17 Burst results for "talking cancer"

"talking cancer" Discussed on Talking Cancer

Talking Cancer

08:11 min | 4 months ago

"talking cancer" Discussed on Talking Cancer

"With cancer will all touch on the latest government guidance and what it means in practice for people living with cancer. If you are asked to attend an appointment, please do keep it and feel confident in doing so we'll also be hearing some updates from Mandy things that keep you connected with people. It's not the same as in person, but it is a good substitute if these are your circumstances now, we know that these recent changes page. Make some people feel very anxious and worried. Please have a listing back to episode 2 of the podcast if you're looking for some guidance and helpful tips about managing your mental health during the pandemic. We're McMillan and we're kicking cancer Rosie and Mark welcome back lovely to have you with us now as in the other episodes we've recorded. I'm going to time stamp this and we're recording this on the 23rd of October 2020 and all the information that we talked about is correct at the time of recording in episode one we discussed what people can do if they're struggling with the new often virtue of two ways of interacting with GPS Specialists and Healthcare professionals, the millions support line team are still receiving some calls about this. So I'd recommend that anyone worried about that particular issue liquid back to episode one for more information loads of great advice there. However, for some people physical appointments and treatments in hospitals GP surgeries and pharmacies are going ahead but Standardly people may be feeling very anxious about the safety of this while covid-19 is still very much present Rosie what precautions are in place in hospitals and Health Care settings at the moment and how are they making these environments as safe as they possibly can for patients? Yeah. Thanks emigrate to be back. Thank you very much. And as you say we talked about some aspects of this last time obviously, it's totally natural to worry about going for appointments. All of us are anxious at the best of times where when doing this but of course now, there's all the added concerns and Logistics on top of that but you know, he was telling me that actually they're really reassured by all the precautions that they see once they arrive. So again last time we did talk about that shift from not quite so many face-to-face appointments and some telephone or video. So that does actually help because that means there are actually less people going through the hospital and of course when you get there, you'll might have a timed entry you might be asked to log In your vehicle until your appointment time and some places are even giving page or alerts out. I know one of our McMillan information centers that same close to one of the hospitals. In fact, right next door. They've opened up their car park to allow people to part there and indeed if you aren't traveling by car, they're also allowing people to wait inside and the hospitals just buzzing straight across when they're ready for the patient off. And of course, there's all the cleanliness precautions Jetta at the doors PPE and for the staff in particular and then the red and green channels in the hospital so areas where cancer patients would be kept well away from potential infection risk and deep cleaning is just going on relentlessly. So I suppose I'd say there are so many precautions in place. The most important thing is that if you are asked to attend an appointment, please do keep it and feel confident in doing so and one last thing just following up on some of the conversation we had last time about the challenges of not being dead. Take someone to your appoint. Yes. Yes. Some of that is lightning up a little bit in some particular circumstances not across the board, but it it's really important so do ask because it might actually be possible that you can take someone to some of your appointments actually from a personal perspective a friend of mine one for her yearly check-up post treatment for breast cancer yesterday and the situation about taking a couple had changed so so she was able to take somebody with her not all the way. That's great. You make sure you ask. Yeah. Absolutely you did just touch on that lightly not everybody is able to be picked up from the front doorstep and dropped at the at the door of the hospital her many people public transports. The only way they're going to get to these appointments and that has its own level of risk and its own level of anxiety as well. What steps can patients take to ensure they are traveling safely themselves really understandable that you're going to be worrying about this and actually you might be worrying about it and feel I really can't bother people. Hospital or my health care teams to talk about this but actually you absolutely should it may well be that there are options that they can do to modify something simple like Changing Times of appointments. So you're not traveling that busy times and might be able to actually organize things so that for example a blood test might be closer to home. So so please do ask if there are any options to explore if you do have to travel then definitely follow the guidelines travel in a bubble where possible if you've got to travel in a taxi, for example where a mass can open the window and not follow the guidelines which you will find online and I know also that some of our McMillan information centers have been linking locally to see what transport services are available. So again, just whereas to assist with this if you're worrying about this ask there's so much talk of what's online and there's so much information online and I know for for some people who maybe don't have access to computers job Or a little bit older and there are people on the end of a phone on there at the hospitals at appointments that and people are willing to talk and explain through the processes that you might have to that. You might expect them very definitely again. I can only reiterate that on that men and support line. Is there also and we'll be able to answer these queries a direct you to any of our local services. So absolutely people are available at the edge of a phone be that your health care team or indeed the mcmillans support line. So absolutely you don't have to go online that there will be someone at the end of a telephone line. And so please pick up the phone and asked I think you know, when you have a cancer diagnosis, it's again creating levels of anxiety. Very basically though. How does the shielding measure that one place in lockdown Mary with these the the new three-tier system that's been introduced by the government recently. So, I think the most important thing is that you do need to check the local restrictions and guidelines. For your area and if you've got any specific concerns about this, then do check in again with your health care team. They might be able to advise about any adjustments and be able to reassure you about precautions. We are advised that there will be a letter coming from the government to people who are on the extremely vulnerable list and to explain to them what advice they need to take and that length is is immanent but I think it's really important at the moment with the rapid change. We're seeing and different geographical areas that you make sure that you're up to date on what the local advice is Margaret. Yes, Rosie mentioned obviously for pharmacies across the UK the changing restrictions and tear system is meaning that you guys as well having to be quite reactive quickly to to make the experience of being able to get along bonuses or access to information from you guys available quickly and safely. Yes. I am I Rosie it is confusing isn't it? And t as in England firebreaks lockdowns in in school? Northern Ireland and Wales. It is very important that you stay close to the local guidance and guidance on travel but for pharmacies are open as as they have been all along through this pandemic and and we continue to be open for advice and you can access your medication and there are rules and support on on doing that. So so feel free not only need to access them physically on the High Street, but also ring ahead and to Rosie's point, you know pharmacies are available to advise. If you have any questions on on how to access medicine or get them delivered or how to help order your prescription with your GP too. Lovely. Thank you. If there was one starting point that people can go to what's your advice about.

McMillan Rosie government cancer Mandy Standardly Mark GPS Specialists Jetta England Wales Ireland UK Margaret Mary
"talking cancer" Discussed on Talking Cancer

Talking Cancer

12:04 min | 5 months ago

"talking cancer" Discussed on Talking Cancer

"Guidance on shielding in August of this year, which means shielding has now been paused so that means in practice you can go to work and if you cannot work from home as long as there's business is what they call covert safe now and it's important to note that this guidance is advisory. So what I would suggest, you know, the first step really is you should just first of all have a discussion wage Employer and agree your plan for returning to work. Now where you work is a question mark you know, so as I've said with the previous series, you know under the equality act which applies in England Scotland and Wales and the disability Discrimination Act which applies in Northern Ireland. Your employer has a legal obligation to make what we call reasonable adjustments to help you assemble with cancer to stay home work and that could be a variety of different things including helping you to work from home. So I suppose what to say to people if people are not feeling safe have that discussion with the employer employer particular with your line manager as your first point of contact and discuss the situation discuss what they're doing in the business what measures they're taking to make the workplace code would safe and if you're still not fitting that that's a safe environment for you, then I'd suggest, you know, you talk to your employer about alternative working Arrangements if that's possible. This is all in an Ideal World with a reasonable employer wage. And a job that you can drive to and get out of the car and get you know and get straight into the office. What about for those people who are contacting that Millions support line because they're they're genuinely worried about returning home after furlough. They might not be in such an accommodating place of work or a practically easy place of work to get to having to use public transport, for example, so what page first of all is actually really try to understand the risk and my first suggestion would be if you're speak to your clinical team. Now if somebody is going thru cancer treatment and and hopefully they'll be able to talk to their Consultants or their nurse specialist if they have access to one and the clinical team should be able to advise you on your health risk based on your condition and you are treatments and everybody's going to be different and this is something that's important to understand just because you have cancer doesn't necessarily mean that you're all automatically at higher risk. It depends on your type of cancer where you are in your tree log. Journey so it's important really first of all, I think to you know, find out the right information. So you understand the health risk for you. If you don't have access to your consultant or a nurse specialist also, you could find your g p and thought you to be about your condition and what you know things you need to be concerned about because again, not everybody will be in the same position. So it's really important to try and for yourself find out what the risks are for you then I would suggest that the next step then would be to go and talk to your workplace. Now. Your first point of contact is always your line manager there there the person that you know are responsible for you. And so you should talk to them about, you know, the information you get from your your clinicians your GP about the risks that you face and then talk to them in detail about you know, what measures they're taking in order to protect you as a worker in that business now, they have a duty and an obligation to provide, you know a safe environment for you as an employee. And so they need to take that very month. Seriously now, you know, there are also other people that you could talk to in the business as well now depends very much on the size of the business and the type of the business but there will be some businesses that would have health and safety officers that you can speak to they'll be others where you have access to what we call Occupational Health which are you know health services that are attached to a business and you could ask for a referral to your Occupational Health practitioner and they should be able to then advise you and the headline manager about what sort of adjustments would need to take place in order to help you to get back into the workplace. So there are some steps that you can take I'm not saying that everything I say here is going to absolutely help every single person out there with their own scenario, but I'm hopeful that it will help people to know what steps to take in order to be able to take control of the situation for themselves so that they understand the risks and what they can do as an employee to support themselves. I guess that you know birth. Taking back control thing is is is comes back again and again and again when we talk about cancer diagnosis and and arming yourself, I guess with the facts as well. That was there's really interesting thing that you said about, you know, making sure that you are in, you know in possession of your risk level and so it's not kind of something that's a bit amorphous for your employee. It's actually you know, here we are. This is it and it makes life a lot easier. If you go as informed as you possibly can to that conversation, it seems yeah, absolutely, you know, the more you know about what you need to protect your health the better position you'll be in to be able to have a conversation with your employer and hopefully your employer will be reasonable and we'll try and support you every you know, every worker has a value and and nobody wants to you know lose people unnecessarily and I'm sure there are lots of lots of efforts that are being made by employers. You mentioned reasonable adjustments. Can you just sort of pick that apart a little bit about what else that might look like a part-time job? Social distancing in an office space and hand sanitizer everywhere. What else might you be able to have a conversation about? Yeah. Well again just to State again. There's the equality act in in that applies in England Scotland Wales and disability Discrimination Act in Northern Ireland and those pieces of legislation say that your employer must make reasonable adjustments when would work place or work practices puts you at a substantial disadvantage because you have cancer and now and that is compared to other colleagues who do not have cancer. So what this means practices that your employer needs to think, you know creatively and you can think as an employee creatively about what sort of changes could be made to allow you to stay at work. Now the context of coronavirus these can be you know, flexible working arrangements. So for example, you know, let's think about if you were traveling to a job, but you didn't want to travel at rush hour because there will be more people. On and increases your risk then a flexible working arrangement might mean travelling later in the morning or coming back late earlier in the evening or later in the evening. Whatever works for you in order to be able to walk to do your job. There's also very good scheme. They're out there called access to work. It's a government scheme and they can pay for certain types of adjustments and it's called government jobs. Best kept secret in many ways because it's a it's a scheme there that the employer and and use an employee can look into to see if it can cover things like travel you might be able to wage claim for maybe first class train travel for example, or pay for taxis to and from work. If you're feeling that that will protect you and give you more security and that is a reasonable adjustment to suck you to stay in your employment changing work patterns shift patterns providing access to things like software and equipment from home so that you'd be able to do your job from home giving you the song. The computer is everything else that you might need in order to be able or even Wi-Fi access to Wi-Fi. So I suppose the important thing is to remember that anything could be considered an adjustment anything that allows you to keep a job could be considered but it must be reasonable what's reasonable for one employer might not be reasonable for another employer. It kind of depends on you know, how big is your business? You know, the finances the sort of adjustment that you're actually asking for so it's it's it's very like it's very specific to that kind of situation that you're in. So again, you know your relationship as an employee if you have cash with your line manager is so important but knowing your rights I think gives you again the confidence to know what you can approach and what you could talk to your employer about and that's hugely important choice. Absolutely, I guess as well the reality of coronavirus and the pandemic is that not everybody will be having as positive and experience in the workplace. We would hope and if people do end up having money worries, they are there other places that they can turn to what should they be doing initially now McMillan has a range of really great services that can support people with cancer. We have a wonderful team of financial guides and they can explain lots of options available and things that need to think about and things that you need to do so they can cover things like your budgeting and you're planning mortgages what to do with mortgages. Maybe you need to take a mortgage break for a while. They can support you about what song versation so you need to have with your building Society or your bank. They provide you information on your pension. For example, if you want to take early retirement Insurance options issues around Financial products is overdrafts. And also if you have debt and how you would manage your death in the unfortunate outcome that you lose your job. We have a team of fantastic welfare advisors who offer home Ice on benefits and other types of support that you might be able to Avail on such as you know council tax breaks as well. And then we've a team a small team of energy advisers who can talk to you about you know, how did you pay your gas or electricity or water bills, you know, and they're really really great team as well to to call and all of these services are available on the Mac Miller and support line, which is a free confidential find that anybody can call. I think there is some tangible Rising tension as well about the the job retention scheme finishing the end of October at people might be terribly worried about a thousand C's at this time. Oh, absolutely. So well the job retention scheme as as you said or the further scheme it's as it's known ends on the 31st of October 2020 now to end for a low employers should give stuff notice in writing if they're going to end the first game and there's no minimum notice. For furlough but employers they should talk to staff about The plant stand for as early as possible and they need to encourage staff to raise any concerns. They have about or problems around returning to work. So that's that's hugely important. Is there anything replacing it that's planned? Yes. So there's a new scheme called the job support scheme. Now, this is a is a scheme. It's designed to protect what they call viable wage jobs in businesses. There are businesses who are facing a lower demand over the winter months because of covet and it's there to help keep their employees attached to the workforce. Now the scheme is on the 1st of November and it runs for six months so over the winter. So what happens in that scenario is that the company will continue to pay the employee for the time worked but the cost of the arrows not worked. So there's not that they're not working. They will be split three ways between the employer between the government and the employee so the government will wage. Up to I think it's about a third but to a certain cap and the employee would obviously pay a bit too through wage and reduction but the whole point is trying to enable the employee to keep their job. Now the scheme isn't as generous as the previous job pretentious game, but you know your employer may be may try to take advantage of that, you know, if they're facing difficult because of covert over the the next six months. It's a really really difficult time isn't it? And I think in you know where so much is in certain and there is so much with worry and concern on top of a cancer diagnosis having such clear.

cancer Northern Ireland consultant England Scotland Occupational Health Wales England Scotland Wales Mac Miller McMillan
"talking cancer" Discussed on Talking Cancer

Talking Cancer

03:15 min | 5 months ago

"talking cancer" Discussed on Talking Cancer

"Think you'll agree some really useful advice from Carol. They're the people who are having to sell for isolate daily before treatment or surgery or if someone in your household is showing symptoms of coronavirus, we've heard how lonely this experience can be. I mean, it must be awful. How can people stay connected it is difficult. And actually we lived in a really connected world now and lots of people have adapted through lock down to using FaceTime and WhatsApp to stay connected to friends and family. However, it's still hard if you can't get out and about in the page away and so people might want to explore things in a virtual way and we've seen lots of things like people doing virtual bingo with their family home or if they love Gardens the National Guard and scheme of got virtual Gardens that people can access its kind of a about finding what you like, but there is a lot their home. Do appreciate that there are some people that are perhaps not adapt at that kind of digital but there will always be someone in their family that is and so rather than feeling originated, you know, sit down with a a family member and and look at what's there and find things that work for you and we've talked a little bit as well which I'm sure adds another layer of anxiety that due to the pandemic. It's meant for some people that they've they're having to face delays to there from diagnosis right through to where they are on the treatment plans. What guidance can you give to help people off that anxiety? They might be experiencing around those delays. What what a reasonable questions that people are you should be asking I think it's really important that they any anxiety they have about their treatment that they do to their cancer team and the cancer nurse specialist because they will have all the information about them as a person they're cancer. And so if people are worried about delays to their treatment they need Talk it through and understand what the impact is for them. And if you're not going through active treatment in your worried, you know, then have a conversation with your GP about whether you should be worried because those are the people that have the most information about your health and what to worry about and what not to worry about them as always a font of knowledge and the voice of support and comfort. Thank you so much lovely to speak to you again for more information on a topics daily, and I have talked about in this episode head to our website McMillan. He's talking cancer the resources advice and support. It's also where you can find out more about donating a million, you know, next episode were talking about work and cancer in the age of coronavirus subscribe. If you'd like to hear that and every new episode whenever it's ready, and if you enjoy the series we'd love it if you could give us a callback. Sing or a review so that others can find the podcast more easily. I'm Emma be talking cancer is a MacMillan cancer support podcast..

FaceTime Carol National Guard Emma
"talking cancer" Discussed on Talking Cancer

Talking Cancer

03:44 min | 5 months ago

"talking cancer" Discussed on Talking Cancer

"Find the support line and and help us there. You you just mentioned their daily the telephone buddy system which roses much in and I love it. Can you tell us a little bit more about how that works? Yeah. So our telephone buddies are our usual volunteers who obviously can't support people in the way that they normally do because of a distancing. They're basically at the end of the phone to support people with advice practical needs and just to be a listening ear. I think it's really important that you've kind of just really took office eyes that there is something for the super tech-savvy right through to you know, people who who it's a computer I can't do it because it is important because job Not for a lot of people, you know doing a zoom chat with somebody they've never met before it's not great. You know, it's not a great option for some people and I love the telephone buddy system that you've got to go. I think it's really cool. So there's there isn't there's an access point for everybody along the tech scale isn't there there is saying that picking up the phone for first time when you have decided and made that call that you are struggling a little bit is is a big step, isn't it? What would you say to somebody sitting there going after I don't know am I making a Fast I'd really don't know whether I should do this or not. I would say they've absolutely taken the first step in acknowledging that perhaps they need help. And so maybe the first thing to do is just talk it through with someone that they feel comfortable with whether that's a friend or their GP or even their their cancer team and just to talk it through and certainly having been a cancer nurse. Nothing is ever too slight for you to listen to them. People often think or why don't want to worry them or this is really silly but it you know, but if it's constantly on your mind the best thing to do is to talk somebody about it and make that first step then to find out where to get help absolutely. Brilliant as always stay there. Don't move. We're going to be speaking to you shortly. Questions about cancer boots and McMillan are by your side from the moment. You're diagnosed through your treatment and beyond our boots McMillan information pharmacist. So on hand with Specialists support from helping you make sense of your diagnosis to advice about living with cancer. You can find them in your local boots Pharmacy or online via video appointment. Visit boots.com forward slash McMillan for more information subject to pharmacists availability. Hi, I'm Carol. I'm thirty-eight and from Manchester. I was initially diagnosed with primary breast cancer in December 2019. And then with secondary breast cancer in February this year lockdown was massive anxiety inducing so much with outside of of all of our control. So I dealt with my anxiety by trying to focus on the things that I could control like, you know the next few hours. So the next few days, I found it quite helpful to limit my exposure to all the Doom and Gloom in the news. I focused on things that made me happy, you know, like catch up with family and friends virtually like that started learning Italian during the lockdown randomly. I exercised and threw myself into things like campaigning for MacMillan. I also found edit ation really really helped as well. I found that was really helpful in trying to make me focus on the present a.

McMillan cancer MacMillan Manchester
"talking cancer" Discussed on Talking Cancer

Talking Cancer

01:44 min | 6 months ago

"talking cancer" Discussed on Talking Cancer

"Them themselves in their family need to take a particular part of the minimum website which is corona virus hub, and we try to respond to the content on there in response to the questions that come through the support line I'm won't and. Dating on a very regular basis. However, we do also make sure that we've got the Gulf Dot UK links on there because you know sometimes as we now announcements made on a Saturday evening and again, coming back to you and your individual care be guided by your healthcare teams and the information that is being sent to you about any specifics and that relate to you. and. So I I think those would be the things that I would suggest in in terms of making sure that you have got absolutely the right information that is personalized for you. Rosie Mark Thank you so unbelievably helpful I really you know there's so much in there to take away it's been a pleasure speaking to you both take care. Thank you. Thanks. Thanks summer. Thanks again to rosy mark for taking the time to speak with me today for more information on the topics discussed in this episode, make sure you head tone website, McMillan dot org dot, UK food slash talking cancer for resources advice and support. It's also where you can find out more about donating to Macmillan in our next episode talking about managing your mental health through the pandemic subscribe. If you'd like to hear that an every new episode whenever it's ready and if you enjoy the series, why not give it a rating or a review, it helps others find the podcast more easily I'm GonNa be and talking cancer is Macmillan cancer support..

Gulf Dot UK Macmillan Rosie Mark UK
"talking cancer" Discussed on Talking Cancer

Talking Cancer

04:12 min | 11 months ago

"talking cancer" Discussed on Talking Cancer

"My mom came with me to every single appointment. She's driven me to hospital. She's hey with me today in. London says dishes so she's got involved. She wanted me to move in with them. I've got a dog who sometimes I can't walk because of the chemotherapy the Amazon and the side effects got the looked after the dog. So they've got involved wholeheartedly. Really did you feel as well? I mean it's something that's kind of coming through. It's quite common taking somebody with you. Indifferent pair of ears really helps to to properly understand what's being said exactly some of whom turns up. She's got little notepad that she writes. She writes down in the Middle Pad and then with the departments that have had you have the appointment with the doctor and also you McMillan. Nason there as well. The the doctors doctor talk she kind of understand but not everything. Then go to another room with Melanin. Andy McMillan nist gives to in Layman's terms makes it more digestible already. Bite size and then minimum our notebook and says this in Comanche about Mason. What could this mean another last year? It's good to have somebody else there. I mean you know this. This is the thing though. Isn't it a New York you know you're used to these environments your the new vocabulary that comes pouring out when you had your first meeting with your oncologist? That was to confirm your diagnosis and to start talking about how they wanted to treat it. Yes so what was said at that first meeting about how they hoped to treat it so by that point at. Hutt my foam diagnosis. So I knew there are definitely cancer and the meteorologist. He basically just explained the type of Kmart. Beyond and what that chemotherapy medication consisted of. And what side effects had probably encounter is just a barrage of information. And it's it's funny until you either have. Cancer are some media? Family has cancer. Are you work in an environment or company that million the involved in cancer? You don't really realize how many chemotherapies the out there you just presume. It's like that's a mall. Everybody has chemotherapy. How did you find out that there were different forms chemotherapy? We told or was it something that you observed found out a thing. Yeah just research online really and also when you go and chemotherapy you in obey with a number of the of the people and above them is a whiteboard with their name and what chemotherapy that on and you look around and nobody is on the same thing and he was like. Oh my gosh. There were so many different types obviously because it needs to be specific to the person and specific to the cancer. You just don't realize it is so I open is yeah. I didn't know that either I did. You know you just wouldn't know exactly so is so eye opening and is partly consideration of the treatment. The you know the kind of person that you are obviously age. What you do you know can we? Can You keep working? Can you know keep working? Are you moving around because tell me tell us then about the treatment that that you eventually agreed on view? The chemotherapy that I'm on is called Flt L. O. F. Teams Ninety for that type of sorry and basically it's an acronym. Epilepsy is mid perform different medications. And I get every two weeks for two days and I have a four times. So it's a period of eight weeks 'em and basically going to hospital on day one and have three medications and then because the chemotherapy that I'm on I come home with off which is in a pump. Which is we expect it to be full of cogs and battery operated or plugged in. But he's just looks like a baby's bottle okay. There's a balloon inside of it yet fully medication and basically the balloon slowly. I guess deflate and push easy medication now. So how was it administered to you? So I've got a pick line in which is basically a Catheter. Straightens in my vein. Okay which is there the whole time. Okay and I'm just so it's just above my elbow a bit. Different to be higher than you would hubbard taken from. And yes. He basically carrying around this baby's bottle full of chemotherapy for twenty four hours and then a district..

Cancer Andy McMillan Nason Amazon Flt L. O. F. Teams Ninety London Kmart Hutt hubbard New York Family
"talking cancer" Discussed on Talking Cancer

Talking Cancer

11:24 min | 1 year ago

"talking cancer" Discussed on Talking Cancer

"Being so honest with us. It's hugely appreciated. Thank you Bob Dany Fabulous McMillan. Professional is back with me. First of all Dina Max. What a what a story what do you make of how him and his family have dealt with it I mean so many practical tips in there from things that they've done that feel like their original that you could put different slot tone but absolutely amazing How how they dealt with as a family and again experiences very different for different individuals for different families. What are the most common questions that you get About end of life so I think A common question people often ask themselves And family members often debate is how long how long have I got left to live? When they know their time is limited and and that's very difficult because some people ask the question on perhaps they don't really want to know the answer and I think it's always very difficult to give a very specific time And I worked with Palliative care consultant. Who was very good at doing this? And she always used to double check that they actually wanted the answer but then she would say whether she thought they had weeks or months and she So she didn't say you have two weeks or you know she just say. I think it's going to be very few weeks. And I think that gives a good indication without being specific so people are taking the days off on the calendar and getting very upset anxious in those days as well. Max described very eloquently This pre grieving process that I completely related to Give some explanation of what that is. What what he meant by that. I mean he really articulated it. Really well Will you know you're going to lose someone but you don't know when and so you you start the grieving process in in essence and that's different for for everyone in terms of shock. Fear Anger acceptance. There's very good literature around the grieving process. And some people experience all of that some people only one of those things but in essence. It's about you coming to terms with the fact that you're gonNA lose your loved one owner on a practical level. I think because we've mentioned you know when you're in this huge emotional turmoil. Structure is is helpful. What if somebody's just received an end of life diagnosis? What sort of kicks in? How what what steps should people expect? on what would happen. Generally to kind of help them through that I think the most important thing. And that's why Max story is just so important is is being able to talk and I know they were a close family. And some people don't feel that they can talk to friends or family Up about it but understanding what what you want. If you're in the situation where you're facing end of life. When do you want to consider having no treatment? If you're still having treatment where where do you want to be? Who Do you want to support you? Support is out there and you can have those conversations with your gp or even your clinical team that you can have them. You can have them and you can actually undertake something called an advanced care plan where you can document those things so that all those people caring for you like the GP will understand what your wishes are and you can share that with family members. I mean obviously including family members in those conversations is really helpful to talking about including people in the conversations maxes story about how his family filmed conversations with his mom. And just you know they just put the camera on so they've got a lot of normal That they've that they've recorded as well stuff that they've they didn't even realize they were recording quite a unique approach but served as a great example. About how you might approach those final weeks or months I just. I thought that was such an amazing idea. I think one of the things when you're going to lose someone that feels really important. Most people is making memories So reflecting on past memories and often you know you talk about things that happened historically that you remember what Happy Times but also creating memories that you can keep hold off once The the person's no longer around and that's was such such a good idea and Unfortunately because often people don't talk about things openly an half those open discussions they lose that opportunity to make those choices make memories which does seem such a shame. If you've never been in the situation. Contemplating death is a huge psychological Minefield it's how do you? What what? What is your advice if you are? Really Johnnie worried about the physicality of it about the the you know the psychological effects about how you're dealing with it links back to your first question about what people expect There's lots of things of the things they sometimes ask is. What will it be like? What can I expect Named reality some some people Active and doing things right up until the last few days whereas other people are much weaker. I'm perhaps the last couple of weeks are very tired and and in bed and I think that they're very individual things will say based on what's causing you to So so what type of cancer you have. What type of treatment? You've had generally how you've coped through. That might be an indication an and actually if people worried about symptoms you can just talk through some of the common symptoms that that that people can have when they're approaching end of life and what you can do to actually alleviate those so people don't have to be in pain they don't have to feel sick and sometimes people get very worried about people eating and drinking yes And there's this need to try and feed their relative or the left one and make sure they they drink to keep them alive and in reality. It's a natural process. I'm people won't suffer through that. So if they're hungry and they want to enjoy something let them half it if they're not hungry I it doesn't matter We'LL IS IMPORTANT. Is that obviously? You keep their Their mouth comfortable and moist You know because obviously if they're not drinking their mouth will dry. It knows Final few days Max and his family planned His mom's funeral meticulously is quite an undertaking. It sounded like a A really special day. How would you recommend people approach funeral planning because it's not easy? It's not an actually doing. After the event is is can be quite traumatic. I mean I I think that's a fabulous example where they had time where they were able to talk and they were able to planets and actually there are lots of schemes. Now where you can do that while you're well and Y which feels much healthier And in a way Takes the burden of you know sort of how many families though taught tweet other about you know what would you do? It isn't and that would be a really good thing to do. You know if you've got the opportunity as a family and you've gone out. Only relative is to try and help those sorts of conversations but but people don't say you know. I think they are a good example of how they approached it. You can still do it. That way. even after somebody has died so think about the person and the essence of the person and what they would have wanted because in reality you probably know anyway. So I think there's lots of ways that you can approach and there's lots of websites out there that give advice I'm we will have on our website. Marie Curie have advice on their website. There's lots of places people can go to think about how you plan a funeral when you do it. Words of advice for people who have lost a loved one resuming their lives. It's a very strange period. After somebody has passed away the friends and family want is your advice in that period afterwards. How do you get back to any semblance of a normal life? I mean yes. Life does have to go on. But actually the the pain of losing someone can be quite physical as well as emotional And talking talking is a really important thing and if you can't talk amongst people that you care about you know talk to your gp about how you feel. Potentially I loved a maximum sample about texting. Mind and and looking online. If you can't kind of pick up the phone All of that applies are after the event. You need just to be very aware of your feelings and know that it's okay to be sad and if you're struggling to pick up the pieces and carry on without that person around then there is lots of support out there. I think I slept for a month. I was exhausted. I think those are you because you you don't realize how much you're coping And the the energy the emotional energy physical energy that that takes up. I slept for a month. It was. It was incredible. And it's okay to cry. When a particular song comes on the radio you know oil in a place you think. Oh they say would have loved to be here I. It's okay to cry. It's a normal reaction. It totally I used to go into. Mum used to perfume. And every time I go into like DEM's or more like that and I'd get a whiff of it for a long time. I just so and it does take you by surprise abated. And it's good to know that that's okay you know. I've still got the bottle of aftershave that my dad was using before he died and now and again I have and it just reminds me of him. It's just so nice. Oh Dany I could talk to you all day. Thank you so very much again and my thanks. Our thanks to Max for coming in to tell a story if you've been affected by the very sensitive topics we've discussed in this episode. Please contact on McMillan support line on. Oh Eight oh eight. Eight eight double zero w zero open seven days a week. Eight till eight next time. We're talking work and cancer with Helen. The night before I went in to have surgery my boss said to me. I think we'll get somebody else in. I ended up two days after my surgery between payroll from my hospital bed in hospital. They actually confiscate my laptop. I should think so. Subscribe if you'd like to hear that in every new episode whenever it's ready have you enjoying the series why not give it a rating or a review? It helps others on the podcast more easily. I'm a maybe talking. Cancer is cancer. Support podcast.

Dina Max Cancer Bob Dany Fabulous consultant Marie Curie DEM Johnnie McMillan Helen
"talking cancer" Discussed on Talking Cancer

Talking Cancer

09:01 min | 1 year ago

"talking cancer" Discussed on Talking Cancer

"Absolute pleasure to speak to you. I will thank you so very much. Thank you Dany Bell McMillan Professional. Hello Lovely Lady. It is great to have you back again. What an inspiration errol is. Would you make of his story? Oh absolutely an inspiration. I think For men they're not great at talking of a now. We talked to him about life after cancer. Can you please explain remission versus cancer free? Okay so they are very different things But unfortunately sometimes professionals or public perception intertwine them so when somebody is in remission and you can be impartial remission or complete remission And it's really that remission is really that the Kansas not active partial remission is where maybe you've still got some cancer cells but they're not causing you any problems and complete obviously is the Kansas being held at bay or clear. Tends to come when you've been in remission for period of five years with no active cancer and then your condition may be enough to say you are all clear at that point so it's really important to understand that during this remission period from the moment that you'll cancer treatment stops through those partial remission to clear what are the kind of what does recovery look like You've had this incredible trauma the treatment. Whatever that has looked like for you individually What can period then begin to look like so? It is very different for different people. And we've talked about this. Before different types of cancer and different treatments have different impacts so that makes it very individual but there are common things that people struggle with energy I'm fatigue is a is a big one And that can take some while to actually recede but some people struggle with it long-term anyway. Some people have problems with pain as a result of treatment and unfortunately some people will have long term problems With pain just because of the impact of the type of treatment. They've had on their body. And and pain fatigue can be quite intertwined and then unfortunately have a knock-on effect on your emotional wellbeing. Well I was I was GONNA say because they will talk quite quite openly about the effect that his cancer had On his sex life. How do you maintain your emotional health as well through this other places to go? Is it an again something that you should you should talk about when you go back to see your? Gp OVER YOUR CHECKUPS. I think GPA is a really good starting point. Sometimes people aren't necessarily comfortable with talking openly about things that they find embarrassing would prefer to talk to the GP about two and GP's are Used to talking to people and helping people that have like arrowhead erectile dysfunction after Treatment so certain types of cancer treatment have a physical impact on how your kind of sexual activity happens but also some people have has psychological impact on their body image and so there are lots of different reasons. Why my impact on your sexual health and your sex life which actually has a massive emotional impact and there's there's all the people say that GP can refer counseling you join groups where people who've experienced the same thing and learn how they've overcome some people find that very helpful to once you're in remission you own sort of send out into the big world and let go there will be checkups. What does what what do they look like is that is that a visit to the GP say how you feeling a return to the oncologist for Something a little bit more invasive so that's a really good question because historically people always went back to the hospital for a clinic appointment and then they would have their surveillance tests but things have changed and we recognize that actually for some cancers particularly Kansas that very low risk. Gp's manage and monitor them and so you may just go and have a blood test regularly and the GP let you know the result of that and actually we even have electronic systems now where I can actually look up their own blood results. And there's lots of information that goes alongside that so they know how to interpret them so PSA which is our talks about is one of those where they're in some areas. They have a remote surveillance system that patients themselves have access to for other people is going back to see the specialist on every sort of You'll find it will be three to six monthly the first year and then actually wants your kind of two years with stable disease. You'll have an annual check. So you know the the longer you're in remission so to speak that the less frequently you go but you will always have an annual surveillance tests and that can be a scan a blood test or both whatever is needed all just absolutely overflowing with positively such great guy to be around but he he he has worries that it might come back at so. There are emotional scars that it leaves as well. I think that's what we highlighted is a very common problem and you'll often hear people say once you've had you always have cancer even when you don't have active disease because it's always in the back of your mind and You know when a scan or an appointment coming up people will get more anxious than normal and and that's understandable in reality. You know that fear of the cancer coming back is very genuine and people need to find their own ways of of dealing with that for some people it might leave hypersensitive to any ailment. That might be you know a around Wendy you. When do you know whether it's something serious that you know? It's not just it's not just a cold. It's something you need to go and get checked out as a hard question. No no no but actually There are indications when you've had a particular cancer what the likely recurrent symptoms will be I'm people should be informed of those by their specialists team and the GP should be aware of those as well so You can be more vigilant about those and of course obviously if you have something persists for three to six weeks then you shouldn't hang around really it's always best to get it. Checked out was most. Mina almonds will recede within that time. And it's just you know so if you have a back ache because you've heard you back it shouldn't last for a protracted period Unless you've done some damage but then you would need to seek help anyway but so You know so if you have a back ache and you have had cancer where Secondary Bone cancer risk. Then you should know that if if that back pain persists you should go and seek help. So he should be given information so that you could monitor but equally put get very anxious about every ache or pain A maurienne someday. There are lots of telephone support services now so even the specialist teams the cancer nurse specialists would much prefer somebody just ringing and checking and mortar. Not they can relieve anxiety over the phone. Finally Dany if you're a friend or a relative of someone who was recently in Remission. They can still offer support if there's somebody listening. What's your advice to friends and family? I think I think the biggest advice as to carry on Life with that person you might need to make some adjustments if they're fatigued but tight make big delivered be understanding and still do the things that you enjoy doing together equally some people with cancer CEO. No one more talk about it. You know and I'm struggling with all this. I look okay. It's okay to ask people if they're all you. Okay today you know. Is Everything all right so An most of is normal behavior. So don't be afraid to have the normal conversations that you would you would have and do do the normal things that you like doing with your friend or your family member. Danie thank you so very much and my thanks to Arrow for coming in to tell a story to get more information about what we've talked about in this episode go to our website. Mcmillan DOT ORG dot. Uk forward slash talking cancer. Next time we're talking about dealing with the end of someone's life with Max we're sitting Rhonda hostile bed in Coventry are then one of the start cry and immediately do the same thing that lows Boudin. Sorry Straightway I think as my daddy said no it's gonna be rubbish is so we cry together. Subscribe if he'd like to hear that and every new episode whenever it's ready and if you enjoy the series why not give it a rating or a review? It helps other spun the podcast more easily. I'm an obey talking. Cancer is a cancer support podcast..

cancer GP Dany Bell Kansas Gp errol Coventry Uk Wendy Danie CEO Boudin Max Rhonda
"talking cancer" Discussed on Talking Cancer

Talking Cancer

10:13 min | 1 year ago

"talking cancer" Discussed on Talking Cancer

"But he said you need to read this letter. When I looked at the letter that he had he had twenty five percent cancer. And he's prostate. Oh my you are kidding me. But he was the first of forty eight guys that walked into my Garrett was diagnosed with prostate cancer of which two are no longer here. I am so journey. My journey for me you know and dealing with prostate cancer is by talking about every day. Yeah and I decided to set up the mckellar foundation to get mental can and the reason why did that was you know by one hundred of my lady customers in mcgarry and said goals. When when's the last time you went to see a doctor in a year and eighty nine out of the hundred doctors I also same question to my male customers and one and what was frightening about him is not only wind because his wife was moaning. Amy Said and she's decided she's not going to give him any more sex until he gets himself. Checked out Larry's smart journey now to raise this awareness and that's how I've had to deal with the bits and pieces that goes on with it and that and this is I suppose. Lots of people talk about their new normal. Your Journey Newell. The projects that you have in the foundation. The talking that you do is is that the new normal for us this errol now. I think it's just amplifying the stuff of done before but it has to be very direct because not helping people to pursue a career. I'm hopefully helping to save lives and you know and and I can't do that on my own. It's great people like yourselves. The fantastic support I get from my wife Sharon and also family and friends because I found out about prostate cancer by accident while I say to people now is is reading lots and lots of reading to find that because so many different different conflicting things that people talk about. But the most important thing I've learned from the reading I've done is. The numbers are very very high and getting higher one. In eight European men get prostate cancer. One in four effort cabin men get prostate cancer. It's important to talk. This is important to talk it out also as well. Can you explain what? Psa stands right. Psa stands for prostate specific antigen. So that is what is produced inside the prostate in order for you to help with your reproduction and exciting things that men have and dream about so yes so the. Psa We know. And that's the count and that's how they measure whether or not there is something going wrong. This is a simple blood tests and it's important that all men make a point of getting himself tested whether the doctors happy to do or no insist on getting it done because this is something if you try and catch early. You're more likely to stay alive with it. Do you think that what's the work that you're doing in and around prostate cancer in Bringing bringing the discussion to the table getting people to talk more about it has been helpful to you in dealing with the experience that you went through personally often. I think the help has been absolutely massive and I didn't realize how big an issue this was until I started to be involved in and you know and why it's important to talk is because I'm what I've learned from talking. Is that if it's in your family. Then it's very important that the generations know about issues because my dad. When I had the conversation with my dad when I was diagnosed a turnaround to mainly suggests on. I had that issue five years ago. Oh my goodness mainly reaction. Oh my goodness May. That was angry. Upset couldn't speak to him for nearly six months. I'm sure that. What have you come to any conclusions throughout this about why men aren't very good seeking help or being aware of their bodies? Yeah Yeah I have two issues with that. The problem with men as opposed to women is that we suffer with two things ignorance and silence. You know so if we have this issue. We go into denial. We find every excuse to accept that it's not happening and then on top of that we completely shut down. We just go into silence. Women I mean you know. Women are very very good at snagging. Whatever time or do you WANNA put it. You know when they have something wrong for me as a mechanic. If they got problem with their cars they come in straightaway with men we wait. The car breaks down but it is interesting. Isn't it nothing women as well? We can. Because we whether that's to do with puberty and starting periods right through to pregnancy. I think we're much more used to our bodies changing. There's a lot more. We talk about a lot more I am more proactive. But but this is. What you've been doing is made such a huge and significant difference. This is not gone unnoticed. Has IT I hope you hope our can make a difference but I always used the word we because one person's not going to make this change. I know you say way. There was only one and h s hero. Would do I rec- when I when. I told me that they were GonNa give me this award. As I said to them. I will only accepts award. On behalf of all the people at the going through the battles with prostate cancer older people that we've lost fruit issue and for me really. I wouldn't have accepted of the not because I felt that I was taking it on behalf of all the people that are involved in this campaign as well so it's People's award for me more than his personal. I'M GONNA come back to you personally just for a second. Because there's this this is amazing. Work that you do this fantastic foundation. Clearly this work is helping you. Arrow and looking forward into the future. When you were going through that who did you look to for Support? Was THAT FAMILY FRIENDS. Was there any outside? Organizations will else's out there for for for young men in your situation fortunate people at the melon prostate cancer UK but it's forums forums more and more foreign online forums. Yeah see that's a really common thread that we're to WIG IT and you know. Actually there's a lot of very valuable support you get from other people in the same situation. Your in House mustering came from my wife and family. They realized a long time ago that they were happy to share me with everyone so I wouldn't couldn't and wouldn't have got fru. I've got to now without that help and that network and the treatment that you had has there been any lasting impact on you and your health. Yes there has been lasting impact. My situation is that You know I have probably less than twenty percent. Feeling BELOW MY BELLY BUTTON. Erectile function is probably non existent. Okay right but what? I've learned through modern with this. Is that some people will get a lot more than that. It's how you manage what you have. I mean and housed on a day to day basis. I mean you know. That's you love. Your wife is that that's complicated and difficult. If it only difficult if you sit down and and decide to do nothing about it I may not be. What call you same boat. I can still be Mo Farah because that makes sense so you have to you have to improvise the best way possible. But you can't beat you. You know what you have to do is and that's comes to. Why South the charity I say is because by talking drought? You realize that you're not the only one going through this challenge you know and somebody you know a lot of times. People say things to me that our massive help you know so. I'm learning every day to do and I think he's well particularly with with prostate cancer. An with men and they're reticent to talk about talk about things that there are. I'm sure all lots of lots of medicine. Lots of concerns about. What makes you a man that may be gets in the way of of of of going to the doctor and do does that make sense a great great question and I'm glad to have asked the question because a lot of men told me that raw not go through this because if it means they're gonNA lose erection then more issues with continents? And what would you say to those because it is real? That's a real concern. I've had the question and what I have said very frequently is look if you have a chance of being alive and maybe helping somebody. It could be your children. Your grandchildren isn't that more important. Do you ever worry about it coming back. I do worry about coming back. I don't have a prostate now. So you know if the cancer comes back it would be probably more aggressive somewhere else but my challenges is to save somebody from having to go through the battles the ave to go for every day. That's more challenge so I try to be positive and give give the love to other people. You're a magnificent human being. It's been an.

prostate cancer mckellar foundation Newell Amy Garrett Larry mcgarry errol Mo Farah UK Sharon
"talking cancer" Discussed on Talking Cancer

Talking Cancer

14:49 min | 1 year ago

"talking cancer" Discussed on Talking Cancer

"Hello I'm Annabi and welcome to talking cancer a podcast for Macmillan where I'll be meeting real people to have honest conversations about living with cancer in this episode. We're talking cancer with Adam. Let that if I decide in your brain but we turn away is going to have to operate need some and then the Black Sonya I knowledge is looking at Solomon Lipset. And when we're talking potential BRAINTREE RATIOS WENT. Yeah potentially thirty one. Adam Carroll was enjoying life and enjoying a job that allowed him to work in New York.

Adam Carroll Solomon Lipset Macmillan New York
"talking cancer" Discussed on Talking Cancer

Talking Cancer

12:46 min | 1 year ago

"talking cancer" Discussed on Talking Cancer

"We're talking cancer with Khloe. Once you hear the word she thinks. This isn't good in twenty seventeen. Khloe Dixon was extremely tired. After the birth of her baby girl I she thought nothing of it but it kept getting worse than I start having these headaches and that was like an elastic band around my head. So then I thought right I better go to the GP blood test revealed. Khloe had chronic myeloid leukemia or C. L. Which is a type of cancer that affects her white blood cells? I'm talking to Khloe about her cancer but particularly her diagnosis. What does it feel like waiting for the news? How do you tell your family? And how does having cancer affect your daily life was horrific? I mean holding my girl and thinking I'm not saying thanks year. Awful plus later in the podcast. I'll be having coffee with Dany. One of Macmillan's fantastic professionals to give her thoughts on what to do when someone says those three fateful words you've got cancer you could actually have a conversation with someone and even if they seem silly questions to you. The professionals at the end of the line will not mind in the least women melon and we're talking cancer lowy. Hello.

cancer Khloe Dixon Macmillan
"talking cancer" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"talking cancer" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Of the generic nature of disease george this is what i've been talking about for twenty five years over twenty five years did diseases are generic they're all based in the deterioration of the body it doesn't floaters of the is arthritis of the i it's heart disease of the eye is alzheimer's disease of the eye alzheimer's diseases floaters of the brain is all the same things the body breaking down it has nothing want to get this notion that diseases are based in specific oregon's out of our heads because it doesn't serve is when we understand that the disease process is generic no matter what you call your disease will be able to take our power back because once we understand that it's just the body breaking now all we gotta do is figure out how to build the body back up that's the answer to all diseases figure out how to build the body backup how to make the body stronger and i'm talking psoriasis i'm talking with rightist i'm talking heart disease i'm talking cancer our goal is not to cure the cancer it's to make the body stronger it's not the cure the arthritis it's to make the body stronger it's not to address a specific organs but to take care of the body as a system and when we understand that we'll see that it's just a few basic things george food nutrition it's oxygen it's reducing your blood sugar this all diseases we're talking about here it's it's stress management it's mental and emotional and spiritual aspects and it doesn't matter what you call the disease if you practice these commonsense generic ideas that.

alzheimer oregon heart disease alzheimer's disease twenty five years
"talking cancer" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"talking cancer" Discussed on KGO 810

"The generic nature of disease george this is what i've been talking about for twenty five years it's over twenty five years did diseases are generic they're all based in the deterioration of the body it doesn't the floaters of the is arthritis of the i it's heart disease of the eye it alzheimer's disease of the eye alzheimer's diseases floaters of the brain it's all the same things the body breaking down it has nothing want to get this this notion that diseases are based in specific oregon's out of our heads because it doesn't serve us when we understand that the disease process is generic no matter what you call your disease will be able to take our power back because once we understand that it's just the body breaking now all we gotta do figure out how to build the body back up that's the answer to all diseases figure out how to build the body backup how to make the body stronger and i'm talking psoriasis i'm talking about right if i'm talking heart disease i'm talking cancer our goal is not the cure the cancer it's to make the body stronger it's not to cure the arthritis it's to make the body stronger it's not to address a specific organs but to take care of the body as a system and when we understand that we'll see that it's just a few basic things george food it's nutrition it's oxygen it's reducing your blood sugar this all diseases we're talking about here it's it's stress management it's mental and emotional and spiritual aspects and it doesn't matter what you call the disease if you practice these commonsense generic ideas that you.

alzheimer oregon heart disease alzheimer's disease twenty five years
"talking cancer" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"talking cancer" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"The generic nature of disease george this is what i've been talking about for twenty five years over twenty five years did diseases are generic they're all based in the deterioration of the body it doesn't floaters of the is arthritis of the i it's heart disease of the eye is alzheimer's disease of the eye alzheimer's diseases floaters of the brain it's all the same things the body breaking down it has nothing want to get this this notion that diseases are based in specific organs out of our heads because it doesn't serve is when we understand that the disease process is generic no matter what you call your disease will be able to take our power back because once we understand that it's just the body breaking now all we do figure out how to build the body back up that's the answer to all diseases figure out how to build the buy back up how to make the body stronger and i'm talking psoriasis i'm talking about i'm talking heart disease i'm talking cancer argo is not to cure the cancer it's to make the body stronger it's not the cure it's to make the body stronger it's not to address a specific organs but to take care of the body system and when we understand that we'll see that it's just a few basic things george food it's nutrition if oxygen it's reducing your blood sugar this all diseases we're talking about here it's it's stress management if mental and emotional and spiritual aspects and it doesn't matter what you call the disease if you practice these commonsense generic.

alzheimer heart disease alzheimer's disease twenty five years
"talking cancer" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"talking cancer" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"The generic nature of disease george this is what i've been talking about for twenty five years over twenty five years did diseases are generic they're all based in the deterioration of the body it doesn't the floaters of the is arthritis of the i it's heart disease of the eye is alzheimer's disease of the eye alzheimer's disease floaters of the brain is all the same things the body breaking down it has nothing we want to get this this notion that diseases are based in specific oregon's out of our heads because it doesn't serve when we understand that the disease process is generic no matter what you call your disease will be able to take our power back because once we understand that it's just the body breaking now all we gotta do figure out how to build the body back up that's the answer to all diseases figure out how to build the body back up how to make the body stronger and i'm talking psoriasis i'm talking about right if i'm talking heart disease i'm talking cancer our goal is not to cure the cancer it's to make the body stronger it's not it's to make the body stronger it's not to address specific organs but to take care of the body as a system and when we understand that we'll see that it's just a few basic things george food it's nutrition is oxygen it's reducing your blood sugar this is all we're talking about here it's it's stress management it's mental and emotional and spiritual aspects and it doesn't matter what you call the disease if you practice these commonsense generic ideas that.

alzheimer oregon heart disease alzheimer's disease twenty five years
"talking cancer" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"talking cancer" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Of the generic nature of disease george this is what i've been talking about for twenty five years over twenty five years did diseases are generic they're all based in the deterioration of the body it doesn't floaters of the is arthritis oh the i it's heart disease of the eye is alzheimer's disease of the eye alzheimer's diseases floaters of the brain it's all the same things the body breaking down it has nothing wanna get this this notion that diseases are based on specific oregon's out of our heads because it doesn't serve us when we understand that the disease process is generic no matter what you call your disease we'll be able to take our power back because once we understand that it's just the body breaking out all we got to figure out how to build the body back up that's the answer to all figure out how to build the back up how to make the body stronger and i'm talking psoriasis on talking about right i'm talking heart disease talking cancer our goal is not cure the cancer it's to make the body stronger it's not security arthritis it's to make the body stronger it's not to address a specific organs but to take care of the body as a system and when we understand that we'll see that it's just a few basic things george food it's nutrition if oxygen it's reducing your blood sugar this all diseases we're talking about here it's it's stress management if mental and emotional and spiritual aspects and it doesn't matter what you call the disease if you practice these commonsense generic ideas that you.

alzheimer oregon psoriasis alzheimer's disease twenty five years
"talking cancer" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"talking cancer" Discussed on WTVN

"And it's a classic demonstration of the generic nature of disease george this is what i've been talking about for twenty five years and over twenty five years did diseases are generic they're all based in the deterioration of the body it doesn't floaters of the is arthritis over the i it's heart disease of the eye is alzheimer's disease of the eye alzheimer's diseases floaters of the brain it's all the same things the body breaking down it has nothing we wanna get this this notion that diseases are based on specific oregon's out of our heads because it doesn't serve us when we understand that the disease process is generic no matter what you call your disease we'll be able to take our power back because once we understand that it's just the body breaking now all we gotta do figure out how to build the body back up that's the answer to all diseases figure out how to build the body backup how to make the body stronger and i'm talking psoriasis i'm talking about right as i'm talking heart disease i'm talking cancer our goal is not to cure the cancer it's to make the body stronger it's not to cure the arthritis it's to make the body stronger it's not to address a specific organs but to take care of the body as a system and when we understand that we'll see that it's just a few basic things george food it's nutrition it's oxygen it's reducing your blood sugar this all diseases we're talking about here it's a it's stress management if mental and emotional and spiritual aspects and it doesn't matter what you call the disease if you practice these commonsense generic ideas that you can employ from the comfort of your.

alzheimer oregon heart disease arthritis alzheimer's disease twenty five years