from enlisted to the academy so i went to west point for two years while i was there. Got my injury that i sustained during active duty. The kid exacerbated to the point that i could no longer sir and unceremoniously. I went home with a ten percent disability. Seven seven hundred eighty bucks or something like that. Night came from west point to sit on my parents. Couch i legitimately want to move. I didn't even know your podcast existed until last week but eyesight. Now what what the heck am i gonna do the rest of my life. I had zero idea. I went from the premier leadership institute in the world to not knowing. I didn't know what the heck did so I decided that applied at schools Just just keep the ball moving and Quickly went to indiana university. Got into the business. School in really just fell in love with entrepreneurship and i let that passion takeover You know my healing process from you. Know both physical and emotional fiercely all of it. I needed to mend myself after coming out of the military. And it's a hell of a won't talk to make that work but Anyway yeah i mean. The transition was man. I don i even describe the transition with it was so unbelievably difficult. It shouldn't need to in needed to be a conversation with a counselor commonality military that said you know. What do you want. do the rest of your life. This is the direction you go and go. Do it can i. It was a lot of soul searching to find. It ought to be honest. But now i've been imagined doing anything else. Couldn't imagine sitting my day any other way when i do and holy shit i get paid for it. I mean oh my god. That's the best. The best thing in the world i completely agree with you will on on that. Come out and you're just in this hot this this song in this hayes in your you have so little direction and even if you had a career counselor to try to talk to you. I don't know if it's just you don't know what you're doing in life because you're so mean you don't stand different concepts yet but man you're just lost wandering out there in and Yeah i grabbed me by accident eck and smack me up a little bit. I do right by sagar i absolutely. I think if there's one thing that i absolutely did right was i I jumped head head on into school and education and building might tool set. Because i wasn't relying solely on the things that i learned in the military to to be jumping off point. I realized i had a heck of a lot of catching up to do. And and that's where the education started for me And obviously i didn't quit. And in fact i found a way to make sure that i didn't have to pay for which was really you know that was. The true transition story was okay. Hang on a second Your bettering yourself. And you're getting somebody else. Pay the bill. This this is something should write a book about Because a lot of that cedeno that hidden. I mean that was one of my biggest struggles was coming out and being twenty five seven a two year old and a five year old that i was literally racing by myself and i was taking eighteen credit hours Getting my degree in biochemistry with minor in english lit. And i you know eighteen credit hours trying to take care to five hundred worked at the same time you know you can get loans and all the rest of it but if you don't have a good nation in what's possible. I had no idea. I was eligible for vote. Rehab you know. When i went i had gi bill and believe it or not. The college never applied the gi bill. I paid for everything out of my own. And even though i was eligible for the gi. Bill is all the time it's really sad is what it comes down to that. We have the capability had had. I recognized what was was there army. And i recognize these benefits. Were there than i could have slowed down and cast in my kids. Now's a roof over their head and not had trying to kill myself to get through it in a short period of time And it would have changed the trajectory of my life. I you know. I watched medical school. Go out the door. Because i couldn't do an internship and be a single parent and i couldn't do medical school and be a single parent. Too young kids had. I had those benefits and recognized that they were available to me. I could have done more. I could've figure things out that's not bad. I mean i. I love where i'm at today but it could have been so much easier. Had i known about all the benefits that are out there. Not just disability. But is as you're talking about. Well the both rehab and the gi bill and things don't get taken advantage of profitable now. I was just gonna say we. We actually just talked about that. I think it was in the last episode about gi bill and how you can leverage it with the Volk rehab well. Vr program now but Leverage that you know those two you know really great benefits to you get further education. Everything i know when i got out You know. I'm sitting in the end of the transition not unit but are transitioning out processing briefings. Right and they're telling us about the va. I knew zero about the. Va except that veterans. Go to the. Va that's really all. I knew about it and they and they told us like. Hey go to the hospital like on post go hospital get your medical records and take him upstairs. Because i had a v. Va office fort hood. They had a. Va office up. Like start for a said okay. Cool and so. I took them and they said okay. Cool we got your medical records like okay to me. It was just another task. I had. I literally had no idea that i was submitting my va. Disability claim audios. Like somebody told me to give you these. I guess this is how i get officially into the va and become a veteran so to speak at someone like your most crucial claim and there you are getting pushed by the system through their said that you're not on purpose fan. That was done on purpose for years and years. And call me a conspiracy theorist or whatever but the truth of the matter is this is mon mon Insurance company pan out benefits and they've got an minimize this as much as far as sharing and you know the the the the hard part was to that by the time i did my first what do you call that first. Compensation exam with the with the doctor or the nurse practitioner. Whatever she was I'm still in tough guy mode. I'm still like yeah. Her s- i'm good. I can you know. I'm sure i can just suck it up for a little while. I didn't realize it's supposed to go there and just be blatantly. Honest like holy crap. This hurts this hurts. This hurts and i can't do this anymore. And i just went. I was like no. This is fine. Do you have anything no. i'm fine. no i'm good. I had no. I d like there was no. There's no plan there's no. There's no one at that point in the transition to to really tell me. Hey this is what you should be doing. This is the level of scrutiny. That they're going to look at your. Va claim with and this is the level of of intensity you need to put to it when you submit it so we can talk about that a little bit like what. What was your guys. Experience with The va disability claims program. I i know with mine drag. Mom i was cormon and i and i was I was one of the supervisors of the ambulance service in and they will. Hospital orlando in the training center training center there and when i sat down out processing with personnel. I still to this day. Remember sitting down at that gray metal desk. And here's somebody that's not much older than me on the other side of the desk in. They're typing out my dvd fourteen. And they're asking me different questions on a checklist and you know how many problems not have any problems you know. Got both of my legs. I got both my arms You know i can hear you talking fine which goes exactly to the point. You're making aaron. And i don't think it was bravado on my side is much as not understanding to transition process and the purpose of the questions being asked as they apply to me in my future not to mention. Let's let's young. Were coming from the military where it's shut the hell up in suck it up. Well it's not only that pervasiveness in the military will absolutely but there's a pervasiveness in the medical side on top of that of we don't go to call unless we are on death's doorstep i had owns and you know i'm i'm urinating blood. I went to the er. I was terrified. I didn't know anything about kidney. Stones about point. I tell you when you look down. Ten o'clock at night and the toilet bowl is you're ready to go to bed. You see bright red blood. You're going to the er right now when they didn't ask me about that as i al processed. I didn't recognize that. The jimmy stones that my kidneys continued to put out than started in the military. Were something that should have been taking care of for in evaluating before on the disability side. And so you know as as a cormon. My knees hurt my back. Hurt dr a are you know my gird. hey dot. Can you write me. Something for this. Ensures tagamet for this there was never any documentation. It was me and my buddy. The doctor who wrote something if i wanted it or b who went to the cabinet and opened up and took out the a hundred older motrin. It took it myself just like i told my fellow shipmates to do or the. You know the marine corps guys that i worked with to do so i mean there was a pervasiveness medicine on top of. What will we say about. The pervasiveness of we have a missions. Do the military. Our mission is to get the dadgum job done. Every single time is not to be standing in sakala. Whine about how this hurts. Don't it well. i'm sorry. I didn't mean now. You know. i think it's for me. I was you know i dealt with something that i deal with. Almost every with almost every veteran client that deal with. It's it's it's a pervasive problem. That every better needs to know you're going to be under compensated for some of your disabilities and you're gonna be overcompensated for some disabilities and when you're coming out of service and you get med boarded for something you know for me. I was hellbent on getting my chest fix chest and backs back rated properly in even though chefs in particular the maximum benefit. I could ever get no matter how hard i tried and no matter what i did was ten percent no matter what so yourself the net absolutely ruined my military career. That is only gonna ever pay me ten percent. I'm sitting. you're banging my head against the wall for at least five years fighting that fight when there was literally nothing i could do. I had to learn the system the right way you gotta do end arounds and connect everything possible to this in order to make sure that your stated appropriately for the actual shit that you're dealing against off that took years to figure out when you don't have somebody holding your hand through the through the that's really true. I mean in my case. I knew the was there that can provides healthcare benefits. But i had a job. I had healthcare benefits. I didn't mean to be a and i correctly and incorrectly depending on how you look at it. I wanted that benefit to be more available my fellow brethren who actually needed it and couldn't make it private healthcare good private healthcare because the. Va does a as much as they get. Beaten up in the news over. they do. Try very hard. You've healthcare Chewed the veterans other. They can't do better but it's not because they're trying to do that. And so i wanted that that benefit of healthcare to be availed more available. My brother and i never looked into. It wasn't until we want to buy a house and property. You're in texas the realtor said. So what's your your disability rating. And which i giggled including talking about and she goes well with your own. You won't have a fun in fee in taxes. You will either of your property taxes reduced or abated completely if you have disability and i said i don't have any disability. I have both my legs and lower. Did she said idiot. I've known you long time. And i know your kidney stone started in service. I know you're back. Problems started from when you were. Emc girl medic in the military in the military. How can you not have this ability rating. And i wasn't out looking for the money. I was making okay money so i never went searching for those benefits and you know that makes that much more difficult woken. Tell you when you're now twenty. Five years ho service. And the g jared processes are really starting to kick in that began in the military to then through this this connection. It would be much easier on him and i if we get the veteran. Who's diagnosed in service with my backers a bit. You know. I have a strain. I have whatever that turns into severe Disabling degenerative disk disease or herniation in those sorts of things. It'd be so much easier if those that are ins new on the way out. I need a copy of my medical records. I need diagnosis in the military. I need imaging. Studies are is cat. Scans whatever to show this. Something started in the military. Because we can tie that together much more easily absolutely and i think with the be. Dd program the benefits Direct delivery program that the provides This new system. I'm helping quite a bit of Servicemembers transition out of the military the contact meteorology and they want help going through their initial claim. You know it's something that You know you can't charge for it's a you know it's a. It's a pro bono thing but the end of the day were taken bets. Soldiers vets who are transitioning out on their first you know their initial claim walking out of the room with a ninety percent. Walk on service. Now we're sitting here fighting on. You know that most important ten percent on the backside to get you to the hundred percent but we're a heck of a lot closer than that thirty percent of the twenty percent that you're getting when you're walking out of there like a hero like you and i are all of us did back at our generation you know there's various services connection is an art. It is not a science. It is an art all day long you. There are ways to stack disabilities on top of each other to maximize your coins. And if you do not know what you are doing you are doing it wrong here. What it takes strength or something. We said to will as a process that that is like everything else that all veterans doing the military. There's a procedure. Here's your procedure. One five and the average veteran doesn't understand it is a legal process. There are statutes. The congress is there are regulations that implement those statues that the va is put out is a legal process and it involves medicine so it's a combination of the legal side in the medical side and the average joe out there doesn't understand the law at that level and doesn't understand medicine at that level to connect all of this stuff together both legally and medically right and so let's dive into the details a little bit of that initial. Va disparity claim you know. Will you talk about it. Being an art and greg you talked about it being a legal proceeding. Is there even a three step. Five step nine step seventeen step process. That veterans can look at and say. Okay here's what i need to do. And here's how. I need to submit that claim. I don't know if there's a five step process but there's definite general over overarching rules that you must consider and And i think most important if i could say This is your kids Number one takeaway take notes Holy shit do. Not shotgun approach your. Va clays do not claim. Every single fingernail do not claim every single to- fungus. It's not gonna get you paid number one and number two. It's going to paint you in a corner so bad no attorney can get you out of just because you have dirty your file. You're talking about non attorneys who are adjudicating legal cases. These people do not practice law. They are practicing what they feel in. Our job is to show what disability looks like as plainly as possible so that we can either capitalize on that person's Motive to assist the veteran or To somehow paint over bad in a file because you absolutely are are leaving a trail of tears when you are claiming a shotgun approach to your to your veterans claims Number step is only claimed things that you are legally entitled to claim so it's going to require a little bit of research on your part to know what you're entitled to but that's that's my claim to everybody number one only clean things that you're entitled Because once you start claiming things that you're not entitled to the most important thing that you can not lose that you just gave away is your a benefit of the doubt that fifty percent and when it's as least as likely as not it's you're full of shit and you're claiming everything under the sun You just lost your fifty percent when it comes to the thing that's going to get you hundred percent. Yeah i think all take off on that in a little bit of of education. The vast majority of raiders as will can tell you are veterans. They want to help their fellow veterans. That's why they get that job. However the vast majority are not attorneys and just like we were talking about procedures few minutes ago. That's what they do. They have a manual called the young twenty one one and it is a procedure manual. They claim they step through the procedures. Won- jews hyperlink year like there for five six hyperlink there is. I wish it was. It's not to say there isn't some feeling in it. I mean there there is they are the trier of fact they get to be the arbitrator in adjudicate the claim but they do get that interpretation on their side in trying to decide. What's right and what's wrong is disconnected is not but it is very procedural. It's they're not looking at line compeer in the law analyzing walleye analyzing the case law even the references to it. They're not opening. No they are now providing a claim. You know it's transitioning to the other point. He made a providing claims that are not shotgun that you're entitled to. What does that mean rethinks. You have a current diagnosis. You have continuity of your condition meaning you. didn't you know. Get a bruise in boot camp. In your thirty years later. Trying to to say i have a problem. You have to be able to document the progression so he is a little bit different than degenerative disk disease that you may have had back pain and service but it didn't really degenerate until a certain point but then it kept getting worse and worse document how it kept getting worse and worse documented in a law whether it's a blood pressure log a headache log of that in law document the continuity of that condition and the third component of that is the next service. How did that. How did service relate to your claim. It didn't have to 'cause it. You could had a car accident while you were stationed florida. That caused an injury service. Puts you in florida. Therefore that disability the you weren't combat got shot and you got that disability but it's still considered service connected because the military had you stationed there so it's not causation. Its relation to. But if you don't have continuity veterans lose every time is you know. Oh i had this. Bigger hangnail. And i had this. This shotgun approach. Yes but that's not a chronic condition. It's a one time edition. Thank you so much will and greg and has been so great heavy on the show. This has been absolutely amazing. we will share some next steps with our audience in the show notes as we don't have time to cover today but this has been so so great guys. I cannot wait to publish this here in just a few days once we get through the very long process. Now because we've been on here for almost an hour and a half. Oh man what get through this very low process of you know post producing this but This has been really great. I know i've learned a lot. No doubt our listeners have learned a lot. Thank you guys so much for coming on the show really really enjoyed having you absolutely are i would not try and in a motor selves doll. But there's more information both in blogs articles that are on our websites on the im l. a. r. dot com their blogs articles about all his unstuffy also webinars that the media von normal basis. That has a lot of money on and join this martin. I'm ask questions where you're to help end. Try and elton's many veterans hand and your minds and you'll get them guys. Make yourselves better absolutely. I wish i wish. I got a website to promote them in the middle of fixing it right now so Sadly i've got a lotta latin or the we're working on that Were growing like crazy. This last year and a half. It's been unbelievable in worth To do a little self promotion where we're entirely. We're all veteran. were were all disabled vets. For all young where he's All worked on the inside. Su know how all the systems work so there we'd and accurately communicate with the that's how we run a different off practice than everybody else who's We what these guys who they're fighting against and there's a alive easier way that i hope you've enjoyed this segment of the interview. Now to listen to the full interview click on the lincoln the show notes fill out that form and we will email that link directly to you again until next time. Thanks for listening. We served now. What is a production of courage to fight again.

VA Greg Aaron Perkins Navy Greg Colton Will Simmons Gregg Golden Simmons Law Simmons Indiana National Guard Premier Leadership Institute Aitken Colton Us Army Sakala Cedeno
S6 E5 - How do I maximize my VA disability benefits? - burst 1

Courage to Fight Again

34:04 min | 11 hrs ago

S6 E5 - How do I maximize my VA disability benefits? - burst 1

"Hey just a quick before we get things kicked off here. I do want to let you know that. There is some strong language throughout this episode so listener discretion is advised. If there's five step process but there's indefinite general over overarching rules that she must consider but it is very procedural. It's they're not looking at compeer in the wall and analyzing while i'm analyzing the case law even the references to it. They're not opening pay. Everyone welcome to season six episode. Five of we served now. What it on this podcast. I do my very best to answer the questions. That veterans and their families are all ready asking my name is aaron perkins on the host of this show and the founder of courage to fight again an hour parent organization. I'm also the author of resolve. Which is a step by. Step guide for q the veteran to help you rediscover purpose meaning and passion and your post military life. Today's topic when the show is via a disability. What you need to do to submit it and not just what to do with. How do it bright outta appeal it. Should you appeal that well. That work all those things and more in today's show. I had a chance to sit down with a couple of really great guys who have done their homework on this. They do this kind of thing. Every single day. Greg colton and will simmons and we set down and chat or mojos that hour and a half i had to cut out unfortunately a lot of that conversation but the week to that full interview can click on the link in the show notes. And that'll take you to a form review request access to that whole uncut interview. And you could watch that in its entirety video interviewed. Please please take advantage of that. But for now i'm going to get out of the way. Make this intro as short and sweet as possible and let you hear the part of the show. The part of our conversation that i was able to stick into this episode here fleas. Enjoy my conversation with greg. Colton and wilson's check it out. Well i am here today with two honestly powerhouses in this field talking about increasing eight disability benefits. I'm here with gregg golden easy. Us navy veteran. This guy has twenty five twenty five years of sea level experience in financial technology compliance security investigation. All these things he's worked with numerous law firms used his own experience with the va to build something really cool. And i know he's gonna wanna talk about that more on this show but it's very good to have you on the show today greg. I'm also here with will simmons. He's a us army veteran former va founder. And managing attorney at simmons law. And i gotta tell you. I could not have asked for a more knowledgeable. Duo to answer veterans questions about va a disability benefits. So i want to just say to both you guys. Welcome to we serve now. What oh thank you very much Very happy to be here with you. you know my own experience of five years in the navy and thinking i came out and was was everything was great. You know always young. And i was happy in that aitken painted matter a whole lot. You know then. I got my late forties and early fifties and realized yeah does kind of hurt a little. Bit so yeah. I'm happy to be here with you and Look forward to the conversation. Will everybody will simmons Absolutely happy to talk to you today. About incentive Something near and dear to my heart. china passion play for me Having gone from ten percent disabled the a lump sum of less than eight hundred bucks and a holy shit. Now what am i gonna digress. My life to one hundred percent permanent total my law degree and my mba so There are programs out there to better your life and puts you in a position to dramatically. Change your life for the better and happy to talk about that too. That awesome awesome. Well let's start our conversation today guys with the transition out of the military. Maybe greg we can start with you. Tell me a bit more about your own transition story what you did right what you wish. You would have known things like that sure. Well you know when. I got out of those one clive in the military. I went through paramedic school in my last year in the military. So i was busy guy for you know. Fourteen sixteen months in the last days in the military. I was also going to civilian paramedic school. So i didn't sleep in as i got out. I worked as a paramedic and did fine. And then i realized that really didn't make a whole heck of a lot of money for all of the responsibilities that i had and that i wanted to do more but i wasn't quite sure how to do. And if i if. I known then what i know now. I would have in fact on to law school however i was a single parent of a two year old and a five year old and i did that for more than fifteen years and i can assure you that. There's nothing fun about going full time college and also trying to get You know to be a good parent and to provide the income necessary and i had that entrepreneurial spirit and i wanted to grow in in and have a big business that that was bringing the wealth i wanted and building it from my retirement and it just There wasn't a lot of of a maps out there. Do this do this do this do this. And through twenty five years of experience. I figured it out and and we've done well and i'm in. I'm thrilled with my past. The navy taught me so much about responsibility and accountability and and those are certainly tenants to be an entrepreneur. No question about it but there was no road map. There was no getting out of the military. Didn't here's your step plans being successful on your own It was it was really hard. So i'm glad to be your health. Talk about that in the journey Will tell us about you and your journey. It was definitely a different Yeah absolutely so i was. How do i even begin this When i joined the military. I joined in forty days. Forty five days before nine. Eleven and I was an architecture student at the time. Indiana national guard kind of do a my weekend. Warriors thing and In after nine. Eleven i i just couldn't physically sit there and design buildings that we're gonna be used to blow people and caused devastation. I wanted to change that. And so i went active duty and went to school and in sadly my entire time in the military was was spent in school one school to the next and in one of those schools. I got banged up. Injured prior to going getting acceptance to west point from enlisted to the academy so i went to west point for two years while i was there. Got my injury that i sustained during active duty. The kid exacerbated to the point that i could no longer sir and unceremoniously. I went home with a ten percent disability. Seven seven hundred eighty bucks or something like that. Night came from west point to sit on my parents. Couch i legitimately want to move. I didn't even know your podcast existed until last week but eyesight. Now what what the heck am i gonna do the rest of my life. I had zero idea. I went from the premier leadership institute in the world to not knowing. I didn't know what the heck did so I decided that applied at schools Just just keep the ball moving and Quickly went to indiana university. Got into the business. School in really just fell in love with entrepreneurship and i let that passion takeover You know my healing process from you. Know both physical and emotional fiercely all of it. I needed to mend myself after coming out of the military. And it's a hell of a won't talk to make that work but Anyway yeah i mean. The transition was man. I don i even describe the transition with it was so unbelievably difficult. It shouldn't need to in needed to be a conversation with a counselor commonality military that said you know. What do you want. do the rest of your life. This is the direction you go and go. Do it can i. It was a lot of soul searching to find. It ought to be honest. But now i've been imagined doing anything else. Couldn't imagine sitting my day any other way when i do and holy shit i get paid for it. I mean oh my god. That's the best. The best thing in the world i completely agree with you will on on that. Come out and you're just in this hot this this song in this hayes in your you have so little direction and even if you had a career counselor to try to talk to you. I don't know if it's just you don't know what you're doing in life because you're so mean you don't stand different concepts yet but man you're just lost wandering out there in and Yeah i grabbed me by accident eck and smack me up a little bit. I do right by sagar i absolutely. I think if there's one thing that i absolutely did right was i I jumped head head on into school and education and building might tool set. Because i wasn't relying solely on the things that i learned in the military to to be jumping off point. I realized i had a heck of a lot of catching up to do. And and that's where the education started for me And obviously i didn't quit. And in fact i found a way to make sure that i didn't have to pay for which was really you know that was. The true transition story was okay. Hang on a second Your bettering yourself. And you're getting somebody else. Pay the bill. This this is something should write a book about Because a lot of that cedeno that hidden. I mean that was one of my biggest struggles was coming out and being twenty five seven a two year old and a five year old that i was literally racing by myself and i was taking eighteen credit hours Getting my degree in biochemistry with minor in english lit. And i you know eighteen credit hours trying to take care to five hundred worked at the same time you know you can get loans and all the rest of it but if you don't have a good nation in what's possible. I had no idea. I was eligible for vote. Rehab you know. When i went i had gi bill and believe it or not. The college never applied the gi bill. I paid for everything out of my own. And even though i was eligible for the gi. Bill is all the time it's really sad is what it comes down to that. We have the capability had had. I recognized what was was there army. And i recognize these benefits. Were there than i could have slowed down and cast in my kids. Now's a roof over their head and not had trying to kill myself to get through it in a short period of time And it would have changed the trajectory of my life. I you know. I watched medical school. Go out the door. Because i couldn't do an internship and be a single parent and i couldn't do medical school and be a single parent. Too young kids had. I had those benefits and recognized that they were available to me. I could have done more. I could've figure things out that's not bad. I mean i. I love where i'm at today but it could have been so much easier. Had i known about all the benefits that are out there. Not just disability. But is as you're talking about. Well the both rehab and the gi bill and things don't get taken advantage of profitable now. I was just gonna say we. We actually just talked about that. I think it was in the last episode about gi bill and how you can leverage it with the Volk rehab well. Vr program now but Leverage that you know those two you know really great benefits to you get further education. Everything i know when i got out You know. I'm sitting in the end of the transition not unit but are transitioning out processing briefings. Right and they're telling us about the va. I knew zero about the. Va except that veterans. Go to the. Va that's really all. I knew about it and they and they told us like. Hey go to the hospital like on post go hospital get your medical records and take him upstairs. Because i had a v. Va office fort hood. They had a. Va office up. Like start for a said okay. Cool and so. I took them and they said okay. Cool we got your medical records like okay to me. It was just another task. I had. I literally had no idea that i was submitting my va. Disability claim audios. Like somebody told me to give you these. I guess this is how i get officially into the va and become a veteran so to speak at someone like your most crucial claim and there you are getting pushed by the system through their said that you're not on purpose fan. That was done on purpose for years and years. And call me a conspiracy theorist or whatever but the truth of the matter is this is mon mon Insurance company pan out benefits and they've got an minimize this as much as far as sharing and you know the the the the hard part was to that by the time i did my first what do you call that first. Compensation exam with the with the doctor or the nurse practitioner. Whatever she was I'm still in tough guy mode. I'm still like yeah. Her s- i'm good. I can you know. I'm sure i can just suck it up for a little while. I didn't realize it's supposed to go there and just be blatantly. Honest like holy crap. This hurts this hurts. This hurts and i can't do this anymore. And i just went. I was like no. This is fine. Do you have anything no. i'm fine. no i'm good. I had no. I d like there was no. There's no plan there's no. There's no one at that point in the transition to to really tell me. Hey this is what you should be doing. This is the level of scrutiny. That they're going to look at your. Va claim with and this is the level of of intensity you need to put to it when you submit it so we can talk about that a little bit like what. What was your guys. Experience with The va disability claims program. I i know with mine drag. Mom i was cormon and i and i was I was one of the supervisors of the ambulance service in and they will. Hospital orlando in the training center training center there and when i sat down out processing with personnel. I still to this day. Remember sitting down at that gray metal desk. And here's somebody that's not much older than me on the other side of the desk in. They're typing out my dvd fourteen. And they're asking me different questions on a checklist and you know how many problems not have any problems you know. Got both of my legs. I got both my arms You know i can hear you talking fine which goes exactly to the point. You're making aaron. And i don't think it was bravado on my side is much as not understanding to transition process and the purpose of the questions being asked as they apply to me in my future not to mention. Let's let's young. Were coming from the military where it's shut the hell up in suck it up. Well it's not only that pervasiveness in the military will absolutely but there's a pervasiveness in the medical side on top of that of we don't go to call unless we are on death's doorstep i had owns and you know i'm i'm urinating blood. I went to the er. I was terrified. I didn't know anything about kidney. Stones about point. I tell you when you look down. Ten o'clock at night and the toilet bowl is you're ready to go to bed. You see bright red blood. You're going to the er right now when they didn't ask me about that as i al processed. I didn't recognize that. The jimmy stones that my kidneys continued to put out than started in the military. Were something that should have been taking care of for in evaluating before on the disability side. And so you know as as a cormon. My knees hurt my back. Hurt dr a are you know my gird. hey dot. Can you write me. Something for this. Ensures tagamet for this there was never any documentation. It was me and my buddy. The doctor who wrote something if i wanted it or b who went to the cabinet and opened up and took out the a hundred older motrin. It took it myself just like i told my fellow shipmates to do or the. You know the marine corps guys that i worked with to do so i mean there was a pervasiveness medicine on top of. What will we say about. The pervasiveness of we have a missions. Do the military. Our mission is to get the dadgum job done. Every single time is not to be standing in sakala. Whine about how this hurts. Don't it well. i'm sorry. I didn't mean now. You know. i think it's for me. I was you know i dealt with something that i deal with. Almost every with almost every veteran client that deal with. It's it's it's a pervasive problem. That every better needs to know you're going to be under compensated for some of your disabilities and you're gonna be overcompensated for some disabilities and when you're coming out of service and you get med boarded for something you know for me. I was hellbent on getting my chest fix chest and backs back rated properly in even though chefs in particular the maximum benefit. I could ever get no matter how hard i tried and no matter what i did was ten percent no matter what so yourself the net absolutely ruined my military career. That is only gonna ever pay me ten percent. I'm sitting. you're banging my head against the wall for at least five years fighting that fight when there was literally nothing i could do. I had to learn the system the right way you gotta do end arounds and connect everything possible to this in order to make sure that your stated appropriately for the actual shit that you're dealing against off that took years to figure out when you don't have somebody holding your hand through the through the that's really true. I mean in my case. I knew the was there that can provides healthcare benefits. But i had a job. I had healthcare benefits. I didn't mean to be a and i correctly and incorrectly depending on how you look at it. I wanted that benefit to be more available my fellow brethren who actually needed it and couldn't make it private healthcare good private healthcare because the. Va does a as much as they get. Beaten up in the news over. they do. Try very hard. You've healthcare Chewed the veterans other. They can't do better but it's not because they're trying to do that. And so i wanted that that benefit of healthcare to be availed more available. My brother and i never looked into. It wasn't until we want to buy a house and property. You're in texas the realtor said. So what's your your disability rating. And which i giggled including talking about and she goes well with your own. You won't have a fun in fee in taxes. You will either of your property taxes reduced or abated completely if you have disability and i said i don't have any disability. I have both my legs and lower. Did she said idiot. I've known you long time. And i know your kidney stone started in service. I know you're back. Problems started from when you were. Emc girl medic in the military in the military. How can you not have this ability rating. And i wasn't out looking for the money. I was making okay money so i never went searching for those benefits and you know that makes that much more difficult woken. Tell you when you're now twenty. Five years ho service. And the g jared processes are really starting to kick in that began in the military to then through this this connection. It would be much easier on him and i if we get the veteran. Who's diagnosed in service with my backers a bit. You know. I have a strain. I have whatever that turns into severe Disabling degenerative disk disease or herniation in those sorts of things. It'd be so much easier if those that are ins new on the way out. I need a copy of my medical records. I need diagnosis in the military. I need imaging. Studies are is cat. Scans whatever to show this. Something started in the military. Because we can tie that together much more easily absolutely and i think with the be. Dd program the benefits Direct delivery program that the provides This new system. I'm helping quite a bit of Servicemembers transition out of the military the contact meteorology and they want help going through their initial claim. You know it's something that You know you can't charge for it's a you know it's a. It's a pro bono thing but the end of the day were taken bets. Soldiers vets who are transitioning out on their first you know their initial claim walking out of the room with a ninety percent. Walk on service. Now we're sitting here fighting on. You know that most important ten percent on the backside to get you to the hundred percent but we're a heck of a lot closer than that thirty percent of the twenty percent that you're getting when you're walking out of there like a hero like you and i are all of us did back at our generation you know there's various services connection is an art. It is not a science. It is an art all day long you. There are ways to stack disabilities on top of each other to maximize your coins. And if you do not know what you are doing you are doing it wrong here. What it takes strength or something. We said to will as a process that that is like everything else that all veterans doing the military. There's a procedure. Here's your procedure. One five and the average veteran doesn't understand it is a legal process. There are statutes. The congress is there are regulations that implement those statues that the va is put out is a legal process and it involves medicine so it's a combination of the legal side in the medical side and the average joe out there doesn't understand the law at that level and doesn't understand medicine at that level to connect all of this stuff together both legally and medically right and so let's dive into the details a little bit of that initial. Va disparity claim you know. Will you talk about it. Being an art and greg you talked about it being a legal proceeding. Is there even a three step. Five step nine step seventeen step process. That veterans can look at and say. Okay here's what i need to do. And here's how. I need to submit that claim. I don't know if there's a five step process but there's definite general over overarching rules that you must consider and And i think most important if i could say This is your kids Number one takeaway take notes Holy shit do. Not shotgun approach your. Va clays do not claim. Every single fingernail do not claim every single to- fungus. It's not gonna get you paid number one and number two. It's going to paint you in a corner so bad no attorney can get you out of just because you have dirty your file. You're talking about non attorneys who are adjudicating legal cases. These people do not practice law. They are practicing what they feel in. Our job is to show what disability looks like as plainly as possible so that we can either capitalize on that person's Motive to assist the veteran or To somehow paint over bad in a file because you absolutely are are leaving a trail of tears when you are claiming a shotgun approach to your to your veterans claims Number step is only claimed things that you are legally entitled to claim so it's going to require a little bit of research on your part to know what you're entitled to but that's that's my claim to everybody number one only clean things that you're entitled Because once you start claiming things that you're not entitled to the most important thing that you can not lose that you just gave away is your a benefit of the doubt that fifty percent and when it's as least as likely as not it's you're full of shit and you're claiming everything under the sun You just lost your fifty percent when it comes to the thing that's going to get you hundred percent. Yeah i think all take off on that in a little bit of of education. The vast majority of raiders as will can tell you are veterans. They want to help their fellow veterans. That's why they get that job. However the vast majority are not attorneys and just like we were talking about procedures few minutes ago. That's what they do. They have a manual called the young twenty one one and it is a procedure manual. They claim they step through the procedures. Won- jews hyperlink year like there for five six hyperlink there is. I wish it was. It's not to say there isn't some feeling in it. I mean there there is they are the trier of fact they get to be the arbitrator in adjudicate the claim but they do get that interpretation on their side in trying to decide. What's right and what's wrong is disconnected is not but it is very procedural. It's they're not looking at line compeer in the law analyzing walleye analyzing the case law even the references to it. They're not opening. No they are now providing a claim. You know it's transitioning to the other point. He made a providing claims that are not shotgun that you're entitled to. What does that mean rethinks. You have a current diagnosis. You have continuity of your condition meaning you. didn't you know. Get a bruise in boot camp. In your thirty years later. Trying to to say i have a problem. You have to be able to document the progression so he is a little bit different than degenerative disk disease that you may have had back pain and service but it didn't really degenerate until a certain point but then it kept getting worse and worse document how it kept getting worse and worse documented in a law whether it's a blood pressure log a headache log of that in law document the continuity of that condition and the third component of that is the next service. How did that. How did service relate to your claim. It didn't have to 'cause it. You could had a car accident while you were stationed florida. That caused an injury service. Puts you in florida. Therefore that disability the you weren't combat got shot and you got that disability but it's still considered service connected because the military had you stationed there so it's not causation. Its relation to. But if you don't have continuity veterans lose every time is you know. Oh i had this. Bigger hangnail. And i had this. This shotgun approach. Yes but that's not a chronic condition. It's a one time edition. Thank you so much will and greg and has been so great heavy on the show. This has been absolutely amazing. we will share some next steps with our audience in the show notes as we don't have time to cover today but this has been so so great guys. I cannot wait to publish this here in just a few days once we get through the very long process. Now because we've been on here for almost an hour and a half. Oh man what get through this very low process of you know post producing this but This has been really great. I know i've learned a lot. No doubt our listeners have learned a lot. Thank you guys so much for coming on the show really really enjoyed having you absolutely are i would not try and in a motor selves doll. But there's more information both in blogs articles that are on our websites on the im l. a. r. dot com their blogs articles about all his unstuffy also webinars that the media von normal basis. That has a lot of money on and join this martin. I'm ask questions where you're to help end. Try and elton's many veterans hand and your minds and you'll get them guys. Make yourselves better absolutely. I wish i wish. I got a website to promote them in the middle of fixing it right now so Sadly i've got a lotta latin or the we're working on that Were growing like crazy. This last year and a half. It's been unbelievable in worth To do a little self promotion where we're entirely. We're all veteran. were were all disabled vets. For all young where he's All worked on the inside. Su know how all the systems work so there we'd and accurately communicate with the that's how we run a different off practice than everybody else who's We what these guys who they're fighting against and there's a alive easier way that i hope you've enjoyed this segment of the interview. Now to listen to the full interview click on the lincoln the show notes fill out that form and we will email that link directly to you again until next time. Thanks for listening. We served now. What is a production of courage to fight again.

VA Greg Aaron Perkins Navy Greg Colton Will Simmons Gregg Golden Simmons Law Simmons Indiana National Guard Premier Leadership Institute Aitken Colton Us Army Sakala Cedeno
Why Is Everyone Investing in NFTs?

The Tech Guy

02:17 min | 2 d ago

Why Is Everyone Investing in NFTs?

"Ever hear about nf tease. That's the hot topic these days. Nfc's i'm in clubhouse another hot place right where people go and they talk about stuff. And there's all these. I i i'm looking at all these little conversations about nf tease one of those. Then i look it up. And it stands for non. Fungible tokens would. What is that. Non fungible tokens It's a kind of. It's not crypto currency like bitcoin. But it's kind of like it. I think my first experience with f. Although i didn't know at the time was a site called crypto kitties. Are you remember that. Still around by the way crypto. Kitties dot co so crypto. Kitty's Was a chance for you to spend some of your hard earned bitcoin or dollars. I guess if you want but pretty much. People used crypto to do it to by cartoon cats. You wouldn't own a cat there'd be no cat involved. You wouldn't even own a picture of a cat. You just own the digital copy of the cat and yet you can make a lot of money on that. 'cause the cat values went up and down depending on who knows what you can breed the cats and create new kinds of cats. That might even be more valuable. It was an investment opportunity and investment opportunity. And i think some people made money on this probably for everybody who made a buck. Somebody lost a buck because that's kind of how it works. That's my first non fungible token lately. It's kind of going crazy. People for instance nba highlights. I don't know how that even makes sense. It's called nba top shot. And you might say. Well that's crazy except that had two hundred seventeen million dollars in sales seventy six thousand buyers and the value in the last thirty days on Nba top shot has gone up. Six hundred ten percents. It'd be a good investment.

NFC Kitty NBA
Is Astra the wrong vaccine for border workers?

Coronacast

04:46 min | 2 d ago

Is Astra the wrong vaccine for border workers?

"One of the big milestones we had about yesterday. Was that the oxford astrazeneca vaccine. I devices of that have arrived in australia. Which is something that we've been waiting for. We're in phase one of the role at at the moment and those are the priority people. And i thought that those people were getting the fis at shot. But now we've got the oxford esters shut here. Are they going to be getting that as well and should they be getting that as well. We're in the press release from the prime minister and the minister. They say that they will guess. That's what they say in the press release and in fact the minister himself a week or so ago a press conference said the same thing that there would be a mix of these vaccines and the trouble with. That is an an accord. Chris murray who ahead on seven thirty last monday which he was. Who's the head of the institute for health. Metrics evaluation in seattle is. That astra is the wrong vaccine. If you're looking at borders let's pull back a little bit about what you're trying to achieve and your vaccine strategy are vaccine strategy is really for a country that has lots of covid around in the middle of covid outbreak. Because you want to partake. H care quite rightly aged care. Workers quite rightly you want to get in there and then you want to protect the rest of the population you want to. Doctors nurses people who work in hospitals all that nor question and we still want to do that but if the virus gets in through the borders that's how the virus gets seen it doesn't suddenly pop aged care home or residential care or pop up in the alfred hospital in melbourne. It comes from overseas. We'll come back to the new zealand situation currently in a minute. So the total strategy in the first instance should be about the borders if we can keep our borders secure. The virus won't get in and then we've got time to immunize for safety reasons. The rest of the population and so astro is the wrong vaccine for. That is not the wrong vaccine. I'll get. I want to say up front. I will get the astro vaccine. I'll be happy to get it. It will protect you in severe disease. But it won't necessarily protect our borders. It will against probably against the uk variant. It's not going to protect almost certainly against us at african variant which only showed ten percent efficacy against. We don't know what is going to do against the brazilian variant which shows vaccine escape. And there's the california variant in american various which. Look as if they might be a bit vaccine resistant themselves and so what we should be doing is saying well astra's fine and the scottish artist suggests it's fine for preventing severe disease but that's for a country that we should be covered getting in the first place. So that's about the pfizer vaccine because it stops transmission. More effectively than the astra zeneca vaccine. I it works within three weeks. You don't have to wait. Three months for the efficacy. Second reason is that moderna there is no. There are no data drawn. Skerritt said on chronic is last week for pfizer. But it's almost identical vaccines to madeira and moderna reasonable efficacy against the south african vary not great but much better than ten percent and and it gives stronger immunity faster so for our borders we should be using pfizer and getting quick protection and we should be protecting their households. Because where's it gonna go after they get infected should he be infected. And if it's the south african is going to go to members of their households at a higher chance so their families or flatmates should be immunized with pfizer to and then the third thing that we should be doing which nobody's talking about just wondering why not but when i talk and by the way this is not necessarily me talking actually sounded out on people who know what they're talking about who aren't where willingness to publicly contradict the government. They say es actually what we should be doing and it's largely what new zealand is doing. They are immunizing. their hotel. boorda workers and their immunizing their families. They've had an outbreak which will come to in a minute. The other thing we should be doing is actually having a forward strategy. Which is if you want to get back into australia. Get immunized and we should help them so some vaccine doses could go overseas to australia. Scott send send it over to make sure the co chain right to our consulates and remember. Pfizer is not quite as temperature sensitive as people say. It's it's a problem once you've dominated you've got to get rid of it but it's not quite temperature sensitive as can last for a while so if you're an australian in london paris and new york senate to this german embassy or their physicians. They've got doctors attached and immunize streams. Get them to pay for. It is cheaper than a hotel quarantine and so you. Don't get on the plane until you've had two doses and you waited another two weeks so you're fully immunized

Astra Institute For Health Oxford Pfizer Alfred Hospital Chris Murray FIS Skerritt Australia New Zealand Seattle Melbourne Boorda UK California Scott Paris Senate London
US Personal Income Increased 10% In January, Consumer Spending Up 2.4%

The Breakdown with NLW

01:25 min | 3 d ago

US Personal Income Increased 10% In January, Consumer Spending Up 2.4%

"The us household income grew ten percent in january alongside. This consumer spending rose two point four percent. This growth came primarily from the latest round of stimulus and was in fact the second largest monthly income growth on record after last april when the initial pandemic payments were sent out. This was also the first month since october. That consumer spending rose. Interestingly the thing to really pay attention to around this is in fact the bond markets. We're going to discuss them a little bit more in our main topic but effectively. What we're seeing right now is a situation where investors think that regardless of what jerome powell and the fed says an improving economy will force them to back off the aggressive monetary policy that has helped asset prices remained so high in response. They're backing off of high priced. Stocks and pushing treasury yields higher. Some are calling this the taper 'less tantrum and this refers to a twenty thirteen market episode. Where the fed tried to taper post. Gfc policies and markets absolutely freaked the. Hell out the fed. This time is saying that it's actually not going to do any such tapering. But the market is still freaking out believing they won't be to not hence the taper lewis tantrum anyway todd of stats around income and consumer spending are exactly the sort of evidence. Those tapes tantrum irs are pointing to

Jerome Powell FED United States
US consumers rebound to boost spending 2.4% as income jumps

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 4 d ago

US consumers rebound to boost spending 2.4% as income jumps

"American consumers were spending money last month after a couple of months of spending drops American consumers picked up spending by two point four percent last month that's a sign that the economy may be making a tentative recovery from the pandemic recession the report from the commerce department also had personal incomes up ten percent in January that was boosted by cash payments most Americans got from the government the sharp January gain suggests that many people are growing more confident about spending especially after receiving six hundred dollar checks then went to most adults last month in a federal economic aid package showing up Washington

Commerce Department Government Washington
CompTIA Security+ SY0601 update. Everything you need to know

Cyber Work

04:36 min | 5 d ago

CompTIA Security+ SY0601 update. Everything you need to know

"We are excited to have patrick lane today. Patrick is the director of products at compton. And we've done a few webinars with him in the past he always does a great job providing us updates on come tears certifications so excited to have you back patrick A little bit about his background. He directs the it workforce skills certifications come to you including security plus pen test plus c y plus and casper plus he assisted the us national cyber security alliance also known as the ncsa to create the lockdown. You're logging campaign to promote multi factor. Authentication nationwide us also implemented a wide variety of it projects including an internet and help desk for eleven thousand end users. Patrick is an armed forces. Communications electronics association lifetime member born and raised on us military bases and has authored and co authored multiple books including hack proofing lennox a guide to open source security so a fantastic guests with us today. I'm excited to pass it off to patrick here in just a moment after we review the agenda so today we will touch on what is security plus Patrick talk about the baseline cybersecurity skills. The job roles and growth indicators. We'll talk about the differences between s wise zero six zero one versus the five. Oh one and kind of some of the updates. There will talk about the exam details and then as mentioned i will pass it off to patrick for questions. So feel free to submit those questions using the qna panel At anytime so with that I'm going to go ahead and give give the control over to patrick here to get us started. Thank you everyone. My name is patrick lane. And as thank you for introducing me. I'm the product manager for competition cybersecurity certifications as a director. I work a lot with the industry and within comp tia in to ensure that our exams are meeting the needs of the industry security plus as one of our largest certifications of all comp. Tia in fact. It's our number one certification and so one of the reasons why people are coming to security plus is because of the skills that it offers and the fact that employers are hiring people who have security plus social security plus will help you get a job in it and cybersecurity so when we look at the certification we have to remember that security plus as an entry level certification exam it was released in two thousand two and it's updated every three years it assesses the baseline or core technical skills required to secure networks software hardware devices essentially it teaches you the basics to securing anything that's attached to a network or the internet. It's a broad range of cybersecurity skills as you can imagine. A any skills are used for high performance on the job so people are coming to take security plus because it proves that they can do the job and employers will know that they could get the job done so the it certification in general is very valuable also security plus appears nearly ten percent of all job ads in the united states and right now sixteen percent of the entire workforce has security plus and we have millions of people who have taken our commttiee exams around the globe. In the last three years. There have been a lot of changes in cybersecurity. Probably all aware of the industry continues to grow their continued to be more jobs available. There continued to be not enough people to fill those jobs and in fact in some cases employers are looking to icy certifications employers are looking to it certifications in lieu of a college degree. Four jobs. That are hard to hire for. They would rather hire someone with the bachelor degree and assert if they could but in this day and age or enough phenomenal time of human history.

Patrick Lane Patrick Us National Cyber Security All Communications Electronics Ass Ncsa Compton United States TIA
Why Square Stock Dropped Today

MarketFoolery

04:24 min | 6 d ago

Why Square Stock Dropped Today

"Came in solidly higher-than-expected shares of square though are down seven percent this morning. Because growth is slowing. There's always a lot to get to with square so when you look at all the numbers. Tell me what stood out to you. Yes for me. I really focused. When i swear on really their burgeoning business which you know is the cash shop. It's funny you mentioned the war on cash and they have this kind of conveniently named cash app so it was really some of the numbers that the shop drew in the quarter and for that matter the fiscal year one of them is one hundred sixty two percent. Increase your ear. Gross profit of the cash up In a lot of that is being fueled by new users and specifically cryptocurrencies like bitcoin. So i think one number is not in throughout the entire twenty twenty fiscal year over three million people transacted bitcoin in some regard which was a two hundred fifty percent increase in volume compared to fiscal year. Nineteen and then they also even gave some gave some information on january twenty twenty one st year with over one million new buyers of bitcoin so really just interesting kind of figures throughout the entire report. Kind of the bitcoin. Being such an important part of that cash app is what really stood out to me. Yeah and that was certainly part of the headline squares square announcing it had purchased one hundred seventy million dollars worth of bitcoin during the quarter so cash app is squares version of ven. Mo- it's interesting to see the reaction from the start because on the one hand. This is a stock. Even factoring in the drop today. The stock is up almost two hundred percent in the past year so i understand particularly traders on wall street with a shorter term mentality saying alright. It's been a good year. Let's let's take a little money off the table. That sort of thing on the other hand. I don't know the overall market cap of square is just over one hundred billion dollars. It seems like a business with a lot of room to run. And i was listening to some of the comments the. Cfo made around what they are. Seeing it square in terms of how sticky the cash app is in terms of the other parts of squares business. How it's this thing that sort of bringing people in and once they're in the square ecosystem. They they start trying other parts of the business. So i don't know like would you look i get the. Pe ratio is somewhere north of five hundred. But when you when you look at everything that square has going on do you look at today as a buying opportunity for people who maybe had square on their watchlist and thought well okay. It's it's seven percent cheaper than it was yesterday. Yeah actually i was looking at. You know over the last couple of weeks how it's performed and through last week year to date. I think it was up. Something like twenty seven percent and then you have over the last couple of days. You know ten percent or so pullback and these are always the days as as a long term investor that i look for you know have a business. That's in my opinion burgeoning. Having fiscal year revenue grow over one hundred percent granted excluding bitcoin. That's only about fifteen or twenty percent but as long term investor. I do think this is an opportunity. I'm not personally a shareholder of square. But it's a fascinating business to me and we've seen so much traction and really their largest growing business in terms of bitcoin transaction cryptocurrency and things like that which really doesn't seem to be dying the craze three or four years ago now. And you know it's all of a sudden habit a two year hiatus and it's got right back in the thick of things you know which squares really benefiting from. So you know. I think if you're a long term investor willing to hold for a couple of years and not too worried about a lot of volatility which has realizing probably will continue to experience over the coming months over coming quarters over the coming years I think this is an opportunity to dip your feet in or maybe increase your position a little bit lows. Fourth quarter report

Squares Square
A shot in the arm: EU vaccine program struggles to speed up

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 6 d ago

A shot in the arm: EU vaccine program struggles to speed up

"It's been two months since the European union's vaccination program began but the twenty seven nation bloc is still struggling to get up to speed ET design meeting to jump start the process fearing that new virus variants might spread faster than Europe's response in the video conference the leaders will look at ways to improve the rainouts they will as the vaccine makers to respect the terms of the contracts as well as trying to fall straight faxing authorizations as the bloke scrambles to boost its vaccine program France's government spokesman Gabriel lifestyle says something needs to be done soon the number of new Kevin nineteen cases decreased by ten percent last week and increased by nearly ten percent this week the situation is worsening and it is actually worrying I'm Karen Thomas

European Union Gabriel Lifestyle Kevin Nineteen Europe France Karen Thomas
Chicago White Sox star Tim Anderson backs new manager Tony La Russa after 1-on-1 meeting

Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

00:56 sec | 6 d ago

Chicago White Sox star Tim Anderson backs new manager Tony La Russa after 1-on-1 meeting

"So the teams are rolling every wants having calls every day players out and there are still a number of unsigned free agents. How about this one. Scott casimir has agreed to terms with the san francisco giants on a minor league deal. He has not pitched in the big leagues since two thousand sixteen. He's thirty seven years old. They reported this yesterday. What i heard was is that in. His bullpen sessions. Fastball velocity was clocked up to ninety two ninety three miles per hour and you look at kasmir career. Typically you see him Pitch better when he gets his velocity up. That's always been the key. Barometer for him. is his fastball. Velocity a love this from tim anderson. The white sox shortstop met with tony larussa after one on one meeting as you know a lot of people who criticized the white sox for the hiring russa tim. Anderson is invested. His quote was the drive to want to win I'm behind him. A hundred and ten percents

Scott Casimir San Francisco Giants Tony Larussa White Sox Tim Anderson Russa Tim Anderson
State Trends In Employer Premiums And Deductibles

The Hospital Finance Podcast

05:32 min | 6 d ago

State Trends In Employer Premiums And Deductibles

"Recently. The commonwealth fund examined the extent to which people with moderate incomes in employer health plans face high premium and deductible costs relative to their income to discuss the results of the study and the implications for policy holders going forward. I'm joined by sarah collins vice president of healthcare coverage and access at the commonwealth fund. Sarah welcome to the show. Thank you so much. Mike so sarah watches. Start out by telling us why you initiated this study and what you're looking for well employer health coverage is really the backbone of the us health insurance system more than half the population of the united states about one hundred sixty million people get their coverage through an employer so the purpose of this study was to look at trends over the last decade and the amount that workers and their families are paying for their employer health insurance and the size of their deductibles in all fifty states and the district of columbia and we compare these worker cost to median income in each state in order to get a sense of the economic burden of these costs on middle income families. And how did you go about conducting the research. We've been conducting the study nearly every year since twenty ten Using the latest data From what's known as the insurance components. Federal medical medical expenditure panel survey This survey is the most comprehensive national survey of use employer. health plans In twenty nineteen Which is the latest year of data. That's available This survey interviewed more than forty thousand business. Establishments With an overall response rate of fifty nine percent we computed from the survey reported statewide average premiums so we take the premiums reported by business establishments and average them across the state and we do the same deductibles and then we compared those averages to the median income in each state so this provides a rough measure of the affordability protectiveness of employer coverage and allows us to track changes over time. And what did you find after you conducted this study. We found that premium contributions and deductibles in employer plans took up a growing share of workers incomes over the past decade those costs together so premium contributions and deductibles accounted for eleven point five percent of meeting median household income and twenty nineteen. This is up from about nine point one percent a decade earlier the this cost burden in employer. Health plans has increased over the past decade because cumulative growth in median income has been slower growth in premium contributions deductibles. We also find that these contributions premium contributions deductibles as well as needing income vary considerably across the country the total cost of premiums and deductibles across single and family policies ranged from a low of about fifty. Five hundred dollars in hawaii. Too high of more than eighty five hundred dollars in nine states. Meet an income ranged from a low of about forty nine thousand and mississippi in mexico too highs around ninety thousand or more in massachusetts minnesota new hampshire new jersey what workers pay towards their premiums and deductibles comprised about ten percent or more of median income in thirty seven states in two thousand ten and twenty nineteen. This is up from about ten states Twenty ten in nine states workers combined costs were fourteen percent or more of meeting income workers in new mexico and louisiana face the highest potential cost relative to their income more than seventeen percent and we actually also find that people living in states that have lower meeting incomes like new mexico are doubly burdened on average workers in states where the median income is lower than the national median income face higher premiums and deductibles compared to people in states with higher median incomes. Also find that. Many people employer plans across. The country are insured Because their deductibles are high. Relative to their incomes tacoma fund has found that insured people who have high out of pocket costs and deductibles relative to their income are more likely to face problems accessing care or paying medical bills Than people who are not under insured. We've we've defined someone with insurance as under insert at their health plans. Deductibles deductible equals about five percent or more of income or if they're out of pocket costs reached similar thresholds in this study across the country. Many people employer plans are underinsured by this measure average deductibles relative median income or five percent or more in twenty states and ranged as high as seven percent in mexico.

Commonwealth Fund Sarah Collins United States Sarah Mike Columbia New Mexico Hawaii Mississippi New Hampshire Massachusetts
Covid long-haulers turn to Seattle rehab clinic

KUOW Newsroom

04:53 min | 6 d ago

Covid long-haulers turn to Seattle rehab clinic

"The corona virus arrived in the seattle area about a year ago. Some who got cova early on are still suffering. The people who still feel the effects of the disease months after their initial diagnosis are called long. Haulers reporter eilly show. Neil has more now on wear long haulers in the seattle area are turning to for care. Donna lawson is forty seven years old. I met her in the backyard of the house. She shares with her husband and teenage daughter in west seattle. I'm a designer artist. In a mother lawson got code back in march at the very beginning of the pandemic at first it seemed to be a mild case. But then things got worse in. May she was hospitalized for three days with low blood oxygen and when she got home she didn't get better. My legs feel like jello. All the time very very weak on really bad days and bad times. I'm trudging through. Concrete is what it feels like or like their cinderblocks literally on my feet or magnets pulling me to the ground. los and says she can't concentrate a remember things. She's tired all the time and no longer has the energy to make art or volunteer at her daughter's school. She says on a good day she's eighty percent of her old self for a few hours other days. She can't get out of bed. That gets me really choked up. Who knows if. I'll be myself again. I'm usually a pretty confident person. I really love helping people. And i love spreading joy. It's really hard to do that when you don't feel joy about ten percent of people who get covid still have at least one symptom two months after their diagnosis more women than men suffer from. What's being called locking cova. They have a broad range of symptoms from shortness of breath to trouble sleeping or concentrating to depression or anxiety. Lawson was never able to get a cova test because there weren't many available at the beginning of the pandemic so she says throughout her illness. Some doctors haven't believed that her symptoms are due to long cove. It when you have medical professionals poo poo what you're saying you can't help but wonder if you're crazy person. If the reason lawson and other long haulers have struggled to find care is that doctors don't fully understand long cove it yet when they run standard tests on long haulers most results come back negative exact mechanisms yet some of the basic science still pending and that will be helpful for guiding treatments. Aaron bananas a rehab physician at the university of washington's harborview medical center. He says researchers are still trying to figure out exactly what causes long cova loose suspicion that this may be a more of an immunologic response in patients or some of the micro-vascular pox insults that are occurring. Maybe causing some of the brain fog and other words long hunters immune systems could still be an overdrive or maybe their brains are still suffering from being deprived of oxygen pandemic worked with covid patients after they were released from the icu. But over time it became clear. It's not just the patients that have been hospitalized in who are very sick that are having long term symptoms and we're seeing this even in patients who may have been sick at home but now three months later are still struggling. That's why been now started a clinic. At harborview specifically serves cova. Long haulers. It's one of many such clinics that are popping up across the country to clinic. I if you want clinic part. Medical office part gym with treadmills parallel bars and other equipment to help patients build back strength and the ability to walk but now seems to know everyone here here he is. I've been good. How are you handsome every day. Now and his team are experts in rehab medicine. They help patients with their recovery and coordinate their complex care but now says his goal is to help his patients get back to whatever they were doing before they got sick. Got a law in our critical illness. Survivors that yeah. Their their heart is still beating and their breathing but everything that they valued and was meaningful in their life is now lost so i think our hope is that just wanna make sure were addressing getting or covert patients as much life as boston so far. This is the only clinic like this in the region. So it serves patients from oregon alaskan idaho as well as washington but now says at first. There was only a trickle of patients. But now the clinic gets forty new patients every week.

Seattle Cova Donna Lawson Lawson Aaron Bananas Vascular Pox Neil Harborview Medical Center LOS University Of Washington Anxiety Depression ICU Harborview Medical Office Boston Alaskan
Home Depot Reports Good 4th-Quarter and 2020 Numbers

MarketFoolery

02:27 min | Last week

Home Depot Reports Good 4th-Quarter and 2020 Numbers

"Home depot. Fourth quarter profits came in higher than expected but shares falling a little bit today on concerns that twenty twenty one is not going to be a strong home depot is twenty twenty was and i will just point out shares of home depot over the past year even with the drop today shares are up little more like let's call it ten percent maybe eleven percent ten eleven percent. This is not a stock that has shot to the moon in the past year. I'm it's still the same business. They've done an amazing job over the last ten months a managing their business in the wake of the pandemic. I'm i'm not sure why there is at least a little bit of pessimism today about home depot the pessimism if there is some Comes out of what a small amount of guidance the company gave so before addressing that On the numbers you know the cops were up comparable sales at that. Existing stores are up. Twenty four point five percent or total sales up twenty four point five percent and comparable sales were up twenty five percent. So that gives you a sort of level set on. How business did they don't grow a lot of stores at home depot. They they just keep doing a great job. The stores they have not many close nominee open So it's not a growth story through. They expand the size of their stores in many cases with side by side. Lots for Plants and things like that and and things that they can put outside the four walls of the store So growth for the company was about twenty five percent for the year. As you say the stock only went up about eleven percent. Part of that is because the sales growth was More expensive margins contracted because of the increased costs of operating during covid and then the guidances is a little weaker than what people might have been hoping for which is a. They didn't give any guidance. They they said Company said that because of the uncertainty of how things are going to play out They don't feel comfortable giving guidance. But if things look in twenty twenty one on the way they looked at the second half of twenty twenty they think flat to slightly positive comps

Home Depot
U.S. home prices rise 10.1% in December, fastest since 2014

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | Last week

U.S. home prices rise 10.1% in December, fastest since 2014

"U. S. home prices surge at the fastest pace in nearly seven years the S. and P. CoreLogic case Shiller home price index shows prices jumped ten percent in December from a year earlier that's the biggest gain since April twenty fourteen and it follows a strong nine percent year over year gain in November prices have been pushed up by low mortgage rates by Americans moving from crowded urban areas to homes in the suburbs and buy a limited supply of houses on the market and prices have increased throughout the country Phoenix posted the biggest gain at fourteen percent while prices climbed thirteen percent in Seattle my camp in Washington

Phoenix Seattle Washington
Associate Editor at Game Informer Magazine, Kyle Hilliard, on The State Of VR Right Now

Techmeme Ride Home

05:12 min | Last week

Associate Editor at Game Informer Magazine, Kyle Hilliard, on The State Of VR Right Now

"What is the gaming industry and by that. I mostly mean developers. What what does the industry think about developing and just the market is it clearly a sliver compared to other things. But do they think like. It's maybe on the cusp of being something. That is interesting. Yeah so. I don't. I don't have numbers obviously but like so to get into my background and just in case your listeners. Don't really know me. I wrote for game informer magazine for eight years as there for a long time until i was we had like right when right when the oculus rift came out like we had an issue like vr issue. Right and we. I remember getting test kits into the office and playing early games and stuff like that and at that time we kind of went in with the mindset of like okay. Well this is like a new. This dobie xbox. They'll be nintendo and they'll be oculus that's kind of how we felt about it like it would just be this other competitive corner of video gaming and now all this time later which is a. We're going to maybe like four or five. Six years later feel like it has found its spot and like you said like beat sabre. Which is the fantastic i played. I almost literally played every day. I love beat sabre Has sold gangbusters There's like i think facebook released a blog that said something like thought they had five other. Vr titles at it sold a million copies which was cool. And so where we're at now is it's interesting because it's not what i thought it would be. Where would be like just as competitive as like the switch. You know what i mean. It would just be another platform that you know hardcore gamers like me would have in their home but it's increasingly kind of become this like weird separate thing that even non gamers are kind of getting into like i've i'm like i've heard of people have met people who aren't really big video gamers but they do have a headset. And they like vr because it does have kind of like what you were talking about earlier. It has practical applications beyond video games. You know you can kind of around the world and see things. I use it to work out like. That's my main exercise purpose lately as i tried to play oculus like at least once a day for thirty minutes played exercise games and beat because they're very movement centered so it's it's closer to like the mobile market. I feel like we're there's a lot of disparate things floating around that are trying to find their niche as opposed to like someone like me. Who's like i have an xbox series s x. I have a playstation five and i got my oculus rift like that's not super common. It's almost treated as like you know gamers like it but it's not like it's not it's more than a video game machine you know. It's like ninety percent of video game machine but like that ten percent is really lifting it up and people are finding that way. Well so this is gets into my sort of disappointment with what i what is out there. Obviously this would have been one of the times where. Vr should have had its breakthrough moment like a lot of things including video conferencing of had The pandemic times now. There are apps on their from companies. That are clearly the eight even says. It's like we'll use this to remote work with your teams and you can all meet in a space and you know whiteboard together and you know. Even you know sketch things and and in a three d. environment especially frano architects and things like that. I can see that but none of it's very good that i've sampled like i would think there'd be more of that. There's also there's also a handful of things that are like we'll watch a movie with your friends and you go into a virtual Sort of movie theater and by the way. All of the like netflix and and prime video they all have apps that essentially you can watch anything you want on a virtual big screen which is very nice for lying down in bed and stuff. But i'm wondering if like they missed a trick like there is nothing that was like a breakthrough during pandemic times for just being virtually with other people. Yeah right when the pandemic started. I remember i think it was fun. Mation was selling tickets to go. Watch a cure with an audience in oculus and i love cura is like one of my favorite movies and i like we are but even i was like i look at that mike. I want to do that like yeah. The resolution on the headset just isn't there like it's basically like shoving a like a switch. Well let me take them. It's better than a switch screen. It's like it's a higher resolution switch green but like it. Just can't look as good as your desktop for work or your four k tv in your living room. It's just it's like you have to accept that limitation in order to participate like i saw this Which i had never seen until today. Maybe because you are emailing me about vr. Google is like oh let's send this guy. vr ads but it was like it was like. Yeah what will like. Let's let's have a workspace. You can have as many monitors as you want and you can have a virtual keyboard. Obviously it'll be but there'll be a virtual keyboard and it's like that's a really interesting idea. But i'm not gonna take that resolution downgrade in visuals. I'm not going to be able to see that. Virtual computer monitor. As well as i can't if i'm just looking at my standard computer monitor and it's not worth that dive and

Nintendo Facebook Netflix Cura Mike Google
Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen says the unemployment rate "if properly measured" is close to 10%

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

01:42 min | Last week

Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen says the unemployment rate "if properly measured" is close to 10%

"Let me start you with thing. You've been writing about this week. And that six terry of the treasury janet yellen said on cnbc. I believe it was yesterday talking about unemployment and the stimulus package and the need to go big sector. Yellen said look unemployment is probably closer when you really Add things up to ten percent in this economy And i i'd love your take on that because that's not the official number. It's not it's a good bit higher. The official number is six point three percent which works out to about ten million people employed. She's implying it's ten percent which works out to sixteen million people unemployed. So how can she say that. Actually there's some pretty good basis for her to be saying that we know right now that were in the middle of a pandemic and that official six point three percent unemployment number comes from a survey that they do have about sixty thousand households. A lot of people aren't responding to that survey. A lot of people don't actually know if they're unemployed. That might sensitive silly when you think about it. But you know there's so. Many limbo categories. People are on furlough. People are told they may be called back in a month or two. It's it's kind of confusing. But the biggest factor of all the reason that she wants to add more people to the ranks is the problem of women dropping out of the labor force appearance and others to care for kids at home and to care for sick relatives. That's about five million people who have had to do that. Those people's jobs are clearly gone because of the pandemic but they're not counted as officially unemployed. Because you have to be searching for a job in the past month to be part of the official unemployment number

Janet Yellen Yellen Cnbc Treasury Terry
Ethereum Prediction Markets with Joey Krug

Software Engineering Daily

04:52 min | Last week

Ethereum Prediction Markets with Joey Krug

"Joey welcome the show. Thanks for having me. You are the founder of auger which is a decentralized prediction market. What is the function of a prediction market. Yes so a prediction market is basically a platform that lets people bet on or against real world events and by taking the odds of those bats you can basically get a forecast for how likely event is to actually happen and practical functionality. does that serve. Yeah so it does a couple of things one. Is that it for the people who are actually betting on the market. It lets them actually. Just make a straight bet if they're betting on something like a sporting event but it also lets people had risks so as an example which is a fairly real example. Say you're a person who wanted to hedge against the risk that taxes increase a new democratic congress. Well you could basically bet on the democrats and if they win you've hedged a little bit of whatever the tax changes you basically make more money if they win if they lose you. Don't get the tax hike but you also lose your bet. The other uses somebody who has just an opinion. They're not looking to hedge risk. They're looking to take risk on because they believe they know something about the world that someone else doesn't and prediction. Markets have a wide range of things you could bet on. It could be sporting event politics. You know whether it's based extra lunches there next rocket successfully really anything now in order to actually make those bets substantive and to make like if i wanted to make a significant hedge against the incoming tax policy makers i need a lot of liquidity to be able to place that bet against what are the challenges in a prediction market aggregating enough liquidity on either side of a trade. Yes so there's a bunch of challenges with it one is that prior to being blockchain based prediction markets most prediction markets were run and owned by a central company which means they tended to fragment the liquidity you might have a prediction market which focused on say new zealand might have another prediction market which focused on spain separate one for the uk and so on and so forth and so one problem is you had this to quitter fragmentation. the second issue is that just forming. The quality for new events is hard so if you look at something like the stock market it has you know these huge systems in firms and entities exist solely for providing liquidity and. There's a ton of different ways that they can hedge their risk but with a prediction market. You're betting over real-world events and not only that but if you're wrong you hold the risk in the wrong way. You could actually lose all your money. They example this is like you know. Take a presidential election if you bet on trump and trump loses you lose all the money that you bet on him and so for market maker. That's very risky. If you look at say like market making apple stock you know the the worst case scenario is that apple moves a little quickly and you end up holding too many or too few apple shares and you may be lose you know in a in a big move a number of percents though of prediction markets. You know something can swing from a ten percent chance to zero percent chance to one hundred percent chance in a matter of seconds or minutes and so that's what makes marketmaking getting liquidity very difficult before you started augured. There were a number of centralized prediction markets. What are the problems with centralized prediction markets. Yeah so if you look at the problems the centralize prediction markets. There's a couple. There's one problem that you know. Even when i got into the space. I thought it was just a problem in theory. I didn't think it would actually be a problem in practice but it turns out it is a problem in practice. Sometimes as well in that problem is because these things are real world events they have a resolution date some point where the event has to be paid out immediately clear winner in actually sometimes controversy over how it gets declared so that's one problem with a centralized one that in an e centralized system. You could have more community driven process for resolving market and pain out that sort of ensures more people are are happy with the result. So it's less arbitrary in that sense. The other kind of big issue with centralized ones is that they tend to be located in you know one or two jurisdictions or handful jurisdictions. Nobody's really created a global centralize prediction market mostly for the for the reason that the compliance cost of gain licensed in a one hundred eighty countries would just be too much overhead in in too much burden for anyone entity to do it.

Auger Joey Apple Congress New Zealand Spain Donald Trump UK
150 Deals at Age 22 by Putting Relationships Over Profit with Cole Ruud-Johnson

BiggerPockets Real Estate Podcast

04:42 min | Last week

150 Deals at Age 22 by Putting Relationships Over Profit with Cole Ruud-Johnson

"Goal. Welcome to the bigger pockets. Podcast man good to have you in the shed. Thanks for having me on. Manus good to be in person how to marry. Yeah so tell us a little bit about how you got into the wide world of investing. Actually before you do that. how old are you. i'm two and three quarters coming. Twenty-three in okay. So that's that's a very young age and and give us a quick before you got how how you got into real estate. Give us a quick look under standing. What do you do. what's your thing. I like sesame. I want to set the table comparable to know like like what you have right now. Can what your business looks like. And then we'll go into how you got into that. So how in depth. You'll get your just give us a broad overview of your current business so broad overview right now we have an off market direct sell the company and renton washington's way of an office two thousand square feet tales managers guys a whole team and right. Now we're doing ninety percent wholesale so to sell on those deals other investors in ten percent flips. We have three flipped going on right now bound so transitioning into that slowly but still primarily also okay and then tell approximately like much volume in a year. Do you do like the last year. Like what have you. What have you done like what kind of like red zone in the past year We do about six to eight transactions a month in the seattle area so before that we were in four different states that number was higher but right now back down six to eight and just comfy and of the three main counties around seattle so whatever that comes out to seventy eighty deals year. Wow okay. that's crazy. I did like i think three wholesales once in a in a five year period and that was i was impressed with myself. I'm still. let's go into how you got started. How'd you get in your young guy with that. Most people be jealous. Jealous of unwind. Yes oh growing up Grew up in real estate family. So my my great grandma started a brokerage called rude realty which one of the first broken all the seattle are. You d you d okay. Sounds yeah okay. are you d. that was abroad. No i've been practicing your name wrong. The rude we've hung out a number of times we've poker together. Yeah exactly and i called you root rud time just let it slide. Tell people the next time it's back to rhodes. He pronounces a lot of words wrong. But don't feel bad rough instead a roof magazine and stop produce anything on accident so she was kind of the she much my whole family in real estate so then my grandparents they did a lot of commercial stuff in seattle. They own a bunch of buildings. She was an agent and then my mom got in the business. She became an agent In my brother followed her growing up Anytime i wanted to make money or be involved at all. I was you know going with her to open houses but he signs out for the open houses and i was a staging she got a staging company on the side. So i was moving furniture around so it's always around the business in some way so transitioning to when i actually wanted to make make money nationally going real estate license at eighteen nineteen left school after semester and i absolutely hated hated hated or being a residential real estate and switch brokerages three times. Of course it was the brokers those a problem of course. I showed up to every sales meeting that with everyone else. That was not my fault shift. Have you still. I sat on facebook a couple of hours a day. Scrolled through few post. How they cold called my sphere which eighteen or nineteen. Yeah they tell you to cocoa your spirits. You're graduating high school soon. How's that how's that looking. You wanna buy a house yeah so it was brutal It was a was making like a couple hundred bucks a month. Just doing like showings rather agents. And then the third brokerage. I moved to was an off market company where they were doing every tuesday night. They'd bring a bunch of investors and and they they would show them what was going to be coming to auction that week and they'd pretty much done go to auction That's what they're running their company so i learned stats out of the business and how they are creating their own inventory at unlike. That seems like something. I can get behind because people don't care what my ages then eighteen nineteen twenty rather than seattle. Sono miller house. Yeah someone's going on here. Sorry and then couple nights later. Like i've learned about wholesaling. Buddy ra- applebee's semi origin story appetizers. We shared how good there's wings it was until i survived college. Right there and We're on instagram. And this desire to young guys in the area had posted this forty thousand dollar check on her instagram. And so i was like. What are these guys doing of they can do. We can do it kind of thing to the next day. He came to my My parents house is living our parents at the time and Up and they're pretty much. Attic started cold calling end for the next three months before we got a deal. We're just sitting up in that room cocoa every single day.

Seattle Rude Realty Manus Washington Sono Miller Buddy Ra Facebook Applebee
"ten percent" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

03:42 min | 1 year ago

"ten percent" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"Schedule in the bell ten percent a year would discourage new development the fact that the market could real estate into a recession there was another group of witnesses who oppose the bill because it doesn't go far enough Tiffany green testified it should be eliminated completely is really need to be put on hold and have a real conversation president Darrell Clark said the bill was a compromise between those two camps and you do something and you have people on both sides of the equation have some concerns you're probably gonna right thing when you come down the middle to pass the bill as it was introduced and is expected to give final approval at its last session of the term next week at city hall Pat lobe K. Y. W. news radio the Chester County DA's office is filed more charges in connection with security hired the patrol the mariner east pipeline including bribery and related charges against the security director of the company behind the pipeline a wide W. suburban bureau chief Kim no word has that story in August two Pennsylvania constables were charged with wearing their badges and uniforms were working private security along energy transfer partners mariner east pipeline construction energy transfer came out with a statement and said Hey those are not our employees we had nothing to do with that Chester County DA Tom Hogan when in fact once we traced it all back it was clear that it was the director of security for energy transfer Frank rectangle court ordered all of this action action according to Hogan is setting up a scheme to backchannel payments to stay constables according to a twenty three page criminal complaint wreck Nagel caught it energy transfers unwritten policy to exclusively use sheriffs constables or other on duty law enforcement for security or constables can work private security they can not wear their uniform or their badge among the allegations money laundering by using things like private bank accounts to pay security workers in order to hide the fact that they are associated with the energy transfer also charge Nicholas McKinnon Michael Bravo James Murphy and Richard Lester was security firms tigris one raven nights with seven people now charged Hogan says it's not the end of the investigation at the suburban bureau Jamelle worked or whatever you wish radio in energy transfer partners spokeswoman says they find it from lean with the DA would file charges the cheese says they're confident will not stand he says the company will back wrecked Nagel as he seeks the dismissal of the allegations weeks after the widow of slain Philadelphia police officer Danny Faulkner pleaded to the state's highest court to have the district attorney removed from her husband's case D. A. has now responded is K. Y. W. crime and justice reporter Kristin Johannson explains so has the state's Attorney General point by point Larry Krasner refutes each of Maureen Faulkner's claims the state Supreme Court when she asked that the district attorney's office be removed from further involvement in the appeals by the man convicted of killing her husband nearly forty years ago Mumia Abu Jamal has filed several appeals the most recent one was not contested by the DJ appoint me by Faulkner in her filing the cries there says that was a strategic move then was in the best interests of the Faulkner families so as to have the seemingly endless appeals stop he also goes point by point on Faulkner's many alleged conflicts of interest claims one of them for instance argues that a supervisor of the appeals unit Paul George had signed a motion one time for a Jamal cries there says George has no involvement with the case it has been shut out of decisions the state Attorney General filed a motion with the High Court supporting Faulkner's right to be heard and says she has the right to question alleged conflicts of interest Kristin you're Hanson KYW newsradio coming up the federal government's getting involved in the aids epidemic.

forty years ten percent
"ten percent" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"ten percent" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Highly concentrated ten percent or so of your brain by weight the dry weight of your brain is the HA yourselves can't talk to one another your neurons can't function you can make your transmitters once you start to replenish your body with coenzyme Q. ten and with these omega threes certainly if you've been the fishing for a long time you can see changes that you won't even believe and it happens very quickly if like a plant that sitting in the darkness it doesn't have any water you put it into the sun you pour the water ran within hours it goes from its wilted condition to a beautiful upright plan we've seen those types of changes and people just by putting back the necessary ingredients and their health can be transformed fish oil is doing this now for millions of people you've got to get it back this is a great way to do it and you get all the other benefits with the plants their roles your cholesterol coenzyme Q. ten really just a great product something purity very proud of we're proud to give it away for people to try and feed and fell there is no obligation by the way we know that if you try this product you'll want to re order it and you want to take it for a very long time that's how we do this by the way we also put vitamin D. three and this product you would not believe the science that coming out on vitamin D. Pat last time we spoke I was telling you that over the next six months you were going to see reports on vitamin D. three that are just going to blow you away and we've actually put five hundred international units of vitamin D. into this product though it's really actually more than a three in one it's actually foreign one because you get the D. in here too this is a product you're going to want to take every day I mean these are three very important nutrients that you want to continue to take and use to maintain your health your appearance your energy your vitality every area of your health over time call up try it put to the test see for yourself and experience but we called the miracle of fish oil with these other things it's really just a great product and I implore anyone out there who has any issue with occasional fatigue or low energy gore who just wants to take control of their cholesterol safely and naturally this is the product for you now Jeez and talk to me about omega threes in neck and back pain well university of Pittsburgh a couple years ago showing that fish oil can be used as an alternative if they're worried about occasional back pain or neck pain or those sorts of things were joined concerns fish oil shown in this initial study really a pilot study but shown to be highly effective the highlight of that study Pat nine out of ten of the people involved in the study said that they wanted to continue using fish oil after the study ended over eight out of ten reported extremely positive benefits Jesus what do you see the skeptic out there who says what's the catch with the free bottle offer her fist up is is good is this Jason camp claims it is why the given away well because it's so good and I don't know is there anyone out there who doubts that omega three fish oils are going to deliver a whole host the better maybe some members of the flat.

ten percent six months
"ten percent" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

06:15 min | 1 year ago

"ten percent" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"Radio many hours truck driver be allowed to stay behind the wheel you know this does affect everybody you might think that this is just a trucker issues but it's not because when you listen to statistics like this one there were forty six hundred fifty seven large trucks involved in fatal crashes back in two thousand seventeen that's up ten percent from the year before and sixty of the truckers in these accidents were identified as a sleep or feed T. that's according to the N. T. S. B. they call it a form of driver impairment but think about it you're driving on the highway you've got a truck driver who's driving in front of you behind you beside you you name it and now they're dosing off and statistically you know we underestimate just how fast we can how much distance we can cover just by that that little bit of a not ever had your eyes closed and then your head nods in your wake back up that's all it takes that's all it takes to crash that's all it takes to be in an accident so let's pay attention to that this is summertime we're all on the road on some level in the summer time whether you are driving on vacation you're just doing a weekend get away whatever it is it has the potential to affect our best the radar saying that's a whole nother conversation that's all another issue when you think about I do know that it takes a lot for state police to maintain things like the calibration on these radar devices I don't know that it makes me nervous to have local police department hats police department to give them the ability to use radar I don't think that's bothersome to me personally but I do think data along with getting the power local police departments need the resources to make that happen they need the resources to make it work because again you have to stand top of those machines you have to stay on top of the make sure they're accurate and you don't want to end up spending a lot of time in court on behalf of your local police department because every time they stop someone their challenge others argue that this is just a way for them to make money just a way to make more money from speeding tickets and I'm not sure that that's what I believe I think that's kind of a stretch but two things we definitely need to keep an eye on okay so coming up in our next hour what are we gonna talk about well there is a new drug that has the potential to delay type one diabetes the onset of type one diabetes there's research going on over children's hospital we're going to get the latest at that on that this is a this is a big medical story because right now that you know exactly what causes type one diabetes is not necessarily now we do know that it often runs through families and it's often diagnosed in childhood so what happens if you can delay the onset of type one diabetes well we're gonna look into that with a doctor from children's hospital who's been on the front lines of this research to see if this really does have the potential to change the quality of life and then before we're done most people heard this story over the weekend about he Jean Carroll who accused the president of rape and she said in her memoir she tells a story about an incident that she says happened between she and then Donald Trump the entrepreneur that the billionaire not the president that happened back in the nineteen nineties well turns out since she came forward with her accusation there's been a spike once again in calls to national sex assault hotlines why is that do we think that hearing someone else's story makes us more inclined to tell our story you know I got into a very I'm not gonna say he did but let's say a excited conversation with a good friend of mine about why women wait and at the end of the day I I said to him that is such a male perspective because you don't understand why a woman doesn't say anything at the time it happens and the layers of why women don't talk or don't tell early on our deep are complex and I think unless you have been in a position where you could be penalized for telling what happened to you then you can understand why people wait I totally understand they give that it just for a minute and I want to talk to the women women in particular batch it's not exclusive to men how many of us and I say us had an experience that in hindsight we probably should have told we probably should have told someone but we didn't because we were afraid we didn't have we had done something to bring it on we didn't know if they were going to retaliate against us we needed our job we needed this security we needed that there are so many layers as to why women don't come forward but now you hear someone coming forward does that give you the strength the courage to come forward and tell your own story we're gonna talk about that coming up in our next hour as well it is our conversation that is sometimes difficult to have but I know in my own life there are things that and and nothing to this extent nothing that comes close to rate but there are things that happen to me as a child as a young adult that in hindsight now even though I knew right from wrong if I knew then what I know now I absolutely would have come forward and told someone it's twelve fifty five triple.

ten percent
"ten percent" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"ten percent" Discussed on WTVN

"Ten percent deductible may apply expected to pay tax on their social security benefits. They're really shocked when they find that out the often heard that taxes aren't applicable on social security, but finding out all that money. You've been stuffing away in an IRA or 4._0._1._K or these tax deferred accounts. Every dime. You pull out later for that lifestyle money in need. So that you can do the things that you always promise yourself in retirement, all that money coming out of those tax deferred accounts is now taxable in most cases. That's what throws people up in making their social security to be taxed. Yes. So I mean is it just I have to save a little bit more now. Or are there plans that once I hit that retirement? Now, here's the green light. Greg's set plan for me. Well, I'm a big proponent of the Roth IRA, so you have to pay the tax man going into the Roth IRA, but everything grows tax free and everything's tax free when it comes out, and if you're pulling your lifestyle money out of a Roth, guess what? Now that can help you keep your soul. Social security from being taxed. Yeah. So you don't have to worry about how much uncle SAM's gonna take. Here's my number. I know it's going to be solid, and I can live in plan with that. Absolutely. Now, we we want to have a good solid income plan to meet all the needs for today that emergency fund that so important for us to take care of those things that are unexpected then that protected growth account that's going to help us keep pace with inflation over time. It's brilliant because when you're planning for the future, you wanna be able to know what you're dealing with an implant, according to the money, you have that's what Greg and Christner all about legacy retirement group..

Greg Ten percent
"ten percent" Discussed on Almost 30 Podcast

Almost 30 Podcast

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"ten percent" Discussed on Almost 30 Podcast

"Almost thirty or ten percent off first order. In terms of like how people can use this information to navigate like their daily. So I mean on a larger scale where it's in the media, and we can kind of, you know, dissect that, and, you know, understand it on a deeper level. But like how far do you have to go into like the houses and the ruling planets and all of that to really gauge kind of a situation, I think that that if by the time that you're going down that rabbit hole. I mean, you're already on the path to become a minister, Allah assure, you know, I think that on a day-to-day basis for people who, you know, it's not their job to try to interpret and analyze and do all of this stuff. I encourage people to just follow great accounts that can really summarize and explain how these energies are affecting individuals on a day-to-day basis. But of course, the way to find out how they're affecting. You as an individual on your own orbit in your own world is to be familiar with your Natal chart and to understand when the moon is in Capra corn. What's being activated in your chart? Are there other planets that are in Capricorn that are firing off right now? When was the last time they fired off like this into understand? So you can become a millionaire with the your patterns in your own life. Can we get a little refresher of? 'cause I actually have heard few times that I still don't know how to explain of rising moon and Sunshine's your Natal chart your birth chart is a snapshot of the sky at your exact moment of birth. So basically, it's a two dimensional depiction of a three dimensional concept. The sun is where the son was at your moment of birth..

ten percent
"ten percent" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"ten percent" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"A natural substance found in every cell in your body that you need to make cellular energy these three ingredients together provide such a wide array of different benefits try it and see you get to experience what we call the miracle fish oil you should be taking well mega threes a mega threes there called essential fatty acids for a reason they're essential that means your body does not produce use them there like vitamins if you don't get enough vitamin c you get scurvy you don't get enough vitamin d you get rick if you don't have enough dha and epa the two active ingredient in fish oil you open yourself up to a whole list of deficiencies that i covered at the top of the show everything from poor mental function and poor immunity to try skin and fatigue and cardiovascular issues just about every area of health is impacted by these two compounds they are found in every single cell in your body the ha is found in every cell membrane in your body putting your brain where it's highly concentrated ten percent or so of your brain by weight the dry weight of your brain is the ha your cells can't talk to one another your neurons can't function you can't make neurotransmitters once you start to replenish your body with coenzyme q ten and with these omega threes certainly if you've been deficient for a long time you can see changes that you won't even believe and it happens very quickly if like a plant that's sitting in the darkness it doesn't have any water you put it into the sun you pour the water in you know within hours it goes from its wilted condition to a beautiful upright plan we've seen those types of changes and people just by putting back the necessary ingredients and their health can be transformed fish oil is doing this now for millions of people across the united states you've got to get it back this is a great way to do it and you get all the other benefits with the plants they're all sphere cholesterol the coenzyme q ten really just a great product something thirty very proud of we're proud to give it away for people to try and see themselves there is no obligation by the way you can try it and then make a decision we know that if you try this product you'll wanna reorder it and you wanna take it for a very long time that's how we do this give it a shot jason tell people what they get here are these tablets are they capsules what should people expect well they're soft gels you can swallow them that's it you just pay a little bit of shipping and handling the beautiful packet beautiful little soft gel capsules you get the fish oil by the way we also put vitamin d three in this product you would not believe the science that's coming out on vitamin d pat last time we spoke i was telling you that over the next six months you were going to see reports on vitamin d three that are just gonna blow you away but oh man the stuff that's coming out on vitamin d and we've actually put five hundred international units of vitamin d into this product so it's really actually more than a three in one it's actually a foreign one because you get the d in here to this is a product you're gonna wanna take every day i mean these are three very important nutrients that.

ten percent six months
"ten percent" Discussed on Talk 1300 AM

Talk 1300 AM

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"ten percent" Discussed on Talk 1300 AM

"Charge the phones without having to plug it in i mean they're they're working on something who knows what it is another company in the news tesla elon musk came out and said they're going to meet there i think it's a model three yeah model three production limit as he projected and boom the stock was a i think a good ten percent you know i mean there's i've got some economic numbers i mentioned to you that i had not i never even place that we never had a time period where we had more jobs than we have people looking for jobs and we've now had that back to back months and i'm going to tell you this is the easiest way to tell we have fallen point wherever you go the services getting worse and worse and worse on your own you know the you know in that's making it a little bit easier for people to jump ship i don't want to say that people are doing that from company to company i think you've got if you take the positive and the negative from these reports there's more jobs than there are career so the the quality of the jobs may not be there but that's also technology changing the way things are done i just had i think there's a local farm that's the first farm that was fertilized by drone you know and that's that's that's taking away well somebody's got fly that drone don't get me wrong but the golf course that i belong to we put a neuter gatien system in about i think it was three or four years ago and instead of riding around on a cart and opening this valve and opening matt valve the superintendent controls every the whole course from an ipad so there's productivity replacing labor dome but we the economy's looking.

musk superintendent golf ten percent four years
"ten percent" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"ten percent" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To engage when you see recidivism you are required to because you are safer and you have the energy to it is every time that a person of color interacts enter decides to take on some they are risking something because they're already engaging someone who thinks less of their humanity in a system that thinks less of their humanity so if someone says something racist to me on the office i'm not risking just having someone think i'm you know no fine and not talking to me anymore i'm risking my shop if i engage with people on the internet and they say something and i challenged them on it i have been threatened i have had people some letters to people i work for trying to remove my income i've had people try to search for my home address and i see plenty of white people who engage in nothing you know maybe it'll be called a name maybe they'll lose a friend but losing a friend as a person of color engaging racism is probably a best case scenario when this happens and so i think it's really important that we understand we're not gonna have the same job we're not gonna have the same role and it's important understand that every one of these conversations takes a lot out of people of color not only because we are engaging in a topic that is activating our own trauma and usually we're doing it at a time of trauma but also because as minorities you may you may as a white person see a racist act once a month but when your ten percent of the population you're going to see it every day and half that time it's going to be against you and i think it's important people understand that entire burden and what that's like and so we have to engage some of us get to choose some of us don't and we have to i think people of color i would say if giving advice you do what you need to do for your humanity which means that someday you're just going to be like when you're going to be like i need to just get home i can't engage this right now i have to get home and then there will be times where you're seeing myself love or my love for community are my need for safety means i'm going to have this.

ten percent
"ten percent" Discussed on TalkRadio 1370AM

TalkRadio 1370AM

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"ten percent" Discussed on TalkRadio 1370AM

"Right i got that forty seven i got to read okay so you don't wanna lose that ten percent match that's free money that that is better than a roth so i'm gonna put that ten percent and get that ten percent match and that's in the four zero three b mandatory ten percent by the way i have no that anyway okay that's awesome all right well then the the the four fifty seven cannot have a match it does not have a match and so i would do roth before i did four fifty seven okay reasoning the reasoning i was using earlier and then when you break through you know the get the house paid off and you wanna put even more into something then you can maybe look at max after you've maxed out your roth are you married okay all right so you can put fifty five hundred and you know you put fifty five hundred into a roth you you know you do your ten percent if you want to put some more and you can put more in the in the four zero three b and just keep going there if you were to get married you can do another fifty five hundred into that roth into her roth that kind of thing and then you can max out that four fifty seven but that's all after you get the house paid off until then we're gonna maximum contribution by be step four fifteen.

roth ten percent
"ten percent" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"ten percent" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"It and see you get to experience what we call the miracle fish oil you should be taking or mega threes omega threes there called essential fatty acids for a reason they're essential that means your body does not produce use them they're like vitamins if you don't get enough vitamin c you get scurvy you don't get enough vitamin d you get rick if you don't have enough dha and epa the two active ingredients and fish oil you open yourself up to a whole list of deficiencies that i covered at the top of the show everything from poor mental function and poor immunity to try skin and not and cardiovascular issues just about every area of health is impacted by these compounds they are found in every single cell in your body the ha is found in every cell membrane in your body hooting your brain where it's highly concentrated ten percent or so of your brain by weight the dry weight of your brain is the ha your cells can't talk to one another your neurons can't function you can't make neurotransmitters once you start to replenish your body with coenzyme q ten and with these omega threes certainly if you've been deficient for a long time you can see changes that you won't even believe and it happens very quickly it's like a plant that's sitting in the darkness it doesn't have any water you put it into the sun you pour the water in you know within hours it goes from its wilted condition to a beautiful upright plan we've seen those types of changes and people just by putting back the necessary ingredients and their health can be transformed fish oil is doing this now for millions of people across the united states you've got to get it back this is a great way to do it and you get all the other benefits with the plant sterols for your cholesterol coenzyme q ten really just a great product something thirty very proud of we're proud to give it away for people to.

united states rick ten percent
"ten percent" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

The Adam Carolla Show

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"ten percent" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

"In today's connected world just takes one weak link for criminals to get in steal your identity and then you're kaput as my grandfather used to say back in the day new lifelock identity protection adds norton security to help protect against threats to your identity and your devices that you can't see or fix on your own protect yourself people it's two thousand eighteen you're online you're looking at those goulash no kettle and chicken popper kosh recipes and meanwhile this hacks in china and russia or getting into your supply man they're going to find out your identity and you can't unring that bell look if there is a problem there won't be but there is one there have agents that will work to fix it now the best there lifelock dawson no one can solve every cyber threat proventil identity theft or monitor transactions at that this is the new lifelock with norton security is able to uncover reggie might otherwise west go to lifelock dot com or call one eight hundred lifelock and use promo code adam for an additional ten percent off your first year promo code adam for international ten percent off all right so so basically this seems like a pretty freaking easy recipe of the dumpling recipe just go down a little bit thank you it's just a us combining eggs and sour cream salt your whisking that together and then yeah a little our after that and then you just wanna apparently consistency of thick pancake batter and then using a spoon dipped in hot water you just scrape the mixture into the pot of boiling water you use like mandolin or something right the.

china russia lifelock reggie norton ten percent
"ten percent" Discussed on The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"ten percent" Discussed on The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

"Monitor transactions at all businesses but new lifelock with their insecurities able to uncover threats you might otherwise miss go to lifelock dot com or call one eight hundred lifelock and use promo code adam for digital ten percent of your first year that promo code adam for an additional ten percent off and seeing jordan harbinger who's sitting in here just now reminds me that dr podcast is now being released on tuesdays everybody tuesdays instead of mondays from now on tuesdays i apologize if there's any confusion on that good see jordan and get to be here the jordan harmed your show up says every week on tens right mike come on tuesday thursday friday you're awesome you're clairvoyant exactly good see you look you look happy you look together you look faking his best i can just like everybody else well let's talk about that because earlier in the week drew funke fide a little came in here yeah it's dragging a little bit i realized there's there's i feel like information is your best friend but too much information can just kick your ass and we're living in time when there's information flying at us and instead of ducking we're opening our mouth and flying before we get it also want to say that in terms of my funk of occasion the creasing magnanimity that adam has been exhibiting and good good spirit has been so unsettled that is turned me a little bit more negative i'm getting us on top of feeling shitty but you're was.

lifelock jordan mike ten percent
"ten percent" Discussed on A Moment of Science

A Moment of Science

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"ten percent" Discussed on A Moment of Science

"None of us really liked growing older is possible that scientists will ever be able to slow or stop the aging process. While dime, scientists are trying to learn more about aging to find out whether such things are possible. An international team of researchers reported important breakthrough in two thousand seventeen for the first time ever. They found a human genetic mutation that protects against some of the biological effects of aging by studying an Amish community in Indiana. I'm not surprised that this discovery was made in an Amish group geneticist liked to stood of the Amish because they don't intermarry with outsiders and keep excellent genealogical records. But how do they find the gene? Their research is studied one hundred seventy seven Amish and found forty three with a mutation in a gene called serpine. One people who had this mutation paired with an unlike gene had lower. Levels of diabetes better cardiovascular health and longer Teela Amir's Attila mirror is a region at the end of each chromosome, which protects it from deterioration and shortens with age people with the mutation on average live ten percent longer than those without. Could this help people who aren't looking to have this mutation? Yes, it could. The Amish with the mutation have very low levels of a protein called plasminogen activation inhibitor, which is related to cellular aging. Doctors occurrence testing an oral drug that blocks the same protein to see whether it has the same beneficial effects as the mutation Sean closer to doing something about aging. Then I thought it was this moment of science comes from Indiana University. We're on the web as a moment of science dot org. I'm Don glass and I'm y'all Cassandra.

Don glass Indiana Teela Amir Indiana University Sean Cassandra ten percent
"ten percent" Discussed on The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"ten percent" Discussed on The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

"Transactions at all businesses but new lifelock with scared his able to uncover threats you might otherwise miss go to lifelock dot com or call one eight hundred lifelock use that promo code adam for additional ten percent off your first year that is promo code adam for an additional ten percent off the first year my nose stuffy from crying laughing i forgot about the monkey drinking the wind dak making sweet love the sex scenes are little much man just hosted the kademi wars it's so funny oh my god show is funny all right i want to play some more stuff but paul forty four minnesota i adam i do going on man i don't know i've talked to you guys i will before so yeah oh yeah and i'm having trouble with my drinking stuff like that and i've been i have a new psychotherapist i'll cool with my family doctor good and he wants me to well right now i'm taking joke called gab a pen okay what is that it's a actually a seizure medicine but it acts at the same site as valium until it has semantics iety some withdrawal properties to it so acts at the same site the same color yeah chloride receptor on the brain cells it doesn't doesn't make be all tired and stuff i still work in the united but after i have to be f l hall for a week in that he wants a puppy on drug called antabuse.

lifelock paul ten percent
"ten percent" Discussed on WLOB

WLOB

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"ten percent" Discussed on WLOB

"An additional ten percent off your first year one hundred point five greater portland's new fm hey we're back geraldo or the name of his book is awesome i it is there's a great name to the arado shell geraldo rivera memoir and there you are sitting that you told me as tora bora with with a broken down tank in the background so why was it important for you to write this portion of your life fading from memory because the troop involvement is so much smaller than it was during the you know the peak years from two thousand one when the united states with its its righteous rage when after the people who had caused so much misery and death here until about two thousand twelve when we started really reducing dramatically afghanistan we thought iraq was over in afghanistan was was fading president obama called isis the jv team so all that entire decade plus was was fading from memory and it was such a vivid and important historical moment not just for the country but obviously for this correspondent and it affected my life and my family's life so profoundly i wanted to really memo memorialize it before it just became forgotten history so let me ask you as much as you you became a star young to me would stands out most is your teamwork attitude and the thing that also stands out for me is when i talked to people that work with you whether they're freelancers or your guys you treat everyone with such respect was it hard to ground yourself as you became so famous and successful and realize that's where i came from on gonna change and you go through a period where you weren't like that because that's the only geraldo i know.

portland tora bora united states iraq obama geraldo rivera afghanistan president ten percent
"ten percent" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

KBNP AM 1410

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"ten percent" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

"You a question here why would you be nervous over a stock market i mean other than maybe the you know if he had a fifty six percent decline in in in value that's going to have reverberations throughout the economy and i understand that and that's not a good thing however would you be nervous about a uh an impending ten percent decline twenty percent line if you are a stock trader that can be a problem how somebody who's who's going in and out jumping in and out of the market somebody who's gambling or if you need to rely on yet principle for your income or ca distribution needs between now and win it however long it takes to recover that's a problem you mean if you have a portfolio that ric choirs you to take an income in other words sell stocks in order to live for the negev rod curies it takes you know the talk about a balanced portfolio just living off the entrance will whether if the interest is enough kgb balanced portfolio jim generally the interest that's being generated by the forty or fifty percent it's in bonds is not enough to live off a so you are selling some securities at the same time able to create your cash distribution yeah if you're doing that during a at a time where the market is going down it doesn't even require a two thousand eight to two thousand nine downturn two really screw up your financial life ten percent if you are selling something when it's down here in trouble that you are so here's my question what if i have seen my income needs all set for the next i don't know what's call it seven eight years i have themselves how well judging by that i'm going to be taking them from accounts that have sort of been set it out in ocoee late in many ways that even if the market took a ninety percent dive well that's a lot all right let's let's but fifty six percent if if if it did it if we had two thousand eight two thousand nine all over again no matter murata.

stock market fifty six percent ten percent seven eight years ninety percent twenty percent fifty percent
"ten percent" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"ten percent" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"An end this you know a sensibly if you if you listen to the government's discourse what they're saying is that and this has been a talking point for for quite some time now with the idea that france has is high unemployment rate which is treat route ten percent which is higher than than bins medics neighbors uh idea is that france's unemployment rate basically is you know flows directly from though is from the fact that they're out there's too much labour regulation and unions have too much power and that's the kind of equation here that they're making and therefore in order to really address this unemployment crisis we need to basically eliminate regulations that gives the unions too much power eliminate protections that um ensure people can't get laid off without cause and that's kind of that logic the logic that's at play here and there's you know needless to say there's a whole bunch of debate over the tie between unemployment and labour regulation is is really that significant in the first place but basically the reforms that are there being unveiled right now and they've already been approved still need to be ratified by parliament but what they boil i knew is basically eliminating making it easier for companies to lay workers off delay people off and basically removing the power of the unions to collectively bargain um and number of circumstances we don't know we can cook civics if you like it can get it can get uh kind of in uh in the my new ship pretty quickly but.

france unemployment rate ten percent