35 Burst results for "ted"

EPISODE 35:  Election Fraud / Interference - The Facts, The History & The Conspiracy Theory - burst 02

The STATECRAFT OBSERVER Podcast

04:09 min | 14 hrs ago

EPISODE 35: Election Fraud / Interference - The Facts, The History & The Conspiracy Theory - burst 02

"It got me thinking back to twenty seventeen And it was about one hundred twenty days into president. Trump's presidency and i wrote an article on statecraft was over dot com called plot. Twist the komi in in it. I kind of touched on a scenario. That i thought was intriguing and it was right around the time that memo's were coming about For komi where the left was just so hard up to try and find something anything they can impeach president trump on and They're at that point in time. The democrats were demanding. Memo's be released in an investigation launched and impeachment proceedings to start and so i theorized in that article that you know what if blinded by their absolute rage over losing the election in november and doing whatever it takes to get president trump out of the white house they now have inadvertently exposed information within other memos comey may have made because they wanted to make all of comey's memo's pop public record right at the time it was all about how komi keeps these immaculate notes on everything and anything he does. It was the whole reason why after he was president trump that one day he immediately went out to his car grabbed laptop and started writing out notes from that from that meeting that everybody wanted where he's a take it easy anyway but that opened the door to all of comey's memo's well at the time and of course s things played out. You know we. We got access to some of them but not all of them and you know it really did kind of turn on the democrats what i thought because know i made the point. Could you imagine the look on president trump's face if he were to be exonerated of any wrongdoing which did happen right. He did get impeached but at the same point in time he got acquitted as well because there was no wrongdoing. Even the molar report showed that there was no wrongdoing. And you know those four hundred and forty eight pages are out there. There's very very little redacted to muller's credit into Ag bars credit there was very little redacted in that document. So you can actually go out and see. Just how much of the report was there. And there was no russian collusion which we knew all along well. Those of us who knew president trump knew all along but i wrote in the plot twists. The komi memo's back in two thousand seventeen and linked to it so you guys can go back and take a look at it if you want to. It's a short article to like a minute and a half to read. But anyway you know if i made the point that if he was exonerated of any wrongdoing and then to add insult to injury for the democratic party that You know they actually exposed through those memos and documents wrongdoing done by the democrats in thereby getting hillary clinton locked up right which you know we finding out now. Due to release of memos that were done earlier this year. But that's exactly what happened. That this whole russian collusion story that chased or that was held over a president trump ted for two years and You know hindered. His presidency in the beginning was all made up and fabricated by hillary. So in prepping for this week's podcast. I was thinking about that and so i wanted to kind of lay out since two thousand seventeen when i wrote that my gut knee joking reaction was actually right just took a while for it to pan out took almost four years for it to pan out but i was right. I wanted to talk about the election fraud now. Obviously we don't have four years to have this one pan out and president trump is running out of time and it's looking more and more likely that we will have a biden harris administration As much as it pains me to say. I

Comey Komi President Trump Donald Trump Democrats White House Muller Democratic Party Hillary Clinton Hillary Biden Harris
Retailers are turning to virtual storefronts this holiday season

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:22 min | 18 hrs ago

Retailers are turning to virtual storefronts this holiday season

"Shopping is big part of the holiday season. We go downtown or to a packed mall browse the store windows smell. The chestnuts roasting in the street. The pandemic has obviously changed all this but some retailers like gap ted baker and ralph. Lauren are trying to deliver that experience to our computers. I just clicked her. A virtual tour of ralph lauren's beverly hills store at the entrance. There's an archway decorated with christmas garlands and a marble fountain with mannequins posed in front of it. I think that that this dude is supposed to be riding a horse or something and there is a saddle next to him. Yeah a saddle. Part of the ranting. I guess. I don't think that it's for sale. And i tried to click on it. But now i ended up in another somewhere else. I don't know where i am. Now let me go back. Oh god okay. I talked about the virtual storefront experience with joe toro a professor at the university of pennsylvania and author of the book. The aisles have is the thing that's weird about it. One is that there's no one else in the store and two. There's no sales people so it's essentially a store after the rest of the world has been destroyed. And when you click on a particular marker next to the goods you see the price of the goods you can actually purchase it. We've seen the companies that make these virtual stores sell themselves during the pandemic as a way to get people in store despite the lockdown Do you think brands are hoping this will drive sales or is it. Just more of a pr move well everything. They're hoping we'll drive sales. I think what it is is an attempt to use the architecture that they have. The stores are brands. The physical architecture says something about store the idea that when you walk into a ralph lauren. Store it's not macy's that's the kind of idea they want to depict find interesting. Is that retailers. Were launching these virtual storefronts even before the pandemic which to me indicates that they think people will want to use them during normal times. Why do you think. Shoppers would go to a virtual store if they could go to one in person because it's easier sometimes because people have gotten used to the idea. The habit of shopping online and because those stores wanna differentiate themselves from amazon. If you can actually walk into ralph lauren. In a way that makes you feel good about what you're doing instead of going on to amazon and just going through a regular kind of standard catalog. Maybe would find more interesting. I mean occurs to me that stores are not always accessible or comfortable for everyone. And don't forget that. If you live in new york los angeles there are stores for just about every brand and so what they're doing is reporting the expensive architecture and branding that they created for these flagship stores in big cities and allowing people all over the country and even the world to go into them. So you've written about. How retailers are remarkably good at tracking us in store figuring out our preferences what we might wanna by using cameras and smartphone apps and gps's how might the data collection process look different in virtual storefront. Well the great thing about that. From the standpoint of the retailer is they can actually follow. Your is particularly if using goggles right. They know what you're looking at. They know where you've gone it has the counterpart of walking through the store. So they can actually see. Have you passed the shoe aisle while maybe if we give you a virtual coupon you'll go back to the shoe while they're that level of lineal activity that they can follow and they can see what you're interested in which is partly possible to do of course on a regular website but in terms of the movement across the store and maybe the the trying on of things and putting them back and all that eventually you'll be able to see in this kind of world That's gonna be useful for Stores to know also where you start when you go to a website you pretty well have search for a particular good and then you put it down or you purchase it when you walk into a store. You may wonder you know. If it's a virtual store the same thing and companies will be really interested in how people wander. That's one of the major issues of creating stores organizing stores figuring out how to get people to buy things. Where do you place your goods based upon how people wonder do you think there's any additional data a retailer might be able to get if you're shopping in its virtual store rather than its in-person store will say say what you look for is one thing if the voice becomes part of it for example if they include a virtual sales people who talk to you the way customers talked to the virtual sales people could become another important piece of data what companies infer from the way you speak and even the literal voice tones that you speak with can tell them things about you. Joe torre wrote the book. The aisles have is

Beverly Hills Store Joe Toro Ralph Lauren Ted Baker University Of Pennsylvania Lauren Ralph Amazon Macy Los Angeles New York Joe Torre
Bob Dylan lyrics, letters sell for nearly half a million dollars

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:31 sec | 1 d ago

Bob Dylan lyrics, letters sell for nearly half a million dollars

"Wind. Yeah. Syriza Booth window. Collection of Bob Dylan memorabilia is selling for nearly half a million dollars. They belong to the estate of Dylan's friend, late musician Tony Glover. They were put up for sale by R R Auction company. Included were letters, unpublished lyrics and hand written lyrics to blowing in the wind. The lyrics, which were dated 2011 fetched the highest price more than 108. $1000

Syriza Booth Tony Glover Bob Dylan Dylan
2 Kansas City fire department members die from COVID-19

Steve and Ted

00:27 sec | 1 d ago

2 Kansas City fire department members die from COVID-19

"Morning to members of the Kansas City Fire Department, died this weekend after battling the coronavirus. Communications specialist and paramedic who worked for the department. Scott Davidson died Sunday, according to the International Association of Firefighters, Local 42 a day earlier, city officials said fire captain Robert Bobby Rocha Died after battling covert 19 for several weeks, the firefighter's union said. Three members of the Kansas City Fire Department have now died with the

Kansas City Fire Department Scott Davidson International Association Of F Robert Bobby Rocha
At least 2 dead in stabbing rampage at San Jose church

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:24 sec | 1 d ago

At least 2 dead in stabbing rampage at San Jose church

"Are dead, Several others seriously wounded following church stabbing in San Jose late Sunday. Police say several people were injured in the attack at Grace Baptist Church reports say a 22 year old man was in custody, but that has not been confirmed by authorities. Yet. Police say no services were taking place at the time, but that homeless individuals Had been brought to the church to get them out of the cold. A 15 year

Grace Baptist Church San Jose
2 Kansas City fire department members die from COVID-19

Steve and Ted

00:27 sec | 1 d ago

2 Kansas City fire department members die from COVID-19

"Two members of the Kansas City Fire Department died this weekend after battling the coronavirus, a communication specialist and paramedic who worked for the department. Scott Davidson died Sunday, according to the International Association of Firefighters, Local 42 Day Earlier, city officials said Fire captain Robert Bobby Rocha died after battling covered 19 for several weeks. Firefighters union said three members of the Kansas City Fire Department have now died with coronavirus for the

Kansas City Fire Department Scott Davidson International Association Of F Robert Bobby Rocha Firefighters Union
Dr. Leana Wen (with Rock the Boat)

Model Majority Podcast

06:02 min | 2 d ago

Dr. Leana Wen (with Rock the Boat)

"I'm happy to join you today. I am dr lena. I'm emergency physician and public health professor george washington university. I also previously served as the health commissioner for the city of baltimore into it wouldn't be a complete introduction here without mentioning that i am a chinese american immigrant. My parents and i came to the us. Just before. i turned eight. And i'm also the you mother of two. I have a son who just turned three and a baby daughter who is five months old. My gosh congratulations. I also noticed that you are from shanghai. As am i so. I don't know if that you still speak shanghainese at all at home. I actually never did. Because i was raised primarily with my grandparents on my father's side whom did not come from shanghai and so i understand shanghainese but actually never spoke. We will not do a practice here. team that don't come late rayo he say you're gonna understand it and kerley speak it. It's always great to connect with somebody from my hometown. We always love to start with an origin story. Lena and you just have such an incredible ordinance story. And you've talked about it in your ted talks and everything but i'm kind of curious like what little was like thinking about this because i look at my son and someone told me prior to you having kids and i didn't really understand this. They said your son or your your children will have all of your best characteristics but also all of your worst characteristics whereas you as parents or adults are able to filter out to end can elise temper your worst. Tendencies your wounded just wash. Show you on your worst using so. I'm thinking about that as i'm answer your question because when i see my son i think is a lot of the same of the worst tendencies up. I think i was very opinionated. Child if you who's who as adults don't find surprising at all. I don't know if i threw a lot of tantrums by son deafening does so i. I'm not sure if it from me or my husband but you know because my parents and i came. When i was pretty young and i think like many immigrant families. We went through a lot of hardships. When we first came to the us we came to utah. Which is another kind of a strange story. Because what shanghai china has in common with. Logan utah is really not very much. Yeah but my mother had actually spoken to a professor of hers back in shanghai and she had gotten into to university so we came because like might. My mother was a graduate student. Here and got into universities one was utah state university in logan utah and the other was university of illinois in chicago and her professor said to her. Oh utah that is. The place to be your. In retrospect your leg. Chicago's way more like shanghai than utah. I think it's just a reminder of how much of our lives are determined by circumstances like that and so we ended up in utah and then we were in la and you know. My parents always worked for jobs just to make ends meet. And so i think so much of what shapes be early on. Were the struggles. Have my parents went through. I mean these things that people referred to as entitlements me. My mother depend on wake when she was pregnant with my sister here in the us we depend on food stamps stamp in. We depend on a medicaid in children's health insurance program and i went to public school all the way throughout including college. Those were not entitlements for us. Those were our lifeline. I can really relate to that so my parents moved to toledo ohio after shanghai as well and when we first arrived in ohio rolling. There's nobody here and just like snow on the ground. There's like nothing around. And i think just the impression of what america is back then is is is just so different and dissimilar to to your family. My mom worked many different jobs like she's worked as a grocer. She's worked at a karaoke bar at some point and so i can totally relate. And it's such a quintessential immigrant story for so many of us. Did your parents ever want you to be anything as you were growing up. It's a good question. It's hard to separate it at this point. Because i am one of those knowing people who always knew that i wanted to be a doctor and so i don't know whether it was something that could be influenced by my parents impossibly but they also knew that it was something that had wanted to do and so encouraged it and so it's kind of hard to tell i will say that i think a lot of immigrants may be able to relate to this too in the us we didn't have any connections. It's not as if we knew doctors right. And so i knew my pediatrician. But i wasn't exactly someone that you could just go to become a doctor in so it was actually really challenged him even in college. I didn't know how to be a doctor. I mean i just didn't have the networks of people who could tell me you need to be taking this m cap prep cores and you need to be volunteering at hospitals in how here's how you get a shadowing experience and These are the types of activities that you should be involved in an and i think that's what's made me want to be in medical education also because i think there are so many people who have that passion for medicine or for whatever other fueled before just never given the opportunity and it's one thing for us to talk about we should have programs to recruit underrepresented minorities and to encourage people who otherwise didn't know about different fields before but for so many people that there's just so much in that experience that's not at all we could imagine including the levels of loans that you have to go through in order to get educated so i think all that is an important component to.

Shanghai Utah Dr Lena Rayo University Of Illinois Kerley George Washington United States Lena Baltimore Utah State University Ohio Logan China Toledo Chicago LA
How COVID-19 human challenge trials work -- and why Sophie Rose volunteered

TED Talks Daily

04:01 min | 4 d ago

How COVID-19 human challenge trials work -- and why Sophie Rose volunteered

"In april. Two thousand and twenty. I made what many perceive is a risky decision volunteered to be deliberately infected with covid nineteen. This infection would be part of what is cold. A human challenge show where young healthy people given a vaccine and then deliberately exposed to the virus that causes covid. Nineteen these trials help. Researchers figure out more quickly if a vaccine is working. I think this research is crucial. Because today i'm going to speak to you for six minutes in that time. Roughly twelve hundred and fifty people will be confirmed infected with covid nineteen twenty. One people will die and then this pot repeat hour after hour and day by day until we're able to vaccinate most of the eight billion people affected but squabble crisis. Scientists have been working around the clock to make those vaccine's reality. But what should we do when the human cost of waiting for vaccines is rising by the day. This is a human challenge shells. Come in the different from the traditional phase. Three bucks trials taking place now where people are given a vaccine or placebo. An oss to go about their everyday lives. Researchers have to wait to see how many people in each group become infected until enough of them get sick. We don't have enough data to know whether a vaccine is working. Finding effective vaccine with this method can take months sometimes years and it requires thousands of volunteers. A challenge tall works foster because research control exposure instead of waiting for people to get sick so instead of a year we could know in as little as a month whether a vaccine seems effective instead of thousands of volunteers a challenge shawl relies on just fifty to one hundred because we know if a sudden when people are exposed and develop disease. These trials also allow us together data about the early stages of infection and our response. This data is impossible together in any other way especially for people who become infected but never showed symptoms. This knowledge is important for designing policies. That limit covid nineteen transmission. The time saved translates into precious month's headstart on manufacturing getting a small working covid. Nineteen vaccines scenes foster. These trials are useful even their recent phase through results on encouraging. The arrival of the fuss vaccine is going to be a monumental breakthrough. it just isn't quite the fairy tale ending role harping full. We're going to need multiple vaccines because we just don't have the infrastructure needed to immunize eight billion people on the planet with just one kind. Each type of back seen requires its own special process and equipment to make store and deliver it if we had multiple working covid nineteen vaccines. We could make use of all of our equipment at the same time. Some of the leading candidates need to be kept extremely colds before they live limit to people. This can be really hard especially in countries where there isn't reliable electricity or a secure method to store them. Scientists have been using human challenge. Charles for hundreds of years. They've sped up the development vaccines against typhoid and cholera. And i've helped us better understand how immunity develops to things like the flu. Malaria and dengue gay with use them for other types of coronavirus. Before there's been a lot of debate about whether challenge charles a too risky. I happen to think that those risks of taking a challenge trial would recruit young and healthy participants think between the ages of twenty and twenty nine fewer than one percent of people in that age group need to be taken to hospital after becoming infected with covid nineteen likely even lower in a challenge trial because researchers check to make sure that participants have no pre existing conditions. The risk of a young healthy person dying of covid nineteen is around five thousandth of a percent

Colds Typhoid Cholera Dengue Malaria Charles FLU
Consumer Reports is no longer recommending Tesla's Model S and is panning the reliability of the new Model Y

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:49 sec | 4 d ago

Consumer Reports is no longer recommending Tesla's Model S and is panning the reliability of the new Model Y

"Reports just put Tesla in second, the last place in the most reliable new cars category. Well, you heard me speak about Elon Musk swell today. Of course, he's the CEO of Tesla. Consumer reports just put Tesla in 25th place out of 26 total brands in this year's edition of its annual auto Reliability brand rankings. Mazda, Toyota Lexus Frank in the top three for the most reliable new cars, But consumer reporters notice analysis. That brands ranking in the bottom third made significant improvements in 2020 rankings are based on the average predicted reliability score for vehicles in the brand's model lineup. The Tesla's model Wise reliability score is partially to blame for the electric automakers. 29 Point average, the car received only five points on consumer reports. 100 Point scale, with the average score for most brands being between

Tesla Elon Musk Lexus Mazda Toyota
Facebook, Twitter CEOs Testify Before Congress

America's First News

01:00 min | 4 d ago

Facebook, Twitter CEOs Testify Before Congress

"And social media treatment of election issues, was also back in the spotlight on Capitol Hill this week was Twitter being a publisher when it's censored The New York Post. The answer from Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey to Texas Republican Senator Ted Cruz was know that it wasn't censorship. Because they have clear policies and what's allowed and users agree to follow them. But he also agreed the platforms handling of 100 Biden story was a mistake. Democrats say not enough is being done to stop misinformation. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg was asked if he would commit to removing Steve Bannon's account after the former White House strategist posted that he'd like to see the heads of Dr Fauci and the FBI chief put on Pike's having a constant violation does not automatically mean you're content. Your account it's taken down in the number of strikes varies depending on the amount the type of a fence Some in Congress are considering a change to strip the shield. Social media companies have from legal liability over what's posted right now,

The New York Post Senator Ted Cruz Jack Dorsey Twitter Steve Bannon Dr Fauci Biden Mark Zuckerberg Texas White House Facebook Pike FBI Congress
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

06:30 min | 4 d ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"I'm anew and for most kids around the country. School is officially out of session. But unlike other summers many kids and teens are stuck at home because of the coronavirus pandemic and so today we've got an episode for everyone. Kids adults parents teens. Go are all invited on this journey. Because we've invited a certain dad back on the show to share the coolest things he's learned over the years here on the ted radio hour topics to blow the minds of young and old and a mystery guest host. Can you please introduce yourself. It's the ted radio hour. Npr hello although guy welcome back thank you okay so guy not only were you the host of this show until you so graciously handed over the reins to me but you are also the host of rather podcast for kids right. Yeah it's called. wow on the world. It's a journey through real scientific research into sounds a little weird but It's like a cartoon for the ear. Where me and my co host. Mickey thomas go on journeys into space and back in time and Underwater and everywhere in between searching for incredible scientific discoveries. and it's this choi full wonderful experience for us and hopefully for the kids who listen to the show. Well that includes my kids and we sort of figured since you and i are both home with our children this summer. We thought it'd be the perfect person to come on and curate a special summer show for the entire ted radio hour family and you have so kindly brought four of your favorite segments that you did the years. How did you even begin to choose which segments you were going to bring to us. Well i think like you probably experienced their lot of ted talks that my kids love and on a really inspired by and then there's some that you know of course are sort of over their heads right but i really want to bring segments. That spoke to curiosity and the sort of the. Aw kids naturally have about the world and so that's how we kinda came up with this this collection and i will say i did feel that way About the first segment that you brought to us. This one is called. How do trees collaborate tell us about it. I love the segment so much So basically scientists for basically forever thought. That trees competed against each other for resources right for for water and son and nutrients and you know they figured that. The tallest trees in the forest were the strongest trees right and make sense. Might but suzanne simard the scientists that were about to hear from she totally changed the way that scientists. Now think about trees because it turns out they don't compete at all. In fact trees collaborate. They work together through this. This mysterious underground superhighway. There is an entire communication network happening under our feet. Let's listen forest ecologist. Suzanne simard had a hunch yes. That's right. She thought that trees could talk. Just imagine like when you're walking through the forest you. Might you hear the crunching of the twigs under your feet in the rustling of the but she thought what if there's more going on big chattering going on that. We can't hear the third attuned to each other now at the time. A team of scientists in england were wrapping up an experiment where they'd grown in the laboratory these pine seedlings together in little route boxes that you could see through. And the scientists took two of these pine seedlings. These baby trees that were in the same box in this aimed dirt and then they exposed one of these seedlings to a radioactive carbon dioxide gas carbon fourteen radioactive carbon. And what they found. Was that some of that radioactive gas. The carbon fourteen made its way into the second ceiling. You can visualize you could see. And so from this experiment. It seemed that somehow these two plants in the same dirt or connected. And i thought. Wow maybe this is what's going on in my forest. Maybe suzanne smart thought maybe all the trees in a forest or connected in a kind of network like our airport system or transportation system our social networks and maybe she thought all of this was happening underground when we walk through the forest what we see as human beings we just see these beautiful trees growing out of the ground but we don't see that they're actually completely linked underground in this superhighway. So suzanne decided to prove this underground network existed. She devised an experiment using some of the same radioactive gas geiger counter to measure it and a patch of birch and for trees. I figured the burcin effort would be connected below ground web. Suzanne pick up the story from the ted stage and i gathered my apparatus plastic bags and duct tape and shade cloth. A paper. suit a respirator. And then borrow some high-tech stuff from my university. The first day of the experiment. We got out to our plot and i pulled on my weight. Paper suit i put on my respirator. I put the plastic bags over my trees. I got my giant syringes and i injected carbon fourteen radioactive gas into the bag of birch. I waited an hour. I figured it would take this long for the trees to suck up the co two through photosynthesis senate down into their roots and maybe shuttle that carbon below ground to their neighbors. I went to my first bag with the birch. I pulled the bag off. Iran mike geiger counter over. Its leaves perfect. The birch had taken up the radioactive gas. Then the moment of truth i went over to the for tree. I pulled off its bay. I iran the geiger counter pits needles. And i heard the most beautiful sound.

Suzanne simard ted Npr mike geiger Mickey thomas Iran england
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

06:30 min | 4 d ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"I'm anew and for most kids around the country. School is officially out of session. But unlike other summers many kids and teens are stuck at home because of the coronavirus pandemic and so today we've got an episode for everyone. Kids adults parents teens. Go are all invited on this journey. Because we've invited a certain dad back on the show to share the coolest things he's learned over the years here on the ted radio hour topics to blow the minds of young and old and a mystery guest host. Can you please introduce yourself. It's the ted radio hour. Npr hello although guy welcome back thank you okay so guy not only were you the host of this show until you so graciously handed over the reins to me but you are also the host of rather podcast for kids right. Yeah it's called. wow on the world. It's a journey through real scientific research into sounds a little weird but It's like a cartoon for the ear. Where me and my co host. Mickey thomas go on journeys into space and back in time and Underwater and everywhere in between searching for incredible scientific discoveries. and it's this choi full wonderful experience for us and hopefully for the kids who listen to the show. Well that includes my kids and we sort of figured since you and i are both home with our children this summer. We thought it'd be the perfect person to come on and curate a special summer show for the entire ted radio hour family and you have so kindly brought four of your favorite segments that you did the years. How did you even begin to choose which segments you were going to bring to us. Well i think like you probably experienced minu. Their lot of ted talks that my kids love and on a really inspired by. And then there's some that you know of course are sort of over their heads right but i really want to bring segments. That spoke to curiosity and the sort of the. Aw kids naturally have about the world and so that's how we kinda came up with this this collection and i will say i did feel that way about the first segment that you brought to us. This one is called. How do trees collaborate tell us about it. I love the segment so much So basically scientists for basically forever thought. That trees competed against each other for resources right for for water and son and nutrients and they figured that the tallest trees in the forest were the strongest trees right and make sense might but suzanne simard the scientists that were about to hear from she totally changed the way that scientists. Now think about trees because it turns out they don't compete at all. In fact trees collaborate. They work together through this. This mysterious underground superhighway. There is an entire communication network happening under our feet. Let's listen forest ecologist. Suzanne simard had a hunch yes. That's right. She thought that trees could talk. Just imagine like when you're walking through the forest you. Might you hear the crunching of the twigs under your feet in the rustling of the but she thought what if there's more going on big chattering going on that. We can't hear the third attuned to each other now at the time. A team of scientists in england were wrapping up an experiment where they'd grown in the laboratory these pine seedlings together in little route boxes that you could see through. And the scientists took two of these pine seedlings. These baby trees that were in the same box in this aimed dirt and then they exposed one of these seedlings to a radioactive carbon dioxide gas carbon fourteen radioactive carbon. And what they found. Was that some of that radioactive gas. The carbon fourteen made its way into the second ceiling. You can visualize you could see. And so from this experiment. It seemed that somehow these two plants in the same dirt or connected. And i thought. Wow maybe this is what's going on in my forest. Maybe suzanne smart thought maybe all the trees in a forest or connected in a kind of network like our system or transportation system our social networks. And maybe she thought all of this was happening underground when we walk through the forest what we see as human beings we just see these beautiful trees growing out of the ground. But we don't see that they're actually completely linked underground in this superhighway. So suzanne decided to prove this underground network existed. She devised an experiment using some of the same radioactive gas geiger counter to measure it and a patch of birch and for trees. I figured the burcin effort would be connected below ground web. Suzanne picks up the story from the ted stage and i gathered my apparatus plastic bags and duct tape and shade cloth. Paper suit a respirator. And then borrow some high-tech stuff from my university. The first day of the experiment. We got out to our plot and i pulled on my weight. Paper suit i put on my respirator. Put the plastic bags over my trees. I got my giant syringes and i injected carbon fourteen radioactive gas into the bag of birch. I waited an hour. I figured it would take this long for the trees to suck up the co two through photosynthesis senate down into their roots and maybe shuttle that carbon below ground to their neighbors. I went to my first bag with the birch. I pulled the bag off. Iran mike geiger counter over. Its leaves perfect. The birch had taken up the radioactive gas. Then the moment of truth i went over to the for tree i pulled off its bay iran the geiger counter pits needles. And i heard the most beautiful sound.

Suzanne simard ted Npr mike geiger Mickey thomas Iran england
Inside the minds of female and male serial killers

Dr. Drew After Dark

02:20 min | 5 d ago

Inside the minds of female and male serial killers

"I'm convinced one day that i'm going to become a serial killer. Want me to explain. why yes. I'll explain every single person in my life. I've thought about how i would kill them. And i've done like due diligence to make sure i could get away with it. And i'm not just talking about think about it like i've actually planned it out to the teeth. Maybe she should be in prison now. Do you think so before she actually does do that. He can't that's too much like someone cuts me off and traffic. I'm not the type to just yell at them or flip them off and just let them go on. No no no. No i will follow you. I will follow you and if you stop i will stop in the. It can get heated and very very aggressive very dangerous loose. Listen or watch murder like podcast or tv shows about it or anything like that to just be like. Oh my god no. I do simply because i'm like. Oh that's amazing. And i like complement. Serial killers on martin. You just gave me an idea we on it. As one of my friends the psychologist pointed out. She said the female psychopaths. There are the dangerous ones. Yeah you really got to worry about. They really do a lot of damage. There was a tech talk. I is a serial killer. Ted talk on that list you guys by any chance. There's a tiktok. I pulled where it explained. The difference between male serial killers females. The males are indiscriminate. Their motivation is sexual surprise for women. It's highly motivated. National relational throw plotted and it's usually for money. Oh here we go. Differences between male and female serial killers meals typically kill for sexual gratification whether that psychological or physical and their victim's identity matters less they typically kill strangers in contrast ninety percent female serial killers their victims and they tend to kill for practical or justifiable reasons. At least in their minds with the most common motivation being financial gain or stealing babies they'll still babies aches. And no. I love this chick by the way. She's got a great talk at live on the edge. She has all these informational. Talks like how to survive if an elevator conflicts in

Martin TED
Unemployment claims break 5-week improvement streak

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:43 sec | 5 d ago

Unemployment claims break 5-week improvement streak

"Americans filed for first time unemployment benefits last week as the new jobless claims unexpectedly rose, and obviously that's right in line with covert 19 cases. In the U. S. Keeps marching higher. The Labor Department just released its weekly report on jobless claims. The million results or this. Initial jobless claims went from 700 to 742,000 and continuing claims went from 6.4 to 6.3. So are continuing claims dropped a little bit and we've also held below a million mark for the 12 straight week, But the new claims also rose for the first time in five weeks. However, they've moved steadily lower since we were at the peak of seven million, so it's looking better and better, but

U. S. Labor Department
Unemployment claims rise for first time in 5 weeks

Steve and Ted

00:15 sec | 5 d ago

Unemployment claims rise for first time in 5 weeks

"For the first time in five weeks we came in at 742,000. This is the week ending November 14th continuing claims that came in a little bit less than expected 6.372 million. Fox Business Network, Cheryl Cause Sony America's listening to Fox

Cheryl Cause Fox Business Network Sony America FOX
Cardi B Named Billboard's Woman Of The Year

Steve and Ted

00:24 sec | 5 d ago

Cardi B Named Billboard's Woman Of The Year

"Magazine, Cardi B Your Woman of the Year, Steve Likes billboard will honor Cardi B for her collaborations with acts like Megan, the Stallion Black, Pink and Anita a swell as her fashion line in her political activism. Dolly Parton, J. Lo Dua LIPA Chloe X Scallion Jesse Reyes will also be on it. I don't know who those people I don't know those people beyond jail. Teyana Taylor will host the

Cardi B J. Lo Dua Lipa Chloe X Scallion Jesse Reyes Megan Steve Anita Dolly Parton Teyana Taylor
Trump fires top cybersecurity official Chris Krebs

Eddie and Rocky

00:33 sec | 6 d ago

Trump fires top cybersecurity official Chris Krebs

"And Republicans in Congress are being asked about President Trump's firing of the top administration official in charge of election. Cyber security. That firing came after the official debunked some of the president's false claims about election fraud. A B C's in as delicate Terra has reaction from Capitol Hill. Senate Republicans breaking with President Trump over Chris Krebs firing here's Ted Cruz from everything I saw, it appeared that he did it did enable job In in a difficult, important role in the president's allies maintained the president has the right to have whoever he wants. Working for him

President Trump Chris Krebs Ted Cruz Congress Capitol Hill Senate
What happens after we develop a COVID-19 vaccine?

TED Talks Daily

05:39 min | 6 d ago

What happens after we develop a COVID-19 vaccine?

"My son was born in january. Twenty twenty shortly before the lockdown in paris. He was never scared people wearing masks. Because that's holy knows my three year old daughter knows how to say jen. Either oil colic. That's the french word for hydro alcoholic gel. She pronounces it better than i do. But no one wants to be wearing a mask or wash their hands with hand sanitizer every twenty seconds. So we're desperately looking at rnd to find the solution a vaccine. It's interesting that in our minds. We keep thinking of the vaccine discovery. Like it's the holy grade but there are a couple of shortcuts here that unlike to unpack. I'm not a doctor. I'm just a consultant. My client focused on healthcare bio pharma companies providers global house institutions and. They've indicated me. We need to find the tools to fight covet and we need to make them accessible tool. I one single vaccine will get us out of this. What we need is an arsenal of tools. We need vaccines winnie winning diagnostics. To make sure that we can prevent identified and treat covid cases in a variety of public relations. Second it's not just about finding a tool. What do you think will happen when one of those clinical trials demonstrate that it is affective do think we can all run to the pharmacy next door. We get the product. We take out masks and go back to french. Kissing no finding effective is just one step in this big fights because there is a difference between the existence of a product and access to the products. And now you're thinking all she means other countries will have to wait well. No that's not my point. Not only others may have to wait but any of us may have to the humbling thing about covid. is that because of its speed and magnitude. It's exposing all of us to the same challenges and giving us a flavor of challenges. We're not used to remember when china got into lockdown. Did you imagine that you would be the same situations few weeks. After i certainly didn't let's go to the theoretical moment when we have a vaccine in this case the next access challenge will be supplied. The current state of the global community is that by the end of twenty twenty one. So that's over a year. After the discovery of the vaccine we would have enough those to cover one to two billion of the eight billion of us on the planet. So who would have to wait. How do you think about access when supply short scenario number one we'll let the market forces play and those who can pay the highest price. It'll be the fastest to negotiate deals will get access to the product. I it's not equitable at all. But it's a very likely scenario scenario number two. we could all agree based on public house rationale. Who gets the product first. Let's say we agree that healthcare workers would get it first and then the elderly and then the general population now let me be a bit more provocative scenario number three countries who have demonstrated that they can manage the pandemic. well would get access to the product. I it's a little bit extrapolated. But it's not complete science fiction years ago. When the supply of high-quality second-leg berkeley's drug was scarce a special committee was established to determine which countries had health systems. That were strong enough to ensure that the products would be distributed properly and that patients would follow their treatment. Plants property those select countries got access. I or scenario number four. We could decide on the random rule for instance that people get vaccinated on their birthday. Now let me ask you this. How does it feel to think of future whether vaccine exists. But you would still have to wear a mask and keep your kids home from school and you would not be able to go to work the way you want because you wouldn't have access to that product every day that has feel inacceptable rights but guess what there are many diseases for which we have treatments and even cures and yet people being infected and die every year. Let's take us. Ten million people infected every year. One point five million people dying although we've had a cure for years and that's just because we haven't completely figured out some of the key access issues equitable access is the right thing to do. But beyond this humanitarian that i hope we are more sensitive to now that we've experienced it in our flesh. There is a health and then economy cognizant to equitable access. The health is that as long as the virus is active somewhere. We're all at risk of reported cases. The economy argument is that because of the interdependencies in our economies no domestic economy can fully restart if others are not picking up as well think of the sectors that rely on global mobility like aerospace or travel and tourism. Think of the supply chains that cut across the globe like textile automotive. Think of the sheriff of the economy. Gross that's coming from emerging markets. The reality is that we need all countries to be able to crush the pandemic instinct. So not only is equitable access. The right thing to it is also the smartest thing to do

JEN Paris China Berkeley
States are imposing more COVID restrictions despite pre-election predictions

All In with Chris Hayes

02:59 min | Last week

States are imposing more COVID restrictions despite pre-election predictions

"You know from the beginning of this pandemic all the way back in in january and february has been painfully clear that for donald trump and most of the congressional republican leadership that cova was primarily a political problem. That had to be managed because of the election not a health problem. A political problem with is on november and one of the biggest giveaways of their possession of their position is what they projected onto their political opponents. They couldn't believe that the steps that some governors mayors we're taking a combat. The virus were driven by serious concerns. That cova was deadly and needed to be combated. Instead they suggested it was awesome elaborate conspiracy to politically kneecap donald trump. If it ends up that biden wins in november. I hope he does. And i don't think he will. But if he does. I guarantee you the week after the election. Suddenly all those democratic governors all those democratic mayors will say. Everything's magically better. go back to work. Go back to school. Suddenly the problems are solved. Won't even have to wait for biden to be sworn in i guarantee you. That's ted cruz guarantee a week after the election. I guarantee you that all those democratic governors and mayors will say the problem solved no more cova restrictions. They'll take them all away. It was all just to her trump. Well guess what the election's over and what's happening in the opposite of what ted cruz cruz. Guaranteed in fact democratic. Governors like gretchen whitmer of michigan and kate brown of oregon who impose restrictions early in the pandemic have now imposed new restrictions amid covid spikes in their states. That's not all republicans who are abandoning their pre election positions. They're the ones who were doing that. And embracing public. Health measures governor gary herbert of doug burgum. North dakota are now changing their tune. There embracing masks after months of resistance. And then there's i will republican governor kim reynolds who vowed back in july quote. No i'm not going to mandate masks. I trust islands. Reynolds was photographed maskless at an indoor pro-trump event in october. That's her giving a high five in a crowded mostly maskless room and not only did she not object to trump holding one of his superspreader rallies. Interstate a few days later. She was spotted in the crowd at the rally. Not wearing a mask. Well now guess what i was. Hospitals are full across the state. There's barely an icu. Bed to be found if you get kobe tomorrow and you have to go the issue. Tough luck it's a nightmare and last governor can reynold who wants to spanish mass mandate. Does he feel good measure. Guess what she did she issued a statewide mask mandate along whether restrictions. It's a good thing too much too late. But it's the opposite of what ted cruz said would happen. Who is really playing politics. Do you think as hospitals fill up at americans conservative liberal being cut down by the virus there are still republicans who are treating. The pandemic with the same recklessness and denial they always have

Donald Trump Ted Cruz Biden Cova Ted Cruz Cruz Gretchen Whitmer Kate Brown Doug Burgum Kim Reynolds Gary Herbert Oregon North Dakota Michigan Reynolds Reynold Kobe
Building successful lives, one plane at a time with TeenFlight,

Aviation News Talk podcast

02:55 min | 2 weeks ago

Building successful lives, one plane at a time with TeenFlight,

"Successful lives one plane at a time at the as air venture in oshkosh a group of oregon teenagers stand beside an rv. Twelve light sport aircraft answering questions. They have spent eighteen months building the plane on display and they are eager to put their expertise on display as well. The adults who quiz them are rightly impressed. The students are with teen flight. The high school arm of airway science for kids or ask which serves students in and around portland oregon team. Flight is the brainchild of erin. Figura ted miller and van's aircraft founder. Richard van grunsven. Who wanted to honor the memory of ask. Founder bob strickland by creating a program for high school students team flight. Young people are given an opportunity to build an aircraft that they will eventually be able to fly. The student built aircraft has showcased at oshkosh and then sold to fund the next build session. Van grunsven noted that this is the kind of program he would have loved as a young man for the first build. Classy offered space in his hangar at the aurora airport and agreed to oversee construction of one of his company's own kit planes the rv twelve quote. The twelve is a well-developed kit plane. He said we were confident. That with the help of adult mentors with the right group of motivated kids. They could get the job done. And the sex. A little. Bit about eric krause. Who was a high school junior when he joined the inaugural teen flight class in two thousand nine. He said whenever. I tell people in school about the program they'd say oh you're building an rc. Plane krause said nobody ever believed we were building actual aircrash if the naysayers could have seen the students mechanical skills on day one their skepticism would have been justified said krause. Some kids didn't know which side of a screwdriver to hold a few years. After graduation cross took his team flight build plan to interview and discuss the process of building an aircraft as a teenager the interviewers impressed and he landed the job. he's now a manager advanced aircraft and he believes the program taught him not only general mechanical skills but leadership skills as well the program's goal is not produce the next generation of aviators or aviation engineers students pursue those goals and ask provides as much support to them as it can including scholarships to pursue flight. Training figure keeps a broader goal in mind when thinking about the program's impact quote. Most of the kids that we work with go on and do interesting things and do creative things so they use the skills they learned in teen flight. He said we like to say that. We're not really teaching teenagers. How to build airplanes. Were teaching them how to have a fulfilling life with good interesting careers and to be excited about it. Van grunsven echoed that sentiment. We have found that the program can be most helpful for kids who maybe don't fit in on other things and maybe aren't doing well in school but when they're able to work with airplanes they get excited. He said we've had parents tell. Their children's grades went up after they went into the program. They work harder and they do better great story and i wish there were more programs like this around the united states and around the world

Air Venture Oshkosh Van Grunsven Ted Miller Richard Van Grunsven Bob Strickland Aurora Airport Oregon Eric Krause Krause Erin Portland Classy VAN United States
"ted" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

05:08 min | Last month

"ted" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"It's the Ted Radio Hour from NPR I'm a new she's Emirati. In for the past couple of months while we've all been doing our part to keep ourselves and others safe. We've also had some time to think about what we value most. Walk through the woods near my home a few minutes walk away from. The village that I live in southern England and for a lot of US including Tom Rivet Karnak, it's planet. Beautiful Part Audi May. See the, light can. Tom Is an expert in climate change policy back in twenty thousand fifteen he helped bring together nearly two hundred countries to support the Paris Agreement, which was the UN deal to curb greenhouse gas emissions. But of course, right now, Tom's been spending his time closer to home one of the amazing things about this forest over the last few weeks of course, is that his deserted. Now. There's no one hand. For many of us, the pandemic marks, the first time, the whole planet having one shared experience. Maybe the first time we feel like we are one species and Tom says, this moment is an opportunity none of us who are alive right now have ever lived through anything like this. We are all facing one challenge, which is how we collectively going to deal with this moment. Now. The best outcome of this is that we as humanity remember we can no longer afford the luxury of feeling powerless. Like the rest of the World Ted Stage is now happening remotely. So Tom Karnak delivered his talk from those woods near his home. Right now, we are coming through one of the most challenging periods in the lives of most of us, the global pandemic has been frightening whether personal tragedy has been involved or not, but it has also shaken our belief that we are powerless in the face of great change. In the space of a few weeks we mobilized to the point where half of humanity took drastic action to protect the most vulnerable. Friday morning. The twentieth. By shift yesterday I came back into the emergency department full. We just like a war room in the respiratory report room. So many people are trying to figure out what a summit to take. Tired. Just been running unfortunately it's not over we're still going up. And so I'm still going back to work tomorrow. These people are caregivers and nurses who have been helping humanity face. Corona Virus Covid nineteen. Now. That's interesting because it shows that humans are capable of taking dedicated and sustained action even when they can't control the outcome. But leaves us with another challenge. The climate crisis. Because make no mistake. The climate crisis will be orders of magnitude worse than the pandemic. If we do not take the action that we can still take to avert the tragedy that we see coming towards us. There's a line in your tedtalk that kind of hit me like a brick wall where you warn us that the climate crisis will be worse than the pandemic. You know we're we're just so in the pandemic right now that it's hard to take the longer view on that. Make the case for why we Yeah I mean one simple answer to that question is that the climate crisis will be permanent. The pandemic is you know a major global emergency that we are right in the throes of right now but we will find a vaccine. We are learning about this virus all the time we are working on social measures to reduce its spread. We're working on back scenes those will take months or maybe years, but we'll come to that point and we'll come through it. World will return to some form of normality although will probably look quite different. In the climate emergency, the climate crisis if we allow ourselves to pass these tipping points. After which we begin to lose control of the climate system itself because certain things about the planet change like when the Sea ice reduces, it exposes the dark water underneath that dark water absorbs more sunlight which leads to more sea ice law. So you get these feedback loops where it becomes runaway. So you lose control of the climate system if we.

Tom Tom Rivet Karnak US NPR Audi England UN Paris
"ted" Discussed on The TED Interview

The TED Interview

03:38 min | Last month

"ted" Discussed on The TED Interview

"It's called countdown that we're working together, which is exactly the counting down of those emissions, the mending of the of the curve. What intrigues you about about this initiative, what is different about it and what what, what are your hopes for it? Well many things I'm I'm very excited about it. The first is Chris. I think five Ted's climate countdown will do something. I have aspired to do for many years unsuccessfully, which is to take this conversation outside of the climate bubble. In order to reach the global targets we need to go beyond those of us in the climate community. The second reason is precisely that the opportunity I hope that this is really going to further the understanding that decarbonising our economy's. Certainly is a moral responsibility, but it is an economic opportunity and not the many projects that we are going to put their on stage will show that this is about people certainly, it's about planet, but it's also by prophet and that dot triple bottom line is exactly what we all need to pursue because one without the other is just not going to make it and the third thing that I'm very excited about. that. I really think that you have managed to position. Ted In the imagination of people people look to. Ted Talks and to Ted events to spark their imagination to spark their thinking to innovate. To to really get out of our Rut of thinking and move over to a different mindset to a different way of thinking about things and I think that's exactly what we need. We have to get out of our mental Rut and understand that this is really quite exciting and that we as human beings town for the first time in the history of humanity in the incredibly privileged position of having full power of designing our future. We have never had that power ever in the history of mankind humankind as my daughters would correct me. And that's what we have right now we are holding the pen in our hands and we can and we will. We're actually going to define a very, very wonderful future. One of the things that's been exciting Ted of the last few years is being the spread of these Fedex groups around the world who self organize and. We're applying this very much to this initiative is often framed as a problem that our political leaders have to solve and our job is to protest and get angry at them. It's also a problem that all of us have to solve. We've got really excited at the thought of having literally thousands of groups around the world engaging on this issue company by company city by city people often feel powerless about it and do feel this just overwhelming sense of dread but probably have more power than they know you know twenty organized employees in a company. Working with the C. Suite can actually get a lot done in terms of making the kind of bold for the long term decisions for that company about how to contribute to that. Beautiful. Carbon emission free future that we all audrey more. Christianity I have to have you and Tom and many many others engaged in helping frame. This initiative is unbelievably exciting. I guess I should say that a certain for this.

Ted Talks Fedex Chris Tom C. Suite
"ted" Discussed on The TED Interview

The TED Interview

05:54 min | Last month

"ted" Discussed on The TED Interview

"You you have the skill to. Persuade other people even if they're not feeling it to take the optimistic science just as to go with it and to say imagine that other people are capable of doing more than you think they're doing. Now, what are you capable of doing that? You just did that repeatedly tell us what actually happened at Paris because a lot of people it's a puzzling agreement to to people people think of an international treaty as being you know these rules setup and has to abide by the and you know Kato. Paris didn't work that way and some people as a result of said, there was nothing legally binding as it's actually amounts to nothing. You believe strongly I believe strongly, it did not amount to nothing what what actually happened there. What do people agree to do? Well. First of all, it is legally binding at least it is legally binding in the hundred and eighty four countries that have ratified the Paris Agreement International Law. What has legally binding though is not is not to do specific things to make specific emission targets, but to agree to a process, is that right? Well, yes and no. So what is legally binding is the ultimate destination which we called the long term target of reaching a global economy that has zero net emissions by twenty fifty..

Paris Paris Agreement International
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

03:41 min | 5 months ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"You gotTA. EEG. Love Him? He always has this ability to take something as mundane as saying. Thank you and turn it into like. A Journey and I do feel like during the pandemic so many more of us have really begun to be more appreciative and grateful to the people who do bring us all the things we need every day. The essential workers in the grocery store I have definitely been making sure to say thank you more, and like I now have a slightly creepy habit of waving and smiling it every year. That passes me when I go for a walk I want. To the world. I mean I totally agree. I think it's sort of forced us to really reflect on on this idea of showing gratitude and what I love about g Jacobs is he says you know gratitude isn't about being optimistic, or you know single. The world is great all the time. It's actually forces you to to really actually reflect on the world because when you show gratitude, you really kind of understanding the process that it took for people to get you the things that make your life better or more joyful in in this instance, and the science is real. We did an episode on my kids show while in the world about this about gratitude, there's a there's a study out of the University of Montana that showed how express gratitude to yourself and to others it actually increases. Your happiness has been proven by science, and it's such a wonderful idea. You know not not just to be thankful not to just sit down and say I'm thankful for this and can for that, but if you can actually think the. Who may not even know that they improve your life? It's incredibly meaningful, not only to them, but but to you as well Yes, it is I want to say a huge. Thank you to you guys for coming back on the show for sharing your favorite ideas for the whole family and I have to say listeners have been very very welcoming to be, but if they're missing you, where can they find you these days? They can find me on how I built this and on well in the world, and I just wanted to thank you for taking the show, and making it even more incredible and wonderful, and just a joy to listen to it's it's awesome means a lot. Thank you guy. That's my Ted Radio Hour predescessor Guy Ross. He is now the host of the podcast well in the world with Mindy Thomas and the show how I built this and kids. If you WANNA learn more about all the ideas that guy and I talked about. We have got some really cool activities for you at Ted DOT NPR dot. Dot Org plus you can watch all the talks that guy mentioned here to you got to see the dolphins owing grownups, you can always see hundreds more ted talks at Ted, dot com, or on the Ted APP, and now I need to show some gratitude and thank our hardworking production staff here at NPR, which includes Jeff. Rodgers Saunas Michigan. Poor Rachel Faulkner Diba Mohtashami. James Hussey JC Howard. Katie Monteleone Maria. Pause Gutierrez Christina Kala and Matthew Cloutier with help from Daniel Shchukin our theme music was written by Rahm Teen, Arab Louis Our partners at Ted are Chris, Anderson Colin Helms Anna, Phelan and Michelle quint. Rhody and you've been listening to the Ted Radio Hour from NPR. She was thinking about Billy Ocean singing Caribbean Queen Carribean Queen. James! One. No. Sign..

Ted Guy Ross NPR James Hussey Caribbean Queen Carribean Quee Rachel Faulkner Diba Mohtasham University of Montana Billy Ocean Katie Monteleone Maria TA g Jacobs Gutierrez Christina Kala Mindy Thomas Rodgers Rhody Michigan Rahm Anderson Colin Helms Anna JC Howard
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

04:36 min | 5 months ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Sometimes, simple act of kindness toward another person. A, thank you. Complement of vote of confidence can have a much bigger effect than we realize and can even change the way we look at ourselves. And for Jacobs that kind of appreciation turned into a journey of a thousand. Thank us all for just a cup of coffee. I decide to go backwards so started with the Barista at Joe Coffee, which is coffee chain in New York where I go? And I thanked her, and she thanked me for thanking her. Would you say to her? You said Hey I just WANNA extra. Thank you for making my cup of coffee this morning. That's it I just rest my gratitude and I think she was pleasantly surprised because he doesn't get thanked all that often. So you after thinking the Barista I, guess you decided to meet with a guy named Ed Kaufman, who who works for Joe Coffee, so yeah I met at Kaufman who is the guy who goes around the world testing the beans tasting them and I loved that because he was so passionate about this brown liquid, and he taught me how to differentiate the tastes, because he would take a sip, and his face would light up, and he would say sensing honey, Crisp Apple, and able syrup in pineapple, upside down cake, and I love that idea of of savoring and appreciating. It's so tied.

Joe Coffee Ed Kaufman Jacobs New York Apple
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

04:36 min | 5 months ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Sometimes simple act of kindness toward another person. A thank you. Complement of vote of confidence can have a much bigger effect than we realize and can even change the way we look at ourselves. And for Jacobs, that kind of appreciation turned into a journey of a thousand. Thank you all for just a cup of coffee. I decide to go backwards so started with the Barista. Joe Coffee which is coffee chain in New York where I go? And I thanked her, and she thanked me for thanking her. Would you say to her? You said? Hey I just WANNA extra. Thank you for making my cup of coffee this morning. That's it I just rest my gratitude and I think she was pleasantly surprised because he doesn't get thanked all that often. So you after thinking the Barista. I guess you decided to meet with a guy named. Ed Kaufman who who works for Joe Coffee, so yeah I met at Kaufman. Who is the guy who goes around the world testing the beans testing them and I loved that because he was so passionate about this brown liquid, and he taught me how to differentiate the tastes, because he would take a sip, and his face would light up and he would say I'm sensing honey, crisp apple, and able syrup in pineapple, upside down cake, and I love that idea of of savoring and appreciating. It's so tied.

Joe Coffee Ed Kaufman Jacobs New York apple
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

04:52 min | 5 months ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Writer professional lifestyle experimenter. self-described curmudgeon I talk about I think in every everyone has the two sides the Larry David side in the Mr Rogers side, so the grumpy pessimist and the optimistic grateful side so many people have helped me to come to this night and I believe. I was born with a very strong. Larry David Side I was very good at finding things to be annoyed about and I think a lot of us are, if you hear a hundred compliments and a single insult, what do you remember the insult? Would you just take along with me? Ten seconds to think of the people who have helped you. Become who you are I was. Aware here that I have this negative bias. This Larry David side, but I wanted to bulk up the Mr Rogers side. Ten seconds of silence. I'll watch the time. It's not something that comes naturally to me and to most people I don't think it comes naturally. You have to cultivate this idea of gratitude. Whomever you've been thinking about. How pleased they must speed to know the difference you feel they've made. What what happened to you to say? Wait a minute I'm not. Appreciate people not. Being grateful. was, a Piff Neil. What was it? Well I. Think it was partly intellectually I knew the power of gratitude. There are tons of studies about how good it is for you. How helps ward off depression? You recover more quickly. You sleep better better. You're more generous. So, intellectually I knew like I should be grateful. But how do you do that and that's when? I decided you know what I'm going to try? This ritual at home where I'm going to try to say thanks to all the people who helped make my meal a possibility so I would I would. Say you know I'd like to thank the farmer who grew the tomato? Cashier who rang the tomatoes up at the grocery store? And, that's when my son who is ten very perceptively said. You Know Dad that's fine, but it's also totally lame, because those people can't hear you. They're not in our apartment. So if you really are committed, then you should go and thank those people in person. Aj. Jacobs picks up the story. From the Ted Stage. Now I'm a writer and for my books. I like to go on adventures. Go on quests so I decided I'm going to take my son up on his challenge. It seems simple enough and to make it even simpler. I decided to focus on just one item my morning cup of coffee. Well, it turned out to be not so simple at all. This quest took me around the world. I discovered that my coffee would not be possible without hundreds of people I take for granted so I would thank the trucker who drove the coffee beans to the coffee shop, but he couldn't have done his job without the road, so I would think the people who pave the road. And then I would think the people who made the asphalt for the pavement. And he couldn't do his job without the folks who drew the yellow lines on the road because they kept my truck driver from smashing into oncoming traffic. Splitting an atom because you can think the people who mixed the paint for the lines on the road, and then the people who made the machines to enable the paints to be mixed and the people who mind the iron to make the machines to mix the paint then. You can. There's lots of people think. Oh, it's never incident. I could have spent the next fifty years of my life, thanking people and I could have given a Ted talk that was about four hundred hours long, because yeah, that's what it made me realize how interconnected! Everything is how many people it takes. It doesn't take a village to make a cup of coffee and takes.

Larry David Side Mr Rogers writer Ted Stage Piff Neil Jacobs
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

07:40 min | 5 months ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Different parts of the light spectrum that we simply can't see with our human is so imagine. There's a stone wall somewhere in Italy that dates to the Roman period so roughly two thousand years ago, and you'd walk over a field and you wouldn't see it. Yeah, well that stonewall. STONEWALL, which may be under a meter, or so of earth it affects the overlain topography so the roots going down. They couldn't go as deep because they'd be stopped by the stonewall and so processing the satellite data, you can actually map out and see those changes we'll start seeing straight lines, and those straight lines form structures, which definitely aren't natural, so just as an example We got a hold of new satellite imagery for most of the pyramid fields and. What I what I started processing. It feels like cheating. You can see everything. How many sites are have you guys? found using pictures from satellites I'm at the point where I've lost count It is in the many thousands, but I don't know anymore. I believe we have barely scratched the surface in terms of what's left to discover. In the Egyptian Delta alone we've excavated less than one thousandth of one percent of the total volume of Egyptian sites. When you add to that. The thousands of other sites team and I have discovered. What we thought we knew. Pales in comparison to what we have left to discover. When you look at the incredible work that my colleagues are doing all around the world and what they're finding. I believe that there are millions of undiscovered. Archaeological sites left to find. Discovering them will do nothing less than a mock the full potential of our existence. When we come back, we'll hear more from Sarah about how her work can help us. All discover more about the planet we call. I'm a new summer. Roti and you're listening to the Ted Radio Hour from NPR, stay with us. He everyone just a quick thanks to our sponsor. Virgo summer is here and vacation is just drive away. Search thousands of nearby vacation rentals on Verb Oh to find your family private home all to yourself you can spread out chill out and feel that vacation feeling again together book them that makes the vacation download the verb virgo. APP, that's V. RB OH. I'm Gregory Warner with NPR's rough translation, so there's a holiday in the Netherlands where every year thousands of white folks where black face some people trying in that tradition, but in very Dutch way you talk you talk you talk you talk you talk until you reach consensus. Can you fight racism in a way that brings the whole country with you? That's on NPR's rough translation. It's the Ted Radio hour from NPR News Zimmer Odi and today on the show ideas for the whole family with my predecessor guy rise in addition to previously hosting this show. He is the host of the kids science podcast. Wow, in the world. Hey, Guy Hello. Before the break we were hearing from you and Sarah Park the space archaeologist about how many ancient sites she has already begun to uncover using satellite imagery. Let's get back to your conversation with Sarah. All right. I mean what you're saying. is we only know a tiny bit about our past? Is that true I mean is most of our history hidden? I would say yes. Because history is always written by the winners and yeah, people are living in places where they've always lived for thousands of years look at places like Rome and his tunnel, and Cairo those cities layers upon layers. Paul layers of of history so I think we've taken a lot for granted about who we are and where we come from, we think living in this very modern age with smartphones and Internet, and and sort of this whole world of knowledge at our fingertips. We know everything the more and more we delve into the past. The more we realized that we don't and that it has a lot of lessons to teach us for today. I wish for us to discover. The millions of unknown archaeological sites around the world by creating a twenty. First Century Army of global explorers will find and protect the world's hidden heritage, which contains clues to humankind's collective resilience and creativity. So how are we going to do this? We are going to build an online crowd source citizen science platform to allow anyone in the world to engage with discovering archeological sites and protect them. By creating this platform, we will find the millions of places occupied by the billions of people that came before us. Acknowledging that the past is worth saving. Mean so much more. It means that we're worth saving two. And the greatest story ever told. Is, the story of our shared. Human Journey. But the only way that we're going to be able to write it. Is If. We do it together. Thank you. I love that line. Re she says means that we're worth it to so great, so I have to ask, it's you could go on an archaeological dig the ancient civilization of your choice. Where would you go? I think I would want to do something like way way way back like early humans or like our even our human predecessors they were. Like creatures at least seven or eight million years ago, and that's what we know of and we've only discovered. The remains of like a teeny number of human like species, and so there's there's very little doubt that we have so many more to discover like hundreds thousands of species, and that would be amazing to go on one of those digs I wanna call Sarah and ask her. If I can go visit one of those places in Peru. She could hook me. Oh my God right. So cool all right, so we have talked about trees, dolphins and ancient civilizations before our final segment I wanNA talk to you guys about two words that we say every day, or at least we should say every day. Thank you two very simple words. Yes, that are incredibly powerful and a j Jacobs wanted to show how powerful those words were, so he took us all on a journey with him through gratitude. Do you talk to your kids about saying? Thank you like. Please all the time because I. Worry that. My kids say it, but I'm not sure that they totally mean it. Yeah I. Think it's natural. We all touch kids about saying, please and thank you. Please and thank you, but It has to be more than just saying. Please and thank you. It's about actually internalizing gratitude, which which is what Aj kind of describes in this in this talk. To practice gratitude you really have to. Slow things down and notice. Age as a.

NPR Sarah STONEWALL Sarah Park Italy Egyptian Delta Cairo Netherlands Aj Gregory Warner Century Army of Paul Rome Peru j Jacobs
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

06:50 min | 5 months ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Different parts of the light spectrum that we simply can't see with our human is so imagine. There's a stone wall somewhere in Italy that dates to the Roman period so roughly two thousand years ago, and you'd walk over a field and you wouldn't see it. Yeah, well that stonewall. STONEWALL which may be under a meter, or so of earth it affects the overlain topography so the roots going down. They couldn't go as deep because they'd be stopped by the stonewall and so processing the satellite data you can actually map out and see those changes we'll start seeing straight lines, and those straight lines form structures, which definitely aren't natural, so just as an example We got a hold of new satellite imagery for most of the pyramid fields and. What I what I started processing. It feels like you can see everything. How many sites are have you guys? found using pictures from satellites. I'm at the point where I've lost count It is in the many thousands, but I don't know anymore. I believe we have barely scratched the surface in terms of what's left to discover. In the Egyptian Delta alone we've excavated less than one thousandth of one percent of the total volume of Egyptian sites. When you add to that. The thousands of other sites team and I have discovered. What we thought we knew. Pales in comparison to what we have left to discover. When you look at the incredible work that my colleagues are doing all around the world and what they're finding. I believe that there are millions of undiscovered archaeological sites left to find. Discovering them will do nothing less than a mock the full potential of our existence. When we come back. We'll hear more from Sarah about how her work can help us. All discover more about the planet we call. I'm a new summer. Roti and you're listening to the Ted Radio Hour from NPR. Stay with us. He everyone just a quick thanks to our sponsor. Virgo summaries year end vacation is just drive away. Search thousands of nearby vacation rentals on Verb Oh to find your family private home all to yourself you can spread out chill out and feel that vacation feeling again together. Book them that makes the vacation download the VERB VIRGO APP. That's V rb Oh. I'm Gregory Warner with NPR's rough translation, so there's a holiday in the Netherlands. Where every year thousands of white folks where black face some people trying in that tradition, but in very Dutch way you talk you talk you talk you talk you talk until you reach consensus. Can you fight racism in a way that brings the whole country with you? That's on NPR's rough translation. It's the Ted Radio hour from NPR. News Zimmer Odi and today on the show ideas for the whole family with my predecessor guy rise in addition to previously hosting this show. He is the host of the kids science podcast. Wow, in the world. Hey Guy Hello. Before the break we were hearing from you and Sarah. Park these space archaeologist about how many ancient sites she has already begun to uncover using satellite imagery. Let's get back to your conversation with Sarah. All right. I mean what you're saying. is we only know a tiny bit about our past? Is that true I mean is most of our history hidden? I would say yes, because history is always written by the winners and yeah, people are living in places where they've always lived for thousands of years look at places like Rome, and his tunnel and Cairo those cities layers upon layers Paul layers of. So I think we've taken a lot for granted about who we are. And where we come from, we think living in this very modern age with smartphones and Internet, and and sort of this whole world of knowledge at our fingertips we know everything but the more and more we delve into the past. The more we realized that we don't and that it has a lot of lessons to teach us for today. I wish for us to discover. The millions of unknown archaeological sites around the world by creating a Twenty First Century Army of global explorers will find and protect the world's hidden heritage, which contains clues to humankind's collective resilience and creativity. So. How are we going to do this? We are going to build an online crowd source citizen science platform to allow anyone in the world to engage with discovering archeological sites and protect them. By creating this platform, we will find the millions of places occupied by the billions of people that came before us. Acknowledging that the past is worth saving. Mean so much more. It means that we're worth saving two. And the greatest story ever told. Is the story of our shared human journey. But the only way that we're going to be able to write it. Is If. We do it together. Thank you. I love that line. Re she says means that we're worth it to so great, so I have to ask. It's you could go on an archaeological dig the ancient civilization of your choice. Where would you go I? Think I would want to do something like way way way back like early humans, or like our even our human predecessors, they were human like creatures at least seven or eight million years ago, and that's what we know of, and we've only discovered. The remains of like a teeny number of human like species, and so there's there's very little doubt that we have so many more to discover like hundreds thousands of species, and that would be amazing to go on one of those digs. I WanNa Call Sarah and ask her if I can go visit. One of those places in Peru, she could Hook me Oh my God right. So cool all right, so we have talked about trees, dolphins and ancient civilizations before our final segment I wanNA talk to you guys about two words that we say.

Sarah NPR STONEWALL Egyptian Delta Italy Rome Netherlands Gregory Warner Peru Cairo Paul
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

08:10 min | 5 months ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"The show today ideas for curious thinkers of all ages and our guide on this hour is my predecessor Guy Ross. Hello, okay, so we just heard Suzanne Simard to tell us about how trees cooperate with one another, and it really gets you thinking about how all kinds of other beings may be communicating, which brings us to the next topic that you brought us. Dolphins Oh man. KINK around with Dolphin. Can't go wrong dolphins. I I learned about and dolphins like communicate through clicks right learn about this from the prisoner about to hear denise hosing. She has spent her entire life studying a very specific pod of dolphins in the Bahamas, and I, remember Malaysia remember seeing this Ted Talk in person and twenty thirteen. And I was totally blown away at the idea that one day we might be able to talk to communicate with not just with dolphins, but with animals like Dr Doolittle. Right I was. Fascinated by that story as a kid never that. And we are closer to that possibility today than ever before. I've seen lots of pictures of if you under water holding a camera. When you're down there. Does it feel like. It's almost like A. Just a better place to I, don't I don't do you get that feeling while you know. It's an immersion into a three dimensional world. The tides and the currents and the salt and the waves, and I mean. It all feeds into your understanding of what their world is like. Usually when I'm down there I'm like trying to follow behavior in make cameras on. It's actually mostly work really right. Denise hosing has been doing that work every summer. With this same group of Dolphins in the Bahamas see is just calculated recently for thirty five years. Breath thousand encounters in the water with the dolphins. Each of those a counters is about twenty minutes long so over one thousand hours of footage and. Data so yeah, it's a lot of data certainly for dolphins and the point of all that data of all that work is to help denise answer one question. Do they have a language. And if so, what are they talking about? A here's denise hurting on the Ted. Stage, now I'm interested in dolphins because of their large brains, and we know they use of that brainpower for just living complicated lives. But what do we really know about Dolphin Intelligence? We know that their brain to body ratio, which is a physical measure of intelligence, is second only to humans. cognitively they can understand artificially created languages. And they pass self awareness tests in mirrors and some parts of the world. They use tools like sponges to hunt fish. Now Dolphins are natural acoustics. They make sounds ten times as high and here's sounds ten times as high as do, but they have other communications signals they use. They have good vision, so these body postures to communicate. They have taste, smell, and touch and sound can actually be felt in the water, because the acoustic impedance of tissue and water's about the same, so dolphins can buzz and tickle each other at a distance. So decades ago, not years ago. I set out to find a place in the world where I could observe dolphins underwater to try to crack the code of their communication system. I will how? How do dolphins communicate to each other? Well, you know we can actually hear fairmount Their whistles are fairly audible to us. They have plex. They have burst pulses which are also. Packets of clicks. So. They have all these different cues, and they use body postures in combination with sounds that will basically communicate certain things to each other. This is total anthropomorphic station, but When you think of like when you see a dolphin animated or drawn and a kids book. They seem be smiling, but we should not interpolate that that means that they're happy all the time. Right Oh definitely. No, yeah, that is just a physical. Physical Cigna they have, going How do you respond? When other researchers say you know? Push back and say hey, like let's not do that. Let's not. anthropomorphized these creatures. You know you just keep doing your work, I think I. don't even think it's a discussion anymore. Honestly most of us that work with social mammals I think kind of move beyond that and just say well. It's a valuable tool for thinking about how they might think. Let's do the work, is it? Is it even we're to talk about Dolphin language, or or is, is it? Should we be talking about Dolphin Communication Yeah. We don't really usually talk about language because we don't have it yet. but thinking out of the boxes. Boxes you know it's like intelligence are other different kinds and types of intelligence. Are there different kinds and types of language I mean? We know there's tons of kinds of language with humans right, but one of the big things about language is that you can communicate about a different time and space right? Are they talking about the food? They're chasing. Are the eating, or are they talking about? Hey, let's go to the reef and a couple of days and meet up with this other group. You know we don't know and that's where. ANTHROPOMORPHIC can be a tool for thinking about how animals might be thinking. which brings us back to the Bahamas and a pivotal moment in Denise Hers Ings Years of work with Atlantic spotted dolphins there. It happened one summer because in the mid nineties. The dolphins did something they had never done with denise before. We just started noticing the dolphins were just start doing things. This is completely a wild right but we knew the individuals and they would start doing things like. Our Body posture in some cases mimicking rhythm of our sounds in the water. We were doing anything vocally. And we just Kinda thought. Would it be cool to see what we empower them? To communicate back to us. In the key to unlocking that communication. Turned out to be, play. Dolphins just like humans love to play games. Mostly with toys, piece of Robe, a bit of seaweed, anything can pull around in the water. Correct! So what kind of games do they like to play well, it's mostly called. Keep away. That is if they get the toy, then the ideas they like to be chased they like to let you get almost close enough to grab the toy, but then they speed off and that's the game. That's what they play with each other actually. The only question was had to use that play to crack the code. The code that would unlock the meaning behind the dolphins noises now one way to crack the code is to interpret these signals and figure out what they mean, but it's a difficult job, and we actually don't have a Rosetta stone yet, but a second way to crack the code is to develop some technology, an interface to due to a communication, and that's what we've been trying to do in the Bahamas and in real time. So we built a portable keyboard that we get pushed through the water and we labeled four objects. They like to play with the scarf ropes, guests them, and also had a bow ride, which is fun activity for open. And that's the scarf whistle, and these artificially created whistles. They're outside the Dolphin's normal repertoire. But. They're easily mimicked by the dolphins and I. Spent Four Years With my colleagues. Adam pack and Fabienne dealt four a working out in the field with this keyboard, using it with each other to do requests for toys while the dolphins were watching, and the dolphins get in on the game, they could point at the visual object, or they could mimic.

Bahamas Denise hosing denise Suzanne Simard Ted Talk Guy Ross Dr Doolittle Denise Hers Ings Malaysia Adam pack Fabienne
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

06:32 min | 5 months ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"I'm a new summer ODI, and for most kids around the country school is officially out of session, but unlike other summers, many kids and teens are stuck at home because of the coronavirus pandemic and so today. We've got an episode for everyone. Kids, adults, parents teens. You are all invited on this journey because we've invited a certain dad back on the show to share the coolest things he's learned over the years here on the Ted Radio Hour topics to blow the minds of young and old and. Mystery guest host. Can you please introduce yourself? It's the Ted. Radio NPR Guy Roz hello. Hello Guy, well back, thank you. Okay, so guy, not only were you the host of this show until you so graciously handed over the reins to me, but you are also the host of a rather popular podcast for kids right? Yeah, it's called. Wow, on the world. It's a journey through real scientific research, and it sounds a little weird, but it's like a cartoon for the ear where me and my co host. Mindy Thomas go on journeys into space and back in time and. Underwater and everywhere in between searching for incredible scientific discoveries, and it's this joyful wonderful experience for us, and hopefully for the kids who listen to the show. That includes my kids and we sorta figured since you and I are both home with our children this summer. Be The perfect person to come on and curate a special summer show for the entire Ted Radio. Hour family and you have so kindly brought for of your favorite segments that you did over the years. How did you even begin to choose which segments? We're going to bring us well. I think like you probably experience there lot of Ted talks that my kids love and on a really inspired by, and then there's some that you know of course are sort of over their heads right, but I really wanted to bring segments that spoke to curiosity and. The sort of all that kids naturally have about the world, and so that's how we kinda came up with this this collection and I will say I did feel that way about the first segment that you brought to us. This one is called. How do trees collaborate? Tell us about it. I love this segment so much So basically scientists basic forever thought that trees competed against each other for resources right for water and son, and nutrients, and they figured that the tallest trees in the forest where the strongest trees right it makes sense. But Suzanne Simard the scientists that were about to hear from she. Changed the way that scientists now think about trees because it turns out, they don't compete at all. In fact, trees collaborate. They work together through this mysterious. Superhighway, there is an entire communication network happening under our feet. Let's listen. Forest ecologist Suzanne. Simard had a hunch. Yes, that's right. She thought that trees. Could Talk. Imagine like when you're walking through the forest you, might you hear the crunching of the? Twigs under your feet in the rustling of the lease. But she thought. If there's more going on. Big Chattering going on that, we can't hear. That they're attuned to each other. Now at the time, a team of scientists in England were wrapping up an experiment where they'd grown in the laboratory. These pine seedlings together in little route boxes that you could see through. And the scientists took two of these pine seedlings, these baby trees that were in the same box in the same dirt, and then the exposed one of these ceilings to a radioactive carbon dioxide, gas, carbon, fourteen radioactive carbon, and what they found was that some of that radioactive gas, the carbon fourteen made its way into the second seedling. You can visualize you could see it, and so from this experiment. It seemed that somehow these two plants in the same dirt. Or connected and I thought wow. Maybe this is what's going on in my forests. Maybe Suzanne Samara thought maybe all the trees in a forest or connected. In a kind of network. Like our airport system or transportation system our social networks. And maybe she thought all of this was happening underground. When we walk through the forest, what we see is human beings. We just see these beautiful trees growing out of the ground, but we don't see that there are actually completely linked underground in this superhighway. Suzanne decided to prove this underground network existed. She devised an experiment using some of the same radioactive gas, a geiger counter to measure it and a patch of Birch and for trees. I figured the Burton. A for would be connected in a below ground web. Suzanne picks up the story from the Ted. Stage and I gathered my apparatus plastic bags and duct tape and shade cloth paper suit a respirator. And then I borrow some high-tech stuff from my university. The first day of the experiment we got out to our plot and I pulled on my weight paper suit. I put on my respirator. I put the plastic bags over my trees I got my giant Syringes and I injected carbon fourteen, the radioactive gas into the bag of Birch I waited an hour. I figured it would take this long for the trees to suck up the CO two through photosynthesis Senate down into their roots, and maybe shuttle that carbon below ground to their neighbors. I went to my first bag with the Birch I pulled the bag off. Iran my Geiger counter over its leaves. Perfect the Birch had taken up the radioactive gas then the moment of truth I went over to the for tree. I pulled off its bay. I ran the Geiger counter up its needles and I heard the most beautiful sound. It was the sound.

Suzanne Simard Suzanne Ted Radio Geiger Ted Suzanne Samara NPR Mindy Thomas Iran England
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

06:32 min | 5 months ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"I'm a new summer ODI and for most kids around the country school is officially out of session, but unlike other summers, many kids and teens are stuck at home because of the coronavirus pandemic and so today. We've got an episode for everyone kids, adults, parents teens. You are all invited on this journey because we've invited a certain dad back on the show to share the coolest things he's learned over the years here on the Ted Radio Hour topics to blow the minds of young and old and. Mystery guest host. Can you please introduce yourself? It's the Ted. Radio NPR Guy Roz hello. Hello guy well back, thank you. Okay so guy, not only were you the host of this show until you so graciously handed over the reins to me, but you are also the host of a rather popular podcast for kids right? Yeah, it's called. Wow, on the world. It's a journey through real scientific research, and it sounds a little weird, but it's like a cartoon for the ear where me and my co host Mindy Thomas go on journeys into space and back in time and. Underwater and everywhere in between searching for incredible scientific discoveries, and it's this joyful wonderful experience for us, and hopefully for the kids who listen to the show. That includes my kids and we sorta figured since you and I are both home with our children this summer. Be The perfect person to come on and curate a special summer show for the entire Ted Radio Hour family and you have so kindly brought for of your favorite segments that you did over the years. How did you even begin to choose which segments we're going to bring us well I think like you probably experience there lot of Ted talks that my kids love and on a really inspired by, and then there's some that you know of course are sort of over their heads right, but I really wanted to bring segments that spoke to curiosity and. The sort of all that kids naturally have about the world, and so that's how we kinda came up with this. This collection and I will say I did feel that way about the first segment that you brought to us. This one is called. How do trees collaborate? Tell us about it I love this segment so much So basically, scientists basic forever thought that trees competed against each other for resources right for water and son, and nutrients, and they figured that the tallest trees in the forest where the strongest trees right it makes sense. But Suzanne Simard the scientists that were about to hear from she. Changed the way that scientists now think about trees because it turns out, they don't compete at all. In fact, trees collaborate. They work together through this mysterious. Superhighway, there is an entire communication network happening under our feet. Let's listen. Forest ecologist Suzanne Simard had a hunch. Yes, that's right. She thought that trees. Could Talk. Imagine like when you're walking through the forest, you, might you hear the crunching of the? Twigs under your feet in the rustling of the lease. But she thought. If, there's more going on. Big Chattering going on that. We can't hear. That, they're attuned to each other. Now at the time, a team of scientists in England were wrapping up an experiment where they'd grown in the laboratory. These pine seedlings together in little route boxes that you could see through. And the scientists took two of these pine seedlings, these baby trees that were in the same box in the same dirt, and then the exposed one of these ceilings to a radioactive carbon dioxide, gas, carbon, fourteen radioactive carbon, and what they found was that some of that radioactive gas, the carbon fourteen made its way into the second seedling. You can visualize you could see it, and so from this experiment. It seemed that somehow these two plants in the same dirt. Or connected and I thought wow. Maybe this is what's going on in my. Maybe Suzanne. Samara thought maybe all the trees in a forest or connected. In a kind of network. Like our airport system or transportation system our social networks. And maybe she thought all of this was happening underground. When we walk through the forest, what we see as human beings, we just see these beautiful trees growing out of the ground, but we don't see that there are actually completely linked underground in this superhighway. Suzanne decided to prove this underground network existed. She devised an experiment using some of the same radioactive gas, a geiger counter to measure it and a patch of Birch and for trees. I figured the Burton a for would be connected in a below ground web. Suzanne picks up the story from the Ted Stage, and I gathered my apparatus plastic bags and duct tape and shade cloth paper suit a respirator. And then I borrow some high-tech stuff from my university. The first day of the experiment we got out to our plot, and I pulled on my weight paper suit I. Put on my respirator. I put the plastic bags over my trees I got my giant Syringes, and I injected carbon fourteen, the radioactive gas into the bag of Birch. I waited an hour I figured. It would take this long for the trees to suck up the CO two through photosynthesis Senate down into their roots, and maybe shuttle that carbon below ground to their neighbors I went to my first bag with the Birch I pulled the bag off Iran. My Geiger counter over its leaves. Perfect. The Birch had taken up the radioactive gas. Then the moment of truth I went over to the for tree. I pulled off its bay. I ran the Geiger counter up its needles, and I heard the most beautiful sound. It was the sound.

Suzanne Simard Birch Geiger Ted NPR Mindy Thomas Samara England Iran Burton
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

02:11 min | 8 months ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Hey everybody it's minutia a quick note before we get started. The Ted Radio Hour team is now working from home. Maybe you are too because lots of things in our world are changing for all of us but we want you to know that we are working extra hard to keep bringing you great stories and big ideas each week. Some episodes we hope will provide a welcome distraction from the corona virus. And everything going on others like this. One will provide context to our new reality which a lot of US includes spending a lot of time online. Jesse no the show may sound a little different in the weeks to come since we're producing it remotely but our goal is to keep bringing you context kindness and stories that help you understand this weird world better so be well and enjoy the show. This is the Ted Radio Hour. Each week groundbreaking. Ted Talks our job. Now is to dream big delivered at Ted Conferences to bring about the future. We want to see around the world to understand who we are from those talks. We bring you speakers and ideas. That will surprise. You just don't know what you're GonNa Find Challenge. You have the acts ourselves like why's it noteworthy and even change you. I literally feel like I'm a different person. Do you feel that way ideas worth spreading from Ted and NPR? I'M NEW SUMMER. Odi and I think I'm a pretty good citizen. I am law-abiding I stop at Red Lights. I pay my taxes. I try to be nice to my neighbors. You probably do to. But what roles do we follow when we go online will none? There are no rules but maybe there should be because what happens on the Internet can have real life reprecussions so this particular example happened was the end of April..

Ted Ted Conferences US Jesse Red Lights NPR
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

06:59 min | 8 months ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Stage. I started talking to neuro scientists and cognitive psychologists and what they told me was fascinating it turns out that when you get bored you ignite a network in your brain called the default mode so our body. It goes on autopilot while we're folding the laundry or we're walking to work actually. That is when our brain gets really busy. Here's boredom researcher. Dr Sandy man wants to start daydreaming and allow you to really wonder you start thinking a little bit beyond the conscious a little bit into the subconscious which allows sort of different connections to take place. It's really awesome. Actually totally awesome right. So this is my brain and FM Ri. And I learned that in the default mode that is when we connect disparate ideas. We saw some of our most nagging problems and we do something called autobiographical planning. This is when we look back at our lives. We take note of the big moments. We create a personal narrative and then we set goals and we figure out what steps we need to take to reach them but now we chill out on the couch also while updating a Google doc. Who are replying to email. The average person checks email seventy four times a day and switches tasks on their computer. Five hundred and sixty six times a day. I discovered all this talking to professor of Informatics Dr Gloria Mark. So we find that when people are stressed. They tend to shift their attention. More rapidly We also found strangely enough. We find that the shorter amount of sleep that a person gets the more likely they are to check facebook. Were in this vicious habitual cycle. What could this cycle be broken like? What would happen? If we broke this vicious cycle what if we reclaim those cracks in our day? Could it help us? Jumpstart our creativity. Maybe my listeners could help me find out we call the project board and Brilliance and Within Forty eight hours twenty thousand people signed by. Yeah I was like. Oh not a special snowflake. This is a thing. People are feeling this so one day. Take the APP that your thumb always seems to gravitate towards take it off your phone and observe what it feels like and then decide. Do you want it back on your phone? Cool go forward if you do. But do not let the tech companies decide as their decision making. Don't let that be the default which it very much has become. I think for consumers so how tens of thousands of people who signed up for the challenge. Some of them called her up because they started to realize that their relationship with their phone had kind of become co dependent the relationship between a baby and teddy bear or a baby. Banke or a baby that wants its mother's cradle when its done being held by stranger that's the relationship between me and my I think of my phone leg power tool useful but dangerous if I'm not handling it properly if I don't pay close attention I'll suddenly realize that I've lost an hour of time. Doing something totally mindless okay. But to really measure any improvement we needed data right. Because that's what we do these days so we partnered with some APPs that would measure how much time we were spending every day on our phone. And if you're thinking it's ironic that I ask people to download another APP so that they would spend less time on their phones. Yeah you gotTa meet people where they are but when the data came in it turned out that we had cut down on average just six minutes from one hundred and twenty minutes a day on our phones to one hundred and fourteen look amazing that you you got so many people involved and then looks at the data and turned out. The people just saved six minutes a day. Don't just sort of like like deflating right. I mean after all this effort people are only sixty six minutes a day. Which tells US something about ourselves? Yeah I mean well first of all it tells me that I have been trained to expect. Tax Returns Right. You know. We expecting huge numbers. And I I thought six minutes was nothing but when I went back to the scientists and researchers were who were advising me on this they I'm not joking. They laughed in my face. They were like who says six minutes isn't significant. And frankly like you know the fact that you got people to change their behavior at all over a week is extraordinary and listen to the stories because the stories will tell you so much more than any data can And that's what people told me. They told me stories about how they realize. They used to relax by playing their guitar and then they suddenly understood that they they hadn't played it in years or things bigger than that That people had sat down this thought. About what the family dynamics were and get to a better place in their relationship there were all these amazing stories that people told us and I thought you know what you're right. F The six minutes right. Get totally or like. Let's stop giving boredom such a bad rap. It actually is an extremely important human function that we are starting to just sort of breed out of our daily lives. And I I sort of look around and I see. There's lots of things like that Downtime eye contact conversations out loud where people stutter or make mistakes or take more than a quick. You know one hundred forty characters to figure out what they want to say. We've lost the capacity in many ways. I think for patients if we want to have excellent ideas the best ideas we need to let them take the time to take root and then blossom and that does not happen in a tap of a of an APP. We're humans we need. I'm and that's the one thing that our phones and it was more of that was me minutia. The new host of Ted Radio Hour talking to guy. Ross the old host Ted Radio Hour back in two thousand eighteen. You can see my full Ted talk on Ted Dot Com and we've got a new episode of the Ted Radio Hour for you coming this Friday..

Ted Dot Com Ted Dr Sandy man Ri researcher facebook Google US Dr Gloria Mark professor of Informatics Banke Ross
"ted" Discussed on The TED Interview

The TED Interview

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"ted" Discussed on The TED Interview

"Yeah. Hi, I'm Chris Anderson at the guy lucky enough to run Ted as in TED talks. Here at Ted were borderline obsessed with the power of ideas. Ideas are amazing things in other patent of information that gets inside your head, and it changes how you see the world. The question, I think each of us have to ask ourselves is when you see something, what do you do? Are you the person that see something and walks away and continues on with your life or e the person who stops and slows down and says, I'm complicit in this. But his thing about ideas, they don't just land perfectly formed. They want to be critiqued, played with its rated on, and sometimes that takes longer than eighteen minutes. The most important questions in human life are questions. We have to be able to talk about this up Tober where releasing a new podcast called the Ted interview. The history of human achievement is that people have done remarkable things from very improbable beginnings. I'll be sitting down with some of the most compelling Ted's speakers. I think everybody thinks that creativity comes in lightning strikes, but I think it comes in whispers and the whispers can grow thunderous over time if you're patient enough to explore it and inviting them to go Deepa to challenge them at all, and to encourage them to challenge us doom trust yourself too much. Over-confidence is really the enemy of good thinking. Episodes drop weekly, starting October, sixteenth, subscribe for freon of a podcast or wherever you listen, I hope you can join me sin. Ex-.

Ted TED Chris Anderson Deepa eighteen minutes