17 Burst results for "ted meissner"

"ted meissner" Discussed on Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

03:13 min | 4 months ago

"ted meissner" Discussed on Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

"You are listening to episode one sixty five of present moment to present moment. Mindfulness practice and science. I'm ted meissner present. Moment is a podcast with interviews conversations.

"ted meissner" Discussed on Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"ted meissner" Discussed on Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

"You're listening to episode one sixty of present moment to present moment. Mindfulness practice and science. I'm Ted Meissner present. Moment is a podcast with interviews conversations and roundtable discussions. We speak with mindfulness. Researchers about their newest findings published in peer reviewed science journals teachers about their understanding and methods as they work with students..

"ted meissner" Discussed on Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

02:21 min | 1 year ago

"ted meissner" Discussed on Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

"You're listening to episode one fifty nine of present moment. Welcome to present moment. Mindfulness practice and science. I'm Ted Meissner present. Moment is a podcast with conversations and roundtable discussions..

"ted meissner" Discussed on Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

02:23 min | 1 year ago

"ted meissner" Discussed on Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

"You're listening to episode one fifty eight of presence moments to present moment. Mindfulness practice and science. I'm Ted Meissner present. Moment is a podcast with interviews conversations and roundtable discussions..

"ted meissner" Discussed on Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"ted meissner" Discussed on Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

"You're listening to episode one fifty seven of present moment to present moment. Mindfulness practice and science. I'm Ted Meissner present. Moment is a podcast with conversations and roundtable discussions. We speak with mindfulness. Researchers about their newest findings published in peer reviewed science journals teachers about their understanding and methods..

"ted meissner" Discussed on Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

02:43 min | 1 year ago

"ted meissner" Discussed on Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

"You're listening to episode one fifty six of present moment to present moment. Mindfulness practice and science. I'm Ted Meissner present. Moment is a podcast with interviews conversations and roundtable discussions. We speak with mindfulness. Researchers about their newest findings published in peer reviewed journals teachers about their understanding and methods as they work with students..

"ted meissner" Discussed on Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

03:07 min | 1 year ago

"ted meissner" Discussed on Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

"You are listening to episode one fifty one of present moment. ooh present moment. Mindfulness practice and science science. I'm Ted Meissner present. Moment is podcast with interviews conversations and roundtable discussions. We speak with mindfulness. Researchers truth about their newest findings published in peer reviewed science journals teachers about their understanding and methods..

"ted meissner" Discussed on Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"ted meissner" Discussed on Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

"You listening to episode one fifty present moment Welcome to present moment. Mindfulness practice INSCI- I'm Ted Meissner present. Moment is podcast with interviews conversations and roundtable discussions. We speak with mindfulness. Most teachers about their newest findings published in peer reviewed science journals teachers about their understanding and.

"ted meissner" Discussed on Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"ted meissner" Discussed on Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

"You listening to episode one fifty present moment Welcome to present moment. Mindfulness practice INSCI- I'm Ted Meissner present. Moment is podcast with interviews conversations and roundtable discussions. We speak with mindfulness. Most teachers about their newest findings published in peer reviewed science journals teachers about their understanding and.

"ted meissner" Discussed on Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

02:47 min | 1 year ago

"ted meissner" Discussed on Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

"He will listening to episode one forty nine of present moment Welcome to present moment. Mindfulness practice INSCI- I'm Ted Meissner present. Moment is podcast with interviews.

"ted meissner" Discussed on Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"ted meissner" Discussed on Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

"You're listening to episode one forty eight of present moment Welcome to present moment. Mindfulness practice INSCI- I'm Ted Meissner present. Moment is podcast with interviews conversations and roundtable discussions. We speak with mindfulness. Most teachers about their newest findings published in peer reviewed science journals teachers about their.

"ted meissner" Discussed on Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

18:19 min | 1 year ago

"ted meissner" Discussed on Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

"INSCI- I'm Ted Meissner present moment is podcast with interviews conversations and roundtable discussions we speak with mind she received her medical degree from the University of Minnesota and completed her surgical residency UC SF she's also a member of the American in College of Surgeons Carter is director of UCSF Center for Mindfulness in surgery as twenty years of personal practice in mindfulness meditation and self directed learning regarding stress condition and resilience she's taken mindfulness teacher training for physicians to the University of ride gesture and is a graduate of Teachers Scholars Program and Medical Education UC SF special thanks to Susan coup for knitting today's interview our guest today is Carter Collaborations Carter thank you so much for being with us today my pleasure thanks for inviting me I you know I read the note about your study I knew immediately that he really wanted to speak with you about a number of different topics to that let's start with just having you tell us about your background okay I grew up in Minneapolis Minnesota and I bring that ups because I lived as a youth in a neighborhood in Minneapolis that ended up inspiring me to do all of this work later in life this was the powder Horn neighborhood and so those of you who are familiar Minneapolis in the eighties it was really diverse social justice oriented neighborhood with a lot of economic challenges also a tremendous amount of profit us and very much a sense of people having a civic duty to their community and to the world at large so that was really absorbed into me from a young age and as I grew up I watched their young people that were my friends and neighbors playmates many of them have how's tremendously different trajectories than I had and so at a pretty early age I started noticing this difference in and what people were able to and allowed to do themselves in their life and as I got older this interest it became a little bit more focused and I found myself drawn to science and drawn to eventually medicine and in that process I started to learn about resilience and resilient science and at that point in time which would've been I guess the mid nineties mid to late nineties there were almost no studies linking resilience and mindfulness those two worlds were parallel absolutely but quite distinct and it wasn't until I started medical school at the University of Minnesota I was first introduced to mindfulness in NBA Sr John kept soon thankfully there's an academically affiliated center at the University of Minnesota that's very much invested in complementary and alternative listen and was through them that made this acquaintance and that was my realize that this idea of resilience this thing that I was hoping to figure out how to teach young people might take her form of teaching mindfulness Oh that was what I said about to do and when I entered medical school I plans to become some kind of doctor that conciliate this work like a adolescent health care provider primary care provider and that persisted until I opened my first abdomen in a surgery as a advanced students and it just blew my mind and I knew that I needed to be around that kind of thing for rest of my life that's possible and so I went surgery not really knowing how it would relate to this other passion of mine but just sort of trusting that somehow it would become clear and and after many many years of training I found myself at UCSF and sitting down with the chair of surgery talking about future academic appointments and become faculty and she is a marvelous woman who asks me what I thought my research interest would be and I told her truths were twins an interested in resilience and training resilience through mindfulness meditation and doing it for people who are the color potential but highly stressed and she said well we don't have any economically stressed at lessons around here we have a bunch of surgeons and they need this bad as anyone so why don't you start with them and that was really genesis that's an amazing story we'll talk a little bit more maybe after the podcast about Minneapolis shared interests as well so on I'm very interested in it sounds like inch in the area that you wanted to go into that there wasn't an immediate rejection of that that off and within the medical profession saying you know I'm interested in this particular area for quite some time others have reported that they were discouraged from getting into that either is a therapist or medical professional areas but it sounds like there was some encouragement at least within the domain of healthcare itself the surgeons in particular were having difficulties with was it like for you to get to get that yeah you know there's a need for this here how how did that played well it was interesting because so much of our culture is based on outcomes across us and I think we're coming to learn especially as in medicine as we embrace pally care and hospice and this idea that perhaps it's not the goal should just prolong life but to rather in surer lives are spent richly and well or to encourage health rather than just longevity I think we're beginning to see that the process really others but honestly I I was constrained by that same way of thinking when this first came up because my first thought was is how will surgeons ever be open to the idea that there's a whole new avenue of skills is in training that they quote unquote need when they are already so high performing and so excellent and this was really conundrum for me I mean I really trusted my mentor that she knew what she was talking about she was quite a veteran had been doing her job for twenty years at the time our conversation and but it was really when I found myself having a conversation about this one art when one of the real historical lions of our departments who was a good twenty years older and my mentor and one of the surgeons that really paved the way for modern surgery today who happened to be deeply interested in this subject of perception and resilience and personal experience and I don't know after one or two conversations and what I felt like I could trust him for that just answer I said I have to ask you why would any of you or US want to do this and you and you case in point like why are you why are you interested in this when you've done it all you know you're an internationally respected you textbooks use pioneered and hire new avenues in surgery that have been profession and life changing for countless people like who cares and it was pretty astounding he said but imagine if I had known balance or happiness or joy or myself else during that process what more could I have done what more could I have passed on to someone else for them to build on and it made me realize that that there were regrets as well as an awareness of a loss of something that was present even in these people on the outside were flawless and so that was bad the conversation was probably almost equally as important as the encouragements I got initially from my mentor chairwoman and it sounds like the connected with as you have been describing your background but there was this this need to to help others yeah it was not just an individual experience of navel-gazing and I could have been more it's also how different the world in that yes stink up with how's your life had gone yeah it's really true I think it's interesting how we sort of categorized suffering you know my sufferings more than yours or mine worse than yours and it's been funny subtle education that it is important to acknowledge difference says that I can't necessarily understand your unique suffering but we all share the experience of suffering in one way or another and that's absolutely not depressing at all that's actually really wonderful you know it's this strange universal experience that binds yes so let's shift a little bit to the Center for Mindfulness in surgery and how how that really got started because no that's established thing how did that start back well so after I had that conversation with my chairwoman a little more time collapsed a couple years where I sort of thought about what this would look like I finished my training I finished my fellowship training and I came back from my fellowship training to use APPS and was essentially give him a charge to conduct the for study and to be perfectly honest I didn't know anything about conducting clinical trial but I knew a lot about good science and I certainly know tremendous amount about the literature around contemplation mindfulness studies designing mind from studies etc and so really relaunched this ridiculously comprehensive randomized controlled trial of a small group of Surgery turns doing everything from psychological self report assays all the way up to teela mirrors and hair cortisol levels and functional brain scans and it was quite a crazy experience besides my chairwoman I think at that ahead of time every other surgeon clinician administrator or leader I spoke to almost down to Emam thought it was ridiculous and the funny thing is is that of them said I think ideas Nicolas but I trust you or I like you or I believe you so I'll help you even though I think what you're going to end up with is a big handful victimless so that was out and then go for them after hasn't gotten through these processes yeah well it's actually really interesting because is I love surgeons I love the way surgeons think approach things of course there's variety among us but one thing I found true who is that if you put in the effort to build evidence and not hand wave not exaggerate not embellish but just tell the truth and tell it as cleanly and completely as you possibly can they will weigh for themselves and they are apps willing to do a one eighty and correct their ways based on what you find and so that was actually one of my biggest champions now is a person who at the beginning said this is completely cockamamie will but I will let you do it simply because I can't stand near you ask me time distance yeah so persistence but but now interestingly just a year ago we started offering Asas for faculty and even though people initially were very begrudging about allowing their residents to attend the trainings it's now becomes something where more and more senior levels are asking for training and we've actually adapted at cred faculty and I think somewhere around seventy or eighty surgery amnesty the faculty had done the same training so it's it's an interesting we're kind of an inflection point here in terms of like a cultural change you think it's one of the challenges is that mindfulness teachers often have is resistance from MD's when it comes to mindfulness your way of working with that in a really appreciate how you're characterizing could sciences that of course it's tentative and as we get new information we change our minds to reflect what the data does it's not about Bella Shing or pawn a fast one on a Detroit will what do we see what actually happens in practice and how do we measure that it's not all just self report metric measures in the rest of us I am thank you so much for doing good science I'm I'm very curious to hear more about your thoughts on active controls for my that is of course one of the difficulties of is not just wait list but also we have active controls around maybe we can talk a little bit about the study that we're here in Chatham bone is the efficacy of mindfulness base hydrated raining in surgery helps a little bit about the study itself what did you do how did this get started so this was the first pilot study I did back in two thousand sixteen and since then we've done two additional actually free but the fourth wave is varied in extent but in this first pilot study we sent out invitations to the entire incoming class of surgery insurance asa and invited all of them to participate in this eight week long training that was two hours per week with twenty minutes of recommended homework that was our population our target population we had about fifty percents of those interns enroll well and and these were insurance that we're all doing our initial year of training in general surgery but who were slated to launch into neurosurgery ear nose and throat urology plastics or Max face all different kinds of subs specialties so it was quite an eclectic mix but all surgeons at heart and the active control that we used.

UC SF director UCSF Center Ted Meissner University of Minnesota College of Surgeons Carter twenty years twenty minutes eight week two hours
"ted meissner" Discussed on Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

15:24 min | 1 year ago

"ted meissner" Discussed on Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

"INSCI- I'm Ted Meissner present moment is podcast with interviews conversations and roundtable discussions we speak with mind many people come to mind awfulness practice for the first time may find it difficult maybe even exhausting work soon after the reasons not to meditate show merrily the excuse of being too busy and perhaps when it's seen as taking an hour to out of your day to formally sit that might be true but what if being present wasn't effort full but effort less and didn't require carving out additional time to work on IT Kelly this leader in field of meditation and psychotherapy his author as award-winning shift into freedom and founder of the open hearted awareness in the toot our guest today is luck Kelly walk welcome to the podcast good to see you thanks to yeah great to be here again I'm glad I'm back in and talking about some new things together so this actually this is the new audience for you this is on present moment I know you and I have spoken from podcast that I do and wondering if you might take a few minutes and just introduce yourself to this audience whatever you feel is appropriate about your background just to fail hello and to say that I kind of stumbled into this field of being in the now Oh and being in this world of mindfulness and a probably through sports I would say is probably if I look back I can remember for a time where I actually heard as a fourteen year old on TV at sports caster said he's got eyes in the back of his head and I kind of said he's got eyes in the back of his head I kind of know what he means but what does he really mean literally tried to I look as if psychically looking behind but then I after a couple of tries I literally relaxed like I was opening my peripheral vision you do when you're driving a car so going from one pointed nece to kind of open and then somehow I just continued to open awareness around to the sides where my sound was coming and going and it almost felt as if my wariness went behind me and then dropped into my body and I was like wow okay oh this is how I feel when I'm in a flow state playing sports oh I can intentionally do this rather than wait until it happens naturally and so I started kind of playing with this and one day that was playing ice hockey goalie and kind of applying it one of the seniors on the ice hockey team heard me talking about it and threw me a book and said here kid read this and it was zen in the art of archery and so I thought Oh my God this is there's a group of people that can access this this is a real thing to learn about people value this it does you know they're saying it brings I'm joy and happiness it's like related to meditation and so it really kind of took me early on into this world old which kind of showed up naturally and I got to say it was delighted in reading the book to see a reference to hockey which I don't get to enjoy an owner Folkston mindfulness so from this early introduction in seeing that there was a different way of encountering the world's devout Rena w-we to be where present how did that grow in your life what happened next I think you know it it led me to really just be more open and it was funny as I think back I I kind of remember at one point being on a bus from school and thinking Oh this is what adults must talk about this must be like the secret thing and and as we all know this is not where the ducks talks and but it because so amazing literally took me out of my adolescent chattering mind and self conscious worry and fear and into a feeling of wellbeing an embodiment and being in the now and just kind of being relaxed so I kept you know I must say I kept this lot I kept coming back in different ways I ended up doing T. I'm at sixteen and then at seventeen during when I went to college doing a zen retreat and then my father developed brain cancer at eighteen right before I went to college and I was Kinda overweight home by grief there weren't a lot of other friends of mine who had gone through this my father then passed away soon after that and I was coming out of the library one night on a kind of a beautiful cold clear night and I was walking back to my door German I just heard a voice in my mind say I don't know if I can take this anymore and the interesting thing was I kind of looked up with my awareness if it was coming from the top of my head or Bob or something but what happened was my awareness opened up in this kind of ceramic way manage even opened up into this kind of big sky mind feeling this kind of open aware this and I felt like you know connected to everything in the universe that I felt like this burden lifted and I felt kind of acted and protected and you know I started laughing and crying and just feeling like Oh my God this is like I felt so weighted down so small solar wound and now there's this feeling of freedom and joy and and connection to something greater than myself that just felt like awareness or the world or universe or something that was subtle but opened me up and and let me be at the same time here more fully so that kind of led me to both interested in medicine Nation in psychology and neuroscience and led me to graduate school and those kind of areas and then I won a fellowship to go to Sri Lanka Aw where I did nine months doing ten day retreats and twenty one day retreats and Inva- Pasadena Insight Meditation Terada tradition and then what I did is I went up north to India and actually bumped into who the Dalai Lama who had just come back from France where he had a given his first talk on section which is Tibetan goodest direct path tradition and he was all excited and I put my hand up I said wow that was amazing who should I go study with and he said well actually there's one person in the Pol his name is Taco Ergen remember Shea and so I changed my plans jumped on a bus and a train it off I went to Nepal and walked up this mountain to this little Hut Nugget Gumbo little area he lived in and then he gave a talk about half an hour and then gave this short glimpse practice and within three minutes I felt the same way I felt at the end of a long meditation retreat except my eyes were open and I was not just calm but I was joined listen here and now so I immediately was curious about what is this and and what just happened awful story in for folks who are curious about the book there are some interesting background that's included in that but I'd like to to jump forward into the Brooke Way of effortless mindfulness and talk a little bit about what this is what do you mean by Beffa Tlass mindfulness and how that's distinct from what listeners may have encountered elsewhere shore so it you know effortless mindfulness is is pretty much what I just described the premise is there's another dimension of consciousness that's already effortlessly aware that kind of hidden by this habit of orienting to fought and creating a point of view that is referencing on fought going to another thought and then going to emotion and then going to body and then creating this separate sense of self and that when we find way to let go open or discover or immediately recognize realize this heartless awareness we can be mindful from there rather than from a com- attentional position or even kind of detached mindful witness so literally is like a third type of mindfulness from a different level of mine so this is based on a few different foundations. I think you articulate five in the book and if he can say a little bit about those foundations so the foundations are kind of the movements of awareness but certainly just a start for those who are listening with the first one is the that there's already a kind of effortless ease that is not just passive but actually is a awake spacious us and that most of us do what we love to do in our free time in order to actually have moments or afternoons or days of this so it's it's interesting often meditation is started and associated with sitting still or closing is or retreating but awakening which is what effortless services about is about a open I'd engaged direct connection with others in the world and it's in a wakened life has to be because you can't just well you could stay in a cave or or monastery but it's interesting that effortless mindfulness this is done by small glimpses with is open many times during your day and then going immediately back in activity so that's the first kind of movement is rather than setting yourself apart calming and quieting retreating closing your eyes you literally learn to open your awareness rather than concentrated in one point to open the awareness to discover that there's already an spacious awareness that's already installed within you that you can be aware from there and then respond and then it's almost like being in a flow state eight or what athletes call being the zone so you literally are not withdrawn and passive as some people feel is kind of the caricature of people who meditate a lot it's like sitting back and saying like would you like some tea and they say all tiers it's the same anything we'll be fine those no problem with anything that serious representation I get into discussions in this podcast you're aware arguments sometimes with folks who characterize contemporary mindfulness teaching is being very describe it's a moving in it's opening it's active in engaged not navel-gazing there the evidence free mongering of what mindfulness is is you're describing yeah yeah so the effortless one of the unique things as it doesn't start with concentration it starts with opening and it doesn't focus on the contents of consciousness which is what four foundations of mindfulness star it by focusing first on the breath as kind of one point in this concentration but then trots since ations feelings pleasant and unpleasant and then mind objects so you're looking from a mindful meditation at contents coming and going which and relieve you of that I sense that you're a solid self made out of thoughts but then the really the magic move or the first movie love effortless is our let's not look at the content let's look at the content let's turn to see what's behind the camera let's look the medicare open up to see who's aware of what's coming and going and literally that changes the whole game so that awareness of awareness is the first of the what I.

Ted Meissner twenty one day fourteen year three minutes nine months one day ten day
"ted meissner" Discussed on Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

10:27 min | 2 years ago

"ted meissner" Discussed on Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

"You're listening to episode one thirty five of presence moments. To present moment, mine from this practice and science. I'm Ted Meissner present moment is podcast with interviews cumbersome options and roundtable discussions, we speak with mindfulness teachers about their newest findings published in peer reviewed science journals. Teachers about their understanding and methods as they work with students of mindfulness authors about their books and interests. And we also speak with everyday practitioners, the websites, present moment, mindfulness dot com has shown notes for each episode along with resource materials. Doctor Sunderland's Lawrence in Somali joins us to speak about her study on mindfulness helping caregivers of veterans. If you're listening to this podcast and find value and insights from what is shared here, know that this is made available from your generosity and the generosity of others, like you, I want to thank those of you who are making monthly donations to keep this podcast going, and if you're not yet, please take a moment. Go to present moment, mindfulness dot com and click on make donation, one time or especially monthly donations show. You value this work, which can't happen without you. Thank you for your help support. Enter kind generosity. We've done several episodes on this podcast about mindfulness for military personnel, pre and post deployment to help them with resulting problems like PTSD or the prevention of it. Those challenges are sometimes faced by others as well as informal caregivers, like spouses, or mediate, family veterans can be forgotten in the need for help as they help through loved ones. Particularly in underserved communities. Dr Sandra lose Loris in his home. Oh, is a developmental psychologist whose research focuses on a dressing, mental health disparities in women and mothers, particularly racial, and ethnic minorities, immigrants and military populations. Her research approach builds a framework focused on psychosocial, cultural structural, and psychological factors. Specifically, she examines? How contextual factors are associated with poor mental health populations of interest as such? She takes an integrated approach to understanding mental health disparities in mothers and women recently, she completed several studies that examined associations between hormone function and perinatal depression, in the Dina's Korean studies, also tested, the effectiveness of a mindfulness based intervention undoing stress, depression, anxiety, and worry in caregivers veterans most of whom were women currently she's conducting multi site study. On prenatal, depression, diabetes, and disease management. Argus today is Dr Sandra's Laura and Somo Oakham to the podcast. Nice to have you here, happy to be here. So, before we get into our main topic, which is the research that you've done, and I'm really interested to hear more about that one. You tell us a little bit about your background. Okay. You know, that's always a funny question to answer because I want to say to you mean my cultural background on my professional background. So just give it a little bit of both because they think it's important for people to know who I am in what Mayan tation is when I approached research. So am a Mexican immigrant. I grew up in south central Angeles. Very traditional Mexican household hard-working very religious Catholic. And so I grew up with very, very clear work ethics in our family and the importance of family, and support so is very collective environment. And that really helped me, I think, to become successful in pursuing teaching research, and providing service to the community because I understood early on the importance of the group. And so that is my cultural orientational and enters my research in training. So I grew up in south central EA, and I was fortunate enough to meet someone who literally drove me to a community college 'cause I, I was not college prep Amin roles community college transferred to Cal State Northridge where I got a bachelor's in development. I was very interested in children and families from there. I went on to get a master's at Harvard. Scuba Chiquet shin than when not get my PHD at Columbia University. So might training is around families development psychologist by training. And so my focus is always been the life course. And so I've taught before coming to the university of Illinois. I underwent some intensive training at UNC Chapel Hill to learn about hormone monk shin at round reproductive mood disorders, my other arm of researches on mental health in mothers and during the perinatal period, especially during pregnancy and postpartum. But before that I was a faculty member at Younes Charlotte and prior to that, I actually worked at the RAND Corporation for about nine years, and that's where I was introduced to military families, and I did work on looking at the consequences of deployment onto children and the spouse, most of home, where women who were then responsible for all the changes that were happening in their house. Hold taking on another dishing responsibilities in dealing with the stress of having a partner who was away out of the country. Sometimes not acceptable, due to communication barriers or safety reasons for the background, I wanna hear a little bit more about the lab itself and how the hell that really contributes to the work that you're doing may be saying a little bit about your staff as well. Yes. So thank you for taking interest in my research, Daf. So I have a wonderful group of graduate, students who draw from here at the college of applied house sciences. Most of them are either a master's in community health, students or their masters in public health students, so they're interested in health and wellbeing in general, and they come with different career aspirations, but also different skill sets. Some of my students also come from outside of the country. Currently I have a student from Nigeria, she'll be graduating in may. She's been with me for two years on I also. So have a pretty diverse Latino group of students, I have a Colombian student, a student from Columbia, who is an aspiring opposition. And then I have a Mexican American student who is finishing up her masters in public health. And then my other student is also Mexican descent from San Diego. So pretty diverse group, I've always tried to recruit a diverse of students, and not just racial ethnically, but economically diverse. So a low income white, maybe first time college or graduate school students in their families. So try to make sure that we have a Representative sample that really reflects the diversity of the country. Thank you for that. If you're doing that work to one of things that United discussed briefly before we started recording was just how really wonderfully diverse group that you the. Symbol at the lab is thank you for doing that. So let's talk a little bit about this new study that you've done and what it is. Let's say I what was it that made you want to do this particular study? Yeah. So as I mentioned previously, I used to work at the RAND Corporation, where we focused on active duty garden reserve. Spouses and publish papers looking at the stress that those spouses, experienced in the context of deployment. And so now that there have been white out wind down in the wars, and we have a large group of veterans that need services. We also know that this is a life changing experience for the spouse or other family members, who are primarily responsible for helping the than servicemember now veteran. And so the RAND Corporation, did an interesting study looking at with a defined hidden heroes looking at the care givers. And they found that. Caregivers of veterans were experiencing Highland was a psychological distress because of the number of hours. They were having to put in the different responsibilities. They were taking on and really the stress that comes for caring for someone who needs complex support in health care services. So at the university of Illinois to vanish an pain, where I am faculty member. We have a wonderful center called the jazz center for wounded veterans in higher education, and they put a call out for funding and their focus was on the veterans, but I really made a push in my grant application for focusing on the caregivers other veterans because we know that they are unsung heroes, and we know that they take on a lot of responsibility have an important role in the wellbeing of our veterans. And so that project funded the objective of that application was to conduct the randomized control. Trial of mindfulness intervention that would target stress worry anxiety, and depressive symptoms in the caregivers. So

RAND Corporation Dr Sandra faculty member Ted Meissner Doctor Sunderland Columbia University Highland Angeles Lawrence university of Illinois Harvard San Diego Somo Oakham UNC Chapel Hill Nigeria partner Columbia
"ted meissner" Discussed on Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

08:14 min | 2 years ago

"ted meissner" Discussed on Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

"You're listening to episode one thirty four of present moment. To present moment mindfulness practice and science. I'm Ted Meissner. Present moment is a podcast with interviews conversations and round table discussions. We speak with mindfulness. Researchers about their newest findings published in peer reviewed science journals teachers about their understanding methods as they work with students of mindfulness authors about their books and interests, and we also speak with everyday practitioners. The website present moment, mindfulness dot com has shoe notes for each episode long with resource materials. Lurk lesser joins us to speak about seven practices mindful leader lessons from Google zen monastery kitchen. If you're listening to this podcast and find value in insights from what is shared here know that this is made available from your generosity in the generosity of others. Like, you I want to thank those of you who are making monthly donations to keep this podcast going. If you're not yet, these take a moment. Go to present moment mindfulness dot com and click on make donation one time or especially monthly donations show. You value this work, which can't happen without you. Thank you for your help your support and your kind generosity. Critics of mindfulness and the business world of often a host of objections to contemporary of practice being used to pacify workers to untenable working conditions. This is quite strikingly. In contrast, the experience those of us who actually teach in corporations as we're typically involved in this work for the purpose of transformation on a personal and social level mindfulness is about seeing things as they are and making changes internally and externally leaders whether that is by position in an organization, or by personal words and actions are best place to foster the kind of conditions in which each of us would like to work and live and that his well-supported by mindfulness. Mark lesser is a CEO zen teacher and author who offers trainings and talks worldwide. He has led mindfulness and emotional intelligent programs. Many of the world's leading businesses and organizations including Google SAP Genentech and Twitter. Our guest today is Mark lesser, Mark. Welcome to the podcast hedge on my other pug casts of your new to present moment. So welcome glad to have you here. Thank you. Ted. My pleasure. So let's get started by just having describe a bit about your background before we dive into the book top end for you. It's interesting because you live in a couple of different worlds that are pertinent to this. Yeah. Definitely. Well, my background. My my one year leave of absence from Rutgers University turned into ten years of living at the San Francisco zen center was kind of the the big big moment in my life. And and interesting how how. I think one of the many surprises about that that ten years. I think the the importance in power of community was was a surprise. You know, I went out like I think many of us did at the time. Right. Our own kind of spiritual spiritual search or search for meaning or search. There is some the some strong sense that there must be more than what I felt like a college had to offer and the idea of to graduate from college and get a job. And none of that was all that compelling and yet starting to read read and discover this whole other world of. From existentialism to. Maslo humanistic psychology and then discovering Buddhism. Then I felt like I needed to explore. The other real surprising thing about that. Ten years was the prominent role of work. And and I it was one of the mysteries was during that time. I kept being asked to take on greater leadership roles from no figuring out how to farm with horses, which is something I did for three years and survived and and then a many years working in and then running zen monastery kitchen at Tulsa HARA. And then my last year my tenth year being the director Ottosson are those those two roles, especially the running the kitchen and being director. Were really surprising in terms of how challenging an how much I felt there was to learn by being in leadership role and also in the. Kind of the sense of work as practice and really live living in breathing it and getting it into my my bones work and leadership as as practice and ended ended up in against surprisingly setting. The course for the rest of my life in that. I thought. I thought well one I really like this really like the sense of work as practice and leadership as practice, and I wondered why isn't everybody doing this? This makes this would make so much sense out in the in the world. And I I set off on that path and went back and finished school right into New York University got an MBA degree. And and then I started I ended up starting a publishing company of agreeing card and calendar company called brush dance, where I was the CEO of for fifteen years of my life doing that in and in some way, I look back and think well in so many different things one. It was a it was a beautiful at again had it's credible things to learn from growing business like that and the ups and downs and hirings and firings and expanding into dot com and going back to a wholesale company. But, but I learned a law was, you know, we licensing. The words of the Dalai Lama intake nut Han told you roomie. So it was very much surprise against pricing aligned with my values. And and it was time for me to leave that that that role after about fifteen years and then soon after I

Mark lesser Ted Meissner Google zen monastery CEO zen teacher director New York University Google CEO Rutgers University zen monastery San Francisco Twitter Han Ottosson Tulsa HARA fifteen years ten years three years Ten years
"ted meissner" Discussed on Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

06:20 min | 2 years ago

"ted meissner" Discussed on Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

"You're listening to episode one thirty three of present moment. To present moment mine from this practice and science. I'm Ted Meissner present moment is podcast with interviews cumbersome nations. And roundtable discussions, we speak with mindfulness teachers about their newest findings published in peer reviewed science journals teachers about their understanding and methods as they work with students of mindfulness authors about their books and interests, and we also speak with everyday practitioners. The website present moment mindfulness dot com has shown notes for each episode along with resource materials. Liz replid joins us to speak about mindfulness with nature and sustainable three. And find value insights from what is shared here know that this is made available from your generosity and the generosity of others. Like, you I want to thank those of you who are making monthly donations to keep this podcast going. And if you're not yet, please take a moment. Go to present moment mindfulness dot com and click on Megan ation one time or especially monthly donations show. You value this work, which can't happen without you. Thank you for your help your support and you're kind generosity. Lately, there have been a lot of conversations about mindfulness and the ways in which it's growing in western society, knowing that there is no singular culture in that very big environment, mindfulness is arising in many ways, some of them are think missing core aspect of mindfulness in that they are like an exchange if you do mindful, meditation, you will get some results another may be outcomes in practice, certainly. There are many of us who live mindfully as best we can making it transactional can also make it somewhat. Mercenary mindfulness is a teach in practice, it has wider implications. And as inservice of changes beyond what happens on the cushion. This Rutledge is deeply passionate about the environment. And it's been doing mindfulness in one form or another since she was ten years old. She teaches mindfulness in schools in the Denver area, and is in the process of getting her mindful school certification, Liz teaches people to come posts garden, recycle and other sustainability activities a blogger and has written the blog on sustainable, three dot coms since twenty fourteen in addition, Liz freelance writer in devils dulls at Oriels and other blogs. Our guest today is Liz Rutledge. Liz, welcome to the podcast it to see glad you're here. Thank you. So I really like to dive in with bit about your background, and then get into the heart of what we're going to be talking about here too. Which is a bit of a follow up from the last interview where talking about mindfulness and bird-watching of clear als rebid a theme which and seeing more and more come up this podcast and the other one that I do on environmental concerns than how much was can help with that. But Liz, let's start by having you tell a bit about your background. Okay. Great. Well, I had been doing my blog at the CENA three dot coms twenty fourteen because it became very aware. Very quickly of the fact that there were not doing enough quick enough to help our planet be healthy for us to live on it. And I started with his blog just trying to help people have certain levels of debt because I think. True sustainable living is really hard for the average person. But maybe we can take little steps. So the one two three is sort of like, maybe you just if you don't recycle you start recycling. You know, maybe level two as you add in composting, and maybe level three's you start tear wait chopping or something like that. So my blog is meant to be simple, easy steps to take toward living more sustainably and just being conscious of the choices that were making coincidentally that same year, a older sibling of friend of my daughter's. He was twelve at the time took his own life. And I thought how ridiculous how does anyone that age even know how to do that? And I went to the school. And I said what can I do? You know, this is insane that that kids are taking their own lives. And I'd like to help them in some way. And I ended up the short story is teaching mindfulness at that middle school for five years doing this mindless thing, and I was doing sustainability thing and then last year sort of realized it's all my from this. It's from this about ourselves, it's mindless, better community and mindless about our planet. That's sort of my slogan, but that's sort of that's how sustainable three came about my background. Basically, the only background. I have around the environment. Is that I grew up in Colorado, and I'm just really care about the environment and having clean air to breathe and fresh water to drink and healthy food to eat and one because of had three children of want to have the planet be a place that they can live

Liz Liz Rutledge Liz replid Ted Meissner Colorado Denver writer five years ten years
"ted meissner" Discussed on Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

03:15 min | 2 years ago

"ted meissner" Discussed on Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

"You're listening to episode one twenty three of present moment. Welcome to present moment mind from this practice and science. I'm Ted Meissner. Present moment is podcast with interviews conversations and round table discussions. We speak with mindfulness. Researchers about their newest findings published in pure reviewed science journals teachers of understanding and methods as they work with students of mindfulness authors about their books and interests, and we also speak with everyday practitioners. The website present moment, mindfulness dot com has shoe notes for each episode long with resource materials. The rain 'em. Hugs joins us to speak about her experiences teaching mindless teens and young adults. You're listening to this podcast. It means you value. The conversations that present moment offers with every episode. This is made available without advertising marketing gimmicks, which is only possible with your financial support. Please take a moment now to positive recording. And visit present moment mindfulness dot com and make your donation to ensure the website and podcast can continue to bring you the guests. You're interested in hearing. Something new teachers of mindfulness encounter is that it's one of the most rewarding activities they can do. And it's also not as easy as it may seem in addition to having personal practice. Spanning decades. Good teachers, also spend years learning the nuances of mindfulness and presenting it to others. This can be even more complicated when the audience has particular needs as when teaching mindfulness to younger people. Lorraine m Hobbs is the director of the youth and family programs at the university of California, San Diego center for mindfulness. During her tenure at the center, she has developed an implementing curricula in mindfulness for multiple age groups, and of course in mindful and compassionate parenting, adolescents certification program, and she also consults with educators on integrating, mindfulness and compassion based programs in schools and offers workshops public talks in the community. Our guest today is Lorraine Hobbs the rain, welcome to the podcast..

Lorraine m Hobbs Ted Meissner San Diego center director university of California