35 Burst results for "tele"

How One California Community Protected Itself From Forest Fires

Environment: NPR

01:57 min | Last month

How One California Community Protected Itself From Forest Fires

"In the foothills of california's sierra nevada mountains sits rock haven. It's a small private holding a forest of cedar fir and pine trees and for years. It was a ticking fire time bomb as throughout the west natural fire had been suppressed for a century. We had it rough even six times as much fuel on the ground as the average for california where you could imagine. That's a tele of the stuff that can burn. Jennifer lives in the east bay. She's the fourth generation of her family to use a cabin near shaver lake and is part of the association that collectively owns the land. She and her husband worked hard to convince everyone else. They had to do something about fire risk. We've been talking for members for you know maybe almost twenty years but many of the families were reluctant a century ago. A lumber company cut most of the trees in the area. When the forest came back people loved the trees and wanted to protect them. The idea that it was good to cut crowded trees and set prescribed. Fires was a non-starter we had ruled in our association. With you better tree and you know tweezers take it and blah blah. but by twenty fourteen. There was a new threat during a punishing drought bark. Beetles began killing entire stands of trees making the fire risk. Even worse mu white finally convinced her neighbors to hire a forester julianne stewart. Told them taking action was urgent. So it was really neat process and kind of bringing dot group of people together to realize like we're on the precipice we have an emergency. Our trees are dying. We need to do something. People compromised and made a plan then came the question of money. We'd never would've been able to pay for it all of that. In a timely manner can run up to five thousand dollars an acre to clean up recover and maintain a forest. That would mean about a million dollars for rock

Rock Haven Sierra Nevada Mountains California Shaver Lake East Bay Mu White Jennifer Julianne Stewart
How One California Community Protected Itself From Forest Fires

Environment: NPR

01:57 min | Last month

How One California Community Protected Itself From Forest Fires

"In the foothills of california's sierra nevada mountains sits rock haven. It's a small private holding a forest of cedar fir and pine trees and for years. It was a ticking fire time bomb as throughout the west natural fire had been suppressed for a century. We had it rough even six times as much fuel on the ground as the average for california where you could imagine. That's a tele of the stuff that can burn. Jennifer lives in the east bay. She's the fourth generation of her family to use a cabin near shaver lake and is part of the association that collectively owns the land. She and her husband worked hard to convince everyone else. They had to do something about fire risk. We've been talking for members for you know maybe almost twenty years but many of the families were reluctant a century ago. A lumber company cut most of the trees in the area. When the forest came back people loved the trees and wanted to protect them. The idea that it was good to cut crowded trees and set prescribed. Fires was a non-starter we had ruled in our association. With you better tree and you know tweezers take it and blah blah. but by twenty fourteen. There was a new threat during a punishing drought bark. Beetles began killing entire stands of trees making the fire risk. Even worse mu white finally convinced her neighbors to hire a forester julianne stewart. Told them taking action was urgent. So it was really neat process and kind of bringing dot group of people together to realize like we're on the precipice we have an emergency. Our trees are dying. We need to do something. People compromised and made a plan then came the question of money. We'd never would've been able to pay for it all of that. In a timely manner can run up to five thousand dollars an acre to clean up recover and maintain a forest. That would mean about a million dollars for rock

Rock Haven Sierra Nevada Mountains California Shaver Lake East Bay Mu White Jennifer Julianne Stewart
Why Only Engineering ? Is there world outside it? - burst 3

Sadharan Baatein

45:08 min | 2 months ago

Why Only Engineering ? Is there world outside it? - burst 3

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US Agency Says Women Can Get Abortion Pill Via Telemedicine

Fresh Air

01:00 min | 2 months ago

US Agency Says Women Can Get Abortion Pill Via Telemedicine

"As the pandemic continues, the administration is allowing access to an abortion pill via tele medicine. That's a reversal of the Trump administration's policy. NPR's Sarah McCammon reports. Medical groups have been working for years to ease restrictions to the drug. And they've argued that Bring the pandemic in person. Pick up exposes patients two additional risk. The abortion pill Myth of Preston has been heavily regulated by the Food and Drug Administration since it was approved more than 20 years ago. Normally, patients have to pick up the medication at hospitals or other medical facilities. Several medical groups, including the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists oppose in person dispensing requirements as unnecessary for patient safety. Last year, the group briefly succeeded in persuading a federal court to block the rules during the pandemic. But in January, the Supreme Court allowed the Trump administration to reinstate them. Under Biden. The FDA says it will allow patients seeking abortions during the pandemic to see doctors through telemedicine and received the abortion pill through the mail. Sarah McCammon. NPR

Trump Administration Sarah Mccammon NPR FDA Preston American College Of Obstetrici Supreme Court Biden
Micro Four Thirds: Should I Stay or Should I Go?

The Digital Story

01:59 min | 2 months ago

Micro Four Thirds: Should I Stay or Should I Go?

"So this is an interesting decision for me. And i've gone over the pros and cons and let's start with why. I like microphone thirds in the first place. Now we've covered this extensively. I'm just gonna do a bullet list of top of mind. Things that really jumped out at me when i pickup a microphone thirds camera and the first thing that i think of these days. Is this fantastic lens. Catalog that you get with microphone thirds. I mean my gosh. You can get everything from an ultra super telephoto that you can handhold right to an ultra compact prime lens. That is barely bigger than the camera body itself. And i can find just the right thing that i want in the microphone thirds mount. And it's interesting. When i look at the lenses that i have for microphone third. They do fall into these two categories. I have my big lenses. My favorite big lands is the olympics. Forty two one fifty two eight pro. I just absolutely love that lands. I think it is a fantastic design the performances wonderful. And if you put the matched two x tele converter on it you go from eighty to three hundred which is really one sixty six hundred in field view equivalency all that and i cannot tell losing a pixel worth a quality by using the wwre so i mean in the big lens category for me. That is my sweet spot but there are other optics. And i actually put my seventy five millimeter. F one eight in the big lance Category because it is especially when you have the metal the matched metal lens hood on it. It's a heavy lands. It's relatively big lens and it's a sweet lands

Olympics
U.S. suicides dropped last year, defying pandemic expectations

The Gee and Ursula Show

00:45 sec | 2 months ago

U.S. suicides dropped last year, defying pandemic expectations

"A toll on mental health G. So this may come as a surprise to everyone. The number of U. S suicides fell nearly 6% last year that is actually the largest drop in at least four decades. This is according to preliminary government numbers. It's hard to say exactly why suicide deaths dropped so much last year, but some are saying that maybe it's an increase in the availability of tele health services and mental health screenings. And some experts is suggesting another factor. Maybe because of the heroism phase, something that you see in the early stages of wars and national disasters where Everyone bands together and expresses support that we're all in this together. You think that's there's something to that?

"tele" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:40 min | 3 months ago

"tele" Discussed on WTOP

"Tele bankrate dot com survey The situation had a positive impact on their overall money situation. Just 18% say it's had a negative impact. 23% of moms say remote learning had a negative impact on family finances. Just 13% of dads say the same. We've heard a lot about the downsides of remote learning, but 43% of parents of remote learners tell the sir Made the experience has had a positive effect on their child's education. 33% say it had a negative effect. Bruce Allen w T. O P News 3 42 New York lawmaker accused of sexual misconduct, says he won't run for political office Again Republican Congressman Tom Reed as apologized to a woman who accused him of sexual misconduct. It comes after Nikola Davis told The Washington Post read inappropriately touched her. At a Minneapolis bar in 2017. Reid says he'll retire from politics and 2023. He had been considering a run against Democratic New York Governor Andrew Cuomo also accused of sexual misconduct. Steve Dorsey CBS NEWS Washington 3 42, Shrek. The musical comes to Colombia tomorrow as we hear from w. T. O P entertainment editor Jason Fraley It marks a return to life theater at Toby's Dinner theater, its track. Everyone's favorite ogre, embarking on a life changing journey alongside a wisecracking donkey, a feisty princess, the vibrant, hysterical and very heartfelt musical like No other director, Mark Minute cast Russell Sunday as the giant green ogre. There's just really great dynamic lyrics and good strong pop rock contemporary score. Founder Toby Orenstein says. The visuals are dazzling. It's like you are watching magic in front of you in that circular space. All these characters Come to life Dinner will be served to your table with the choice of chicken, salmon or prime rib. Jason Fraley wt Happy news. Coming up in sports. It's March Madness. Monday. We'll get you the latest on the scores so far today on the men and the women side and the N B. A is mourning the passing of a legend. It's 3 44. Hi, I'm Dr Ebony Haskins. I'm a gynecologic oncologist at Medstar Washington Hospital Center. I've seen firsthand how devastating covert 19 can be. So the decision to get vaccinated was an easy one for me. I knew the vaccine was the best chance I had to protect myself, my family and the patients I care for on a daily basis. 2020 was a tough year. But there's light at the end of the tunnel. Once enough people get vaccinated. We can go back to doing all the things that we may have taken for. Granted. I strongly encourage you to get vaccinated as soon as.

Steve Dorsey Nikola Davis Bruce Allen 2017 Jason Fraley Reid 43% Ebony Haskins 2023 23% 33% Colombia Tom Reed Monday 2020 Medstar Washington Hospital Ce Mark Minute w. T. O P today New York
Pandemic Provides an Opportunity To Tackle Problems in Mental Healthcare

C-SPAN Programming

02:36 min | 3 months ago

Pandemic Provides an Opportunity To Tackle Problems in Mental Healthcare

"I think that the Kobe pandemic is an opportunity. I think that there is the possibility to leverage this pandemic and these global stressors that are giving many Pete For their first onset psychiatric disorder and exacerbating pre existing psychiatric disorders and two said we need to make changes in prioritizing mental health care, developing mental health, tele therapy devising software and smartphone applications to monitor and surveil our loved ones to make sure that they're safe and that we can understand what point they're not. I think that we need multi disciplinary teams in hospitals and clinics so that mental health isn't separated from other forms of health. And I think we need to pay attention to the mental health care of people who are isolated and that much more risk for mental illness than others. The elderly undocumented immigrants, people who are experiencing homelessness. I think that coded actually does provide An opportunity to try and make some big advances. And I wouldn't say that without the knowledge of history at the end of World War two my grandfather recognized along with other people that there had been many more cases of mental illness or psychiatric casualties, as they were called in World War two than anybody expected that normal people became sick in abnormal circumstance and Truman to his credit leverage that, he said. We're going to take this opportunity now to change things, and he established the National Institute of Mental Health precisely because of the war. He then ordered the military to adapt its manual of mental disorders called Medical two or three to become something that would eventually be GSM different title. Exactly. GSM universities enhanced and built psychology departments and clinical psychology programs and medical schools build new residencies. This was a huge burst of a real shot in the arm for for mental health care and mental health research because of this global crisis that said two people to be stressed is not a bad thing. It is normal in a way, and I think we could do that with this pandemic as well. Anthropology Professor Roy Richard

Pete National Institute Of Mental H Truman Roy Richard
New York House Democrats call on Cuomo to resign

Fresh Air

00:55 sec | 3 months ago

New York House Democrats call on Cuomo to resign

"As sexual misconduct allegations Mount, the governor of New York is defying calls from members of his own party to step down. I'm not going to resign. I was not elected by the politicians. I was elected by the people Democrat Andrew Cuomo in a tele briefing today, reacting to calls from two high profile lawmakers from estate U. S representatives Jerry Nadler and Alexandria Ocasio Cortez. They've joined a majority of state lawmakers in calling for Cuomo's resignation after six women, including former staffers alleged the governor had sexually harassed or assaulted them. Politicians. Who don't know what single fact. Yet form a conclusion and then opinion Are, in my opinion, reckless and dangerous. Cuomo denies the sexual misconduct

Jerry Nadler Alexandria Ocasio Cortez Andrew Cuomo Mount New York Cuomo
The mental health impacts of the pandemic one year later

Closer Look

04:40 min | 3 months ago

The mental health impacts of the pandemic one year later

"In September of last year, I spoke with a group of college journalists. For conversation about what? It was like reporting on the pandemic while they're in school, and I asked this question Let me ask you all this because not only as students, but as student journalists. Are there any story angles that perhaps we're missing right now, as relates to the college experience and what college students are dealing with. If so, tell me what it is. I feel like the mental aspect of things. This is such a new experience for everyone. Everything we're doing is the first time whether it's being full virtual. Hang on campus with certain restrictions. So I feel like, although we do talk about in like the mainstream media was going on our students going back on campus, I guess just like the process. Into school. I don't think the story of what the students are thinking or what happens when you get back on campus, or how's this virtual experience going on? I don't feel like that conversation's being had Enough about Okay. What do we think about this In terms of our mental space? I think one major thing that I've noticed is student mental health both on and off campus. You've got freshman on campus who are having a severely diminished experience. They're not getting to go to in person events. Things as simple is the dining hall or the gym are closed or have limited access. And so a lot of students are being very adversely impacted by Kevin 19 on a mental level because they feel isolated, or they're overwhelmed. In terms of having to deal with pandemic on top of normal school work, And then you've got universities all over the country, sort of acting like everything is normal. A lot of universities didn't adjust tuition. They didn't account for certain things such as, like students not being able to work jobs because they can't physically go into those spaces. And so I think students our overall lot more stressed than they would be. So I think that's definitely something that larger news media could be touching on is the adverse impacts on students mental health as a result of this virus. Well response to all this. Many colleges and institutions of higher learning are working to expand mental health resource is for students and joining me now to talk more about this is Teresa Johnston, She's assistant vice president for student affairs at Kennesaw State University. And she oversees a new initiative. Call Well being at K S U. Thank you so much, Miss Johnston for taking the time. I really appreciate it. You for having me I really appreciate the opportunity to be here. Your overall thoughts on what you just heard from those students, and that was just last September. No, My overall thoughts are there. The impact is staggering of covered 19 certainly on our population or student population and the challenge for students right to go having been in a physical environment than switching over a very rapidly right to a virtual Ethos. And so there has been some fall out for sure, To the extent that students had to adjust. Certainly to the technology alone, faculty and staff had to deal with technology of well as well. And then how do we connect students again in a virtual environment? Because much as we know that our student population are young adults, and even our younger generations are connected to technology. It's a very different experience to be in a box and Talk online versus being in the classroom with each other. So you know, we have seen. Excuse me. We have seen some increase in anxiety. I think the isolation is a big part of it. And helping students stay connected even in the virtual environment, leaving their video screens on right, leaving, leaving the video wander by just turning off it just listening, and hopefully there listening, so I do think that there is a very big impact. What were you all have been hearing at Kennesaw State in regards for students. Did you see an increase in students trying to seek additional resource is what has it been up to You all launching this new initiative? So for us, we have seen an increase in students participating online in workshops and group therapy, which has been interest and increase. Certainly in Tele mental health. We were Stepped right into the tele mental health field as we've had to expand those services for students and be available S O. The students found their way much of advertising and outreach to students. But they did find their way into the virtual environment for Tele mental health as well and the increase in the participation interestingly enough in group is greater than it had been prior. What do you think It's feel comfortable in the environment differently than potentially those of us who practice in the field? So very interesting.

Teresa Johnston Miss Johnston Kennesaw State Kevin Tele
Microsoft unveils Mesh, and dives into mixed reality

Daily Tech News Show

01:58 min | 3 months ago

Microsoft unveils Mesh, and dives into mixed reality

"Microsoft also released to reporters from their. Nda's to talk about something called microsoft mesh. It's microsoft system for virtual tele presence being demonstrated on hollow lens but meant to work with whatever mixed reality headset. You're wearing microsoft. Wants all the people including to work with this avatars in microsoft mess are mostly cartoons. But you can scan yourself to become something. Microsoft is calling a hollow something that microsoft technical fellow alex kitman actually showed up at the nineteen early versions of mesh. Were used by diplo at burning man's virtual event if you remember that niantic is working on using mesh for polk mongo where people were headsets out in the real world could have they're poking on battles in the real world cirque du soleil founder a guy labor labor day is developing virtual immersive theater spaces with the hanae world project. So you wouldn't have to be at the theater to be able to experience the theatrical production james cameron's xs using it for people to experience three d maps of what deep divers are discovering on the ocean floor so people can be up in an office on the boat and see what the probe or the divers are seeing down on the floor. Essentially this is microsoft's played to be the platform for collaborative mixed reality. All of ignite was conducted on microsoft. Mesh if you had the right equipment you could access it that way all space. vr apps. We'll get an upgrade to support. Mash and a preview app is coming to hollow lens. Those are the first two ways you'll be able to see it but it's also planned to come to teams and dynamics three sixty five developer tools are expected in the coming months for that third party integration that they're hoping to get But this is a very robust platform has a lot of promise proofs always in the pudding when you get people actually working on it. How well it actually works and what people use it for but microsoft really smart making an early play to say. Yeah we got hololens but we want to be the platform that everybody

Microsoft Alex Kitman Polk Mongo NDA Du Soleil James Cameron
Cathie Wood Making Stock Picking Popular

Odd Lots

04:50 min | 4 months ago

Cathie Wood Making Stock Picking Popular

"So tracy here's something that i never thought i would see again so i i started following markets in the late nineties The dot com era and something that i never thought i would see again in my career after that ended was the superstar fund manager. Okay why is that. Well the actually totally true. What i mean is more the superstar stock picker because of course back. In the old days there are a lot of like star stock stock pickers fund managers. You know Peter lynch comes to mind some of the other tech investors back then but these days with et fs with online brokerages that make it really easy for individuals to buy stocks on their own. It really sort of seemed to me like that era had gone bright so i suppose there was this idea that the time of stock picking has come and gone and that if you want to make returns in the market you should just poor all your money into something like an s. and p. five hundred. Etf like a vs tax or something like that and just stick with it and don't bother trying to outperform the market because over a longer period of time. Even the best stock pickers had eventually underperformed. Right i think this mantra of don't try to pick stocks. A if you try to pick stocks. You're probably going to underperform the index and be if you come across a mutual fund or a fund manager. Who's good at picking stocks. Oh it's probably just luck it's not going to last too. You know even if even if there is someone who can beat the market. How are you going to know whether it's actually worth putting your money with them until like this idea that everyone should just index Trying to beat the market is kind of a lose lose proposition. It's really been drilled into people's heads. And i think like you know for years. They're really we just haven't had a sort of another new peter lynch or buffet. There's star quantum maybe some bond fund managers who are known but the idea of like someone who is just really associated with a great track record of picking individual stocks. Hasn't been a thing for a while and yet and yet a star stock picker emerges over the horizon. Yeah executive obviously that really That for the first time in a long time there is currently a fund manager a stock picker who is a mess and incredible track record an incredible following. And of course. We're talking about kathy. Would she is the ceo and chief. Investment officer of arc invest and there is a total fascination with our and this family of actively traded. Etf a phenomenally well in terms of returns but also ex Attracted an extraordinary amount of investor cash in the last couple of years right so the arche t fs. I mean i'm looking at their performance. They have five different semantic portfolios alone. Ch- that have basically doubled over the past year. Which is pretty amazing if you think about it. It's amazing enough for just one stock to double in price like that in just the space of twelve months but to do it across multiple is really remarkable and i think within their actual portfolio. There's a tiny tiny number of stocks that haven't risen recently. And i'm not even sure there are any actually. It's a really amazing. Performance is really sure to actually. I'm looking at the end of twenty twenty for twenty twenty their performance of a r k. Which is the sort of flagship innovation. Etf that arc has was up one hundred fifty two percent for the year Extraordinary returns and if you look at the holdings they're just all of the companies that have absolutely killed it in the real environment. Tesla is the biggest one but other names square. The payments company phenomenal roku huge winner. Zillow spotify tele doc. Which of course had an incredible year. Thanks to the rise of rome medicine and so forth so it is a Just extraordinary number of winners that this There's a fund and the related funds. There's a related fund for finance and Medicine that have That they've brought it. Just the triggers incredible. If anyone follows. Eric balchunas who's sort of bloomberg intelligence is etf analyst. I feel like three quarters of his tweets. These days are just about. How extraordinary this Family of funds and the performance of arc invest has been lately.

Peter Lynch Tracy Kathy Tesla Zillow Eric Balchunas Rome Bloomberg
CTU Reports ‘Tentative Agreements’ With Chicago Public Schools In Four Areas As Reopening Negotiations Continue

WGN Showcase

00:42 sec | 4 months ago

CTU Reports ‘Tentative Agreements’ With Chicago Public Schools In Four Areas As Reopening Negotiations Continue

"Union says it's reached tentative agreements with Chicago public schools on four key areas to resume in person Learnings. Now they are Health and safety protocols, ventilation, contact tracing and safety committees. But it says there are no agreements yet on reopening metrics, vaccinations, testing tele work accommodations and remote learning improvements for students. CTU President Jesse Sharkey. We have said all along that our goal is not no re opening our goal to safety opening And CBS CEO Dr Janice Jackson. This plan has worked for thousands of students over the past 2.5 weeks, and we know that it will work for the other 70,000 students. Those 70,000 students said to return to the classrooms on Monday, a

Jesse Sharkey Chicago Dr Janice Jackson CTU CBS
How The Pandemic Influenced 5G Use in Tele-Medicine

The 3:59

02:29 min | 5 months ago

How The Pandemic Influenced 5G Use in Tele-Medicine

"So the coronavirus changed everything. How did products posed by the pandemic a shift the direction and the thinking about the use of five g as a solution to solve today's problems so that's a good question. I think i kind of have to answer hundred. Change the thinking about how we're gonna utilize digital solutions to provide care to people and we all had to turn on a dime over weekend in early march t to make that happen and you know for us. It may oh we'd had a long standing program digital healthcare but our implementation plan for people was really very much hand holding spoon fed to kind of implementation process where he would meet with each department to get them up to speed on that weekend in march. We suddenly develop a self help program with three major step so individual apartments could get going on their own and then in parallel we set up a a provider side call center to serve their needs when they ran into problems with the self help program so that was really how we had to go whole hog in terms of getting the whole institution using all of our products and services that we have at the center for connected care how that translates for the consumers which is really where the different broadband solutions of makes a difference is is is what we're going with this conversation. Obviously ad and five g does offer a lot of promise. I mean the fact that there is less lag. Faster speeds means that even these conversations where there's just that little bit of a of a pause when you and i speak to each other as those comedown it makes those conversations feel and more conversations we have in our offices are in our homes Said that will make the experience feel more natural for people the ability for more stable video and maybe with complementary data from a device you might be wearing to augment that video has has a bigger promise with a solution that offers in theory. You know one hundred x improvements in in Upload speed download speeds. So so. I think there's a lot of promise that way. And we'd happy to see come to fruition but i think there's also some realities that we talk about the promise versus what the current reality is And i think that there's some we can be excited but we have to take some cautionary tales as we enter into

Inauguration in Washington, DC: Widespread road, bridge closures

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:39 sec | 5 months ago

Inauguration in Washington, DC: Widespread road, bridge closures

"Any travel plans that you take into the district on hold six bridge closures across the district now through there Tuesday morning is a major move. And while drivers are encouraged to avoid the area, advanced notice has allowed many people to plan ahead, opting for tele work or alternate routes so the impact could be minimal. W T O P. Traffic reporter Dave Gill died. The past is prologue. Advanced Notice goes a long way inconvenient, definitely for the people who work or live near the red zone for everyone else. No reason to bother driving anywhere near downtown. As for the regional impact these closures could have, he says. That's still unclear. Bridge closures will remain in effect until 6 A.m. on Thursday. Melissa Howell, WCO Penis I'm Neil

Dave Gill Melissa Howell Neil
Out With The Old - SolarWinds Smoking Gun, Signal Influx of WhatsApp Users, Male Chastity Cage

Security Now

03:07 min | 5 months ago

Out With The Old - SolarWinds Smoking Gun, Signal Influx of WhatsApp Users, Male Chastity Cage

"It's time for security now the show we cover your security online your privacy. How things work out bad. It's getting how good it's getting all that stuff with this guy right here. Live long and prosper steve gibson. I got put the thumb outright. That's the key bomb out can't do do i have a show for today. What's the topic This well the title is with the old which was inspired after i got back into spin. Right sixes source code and realized how much crap was in there to deal with that the things that we were having to deal with back in the nineteen eighties and nineties at the beginning of the pc era. And so i. It was just going to be kind of like you know. I've just mentioned it. But i just think our listeners will really find that interesting. Old-timers will be going on. I remember when dos had a thirty three and a half megabyte partition size limit. Believe it or not and and you know younger viewers are gonna be like what so anyway. We've got so much talk about. We have critical updates for fire. Fox and all of the chromium based browsers and a potentially unwelcome but reversible. Change coming to fire fox We're going to look at an another new tactic. Being employed by the ransomware gangs or at least one of them an update on ransomware profitability. A bogus seeming announcement from intel. The which was made yesterday during their cas announcement of the eleventh gen. core processors. I i well. I did dig in to see if there is anything to it and bow. Oh i gotta be left with no question about how i feel and we have the i use on this. Podcast of the term tele dildo onyx. Tell donna deal. Get it right until donald bill tell anybody knows ask that we have some residual solar wins news the formation of a security screw up crisis management group news of the inevitable attacks on zych sell users the mass exodus from what's app following their plans to force all meta data sharing for users of their platform at quick sifi note about the expanse and then as i said inspired by the amazing amount of old code. I have rediscovered inside spin right. I'm gonna take our listeners back to the roaring eighties with a look. At how far we've come from dos. Three point three. So oh and we do have a picture of the week for the ages so good it came without caption cheeto.

Steve Gibson Donald Bill Zych FOX Intel Donna
Washington, DC shuts down indoor dining, closes museums amid spike in coronavirus cases

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:47 sec | 6 months ago

Washington, DC shuts down indoor dining, closes museums amid spike in coronavirus cases

"New sweeping coronavirus related restrictions will affect a large number of businesses in the district next week. The restrictions are part of the city's effort to slow the recent sharp increase in infection. Remember your bouncer has issued an order banning all indoor dining beginning Wednesday, the 23rd at 10 P.m.. Museums and libraries will also have to close and non essential businesses are required to move back to Tele Work service on the D C. Circulator National Mall routes will also be suspended. The order also removes occupancy limits on grocery stores. It will be in effect until January. 15th at 5 A.m.. The mayor's orders, cites a recent spike with cases increasing from 112 November 16th 2 246 a month later. Outdoor dining delivery and pick up are still allowed. Montgomery and Prince George's counties have also prohibited indoor dining.

C. Circulator National Mall Tele Montgomery Prince George
Washington, D.C. moves to tighten coronavirus restrictions on businesses

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:50 sec | 7 months ago

Washington, D.C. moves to tighten coronavirus restrictions on businesses

"19 cases continues to rise, she says. Sacrifices have to be made to make the community saying there, Muriel Bowser says in an effort to blunt the rise of covert 19 in the district. She's tightening face to restrictions at this time. All non essential. Non retail businesses are strongly encouraged to have employees tele work. Starting Wednesday. Outdoor gatherings are limited to 25 people on Lee 10, people could gather indoors. Houses of worship are limited to 25%. Jim's must suspend indoor group exercise classes and the live entertainment pilot is canceled. Additionally, beginning Monday, December 14th. We are reducing indoor restaurant capacity by half to 25% Megan Cloherty. W T o P News. GOP TOO old six

Muriel Bowser Tele JIM Megan Cloherty GOP
"tele" Discussed on FOCUS on POCUS?

FOCUS on POCUS?

02:54 min | 8 months ago

"tele" Discussed on FOCUS on POCUS?

"<Silence> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> That's <Speech_Male> an interesting <Speech_Telephony_Male> or if apple <Speech_Telephony_Male> build a <Speech_Telephony_Male> heart I mean they already <Speech_Telephony_Male> have heart monitors <Speech_Telephony_Male> in their apple <Speech_Telephony_Male> phones <Speech_Telephony_Male> and <Speech_Telephony_Male> I mean Apple <Speech_Telephony_Male> Apple Watches <Speech_Telephony_Male> and things but <Speech_Telephony_Male> I guess <Speech_Telephony_Male> They could <Speech_Telephony_Male> have a little sad <Speech_Telephony_Male> and you stick your finger <Speech_Telephony_Male> on just like the <Speech_Telephony_Male> fingerprint. <Speech_Telephony_Male> Thing on <Speech_Telephony_Male> on on <Speech_Male> the on the <Speech_Telephony_Male> you know the iphone <Speech_Telephony_Male> you stick your finger <Speech_Telephony_Male> on it and <Speech_Telephony_Male> take Tariq <SpeakerChange> E. <Speech_Telephony_Male> and yeah, <Speech_Male> that's <Speech_Male> That's <Speech_Male> that's that's amazing <Speech_Male> stuff. I didn't even consider <Speech_Male> the whole the <Speech_Male> whole phone I know a lot <Speech_Male> of people that I know yourself. <Speech_Male> You're a runner too <Speech_Male> and I it does <Speech_Male> track. You know how far <Speech_Male> you go your your? <Speech_Male> Your blood <Speech_Male> pressure and <Speech_Male> your heart rate and <Speech_Male> all those basic <Speech_Male> <hes> <Speech_Male> physical exam <Speech_Male> and vitals. <Speech_Male> So I, can see <Speech_Male> that happening <SpeakerChange> well, it's <Speech_Male> interesting and <Speech_Telephony_Male> they have continuous <Speech_Telephony_Male> blood sugar <Speech_Telephony_Male> monitors. Now <Speech_Telephony_Male> that are being <Speech_Telephony_Male> widely used they're <Speech_Telephony_Male> not. <Speech_Telephony_Male> I mean <Speech_Telephony_Male> the way <Speech_Telephony_Male> they're currently <Speech_Telephony_Male> used as the patient <Speech_Telephony_Male> has them at home. <Speech_Telephony_Male> They have it <Speech_Telephony_Male> on a little recording <Speech_Telephony_Male> device and then they <Speech_Telephony_Male> bring them in <Speech_Telephony_Male> and that device <Speech_Telephony_Male> gets downloaded <Speech_Telephony_Male> in <Speech_Telephony_Male> the office onto <Speech_Telephony_Male> onto a software <Speech_Telephony_Male> program. But <Speech_Telephony_Male> I'm sure <Speech_Telephony_Male> it's it <Speech_Telephony_Male> would be very easy <Speech_Telephony_Male> to download them <Speech_Telephony_Male> remotely. So <Speech_Telephony_Male> you have all the <Speech_Telephony_Male> the glucose <Speech_Telephony_Male> readings and <Speech_Music_Male> I <Speech_Telephony_Male> think that's <SpeakerChange> the way <Speech_Telephony_Male> things are hitting. <Speech_Male> Well, maybe next <Speech_Male> time as neighbors <Speech_Male> <hes> <Speech_Male> when you lovely <Speech_Male> wife Debbie get <Speech_Male> together with Cathy and <Speech_Male> I we can. <Speech_Male> Form our medical <Speech_Male> device company <Silence> over <Speech_Male> Some <Speech_Male> drinks or something <Speech_Male> start a <Speech_Male> whole new revolution. <SpeakerChange> What <Speech_Music_Male> do you think? <Speech_Telephony_Male> It <Speech_Telephony_Male> it. <Speech_Telephony_Male> You <Speech_Telephony_Male> know it sounds like <Speech_Telephony_Male> the nathen the next <Speech_Telephony_Male> Jeff bezos. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> All right <Speech_Male> Dr Barry's <Speech_Male> airing listen. It was <Speech_Male> great having you on today's <Speech_Male> podcast <Speech_Male> instead honor and we <Speech_Male> thank you for all. You Do to <Speech_Male> increase patient <Speech_Male> safety and you <Speech_Male> stay safe down. <Speech_Telephony_Male> US <Speech_Telephony_Male> Well. James <Silence> so fun. <SpeakerChange> Thanks. <Speech_Male> Berry <Speech_Male> don't forget <Speech_Male> <hes> for more polka <Speech_Male> style

"tele" Discussed on FOCUS on POCUS?

FOCUS on POCUS?

08:15 min | 8 months ago

"tele" Discussed on FOCUS on POCUS?

"Not always directly into the throat. I'm just sitting here trying to think if there's any Technical innovations that overcome some of these limitations of telehealth maybe there'll be some technological innovation that they'll come out with some more like a simulator I'm not sure you the only thing about that. I I do I mean I think you know we we have as an example, we have a a a retinal camera in our office Initially, it was extremely hard to take pictures of the retina and the technology has advanced the point now where. We're the the through sort of internal, a all I, the camera. Is. The retinal camera that we have is able to take a very good picture of the retina and as soon as the technician positions that appropriately a green light goes off and they know that they've gotten a good picture five five years ago they were positioning the patient and moving them around and looking at the photo and seeing whether it was good and now the cameras just tells you that it's in the right place and and so I'm I'm sure somebody's going to come up with tech innovations like that and you know the other day when we were talking I know you guys are initiating internal medicine their. Point of care ultrasound in your program how's that going? How is that going from? I guess. From attending. To more, some of your residents said integrating well with your daily practice. The residents love it the residents can't can't get enough of it and You know we're in a teaching institution and and part of the problem is that we don't want everybody having. We. We we don't want the the wild west of ultrasound. So we we're we're trying to teach people how to use ultrasound appropriately and make sure that they capture images and the images are reviewed and and that medical decision making is not made based on poor imaging So the resonance love it the Many of the physicians love it because especially in primary care. We haven't always had a lot of procedures that that we do in the office, but many of the ones that we have historically done in the office like. Arthritis and teases and In an even just OSCO TATION OF HEART? You know we've lost to the specialists so we listen to people's hearts, but anytime, anything is abnormal resend them for an echo with we see a joint. They often go for a ultrasound guided Arthurson teases and this has given us the ability to sort of take back some of those procedures. So you I mean it's it's at the beginning and we haven't gone very far but patients really like it when we are able to do procedures in the office and and not have when somebody comes in and their knees swollen, they really might having having tapped in the office and not having to wait a week or two to see to see radiology to get a tap. Yeah that's nice that sort of gives you more of a hands hens on empowerment that you had in the past. That's good and I know a lot of these smaller hand held devices. We have talked to a few that are coming out with some artificial intelligence to shorten that sort of hands on clinical to ship learning time. So your images are on axis in done nicely which makes it even more attractive. So I kind of want to know now that we're winding down here, you have any. Personal experiences to share with regarding telemedicine or. What you've done so far. I mean I think the hardest thing has. been the hardest thing in the age of cove it is bad Is that. We're in. We're in an era when anybody who has a fever is has covert until proven otherwise. So we're on, we're on video all day long talking to people who? Who you know are feeling ill, and the first thing that we say to them or even in their own minds, they call really thinking that they need a cova test in in the hardest part is that mixed in that group of people who have fevers some of them just have colds and runny noses but other people have turned out to have more serious medical problems and so. I think all of the doctors in my practice now have had experiences where somebody calls and they say they have a fever and you do a telehealth visit and then send them for Copa Test and then a week the Cova tests comes back and then it a week. Later they are still feeling poorly and we send them for another Cova test and I have one particularly memorable. Patient. WHO Did this three or four times and then? Ultimately was not feeling well, then I ordered some tests as an outpatient and it turned out that he had end of cordite and needed to be admitted to the hospital and and was really quite ill i. think. that. You know that missing piece of the of the physical exam is is not is not a small thing. I think it's it's a little bit at the moment like if you if you if some if you took your, if you did a tell the health visit of your car service and you just drove your car in front of a cell phone and showed your your car to the car mechanic they would have limited. Information about that car and it would almost seem silly i. mean if you just showed the hood or the windshield of your car to a to a car mechanic and said you, you need to repair my car, they would laugh at you certain things would be okay like if you showed them a crack in the windshield or you showed them a crack candlelight or something, but certainly not the engine and I think. It you know I. Think we're sort of at the start of this and I think as as more devices as a as point of care ultrasound gets linked into telehealth EKG's get linked into to tell the health home blood pressure monitors, and scales, and all those devices get linked to tell I, think it'll be much more useful but right at the moment. it's it's tricky to us and and the only reason we're using it so and and it's been great. We're using it aggressively because it keeps everybody safe but it hasn't solve all our problems quite yet. Yeah. I. Was thinking of that thinking of having a pulse ox or blood pressure. EKG. Tabs. But but you would have to have those devices unless they were mailed to the patient but then again. Most patients are sick and they report I, don't you know I'm just trying to see how that would happen. I guess it could especially in rural medicine or different areas around the world were seen a physician. I'm thinking of remote places in northern Canada where they're trying to recruit physicians are just not enough around. There's already assurance in more urban areas so.

fever Cova technician Canada Arthritis Arthurson
"tele" Discussed on FOCUS on POCUS?

FOCUS on POCUS?

08:04 min | 8 months ago

"tele" Discussed on FOCUS on POCUS?

"Yeah. It's. It's a pleasure to have you here and also I forgot to mention. Berry is also my neighbor? So I hope to have return all the tools that I have borrowed from him over the years. All right. So here we are and thank you for having right after your big workday, and then you call in and So what do you think has tele healthcare landscape changed since the Kovin epidemic began. It has changed dramatically Both in the volume of telehealth visits that we do and the. And and I think the attitudes of the both the providers in the the patients who are using it. So now that we have the telemedicine up and running and I guess, you're seeing a lot more patience virtually. Any. Before that time I imagine I guess somebody with a distance situation. No I mean, they're they're actually has been a push to us Tell it tell them Edison for I'd say, well, over two years many of the big health systems including the one that I work for have been have enthusiastically embraced it and They've tried to encourage people to use it. I think there. There was. There were a litany of of problems or barriers associated with using it in the pre covert era, some technical problems. Some there was there were several different platforms that had been employed. There was there was a learning curve for each of the platforms and and and so you know there was there was hesitation about changing from platform to platform. But I, think the the biggest reason I'm in primary care and I think the biggest reason in in primary care that people didn't that. Providers weren't using it is that I think many of our patients in the pre dear really didn't see the value in using it and we're. Quite happy to come in for in person visits there was a small small group of people who. Who felt comfortable with it but I I think most people felt that They really didn't see the value in it. Yeah, it's kind of a confusing It's kind of ambiguous when you say telehealth. Immediately think of very rural settings. Places in Africa where Geographical distance makes it more practical. So I. Don't see it so much. Now I understand obviously for the epidemic that were in the middle of here now. What about the shift of telehealth visits? How's that been sustained? So. I would say in the pre covert era, my practice was probably doing. on the order of me, I mean, we do. My practice does about forty thousand not me personally but the the practice that I work and does about forty thousand visits a year we were probably doing two hundred telehealth visits starting in March. starting in March after the lockdown began. we were doing about we were doing about fifty percent of all of our visits telehealth visits. We were doing about ten in in person visits a week and Now, as of I would say last week. Our volume has returned to almost back toward violent volume has returned almost back to pre cova levels and the ratio is now running about. Seventy percent in person visits in about thirty percent telehealth visit so. Dramatically different than before the copay or when we were just doing a handful of them over the course of the year. Yeah. So. It's sort of chain us. We're going I. Guess can you shine a light on some of the biggest sides to telehealth visits? I I I think. someone I mean at the beginning certainly in March when we were getting this up and running the the biggest downside where a lot of the technical issues, it was exhausting even to get through the day men, the sound quality was variable. The video quality was variable Many of the patients didn't know how to use it and and the physicians were providing tech support for for people we did as an example, you know have quite a few patients who tried to do telehealth on on flip phone send were frustrated that they were unable to see their physician from their flip phone Yeah, and and I think pe-. People's comfort level with just with just positioning themselves and lighting and all sorts of things which just very, very challenging and and very time consuming Y- The other thing is for physicians we're used to examining patients and and patients are used to being examined and I think one of the big barriers to using it was that the physicians felt uncomfortable I think medically and medical legally making decisions without seeing the the patients in person and the patience really I think felt very they felt that they weren't getting their money's worth. They were being charged or they were being charged a co pay which was equivalent to what they would pay to see the doctrine person and left feeling like they had just gotten enhanced telephone call So I think there was. Initially people were very happy that they could talk to the doctor during the lockdown. But as time went on, they became more critical of what they were actually getting during this. Yeah. I I. I can imagine one of your patients you know saying. How can the doctor diagnosed me without doing a physical exam? Zinni whenever said something along those I can't see how you would do. You know maybe any one of the Sanford twenty five virtually. there. There's there are a few things you can do. You can see if the patient appears toxic, you can assess their respiratory rate. You can look for Rashes There are some people who have published studies suggesting that you can. that there are certain maneuvers that you can do by video to try to assess abdominal pain and and and things like that, and and re remarkably you can. You can get a fairly good look in somebody's throat and mouth if they position their cell phone appropriately, the positioning is really the hardest thing. 'cause you find yourself looking at at at eyes and noses and other other parts of the face and.

Berry Africa abdominal pain Sanford Edison
"tele" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

08:21 min | 9 months ago

"tele" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Is interesting. Maybe maybe that's could be. Who knows their introduction to? Internet technology and. Seen other facebook with your grandkids. When we hope will happen sometime sooner rather than later but eventually. We think this pandemic Wayne and things will start to. Sort of level off to some maybe new normal and I'm wondering if. You will look back on this five years from now and notice that in twenty twenty one. You were using a lot more telehealth than you were in. Twenty. Nineteen. As in wispy jump. I mean I didn't explain that very well, but is this going to become part of the new normal sort of greater reliance on telehealth going into the future even after the pandemic? Yes we believe. That it well, one of the reasons that we that we believe. So passionately, Intel monitoring. Fat Leave. Really. Do believe that it keeps people's home faith and out of the hospital. probably monitoring can be used for a number of different people with different condition, but we primarily use it for people with heart car conditions hypertension. if they have any respiratory issues like COPD, those are the people that we see ten go to the doctor a lot and you know unfortunately hospitalized a lot. the we really do think that my had been checked vital find them by partnering with the patients. Again in the home, they have certain questions that they have to answer. That are disease specific that will help us to look for those small little warning signs little changes that again might indicate that that they're getting a little worse. So unfortunately, you are not going to go away anytime soon. They're they're not and I think also the the the desire to want to stay at home. Especially, as we see Kinda shifts in our demographic in the demographics, our population people want to be at home I. Think No one wants to go to the emergency room, go to hospital and I think partly what the pandemic has shown us is that there are lots of different opportunities to use telehealth for people so I know that our maternal on child health team. Used it to support women who were pregnant who had just had a baby after they got home from the hospital with lactation support and kind of other other care needs and are we have therapy team Rpt's are Ot's and our speech and language pathologists could use video visit functionality to to provide visits, fully remote visits and also to provide check. INS In between visit. So I think an you know the technology is really expanding in terms of what can connect to the Tele Monitor and what we can do remotely. So there's never going to be replacement for the hands on in person care, but I think this will be used to provide a lot more and more robust, complementary and supplemental care. For. People. In you know we were talking a little bit ago about the nurses driving out in the rural dirt roads and so on. These, these places tend to be often the last to be served by strong broad broadband access and I'm wondering obviously telehealth. Good Good Internet connection. Right. are you running into the? Limitation these days and and serve more if it is for for the state or local communities to build out broadband. are in favor of broadband across the state Fortunately, the company that that we have used to provide the monitors is called HRIS health recovery solutions, and these tablets come with a variety Eisenson card. So it's just like having having a cellphone. what we have found that most places do have a variety signals that we are able to place in the home. Even if the person doesn't have any any Y fire broadband we also have a tablet with an at and T. Card in it that we are using to see in those areas that don't have ride and signals can we still reach them at and T.? I mean is there a percentage that were were they just don't have good cell service. And and still gap or what we think. Oh. have been it Gas probably in only about two percent of the people that have tried to put it in. So we've been very fortunate with a lower than I would have expected to. See. That is good news. This is A. Fascinating conversation. But unfortunately, we're about out of time. So I. Wish you well in farewell but. He set in emily mechanics have sex with home health and hospice have really enjoyed talking with you this morning. Thanks for filling this all about telehealth. Monitoring it's. Great talking with you. Over. Already. Let's see. WE'RE GONNA go into a CBS news minute at the top the our beliefs speaking with our good friend Bob Ney just after the break and and then Matt Dickinson. College on what it means when the president comes down with Geraldo virus. Exciting things are happening anymore and village the pitcher in and more and store are under new management upgrades. Improvements are in the works maintaining the ambiance and character while breathing new energy and resources into these iconic properties. We are open while practicing all CDC protocols, comfort lunch at Iraq and Delhi, and see for yourself with the buzzes all about both businesses are hiring especially seeking fine dining room staff and sales associates are not still fund funky and friendly better than ever open daily on Main Street. Warren village. The Dave Ramsey show. W DV. Right. We are ragging into our second hour on this Friday morning October the second and has to do on Fridays. We talked Bob Ney when our national correspondent. It's always great talking with you what's going on this morning? Well, we know what's going on this morning. Yeah. Wow. What's the reaction out there? With me. That's weird. Not Hearing. Hearing Baba this moment. Baby We need to. Okay well, anyway. Bob Hayes Raila. Yes. On Friday mornings, we are trying to connect with him in the hoping to chat with him about this giant news that broke overnight via tweet from the president of the United States that the President Donald J trump and his. Wife First Lady, Melania, trump have both tested positive. For the virus and This of course. Comes after a week in which? The president engaged in several events in meetings and so on. A wide variety of people which were not Shall we say? Extremely, strong on. Corona virus protections and avoidance measures and let's see. Let's see if we got five now by mayor you there. Yes. Can you hear me? I can hear you now. Thanks very much. This morning. Wow love and so what's the? What is the General Reaction Around Washington people? Just, Kinda shocked about this or what? What's what's what's the thinking? It's all over the board. Some people have said we knew this was going to happen. He is cautious. Some people have said this. Of course I go to beyond human concern to people happen to be present first lady with everybody wishes them. Well, I would hope but also then the political type David is DC after all, it's A. Very tough place but the political talk is, will this favor him if he can continue.

president Bob Ney facebook Wayne Intel Dave Ramsey hypertension. team Rpt Warren village Bob Hayes Raila Washington CBS Eisenson T. Card Matt Dickinson Ot David Melania CDC Baba
A highlight from Slow Radio : Will We? - full performance

Slow Radio

02:26 min | 1 year ago

A highlight from Slow Radio : Will We? - full performance

"Awesome okay bill. We have a shake the hand of the breakdown. Stay one rainy weights. Layby saviors arrived. Who will hold the ladder whilst richest windows as they paint. Will we see. Will we help the person down. The heights of scaffolding struggled to find their footing will stop on wildlife hills. Will we can help the follow which they have escaped. We spend seconds long. Tolkien said the tele filling stations and just to make them feel less lonely. Will we sit and pause the departure. We to internal ourselves. Imperviousness will

Tolkien
"tele" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio

Mayo Clinic Radio

20:31 min | 1 year ago

"tele" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio

"Welcome back to the male clinic. Radio I'm Dr John, Jives and I'm Tracy mccray telemedicine. It's a relatively new concept, but with the rapid changes in technology over the past few decades, telemedicine has turned into this complex integrated service. It's used in in hospitals and doctors, offices and homes, just about any kind of health care facility. You can think of here to tell us how it's used and why? It's so effective as Mayo clinic physician assistant Ms Aaron Mason and Emergency Room Physician Dr. Chris Russi welcome both of you to the program. Thank you. Thanks for having us back. Good to have you so Aaron. We had a previous life working to get your Mayo but. You now. Are Out in the hinterlands, and you're using telemedicine. Tell us how that works. That's correct so using telemedicine as part of my everyday work life in the critical access emergency department that I work in a mostly in falls and Lake City and in these critical access hospitals. There's usually just myself as a sole provider and one sometimes two nurses. I use telemedicine on a daily basis when I need a second set of eyes to look at a patient with me or to. Problem solve through cases that may be. Different interesting as well as just kinda shoot ideas back and forth with the the other person on the on the other end of the Monitor, usually Dr Rossi or one of his colleagues got rusty. What equipment do you need to set up telemedicine? It's tricky, so there's obviously fairly significant upfront capital to put a program like this together where we were fortunate is Mayo Clinic had already invested in. Partying with a company called intouch health, and they provide our software and hardware. For for the service. So on my end when I'm sitting in the telehealth bunker in the emergency department. Really need a computer I need a good Internet connection. I need a good camera, and then the software to Lincoln to the we call them affectionately a robot, but a cart. That sitting with Aaron up in Lake City or cannon falls, or whatever or localities which are small towns close to Rochester and part of the Mayo Clinic healthcare system correct. And we affectionately called it the hinterlands, but there's a lot of this country that is the hinterlands, and so how does this? How does this make a difference for patients? Foil for for patients. It makes a difference in a couple of actually big way is. A lot of patients who are not able to travel all the way to Rochester to see specialists or have the expertise they may otherwise only get in this location, so they'll come to my emergency department, and with whatever issue they have going on, and it's a way for them to happen to these this huge specialty resource that we have here in Rochester Minnesota so if you have a question and is almost always something that you've seen in the emergency room. That's where you work in these. Hospitals smaller settings, so then you can call on Dr Russ anytime to ask him any question about the patient and it's audio and video. Russi yeah, that's right and I just wanted to jump on. The other major benefit to patients is the ability to help care for the critically ill. So Aaron as you mentioned the hinterlands, but these are small rural communities that are resource limited right? She's often the only provider in that entire facility. And so when we run a resuscitation here in the academic campus, we bring teams of people right to care for that one individual. We want to emulate that to whatever degree we can for her right. It's not that Aaron can't do the job. She doesn't very well, but we bring on Tele- pharmacists with us. Bring on emergency. Medicine boarded physician and together. We're seeing the patient We're bouncing off ideas talking about tactics and strategies I can on the back end. Help off load her cognitive burden. Substantially by getting accepting physician for a transfer, getting them a helicopter, getting a critical care transport team, and so allows her to stay at the bedside, and really focus on the patient and and continued. Do her good work I. have to jump in and Rick will have to edit this. Because I didn't give a chance from this point, Aaron what equipment do you need on your end? There's There's a few different ways that I can contact physician on the other end. One is either by just telephone. I can call and discuss the case with DR AC- Another way is through our medical record system. We could we have a texting option where I could just send over a quick request or sentence or have a look at this that etc? And then Third Way, which is probably the most useful I think is video, so I actually bring the video camera into the room and explaining to the patient. It's a lot like skype where you're seeing somebody on the screen. They're interacting with you in real time. gives that Dr Rusty an opportunity to see the patient as if he was sitting bedside with me, so it's not a lot. It's not a lot of equipment on either end. If you're resuscitating somebody at one of these smaller facilities. Than Dr, Russi can help you with regard now. I think it's time to shock them now I. Think you should give them this drug, etc. Yes, absolutely Often I'm the one who's running the resuscitation or the code. We call it and Dr. Russie has access. He can see my monitors. He can see my lapse that have gone through. He can see the patient, and as if we're standing next to each other in this room. Discussing the case, I think it's been about two minutes. I think it's time we shocked now. I agree that we should do that or We've tried this algorithm..

Ms Aaron Mason Mayo Clinic Emergency Room Physician Dr. Chris Russi Rochester Dr John Dr Rossi Dr Russ Tracy mccray Dr Rusty Lake City Minnesota Dr. Russie Lincoln Tele cannon falls Rick
"tele" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio

Mayo Clinic Radio

13:34 min | 1 year ago

"tele" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio

"That predispose them to have autism, but we also know that that genetic differences not enough in most cases to turn that gene on that. There's something else environmental. That's happening with these children that is allowing that gene then to be expressed and the environmental causes. We're still trying to figure out what all of those are, but the ones that have been most substantiated are things that happen very early in development, so parents both MOMS and Dads who are older at the time of conception is a contributing factor. Any difficulties during pregnancy like an illness that mom might have for a longer period of time, not just like a cold, but something that lingers and hangs on bit longer than that. Also any problems during delivery The child doesn't get oxygen for longer periods of time, and children who are born preterm very preterm. Usually you know twenty four twenty five weeks somewhere around in there and also kids that are born little so low-birth-weight babies about any relationship to the age of the parents. Yes, Time wrote perception. Yeah, so we used to think that it was just Ma older MOMS who were contributing? A risk factor then for children to develop some, but now we know from the research that it's both older moms and dads have a higher risk of having a child with autism. That boys four times. Communist girl explained that. We don't know the answer to that question yet. I mean in general. Boys have more genetic and medical issues than girls but so so girls have a more of a protective factor with having two x chromosomes, but we don't fully understand it. There's some mice model research that suggesting. That things can go awry more easily and male brains in terms of imitation and social skills, and so we think that when a problem happens during pregnancy or something is amiss, that affects boys differently than it affects girl Saturday any evidence that there is a relationship between vaccinations and autism. Now our guest expert on autism spectrum disorder Mayo. Clinic Psychologist Neuro Psychologist Dr, Andrew. Heat air time for a short break. When we come back, we'll talk a little bit more about diagnostic criteria and the importance of starting treatment early,.

"tele" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

10:21 min | 1 year ago

"tele" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"The appointment of our people to the bench and and two executive branch positions are is the factor really to denude the Party of its intellectual bench. Your I mean I do think the question the Federal Society is complicated in that. If you were to ask a bunch of the people involved in checks and balances they would still say that. They are federal as society members in good standing. And I think if you would ask John Adler he would be happy to say that right that. He participates in federal society. He's involved with it. He thinks it's important and the he also thinks that there's a lot of federal society members who for various reasons are having to engage in degree of preference falsification but a really uncomfortable with the way this administration is operated. But the go back to the general point you know the overall framing of the book that these are professional groupings who provide services to the party. Right those are important services. Those are services that That need to be performed. And if they can't be performed There are real consequences and I think you know the the fact that the that they've had to operate without a lot of the more talented lawyers without a lot of the more talented economists and national security experts has had real consequences for this administration even in pursuing its own Its own ideas right. There there are a lot of the decisions that have been made by the administration environmental areas and other ones that had gotten struck down by the courts in large part. Just as a result of just bad lawyering. When you think about why was it? This administration was so unable to put together anything to a reverse obamacare that was not accidental. To the fact that they did not have most of the really serious economists who can actually put together proposals working with this This administration and I think in some ways the response to covid nineteen which has had very significant consequences for trump's our capacity to get reelected it can really be directly traced to the fact that it's it's having to operate with the bt Or to some degree now right with the C team And so all of that. I think in a way the net the never trump people while a certainly weren't able to stop trumper get or stop his his hold over the Republican Party. Mass base have through their absence. Had A real consequence for the quality of of this administration's performance in office and thus ultimately their Their success as a as governor establishing. And what do you think is the future of the never trump movement both in the legal establishment and in the national security establishment? Is it like the Scoop Jackson? Democrats of the of the late seventies who kind of drift into the Republican Party. And become what we think of now as the neo conservatives is more a a rebellion that gets put down and they kind of fritter out into nonexistence and political quietest them or is it something else I mean. Does this have in a two party system? I mean in a in a if we were in Germany they would start a new party. But that's not gonNA happen in the United States. So what's the what's the future of it is? It just gonNA drift away or is it going to become some kind of intellectual force either. An insurgent force within the Republican Party as his Ben or kind of deepening and broadening of the Democratic Coalition will. So I do think the parallel to the neoconservatives is not right because You really can't underestimate how much political polarization matters. You know how far apart these parties fundamentally are and the important thing to recognize about most of these never trump conservatives is. They're conservative right. There are exceptions. I mean I think some of them. You know like Gin Ruben boot have come to rethink some significant parts of their ideological coloration but a lot of them were so really thinks. Continue to think of themselves as conservatives in have very large disagreements with the general beliefs of the Democratic Party even is some of them are willing to work with it because they think that they're in a kind of national emergency and that's why I think the future of never trump conservatives is really to be the kind of professional and intellectual establishment of a minority but pivotal faction in the Republican Party and the end of the book we on we suggest that both of the democratic and the Republican parties are likely to be more factionally divided divided into deeply organized groups who negotiate with each other internally and so I do think that there's GonNa be a kind of dominant populist faction of the Republican Party With a base in the In the South and west and to some degree mid west and a dissident liberal would we call liberal conservative faction on? That's going to a different geographical basis to have a different material base in terms of WHO's funding it. But without which the dominant populist faction will not be able to actually acquire power and so. I think a lot of these guys are going to stay in the Republican Party. But they're going to be creating a durable faction without that. That's that the populist faction of the Republican Party is going to have to negotiate with. I wish I thought you were right but I actually don't leave us on this note of discord I think the experience of Donald Trump is so traumatizing to a lot of these people. That are whole bunch of them have come to actually identify with Emotionally intellectually with the other party and its interests and that's not to say that they agree on policy issues but they they feel in their guts that the other side winning is important. I think that feeling is the core of political identity not policy and that the reorientation of conservative intellectual elites toward the Democratic Party is likely to have very substantial implications both for the Republican Party and for the Democratic Party in the long run. Yeah I mean. I do think that it's unlikely that a lot of these guys are in fact. GonNa find a home in the Democratic Party that is they may be voting for them in this election in very much hoping the Democrats win but to imagine that there are actually that that any Democratic president even is moderate Biden would appoint Elliot Cohen to a position in the state or Defense Department or the National Security Council is extremely hard to imagine and again that's where I think the underlying dynamic of polarization matter so much and again my my scenario of a minority Republican faction is not even what I would consider to be the highest probability option. But I think I'm less interested in prediction than I am in building scenarios for people who actually have decisions to make part of my what we argue in. The conclusion of the book is that you know how history goes is in part shaped by consequential decisions that people make in pivotal moments. And I do think that never won big criticism. I have never trumpers. Is they invested too much. In building linkages with Democrats to support the rule of law and democratic norms as opposed to actually doing the the deep hard work of building up party faction inside the Republican Party. So they're really over three years behind in that project but they're going to have to start doing it now because there's really no alternative. There's no third party. There's no you know disassociated nonpartisan center. That's out there. Are you really do in in polarizing conditions? You really have to pick a party and work within it. And if it's not the Republican Party I don't think they have much of a future among in the Democrats. The book is never trump the revolt of the conservative elites. It is by Robert P Salton and our guests. Steve Tell US Steve. Thanks so much for joining us. Thanks for having been low-fare podcast is produced in cooperation with the Brookings Institution your audio engineer. This week was Zachary Frank. Please rate and review the Law Fair. Podcast wherever you get your podcasts. And Sheriff's widely the law fair podcast is produced as always by Jan Patio. Hal and your music is performed by Sophia Yan. Thanks so much for listening..

Republican Party Democrats Democratic Coalition Donald Trump Federal Society John Adler executive Brookings Institution Germany United States Jan Patio Sophia Yan Gin Ruben bt Zachary Frank Steve Jackson Hal Robert P Salton engineer
"tele" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

12:39 min | 1 year ago

"tele" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Of investigations that involve the Clintons and also just at the level of what she represents substantively. There is a lot more fear of her individually than for example there might be with Joe Biden like figure. Yeah I mean I do think that well. I wonder about that. I mean I do think for at least for some of these people write me and some of the people on the legal side had literally been involved in the Whitewater investigation had been hunting the Clintons for years that kind of stuff but I think that the larger fact that there was a the Scalia open seat matter a lot in that really sensitize people to the idea that this was a pivotal election over which irreversible change in the judiciary thus the legal system was at stake. I think that's very important. I do think to some degree they. They saw Hillary is more likely to play hard ball with them where law was concerned. But I think more they were likely to say look. We've got two teams. We got a team a conservative lawyers and a team a liberal lawyers and both of these teams really want to entrench to use their political power to entrench themselves in the judiciary and the larger structures of the law. And IF WE LOSE WE LOSE THIS NEXT FOUR YEARS. Were never going to get back. And that's where there's a big discussion of this Michael Anton Flight Ninety three article. The idea that this was a you know we literally were about to be. The plane was like that taken over by the equivalent of terrorists. And unless you rush the cockpit that you were GonNa you're going to go down and so lawyers were much more likely to see the world that way right on deceit. As deeply zero-sum and irreversible election way that national security conservatives didn't and you know the difference between Biden and Clinton would have been somewhat relevant there but I do think only thought that whoever was a Democratic president would bring this other team in and that other team really wanted to to you know make these people subordinate right really wanted to To rule them in a way. The national security conserves more likely to see the person on the other side is really their counterpart between the forty yard lines and so in addition to that or counter. The countervailing factor. Is that for a lot of conservatives who have a legal conservatives who have you know stressed for many years process regularity rule of law issues trunk is a is as jarring figure as he is to non conservatives who are interested in in things like procedural regularity and rule of law. And so. I'm I'm interested in how those fights how that tension played out. The result is a kind of split in the conservative legal movement. That is not there in the for example the Republican foreign policy establishment. Yeah I mean. I didn't think it is interesting that there is an actual organization held checks and balances that came out of legal conservatives WHO OPPOSED TRUMP. But even within the thing. That's interesting when you interview the people who were involved in that even George Conway on who is about is Over the top an opponent trump is as possible to get even. He is likely to say that he loves the judicial appointments. So the first thing to say about lawyers as compared to national security is there is a kind of ambivalence there right. Lots of people really don't like on his relationship to judicial norms. The norms of the execution of the office a lot of them also just disliked the generally shambolic performance of the administration where Legal Matters are concerned and yet on the other hand right they They would be really worried about other people being appointed to the on judiciary from the other side and generally like they know the people who are actually getting appointed to these judicial positions and they they like it so you know I think that is really the the division they're in part of it is when you look at the people who are most likely to have signed. There was an originalist against trump letter. That was very heavily weighted toward academic conservative lawyers. And I think that's not an accident that those people on an operate inside of generally liberal institutions like law schools and. They take seriously the idea that they're on a long term battle to actually persuade people of the rightness legitimacy of principles like originalism. And I think the idea that trump would cause lasting damage to those ideas and those ideas would get tarred with trump brush and therefore never be able to get that set of steak off them. Really weighed heavily. Steve Sax at Duke Law School and will about it at Chicago. Both said things. They were the ones who put together the originalists against trump letter. They both really emphasized that one thing they were trying to do with the letter was to inoculate originalism against the on the state of trumpism and to what extent do you think has been persuasive in a world in which originalism is both associated with a set of ideas right but it's also associated with the appointments that the president has made and the political valence of those appointments even for people who are sympathetic to it and And you know I have my my areas of sympathy with it though. That's complicated but we have now associated originalism with the political right which is now the trump right and so to. What extent do you think that is a talking at windmills? On the part of Stupid Saxon will bow the and others and to what extent do you think there has been a a remotely? Aren't even marginally successful efforts to insulate the ideas from the people? I mean my instinct. Is that probably not right? Probably hasn't been very very effective. No again part of this. Is that the General Force of political. Polarization is so powerful That it sorta sweeps everything you know in its wake in so I do think you know the the project of arguing that originalism was somehow above. Not just being a partisan project Which really is the project of people like will end Steve and others like them. That's a really important idea for them that they're not just partisans and in certainly in wells case where I will really doesn't think of himself as a partisan even though you know he clerked for McConnell and and Roberts But that's an increasingly hard position to maintain. And do think if you look in the economy that that project of legitimating conservatism and creating a home for it fewer. I think there are fewer and fewer liberals in the time of trump who were willing to go along with that. And you know again I would have to. I haven't asked will About this but I do wonder whether the project of trying to persuade liberals of the merits of their ideas which was a very important part. It was very important. Part of the original federal a society designed to go back to the rise of the conservative legal movement. That on the people created that really thought there was an opportunity to engage in persuasion that they many of them have been liberals before steed calibrating had been a Lebron. He had been persuaded and he thought that the design the federal society would really be able to bring people over to their side and I do wonder whether that project is more or less edits end and that's a really dangerous fact for our larger political system. I think the idea that parties previously thought about raiding the other party that you know we didn't just have completely fixed battle lines but you could actually do raids around the though you know the flank of the other party and take takeaway part of their coalition was actually a very important democratic stabilizing mechanism. Because it meant that you didn't just think that it was trench warfare but increasingly. Neither party really thinks that they can actually steal components away from the other parties coalition. And that's where politics really does start looking more like civil war so and yet I wanna make an argument that your your book. Here is a reflection of the fact that parties are stealing at least intellectually from each other. So you know when you take the checks and balances group that you describe. Many of whose founders are associated with law fair. One of the things that I think is is interesting about a group like that is that is a chunk of the intellectual elite of the Republican legal establishment. I mean when you when you take away the the or incurs and the John Adler and the Keyter Heisler and the George Conway's and you either and I don't know what the future holds. Make them the the conservative wing of the Democratic Party. Or whether you make them kind of politically homeless or whether you one thing you are doing is you're depriving the conservative movement of of that and you are disrupting the the idea that you have these two parties. Each with their own intellectual bench that is substantial and deep and intellectually compelling and. That's even more dramatic on the national security side. There simply is no prominent group of national security intellectuals who in a in a sustained serious way will make an art will make the arguments for what this president has done in his representing. And so I'm I'm actually wondering whether the turning of the Federalist Society from a body that persuades which it really did for many many years and a body that that engaged in serious argument to essentially a Republican Interest Group and Networking Organization that actually stands for very little except for.

originalism trump president Joe Biden Steve Sax George Conway Hillary Democratic Party Whitewater Scalia Federalist Society John Adler Duke Law School Michael Anton Keyter Heisler steed Networking Organization
"tele" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

03:11 min | 1 year ago

"tele" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"The lawyers are a much more divided crew and so first of all describe the divisions on then described the explanation for the divisions so I mean again with lawyers. The most important thing to recognize again. That's compared to national security conservatives. An economic conservatives is that trump had accepted both their ideas and their jurisdiction now part of that has to do with the fact. That trump really does have a kind of almost reptilian six cents for power. Trump doesn't have a really coherent ideology Why I think he's better understood as a demagogue. Ben Some kind of fascist like a lot of people wanNA think of him as but he does have a sense of who has power and who he can push and demean and who he has to cut deals with and social conservatives and by extension judicial and legal conservatives are group that he clearly looked and said these people have real power. These people really can hurt me and I have to cut a deal with them and his propose. Ideological reconstruction urged to philosophical reconstruction conservatism. Didn't actually involve a break from pre existing legal beliefs although certainly his his performance at the office in some ways has so the first thing they say is he didn't poke the lawyers in the I. The second thing is he clearly if anything. He expanded their jurisdiction. And that's why I think that the the parts where he you know he put out these. These a list of potential Supreme Court justices that he had gotten directly through heritage the Federal Society Networks. That kind of stuff. That was a recognition of those people's jurisdiction right that was in a way of him bending the knee to them. And that's one important part. The important part to recognize is a lot of these lawyers were genuinely afraid of what a democratic administration would look like on their issues on they genuinely were closer to the flight. Ninety three belief that a democratic administration would create permanent and irreversible damage to their fundamental existential interests on again very much not like national security conservatives right lots of nationals curry conservatives. Were more likely to say that you know our battle with the other side is between the forty yard lines whereas these people really are in a deeply adversarial relationship with the other side. Deeply Zeroed Song and that point is accentuated with when the candidate is Hillary Clinton because to national security conservatives..

Trump Hillary Clinton Supreme Court Federal Society Networks
"tele" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

10:21 min | 1 year ago

"tele" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Bright Council on Foreign Relations meetings then and Task Forces Aspen Institute. Right all those kinds of things and internationally right. They're going to international meetings of people on the left and right and then we mentioned in the book is in many ways one thing that holds national security experts on both the right and the left together is a fear of popular involvement in national security. Right both of them. Are you know believe that you know too much? Democratic participation in national security is dangerous and so they have this kind of Guardian mentality and that one thing they saw and trump in in populism in general is the collapse of that insulation foreign policy from too much democratic involvement. And so I think that it goes a long way to explain this particular world view of this community when they when they saw trump and why they reacted as strong as they did and I think the lawyers are a little bit different will let let let's cut. Let's come to the lawyers in a minute. I Want I want to further explore the national security folks many of whom right for law fair and you know people have often said of law fair that it turned less and by which they mean it became very Nash. Very anti trump. I think that is rather a a reflection of a lot of the things that are going on in that chapter that the National Security Community in general was quite shocked by trump for a lot of the reasons that you describe there are certain baseline commitments. But I do think that there is another factor which I alluded to in my earlier question which you talk about a little bit in in the book. Which is you know. These are people who've been with presidents or senior officials during exquisitely difficult decisions right and there is a sense for them in a way. That may be really isn't true for economists that the character of the individual deeply matters. And you know I can see being an economist and saying I don't care if a rogue who I wouldn't trust with my daughter in the room is doing the the deregulation that I think is so important or a good person is doing it. But when you've you know when you sat with presidents in or secretaries of stained or of defense in the kind of most difficult decisions they make based on imperfect information and maybe they get things wrong in with tragic consequences or maybe they get things right and you have great successes but you do have this appreciation of the degree to which they are or are not considering the right variables thinking about it in a way for which you have respect. And so I'm I'm curious to what extent that is and I and I noticed in some of the emails that you quote in In the deliberations surrounding the never trump letters from the national security conservatives. There were a lot of references that unfit. I can't do this right I support. My party's nominee. How much of? It was a mismatch between the expectations of that community and the character of the individual. Yeah I mean I do think the character the individual here mattered a lot written and again unit talk but the other groups just for comparative purposes in The Economist Chapter. We we interviewed Douglas. Holtz Egan who had been a senior economic adviser to John McCain. A person that clearly in the interview of Halsey can hold held and extraordinarily high regard and and trump had direct. You know his one of his most offensive comments which is the one that I prefer people who were soldiers who weren't captured in reply. Mccain read that clearly kit Halsey can pretty clearly and yet one of the big themes of Martin interview with Douglas. Deakin is is that you know. He has a library says look I got a list of stuff I want to get done and you know I'm going to have to. I'm going to work with whoever to get that. Get those things done writing again. Part of that is so much of that agenda is legislative in therefore it's transactional anything especially somebody like hold can was egging. Look I can either. You know fly freak flag about how much I dislike trump or I could you know. Get A tax. Bill passed or Regulatory Reform. Or whatever right but the legislative part of national security is not nearly as important as the discretionary power that presidents exercise in moments of of crisis in decision. And so that's why that sort of thing I think did loom much larger for for those kinds of people because they didn't think about the president mainly as as a sort of device for the passage of policy closer to wear their ideal preference. Point would be right in the other part. I think is really important that we do plays in the book is. There's a line somewhere I forget who used that. Said you know the the limes he was actually fill Zelko that the lives of people in national security are one ritual and funeral after another. That's a huge part. That ritualistic perform it. Is You know. In performance of honor is of really important part of the lions of these kinds of people and the willingness of trump to really not be willing to exercise that right not willing to willing to step into the role. And that's one of the things that they case characterists go at. Trump is trump really rebels against role appropriate behavior. Right about the idea that. There's an inherited office that he's supposed to be acting on the basis of the norms that he's inherited trump really doesn't like that and that's really important for these kinds of people and so. I think those all matter and then the final thing that really just can't be underestimated. Is there were a lot of these people who thought trump was disloyal? And there's no gentle way to put that Where they're just was a you know in this game especially with these people that you know is just an absolutely irreducible fact. That you know other people in other professional communities wouldn't necessarily have had to see that but the idea that all of the secrets of the country would be consumed by this person right and even if there was a slight worry that this person was not entirely loyal to the United States that looms incredibly large for these people in a way that it doesn't necessarily further the economist. Yeah right I mean again in that. That sort of Yemen look now. There were a lot of economists who deeply disliked trump and it is not an accident that you had a way less representation by economists in this administration. Now that's also a characteristic of of trump's own approach right when you think about what was it about inherited republicanism. That trump was rejecting. He was both rejecting a lot of the economic of sort of classical economic approach are Republicans and the national security and he was also rejecting their jurisdiction. The idea that this group of should get these senior positions and so there are relatively few prominent Republican economists in this administration as compared to previous ones. But even then right economists are much air much more cynical about political leadership whereas I think these national security people really do think that character matters in a way that economists are much more likely to think about the entire political process as a market of exchange. And they didn't like trump because trump was with not going to do with political power. What they want it right in the market of political exchange. He was going to be. You know doing things like you know. Cutting our trade relationships with other countries Potentially doing more crony capitalism and the connection between his own economic interests and those of the United States but on he didn't offend them at as sort of really deep fundamental level because they had such a low expectation of political leadership in the first place. All right. So let's turn to the other central law fair readership community that you treat in this. Which is the lawyers? And if the national security conservatives are relatively monolithic in terms of their embrace of the never trump movement. There are of course exceptions. But it's a it's really an area where as you describe it in the book. This is the molten core of the never trump movement is the national security conservatives..

Trump trump president National Security Community John McCain United States Halsey Task Forces Aspen Institute Douglas Nash Yemen Holtz Egan Deakin economic adviser Bill Regulatory Reform Martin
"tele" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

17:38 min | 1 year ago

"tele" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Approach Donald Trump and how these two schools of thought have informed the never trump movement. It's the law fair. Podcast may twenty third Steve Telus on never trump. Before we get into your current book I WanNa Start with your prior book which I believe was your first on the rise of the conservative legal movement because this at least as I see this book for You. It is part of a longer term project of kind of chronicling the development of the intellectual side of conservatism. And so talk a little bit about this project in relation to your prior project. Yes so the The book I think you're referring to is two thousand eight. The rise of the conservative Legal Movement. Which in fact is my second book after my My dissertation and I've had a long ever since I graduated in January nineteen ninety-five and going back to Grad School. I've had a long interest in American conservatism and I should mention that. I studied with conservatives which is an increasingly unusual phenomenon My advisors in Grad School. Were Jim Caesar and Martha Dir. Thick and Steve Rhodes who were all on intellectual conservatives and so I've had an opportunity to sort of look at this study American conservatism especially intellectual conservatism. From the inside and in the book in two thousand and eighths the rise of the conservative legal movement. The question I asked was how did conservatives counter mobilize against the growth of legal liberalism and I think this framing something. That's often missing. When people are studying conservatives they especially because liberals generally view themselves increasingly as the losers of American history and so it's hard for them to imagine just how disadvantage conservatives felt when you went back to the nineteen sixties and seventies on especially in areas in professional intellectual areas the degree to which they felt that liberals really dominated those parts of American society and so as conservatives were winning elections all across the country the Reagan Revolution. They were increasing their electoral power. They still found their ability to actually get policy results. substantially constrained by the fact that liberals control not only professions like the law but all kinds of institutions that fed into those domains right law schools public interest law firms on insulated bureaucratic institutions across government and so the challenge that conservatives had was. How do you counter mobilize when there's a limited degree to which you can simply use an electoral lever to affect those domains? And so what I asked in the book. And the is a conservative legal movement was how did conservatives go about building a kind of counter mobilizing structure to the quite enormous structures at legal liberalism and bill? And in the course of doing this one of the things about that book was just a number of figures in the development of that movement that you interviewed and that you interviewed from a kind of institutional development point of view and that seems to translate pretty directly to how you and your co author approached this project on the never trump movement. There are amazing number of people who you sat down with over. What looks like two and a half three years to discuss. What makes them different from the direction that the mainstream Republican Party wet? So let's talk about this project in the aggregate and then we're GONNA burrow down into a few discrete areas of it. Yes so A lot of the again you go back to the rise of the conservative legal movement. That book was based both on interviews and on extensive archival materials in fact not even really archival materials in that most of them were not actually in any formal archive. They were an organizational file. Cabinets here there and everywhere and my strategy was not really to focus on the actual ideas that these people had on there have been plenty of intellectual histories of conservatives written But they have a real organizational focus. The basic idea was that Ideas are fine but somebody actually has to keep the lights on And actually make organizations that are capable of of doing something with those ideas and so in that book. I looked at the federalist society on do for Justice Center for individual rights the Law Economics Center and I really did take a an approach. It's more common especially in sociology of resource mobilization. Headed people acquire resources. How did they deploy them? And so I was less interested in the big picture. Big Thinker people than the people who are actually in the the guts of the machine making it on making it work so and so some of those right there. There's overlap in In that but I think the main thing I did is I tried to understand the world as these people saw to the degree to which I could I tried to imaginatively operate inside the constraints and opportunities that they saw into reconstruct what that looked like at the at the time. And so that's a lot of what Rob Saudi and my co author. And I try to do here now again because we're riding essentially real time social science here. We don't have you know with one large exception which we talk about national security. We didn't really have archival materials to go on so we had to draw on People's own own memories. But I did. We did try as much as possible to to you. Know to burrow inside of people's own way of looking at looking at the world and the question that the book seems to focus on and it focuses on it across a number of discrete professional disciplines is what made the never trumpers conservatives different from the other conservatives that ultimately accommodated themselves to the trump movement. What made them distinctive. And how have they reacted? And I'm I'm interested in your kind of gestalt answer to that question if you look at a conservative intellectual or political activist or a former government official. What are the salient variables? Most likely to predict whether that person becomes a never trump figure or become a person willing to accommodate him or herself to the direction that the party has gone under under president. Trump is so the book is organized around these what we might call professional service providers to the Modern Republican Party. And so but there's partially a theory about Party. That's underneath that. Which is that now under. Current conditions parties depend on a quite extensive to network of people. Do the expert work of politics and public policy. And that's not incidental to the answer to your question. Which is we did find pretty systematic differences across these different professional service provider so in the book on National Security Conservatives. Were the ones who were the seemed to be the most likely to oppose trump. And that's where you really need to not think of them as individuals right but that there's really sort of social glue in that group. These are people who know each other they interact with each other. They served in government together at they'd been in the equivalent of the Fox hole with each other they have In that sense a lot of kind of lateral influence on on each other right there was a real unit cohesion in that group So if you want to explain the behavior of any individual you really need to think about the the collectively of which there there are apart and people in that world really did exercise influence on each other right they did try to establish norms four their community right amount why they as a collectively should oppose trump and I think sociologically they were just more used to thinking about themselves as a group in that in that sense and again national security conservatives also had some very particular reasons to oppose trump again one. They had lots of them had very significant suspicions that he was not altogether trying to find a delicate way to put this not not altogether a Entirely committed to American interest as opposed to again especially in the campaign of those of Russia. The other part was that on. These are people who for whom government service really mattered. And they really did. Think about the commander in chief as having a kind of moral authority and they really couldn't imagine having been in this situation room having been in the West Wing Right. They just couldn't imagine taking moral direction from Donald Trump and so in the book. We distinguish that from lawyers whose own professional practice is much more likely to involve thinking about the person that worked with as a client and clients of lawyers are quite frequently. Not People have particular moral authority and lawyers are used to thinking about part of their professional socialization as being able to separate out there their client from their own personal moral authority that they have some other source of moral authority other than what's derived from that of the on the person that they're working for so I do think those professional categories don't get you all the way to explain everyone but they give you a good gross division of these groups into who was more likely to sort of make their peace with Donald Trump and who were who were the real irreconcilable. Yeah so I think it's interesting like I'm gonNA focus on two of these professional categories because they're the two that that law fair deals with. We're GONNA leave out the economists and the political operatives and talk about only the the national security professionals and the lawyers but I do think like that is an interesting bracket because at some level the national security folks are the people who have the least to gain from trump in the sense that they are the ones who were most most sensitive to the delicacy of presidential decision making in crisis. They are also the ones who you know as you guys describe in the book. They're pretty committed in a kind of nonpartisan way to what you might call the liberal world order and certain structures that American presidents have have created across parties. These are things that trump has threatened and really has open contempt for and so they of the kind of the lease to gain from it and the most to lose whereas the lawyers are a really interesting case because on one hand there's all these principles that lawyers purport to believe in the rule of law stuff that trump is pretty threatening to but on the other hand you know what conservative lawyers get out of. The trump administration is no small thing which is judicial appointments. That they are genuinely excited about. And so I'm I'm interested for your sense in. You know how much of this at the end of the day is structure role that like certain professions had more to gain from trump and certain professions had more to lose. And how much of. It is the aggregation of what you just described which is social networks. Which is once you know. Once some National Security Type Circulating Letters Defame Ass- never trump letters. There social pressure to join that and so that community ends up really going on the record in a way that others did not so at the end of the day. How much of it is personal? And how much of it is is the sort of structural forces that you describe. The structural things are the necessary. I cut and I'm going to go through. The there was a lot packed in their solid. Trying to go through Systematically I mean one thing with the national security conservatives. That's really important is that you know. It was somewhat easy for them to oppose trump because trump had already poked them in the eye with you look at the the reconstruction of Republican conservatism. That trump was proposing a national security. It had very large consequences. It so on the one hand in policy terms trump was proposing a very large alteration of American foreign policy that was directly opposite to what most of these people believed in. So that's one thing. The second thing and connected to it is that trump was directly questioning their professional authority right on or in sociological terms their jurisdiction right on that is most conservatives before for decades before had essentially accepted the jurisdiction of this particular network of experts right. And that's a kind of a complicated formulation but one way. Think about that is if you running for president in the last of quite mini-cycles part of their legitimation ritual. You go through in running for president is you would surround yourself with a bunch of these kind of people to show that you were a serious candidate. You'll get advice for them. You would advertise that you were in seminars with them where they would explain to you life. What's going on in Yemen and the American force posture in the South Pacific? And all that so that was really their jurisdiction and trump directly said. Look I'm not gonNA take advice from these people. These are yesterday people. They got us into Iraq. They're all week. I'm going to take advice from new kinds of people right so national security. He had both rejected their ideas and he'd rejected their jurisdiction on so those two things are important. The thing that's important about national security conservatives is especially as compared to these other groups their professional identity is as you. As you mentioned before very much bipartisan. Right you know. They think they have a lot in common. At least with significant parts of the National Security Community on the other side of the Democrats they have lots of social processes that. Bring them into you. Know repeated interaction with them..

Donald Trump Legal Movement president Grad School Republican Party Steve Telus National Security Community Jim Caesar Russia federalist society Rob Saudi Modern Republican Party Martha Dir Steve Rhodes Thick Iraq official
"tele" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio

Mayo Clinic Radio

05:24 min | 1 year ago

"tele" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio

"I really appreciated hearing bullet. Different hospitals did things when we'd have others rotated rotate elsewhere. So I can imagine. That's a really gratifying experience. That that's the point you bring up. A is is that they've seen exponentially more. Kobe patients than we have here in Rochester. So in terms of understanding the disease that coveted brings We're learning from them. We can bring sort of the cultural piece of how an ICU operates from day to day. How the process flows. But we're really learning a ton about how these bases present How they're able to manage the patients with Kovin. So it's really. It's really a two-way learning street. Many of us are familiar with the ICU services that Mayo provides is tele- ICU. Different in some way than an e I say you know. It's the same. Issue is is probably now an outdated moniker. I think the the more traditional and now accepted terms is telly. Icu aware exactly. Can you offer via Tele Medicine so specifically from New York? I'll give you a little context. Was what's happened is their usual intensive care unit has been completely overrun by the number of patients. And so what they what they've had to do was to set up Another sort of ICU in an area of the hospital that typically is not an ICU area. So they took an ambulatory surgery unit and turn that into sort of shift. Icu You almost like a field hospital so to speak and because they only had a certain number of intensive care specialists who typically staff. They're they're smaller ICU. On any given day they've had to bring in physicians and events practice providers from other areas. So really what's happening in the unit that we're rounding in is it would be cardiologists As the intending it would it might be a fellow as the attending might be a an internal medicine specialist hospitalised. And so what we're able to do is bring A little bit of the culture in process and know how of critical care throughput critical care processes. Best Practices. That sorta stuff that those attending might not be familiar with. They've got a huge roster of docs who are able to around in the units But they don't have that sort of ICU. Expertise that is needed to help move patients through the system. And so that's what we bring rounds. We WE RUN. Exxon every patient We give input on medications. We can help them. Does things for patients who are in renal failure. We make sure they get Holidays from their sedation. For example easier you know little little things that we think every day. That aren't intuitive to somebody who doesn't do it on a regular basis. You know as this has progressed. Many of us in clinical practice have become much more familiar telemedicine as far as offering visits into our patients home using telemedicine video visits as well as phone visits. And I'm wondering what other applications to use e perhaps in the hospital or or otherwise for the use of telemedicine in the future. You're right were tell you having been doing this program for seven or eight years. It's very difficult to change culture at Mayo and I think at at many places. We're so used to doing things in person and at the bedside. Even though we've known for some time that telemedicine can bring a lot to patient care and so This crisis has really shined a light on ways to do things differently. And so we've we've actually introduced a telemedicine program into our own medical. Icu We have the same. Probably same in touch tablets. You might be familiar with with the sort of the at home care. These are tablets that are placed in patient rooms in our own intensive care unit that allow providers to Communicate from outside the room so for example patients who are coded positive or or under investigation. We WanNA limit the amount of time you go in and out room. You limit the amount of PB that providers utilizing so we. We've used these tablets with the in touch application to communicate with the nurse in the room to communicate with the patient in the room also to communicate with family members who are still at home and able to visit their loved ones. And I imagine that it's just a matter of getting used to this somewhat. We have patients who haven't wanted really to see us on video visits because it's not something they're familiar with and would prefer to wait and come. C. Span. I think This pandemic may help us make some positive changes that way links crisis breeds chain. I think rather than really having the option to do this. We just need to make it happen to people. Can you know it'll be the learning curve? I think it's it's a lot easier than people into. Is there anything else that you like people to know after cables about Telemedicine we're GONNA see a lot a lot more of it once. The dust settles from coverted. For sure I think you know as we're still in the acute phase of the covert endemic. There still is a lot of bandwidth on our end to to help wherever we can't and so we're trying to get the word out to maybe other institutions that could use us in a similar way and so hopefully these kinds of Media broadcasts can help do that. That's wonderful thank you so much for being with us today Dr Shawn Cable. Who's a critical care.

ICU tele- ICU Mayo Kovin Tele Medicine Kobe Exxon Rochester Dr Shawn Cable coverted New York
"tele" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

05:26 min | 1 year ago

"tele" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"I know when I was training and residency. I really appreciated hearing bullet. Different hospitals did things when we'd have others rotated rotate elsewhere. So I can imagine. That's a really gratifying experience. That that's the point you bring up. A is is that they've seen exponentially more. Kobe patients than we have here in Rochester. So in terms of understanding the disease that coveted brings We're learning from them. We can bring sort of the cultural piece of how an ICU operates from day to day. How the process flows. But we're really learning a ton about how these bases present How they're able to manage the patients with Kovin. So it's really. It's really a two-way learning street. Many of us are familiar with the ICU services that Mayo provides is tele- ICU. Different in some way than an e I say you know. It's the same. Issue is is probably now an outdated moniker. I think the the more traditional and now accepted terms is telly. Icu aware exactly. Can you offer via Tele Medicine so specifically from New York? I'll give you a little context. Was what's happened is their usual intensive care unit has been completely overrun by the number of patients. And so what they what they've had to do was to set up Another sort of ICU in an area of the hospital that typically is not an ICU area. So they took an ambulatory surgery unit and turn that into sort of shift. Icu You almost like a field hospital so to speak and because they only had a certain number of intensive care specialists who typically staff. They're they're smaller ICU. On any given day they've had to bring in physicians and events practice providers from other areas. So really what's happening in the unit that we're rounding in is it would be cardiologists As the intending it would it might be a fellow as the attending might be a an internal medicine specialist hospitalised. And so what we're able to do is bring A little bit of the culture in process and know how of critical care throughput critical care processes. Best Practices. That sorta stuff that those attending might not be familiar with. They've got huge roster of docs who are able to around in the units But they don't have that sort of ICU. Expertise that is needed to help move patients through the system. And so that's what we bring rounds. We WE RUN. Exxon every patient We give input on medications. We can help them. Does things for patients who are in renal failure. We make sure they get Holidays from their sedation. For example easier you know little little things that we think every day. That aren't intuitive to somebody who doesn't do it on a regular basis. You know as this has progressed. Many of us in clinical practice have become much more familiar telemedicine as far as offering visits into our patients home using telemedicine video visits as well as phone visits. And I'm wondering what other applications to use e perhaps in the hospital or or otherwise for the use of telemedicine in the future. You're right were tell you having been doing this program for seven or eight years. It's very difficult to change culture at Mayo and I think at at many places. We're so used to doing things in person and at the bedside. Even though we've known for some time that telemedicine can bring a lot to patient care and so This crisis has really shined a light on ways to do things differently. And so we've we've actually introduced a telemedicine program into our own medical. Icu We have the same. Probably same in touch tablets. You might be familiar with with the sort of the at home care. These are tablets that are placed in patient rooms in our own intensive care unit that allow providers to Communicate from outside the room so for example patients who are coded positive or or under investigation. We WanNA limit the amount of time you go in and out room. You limit the amount of PB that providers utilizing so we. We've used these tablets with the in touch application to communicate with the nurse in the room to communicate with the patient in the room also to communicate with family members who are still at home and able to visit their loved ones. And I imagine that it's just a matter of getting used to this somewhat. We have patients who haven't wanted really to see us on video visits because it's not something they're familiar with and would prefer to wait and come. C. Span. I think This pandemic may help us make some positive changes that way links crisis breeds chain. I think rather than really having the option to do this. We just need to make it happen to people. Can you know it'll be the learning curve? I think it's it's a lot easier than people into. Is there anything else that you like people to know after cables about Telemedicine we're GONNA see a lot a lot more of it once. The dust settles from coverted. For sure I think you know as we're still in the acute phase of the covert endemic. There still is a lot of bandwidth on our end to to help wherever we can't and so we're trying to get the word out to maybe other institutions that could use us in a similar way and so hopefully these kinds of Media broadcasts can help do that. That's wonderful thank you so much for being with us today Dr Shawn Cable. Who's a critical care.

ICU tele- ICU Mayo Kovin Tele Medicine Exxon Dr Shawn Cable Kobe coverted Rochester New York
"tele" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

03:28 min | 1 year ago

"tele" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"George Laurie back with Michael tele Jr he is live in South Africa what time is it there now Michael the gone with my ten plus nine in the morning all right so you're a little ahead of us you renew your time time traveling you're ahead of us exactly where have you guys in New York Michael list if this was a machine Adam's calendar was a machine all portal to get them to another world where are the components for it the machinery that would probably go with that because surely they're not going anywhere with stone structures well that's exactly where most of our modern teachings and modern science has gone wrong and because they don't have enough information and we've been teaching the wrong sign from the wrong information at school today very early age programming on mine and destroying a mind in the process to the simplicity of nature and the natural order around and and how things really work here are we we are the problem with our mainstream science is that and I'll get into house items garland and the tentacles work okay I just want to point out the fault in our mainstream science and the approach we take to that is that we we all believe that time definitely very complex and and complicated that very few people can understand it and yet it happens around a miracle happened around us all the time you know what our bodies grow out of a single cell and the density to be complex bodies of trillions of cells and we have nothing to do with it hi this is nothing to do with it it's all part of nature and it's all part of this incredible thing the natural order of things around up and and and we practice of science gold reduction of crime well we believe that if we break something down and if we see the parts of the components are something like open up the human body and we see all the body exists up skin and heart and lungs and liver and kidneys and muscle and bone we see we can we've identified all the components of the body now we understand what the body is we have no bloody idea so how what about how the body works which is identified as very sore but shallow level of what the body is made up of could not be out of work the complexity of it and what actually drives it now in our most advanced technology the very important components that drive our most advanced technology are so simple that people can't actually grasp it and that's called silicon based technology the Lincoln valley although most advanced computers in the world all driven by crystal or silicon and carbon and silica based component fiber optics and and sample so when you start looking at stones and what makes up the two most abundant element on earth which is Walker and Sandel silica water and silica and stone rock you start to see the fundamental building block of advanced technology and for those looking there's a list of yours that are listening to us right now that I've done the research will know what I'm talking about the most advanced technology.

George Laurie Michael tele Jr South Africa
"tele" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"tele" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Of course was Emily Tele. But let's look at it. A little more seriously interest rates are moving and now volatility is spilled over in a commodities, and in particular, the the oil market, some blame the drop in the Dow this week on the decline in crude oils price, only, Wall Street could think that a drop in energy prices is a bad thing. I mean, everybody else's enjoying low prices at the pump. But no investors think this is a bad thing. Crude oil fell below sixty dollars a barrel on Monday, that's the eleven th consecutive daily decline. That's like two weeks. Oil prices have been steadily dropping remember a couple of weeks ago on the shell. And I told you that crude oil was among the better performing asset classes for the year. We just fast forward a couple of weeks later and now crude oil is on its longest losing streak on record. So it just shows to go ya. It's almost impossible to predict what any of these markets. Are going to do in the short term. And that's why we don't even make the attempt. It's a losers game. Even the pros so-called can't make the short term approach work. And if you want to proof of this just look no further than the hedge fund industry. Hedge funds are suffering through the period of the some of the worst performance they've ever had so far this year. Investors of yanked about eleven billion dollars out of hedge funds. Hedge funds just had their worst month ever in October. And if you're listening to the show back in October. You heard me talk about the big drop in the Dow back then and and by the way, if you missed the show, you can listen to it just go to Rick element dot com. Click on the radio button. Anyway, the Dow two weeks ago it surged it gained five hundred forty points the day after the midterm elections and up thirteen hundred points for the past couple of weeks. But then on Monday this week fell six hundred. So this is just saying, no, we're not an environment. Where prices are steadily rising, nor are we an environment. Where prices are settled a falling instead were an environment. Where prices are steadily changing up one day down the next. It's called volatility. Nothing unusual about it. What's been unusual is that we haven't had much volatility for the past year or two or three or four, but volatility is back, and that's raising questions from a lot of folks. And so while these price movements might be making you feel bad. Well, it's just not as nearly a big a deal as you might think it is.

Emily Tele Rick two weeks eleven billion dollars sixty dollars one day
"tele" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

03:05 min | 3 years ago

"tele" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Tele cuts diplom most look just upscale main saying games in dinner choices laughter limit noise pin about the lack of that money the real you we are now catholic jerry next was she do.

jerry