12 Burst results for "tad Lincoln"

"tad lincoln" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

History That Doesn't Suck

03:50 min | 2 months ago

"tad lincoln" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

"John's bullet enters the back of the unsuspecting president's head Henry Rathbone lunges at John but the famous actor Answers by slashing the major across the chest with a hunting knife Factory now places one hand on the boxes railing and leaps out. It is in graceful. One of John's Spurs gets caught in the flags and possibly connects the framed portrait of George Washington decorating the front of the presidential box. He crashes down on stage possibly breaking his left leg just above the ankle as he lands on his hands and knees. Rising painfully John holds his hunting knife up high and yells out six semper tyrannis. That's Latin for thus always to tyrants. It's also Virginia's state motto the actor. Then hobbles were dashes off Witnesses don't agree on which escaping out the theaters back the audience doesn't even know what to make of this month. Is this part of the show and Mary's pained voice cuts through the still air. They have shot the president. They've shot the president. News the confusion of plot quickly spreads Messengers. Tell Edwin Stanton and Gideon Welles that Lincoln has been shot and William Henry Seward assassinated. They both arrived at the Seward home about the same time the blood-stained aftermath of the attack is unreal, but it's relieving to find the Secretary of State alive Mars in Neptune then make their way to the theater, but they finally fading president has been carried across the street to the Petersen boarding house. Mary sends word of what's happened to her son Robert the young Captain Lincoln John Hay and Senator Charles Sumner all share a carriage heading straight to the scene. What about twelve year old Tad Lincoln? Oh that my little tabby might see his father before he died Mary exclaims. Hoping to bring their him suffering. They don't send for the emotional child, but cruel fate would have to know anyway, the child is watching a performance of the play Aladdin at Groves theater when the manager interrupts to announce the birth It has been shocked had runs out of the theater subbing screaming Stompin. Tom pain. They've killed Papa dead. They've killed Papa dead. He cries the White House doorkeeper Thomas Pendle as primary herself. She's in and out of Lincoln's room and parlor through the night. She tells unconscious Lincoln to take her with him doesn't even want to live without him countless mourners gather outside the Peterson boarding house throughout the night Edwin is in full War secretary mode the organizing a Manhunt and.

Captain Lincoln John Hay Tad Lincoln president Groves theater Mary Edwin Stanton Papa George Washington William Henry Seward Henry Rathbone semper tyrannis Virginia White House Senator Charles Sumner Thomas Pendle secretary Gideon Welles Tom pain doorkeeper
"tad lincoln" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

06:49 min | 7 months ago

"tad lincoln" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"And welcome back to coast to coast Jim al Khalili back with us who was with me a few years ago his new book is called the world according to phys easy quantum physicists author broadcaster based at the university of Surrey in England he received his doctorate in theoretical nuclear physics in nineteen eighty nine and has published more than a hundred research papers on the subject he is very well known presenter of television and radio in Britain recipient of the Royal Society of London's Michael Faraday prep price we talk about the Faraday cage a lot of this program and the institute of physics Kalban metal in two thousand sixteen he received the inaugural Stephen Hawking battle for science communication Jim why do all the Brits why are they all great physicists what they do is glad to be back I'm not sure I think maybe we just we just have a knack for it well thank you very well he has been a few years since I left on the shelf absolutely are they going crazy in England to over this coronavirus oh yeah oh yeah at the moment maybe not quite as bad as continental Europe Spain Fonseca the ethical family but yeah we getting that with I guess what the states with maybe a week or two behind the worst countries at the moment you my missing something the seasonal flu and I've said this a hundred times on this program people probably tired of hearing me say this but the worldwide already since since this was discovered in December seven thousand people died across this planet from this virus seven thousand people yes at the same time actually even less a hundred and fifty thousand people have died from the flu worldwide yep yeah one of my missing here yeah no you're right I mean people should get the numbers of people dying from so many other things I guess it's because this is on those because it's sitting at the very start of an exponential curve so we know who we calm slow it down because we don't have a vaccine yet and we know it's just going to rise and so I suspect worldwide we construct millions just in the United States just in the United States guess how many people died falling out of their bed I kid you not four hundred and fifty people four hundred and fifty people went to bed and they never woke up thanks a lot of their bed their hit their head and that that one should sleep on mattresses on the floor exactly that's because anyways let's talk about your homework the world according to phys first of all to you what is physics well it it's a way of understanding reality to me it's convenient way of understanding that this is the physical universe the world around us the stuff the matter the energy at the cinnamon at the deepest levels you you you drill down you get to see that you know whatever explanations you have even you know when when in other sciences biology leads to chemistry ultimately the specifics of the fundamental way of understanding the true nature of reality in my view what is it about physics that really in the something you enjoy I think it's and and this is why I fell in love with it you know as a teenager I think I mean I I enjoy it because I'm good at taking and not everyone is good at everything I'm I'm I'm not so good at playing the piano I'm good at it but it's fun it's it's common sense and it's possible falling within mysteries out there I don't follow what someone else tells me this is the explanation of the mystery I realize that using mathematics using the tools and tricks of science console those mysteries so it is that it is a mystery that holds the puzzle and there are ways and means that you can use to reach out I just find that absolutely fascinating you keyed in on nuclear physics how come well that was not really all right I was in my finally of my bachelor's degree undergraduate degree and one of the professors the idea that a research project with with the new fifty electrical nuclear physicist so he doesn't have Mexico we have mathematical modeling nuclear arsenal nothing to do with nuclear power role or nuclear weapons just understanding the structure of the public nucleus I did this project with him and he must have been impressed that he said would you like to stay on and do a PhD with me and hadn't even occurred to me to do that I was at the time was about to get married I am not going to get a job out there to get a handle so could be grown up and and this peace deal because he was handed to me and since it was off but I knew I had to say yes and my my wife to be now my wife of fifty years I'm still paying her back for the for the thanks thank you for allowing me to do my I love it well tell me a little bit about this new work the world according to phys yes this is a it's a small book it's it's almost finalized it's sort of hospitality in fifty thousand words of other books that I've written some of my love affair with physics what we know and how we know what we know so I I would say as an example but it's one of the only killed we had a few physical universe gain from physics is an island and beyond its officials of the evolution of the unknown we don't know if that extends on for instance the weather will finally know everything the department is expanding all the time and it was closed book isn't an exploration of the on this as a lot of other popular five books are it's really an exploration of the shoreline that we walking around the shoreline looking at the cutting edge of what we now know in physics maybe rolling up you'll feel fuel if you give me a tad Lincoln's and wading into the water wearing a little bit of the unknown what is it that we still don't know but if we on the brink of understanding hopefully so that's where it's at the book that brings the athletes reader up to speed on some of the most profound issues in physics you were born in Baghdad back in nineteen sixty two in one of the characters in your book is the error of physicists it been under Haytham tell me about him is was is he real yes absolutely yes certainly my my mother's English my father came from from Iraqi met my mother in law my studying engineering them back we I I grew up in in Iraq at a time when you.

Jim al Khalili university of Surrey
"tad lincoln" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

11:16 min | 8 months ago

"tad lincoln" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"And welcome back to coast to coast Jim al Khalili back with us who was with me a few years ago his new book is called the world according to phys CZ quantum physicists author broadcaster based at the university of Surrey in England he received his doctorate in theoretical nuclear physics in nineteen eighty nine and has published more than a hundred research papers on the subject he is very well known presenter of television and radio in Britain recipient of the Royal Society of London's Michael Faraday prep price we talk about the Faraday cage a lot of this program and the institute of physics Kalban metal in two thousand sixteen he received the inaugural Stephen Hawking battle for science communication Jim why do all the bricks why are they all great physicists they do expect to be back I'm not sure I think maybe we just we just have a knack for it have you been well thank you very well it has been a few years since I was off on the set up slowly are they going crazy in England to over this coronavirus oh yeah oh yeah at the moment maybe not quite as bad as continental Europe Spain France a typical family but yeah we getting that with I think I guess we'll let the states where maybe a week or two behind the with the worst country to the moment you my missing something that the seasonal flu and I've said this a hundred times on this program people probably tired of hearing me say this but the worldwide already since since this was discovered in December seven thousand people died across this planet from this virus seven thousand people yes at the same time actually even less a hundred and fifty thousand people have died from the flu worldwide yeah yeah one of my missing here yeah no you're right I mean people forget the numbers of people dying from so many other things I guess it's because this is on those because it's sitting at the very start of an exponential curve so we know who we contact no it down because we don't have a vaccine yet and we know it's just going to rise and so I suspect worldwide we construct millions just in the United States just in the United States guess how many people died falling out of their bed should you not four hundred and fifty people four hundred fifty people went to bed and they never woke up they sell under their bed their hit their head and Beth it once it's legal matters is on the floor exactly it's crazy anyways let's talk about your work the world according to phys first of all to you what is physics well it it's a way of understanding reality for me it's the way of understanding that this is the physical universe the the world around us the stuff the matter the energy at the phenomena at the deepest level you you you drill down you get to physics you know whatever explanations you have even in a win win in other sciences biology leads to chemistry ultimately at least if it accepts the fundamental way of understanding the true nature of reality in my view what is it about physics that really in the something you enjoy I think it's and then this is why I fell in love with it you know as a teenager I think it's I mean I A. I. I enjoy it because I'm good at taking and not everyone is good at everything I'm I'm I'm not so good at playing the piano I'm good at it but it's fun it's it's common sense and it's possible folding within mysteries out there I don't follow what someone else tells me this is the explanation of the mystery I realize that using mathematics using the tools and tricks of science I consoled those mysteries so it's it's it's that it is a mystery that to be sold is that possible and there are ways and means that you can use to reach out I just find that absolutely fascinating you keyed in on nuclear physics how come it was sort of not really all right I was in my finally have my bachelor's degree undergraduate degree and one of the professors the idea that a research project with with the new fifty electrical nuclear physicist seventy thousand medical care we have mathematical modeling ultrasonic nuclear arsenal nothing to do with nuclear power role or nuclear weapons just understanding the structure of the comet nucleus I did this project with him and he must have been impressed that he said would you like to stay on and do a PhD with me and it hadn't even occurred to me to do that I was at the time of about to get married I am not going to get a job up there to get a handle so gonna be grown up and and this PhD opportunity was handed to me and as soon as it was off but I knew I had to say yes and my my wife to be now my wife of fifty years I'm still paying her back for the for the thanks thank you for allowing me to do my best I love it well tell me a little bit about this new work the world according to phys yes this is a it's a small book it's it's almost five it sort of half the families in fifty thousand words of other books that I've written it's sort of my love affair with physics well what we know and how we know what we know so I I would say as an example that if one only took off we had a few physical universe gain from physics is an island and beyond its officials of of of the the the election of the unknown we don't know if that extends on profanity or whether we'll finally know everything that is on and is expanding all the time is on the list grows book isn't an exploration of the island as a lot of other popular science books are is really an exploration of the shoreline the we walking around the shoreline looking at the cutting edge of what we now know in physics maybe rolling up your field you'll you'll give me a tad Lincoln and wading into the water wearing a little bit of the unknown what is it that we still don't know but if we on the brink of understanding hopefully that spirit that is the book that brings the average reader up to speed on some of the most profound issues in physics you were born in Baghdad back in nineteen sixty two and one of the characters in your book is the error of physicists it been under Haytham so tell me about him is was is he real yes absolutely yes certainly my my mother's English my father came from from Iraqi met my mother in England my studying engineering them back we I grew up in in Iraq at a time when you know life is easier was different back there was no will not help but to you well they're very much realistic crime yes I speak only am I with the win although it was put in the home is my mother tongue I did school in Arabic and in in history classes that would not science classes with us about some of these great medieval scholars of the of the Islamic empire you know people who invented whole finances you know like algebra and trigonometry in astronomy and then the woman in the west and so at ten ten about ten years ago I did a BBC documentary about these medieval scholars I then followed this up with the popular science book which came out in the U. S. under the title the house of wisdom and it was received very well one of the main characters in it is this tenth century genius if not hate them mostly in the west he was known by the Latin version of his name and his team because a little bit his his works as text to translate it into left in in the European Renee phones they used his book of optics and he's one of these fantastically colorful characters because of a lot of historians write about and so we know quite a lot about his life he he figured out how to solve the the problem of the Nile in Egypt how we would be flooding and then because of drought and he proposed what we would now have as the Aswan dam on the Nile really yeah he he proposed building a dam he told the caliph of in Cairo that he could do this and then so he might he was invited over and failed because he realized he didn't bitten off more than he could chew so rather than apologize or at trying to make excuses he feigns madness and that statement if she's with that second if they manage it when it was still a young man working in the southern Iraq in the city of Basra he had a very boring clerical administrative job and he really wanted to be studying to put the great work of the Greeks the Greek astronomer Ptolemy so to get half of his job he feigned madness got got kicked out of his job and was supported by reading some of these texts the wonderful character box he was also a genius and he was probably the greatest physicist in the two thousand year span between all communities in ancient Greece and Houston we made many great big discoveries in astronomy and and analytics so yeah the hero of mine can you imagine if you live today with the kind of technology we've got available to him yeah it's it's it's it's quite incredible because he was also one of the earliest proponents of the scientific method so he'd say things like you know if you have a good idea if you have a theory hypothesis it's no good just saying it's true believe me you have to try and test it you have to find an experiment to see if you're right so he learned things like light always travels in straight lines and have light reflects and reflect that refracts through blocks and water and so he combined theory and mathematics and experiment all the time in the way that I think didn't really happen until much later in Europe Galileo for example hello yes with modern technology he well who knows what geniuses like it might have achieved any imagine others let United to Vinci you know well if they could lift today what what could they do it Feinstein had a computer right she would have to write on the chalkboard all those numbers yeah but it looks cool doesn't it it sure did there are still mysteries of science the mysteries of modern physics here we are it's twenty twenty we've been to the moon in nineteen sixty nine we've done all these amazing things yeah we still really don't know about dark matter and dark energy how come well it's it's a sign that we haven't reached the end of our understanding of of the universe I mean that that there was a famous article written by Stephen Hawking in about forty years ago now the nineteen eighties when he said the end of the physics is near will almost half the theory of everything all we just need to do is stop the Moscow since he's feeling that would unify all the forces of nature and of course he was wrong because we are still looking for.

England Jim al Khalili university of Surrey
"tad lincoln" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

13:04 min | 8 months ago

"tad lincoln" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Welcome back to coast to coast Jim al Khalili back with us who was with me a few years ago his new book is called the world according to phys easy quantum physicists author broadcaster based at the university of Surrey in England he received his doctorate in theoretical nuclear physics in nineteen eighty nine and has published more than a hundred research papers on the subject he is very well known presenter of television and radio in Britain recipient of the Royal Society of London's Michael Faraday prep price we talk about the Faraday cage a lot of this program and the institute of physics Calvin metal in two thousand sixteen he received the inaugural Stephen Hawking battle for science communication Jim why do all the bricks why are they all great physicists they do expect to be back I'm not sure I think maybe we just we just have a knack for it very well thank you very well he has been a few years since I'm not the messiah actually are they going crazy in England to over this coronavirus oh yeah oh yeah at the minute maybe not quite as bad as continental Europe Spain France a typical family but yeah we getting that with I think I guess we'll let the states with maybe a week or two behind the the worst countries at the moment I am in my missing something the seasonal flu and I've said this a hundred times on this program people probably tired of hearing me say this but the worldwide already since since this was discovered in December seven thousand people died across this planet from this virus seven thousand people yes at the same time actually even less a hundred and fifty thousand people have died from the flu worldwide yeah yeah one of my mission here yeah no you're right I mean people forget the numbers of people dying from so many other things I guess it's because this is on those because it's sitting at the very start of an exponential curve so we know who we confluent down because we don't have a vaccine yet and we know it's just going to ride this though I suspect worldwide we Comstock millions just in the United States just in the United States guess how many people died falling out of their bed I kid you not four hundred and fifty people four hundred and fifty people went to bed and they never woke up they sell out of their bed they hit their head and Beth everyone should sleep on mattresses on the floor exactly it's crazy anyways let's talk about your homework the world according to phys first of all to you what is physics well it it's a way of understanding reality for me it's V. way of understanding by this is that the physical universe the the world around us the staff the matter the energy at the phenomena at the deepest level you you you drill down you get to physics you know whatever explanations you have even you know when when in other sciences biology leads to chemistry ultimately at least if it accepts the fundamental way of understanding the true nature of reality in my view what is it about physics that really in the something you enjoy I think it's and and this is why I fell in love with it you know as a teenager I think I mean I A. I. I enjoy it because I'm good at it you know not everyone is good at everything I'm I'm I'm not so good at playing the piano I'm good at it but also it's fun it's it's common sense and it's possible Foley so I went and mysteries out there I don't follow what someone else tells me this is the explanation of the mystery I realize that using mathematics using the tools and tricks of science I consoled those mysteries so if if if that if there's an issue that could be sold it's a puzzle and there are ways and means that you can use to reach out I just find that absolutely fascinating you keyed in on nuclear physics how come well that was sort of not really all right I was in my finally have my bachelor's degree undergraduate degree and one of the professors the idea that a research project with with the new fifty electrical nuclear physicist so he doesn't carry that mathematical modeling ultrasonic nuclear arsenal nothing to do with nuclear power role or nuclear weapons just understanding the structure of the comet nucleus I did this project with him and he must have been impressed that he said would you like to stay on and do a PhD with me and they hadn't even occurred to me to do that I was at the time was about to get married I am not going to get a job up there to get a handle so gonna be grown up and and this PhD opportunity was handed to me and as soon as it was off but I knew I have to say yes and my my wife to be now my wife of fifty years I'm still paying her back for the for the thanks thank you for allowing me to do what he faced well tell me a little bit about this new work the world according to phys yes so this is a it's a small book it's it's almost finalized it sort of half the solids in fifty thousand words of other books that I've written but it's sort of my love affair with physics what we know and how we know what we know so I I would say as an example that if one only took off we had a few physical universe gain from physics is an island and beyond its officials of of all the the the ocean of the unknown we don't know if that extend comparability or whether we'll finally know everything the department is expanding all the time is on the list close this book isn't an exploration of the on that at the mall of other popular five books are it's really an exploration of the shoreline that we walking around the shoreline looking at the cutting edge of what we now know in physics maybe rolling up your field you'll you'll give me a tad Lincoln and wading into the water a little bit of the unknown what is it that we still don't know but if we on the brink of understanding hopefully so that's where it's at the book that brings the athletes reader up to speed on some of the most profound issues into the you were born in Baghdad back in nineteen sixty two and one of the characters in your book is the or physicist inventor R. look Haytham tell me about him is was is he real yes absolutely yes certainly my my mother's English my father came from from Iraqi met my mother in England my studying engineering them back we I I grew up in Iraq at a time when you know life is easier was different back then there was no will not help but to you well I was a crime yes this week the White am I with the win although you know we couldn't be at home with my mother tongue I did them a school in Arabic and in history classes that would not science classes with us about some of these great medieval scholars of the of the Islamic empire you know people who invented whole finances you know like algebra and trigonometry in astronomy and then the woman in the west and so at ten ten about ten years ago I did a BBC documentary about these medieval scholars are then followed this up with the popular science book which came out in the U. S. under the title the house of wisdom and it was received very well one of the main characters in it is this tenth century genius if not hate them mostly in the west he was known by the Latin version of his name and his team because a lot of it is his works is Texas translated in selecting the new European when iPhones they used his book of optics and he's one of these fantastically colorful characters because of the amount of historians wrote about and so we know quite a lot about his life he he figured out how to solve the the problem of the Nile in Egypt how it would be flooding and and because of drought and he proposed what we would now have as the Aswan dam on the Nile really yeah he he proposed building a dam he told the caliph of in Cairo that he could do this and then so he might he was invited over and failed because he realized he didn't bitten off more than he could choose so rather than apologize school trying to make excuses he feigns madness and that statement if this which is that second if that meant that the wind was still a young man working in the southern Iraq in the city of Basra he had a very boring clerical administrative job and he really wanted to be studying the great work of the Greeks the Greek astronomer Ptolemy so to get half of his job he thank madness got got kicked out of his job and was supported by reading some of the six six wonderful character box he was also a genius and he was probably the greatest physicist in the two thousand year span between all communities in ancient Greece and used in the making many great big discoveries in astronomy and and I don't think so yeah the hero of mine can you imagine if you live today with the kind of technology we've got available to him yeah it's it's it's it's quite incredible because he was also one of the earliest proponents of the scientific method so he'd say things like you know if you have a good idea if you have a feeling a hypothesis it's no good just saying it's true believe me you have to try and test it you have to find an experiment to see if you're right so he learned things like light always travels in straight lines and how light reflects and reflect that refracts through blocks and water and so he combines theory and mathematics and experiments all the time in the way that I think didn't really happen until much later in Europe Galileo for example so yes with modern technology he well who knows what genius at like a lot of the chieftain connected out of let you know the divinity you know what if they could lift today what what could they do if Feinstein had a computer right she would have to write on the chalkboard all those numbers yeah but it looks cool that might intrude in there are still mysteries of science the mysteries of modern physics here we are it's twenty twenty we've been to the moon in nineteen sixty nine we've done all these amazing things yeah we still really don't know about dark matter and dark energy how come well it's a sign that we haven't reached the end of our understanding of of the universe I mean did that there was a famous article written by Stephen Hawking in about forty years ago now early nineteen eighties when he said the end of the physics is near will almost half the theory of everything or we just need to do is stop the Moscow since he's feeling that would unify all the forces of nature and of course he was wrong because we are still looking for that theory of everything and in the intervening period as you say different things like dark energy that have been discovered we still don't know what dark matter is made of we don't even know if the Big Bang what is the default so don't get me on that but I'm going to ask you about that now yes so that I mean to me that's great there are still mysteries out there because you know that as I say this is one of the reasons I love physics if we had all the offices and life will be more boring I'll be out of a job as well you know I I'm trying to think about this universe and I'm let's take god out of the equation for a moment because that's an easier answer but with god out of the picture for just this moment I'm trying to think of this universe how it was formed from nothing in I just can't get it Jim I can't get it yeah it's it's it's one of those at six I T. is that it seems like if the universe is expanding what is expanding into little that that exactly what's on the other side of it or something zero zero waste I think what the problem is that you have people working at the cutting edge of the foundation of physics do I have a and understanding of all of these these these issues albeit not complete but will rubbish it's explaining it to people without the benefit of years of experience one of the things I've tried to do my book is find fresh ways of explaining some of these concepts it's you know you got some even just an asylum by and and and and and do the developers are okay now I get it it's his supple the idea that could be something from nothing as for the system even called it the ultimate free lunch and how can you get maximum energy.

England Britain Jim al Khalili university of Surrey Royal Society of London Michael Faraday
"tad lincoln" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:29 min | 9 months ago

"tad lincoln" Discussed on WGN Radio

"A disturbance at this bar someone was shot on the street near this bar on this disturbance police were called and police got here to the scene and they started looking for potential suspects they saw a suspect who shot at the officers who chased him shot and killed him the officer that shot the man had minor injuries from a fall he is on administrative duty while the investigation continues in New York City this weekend back to back shootings targeting police a man described as a career criminal list now in custody police say he wanted an officer in an unprovoked attack an attack on his patrol van last night then opened fire inside a precinct headquarters this morning injuring another officer police commissioner Dermot Shay is thankful it wasn't worse it is only by the grace of god tell her look actions of those inside the building that took him into custody that we are not talking about police officers murdered inside a New York City police precinct police say the suspect is identified as Robert Williams he was paroled in twenty seventeen after an attempted murder conviction for two thousand two incident over sixty passengers have been diagnosed with the corona virus on board the cruise ship docked off the coast of Japan the captain ordering a fourteen day quarantine of over three thousand passengers and crew New York newlyweds Malena posso and Gaetano guy Sir Rouleau are on board it's the diamond princes and they spoke to ABC news about their experience there and what they say is their biggest fear with the newly discovered cases start food they had interaction with the crowd a crude and move to the next room in which an extra minutes so on so forth like that's exactly how this threat and the quarantine passengers are expected to stay on the ship until February nineteenth several special events are planned this month of the Abraham Lincoln presidential library and museum including free admission on Lincoln's birthday this week museum spokesperson Chris wills says there are several unique artifacts on display one of them is Bible that Abraham Lincoln owned a in the last couple of years of his presidency we were given that last year it's a great addition to our collection we also have a tiny little rang worn by tad Lincoln Abraham Lincoln's youngest son and it's made out of horse here from a one of his ponies and visitors will get in free on Lincoln's birthday this Wednesday it's is two hundred eleventh birthday WGN sports the Blackhawks visit Winnipeg tonight pre game with.

officer New York City Dermot Shay Robert Williams Japan Malena posso Sir Rouleau Lincoln Abraham Lincoln WGN ABC Abraham Lincoln Chris wills Blackhawks Winnipeg
"tad lincoln" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

03:48 min | 9 months ago

"tad lincoln" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Started shooting in the woman's direction police say the firefighter who had responded to the car fire was hit in his left leg while the two groups were shooting at each other on the northwest side Judy way WGN news while taking his victory lap following his acquittal in the Senate impeachment trial president trump's made some major changes to his staff inside the administration including lieutenant colonel Alexander vin men who was a key witness for the house impeachment investigation A. B. C.'s Kyra Phillips is outside the White House with more on another staffing change for the vin and statements twin brother also an army lieutenant colonel was to serving at the NSC as a lawyer focus on ethics he was also fired suddenly and with no explanation according to his lawyer sources close to the president telling us quote he's house cleaning all of those he sees as being disloyal to him gorgeous online president trump's ambassador to the European Union also was fired Irish voters are choosing their next prime minister in election where frustration with economic austerity and a housing crisis have ruled the fuel the rise of shin Fane party shunned by the country's main political parties because of its links to the Irish Republican Army voting stations opened at seven o'clock today a national exit poll expected shortly after they close at ten PM local time Americans gave their credit card to real work out this past holiday season the federal reserve says borrowing on credit cards rose by the largest amount in more than two decades in December total U. S. consumer borrowing rose twenty two point one billion dollars that month an update on a story between Major League Baseball and a member of Pink Floyd A. B. C.'s taught and has the story M. L. B. dot com was among the organizations sponsoring ticket presales for Roger Waters this is not a drill tore but that business deal is over after baseball officials said it will not schedule any more advertising on its platforms promoting waters the issue started with the leadership of been a breath international sent a letter to commissioner rob Manfred coaling waters at about anti Semites whose views on Jews in Israel far exceed the boundaries of civil discourse waters says he's not anti Israel or biased against Jews but he does support the boycott divestment and sanctions movement targeting Israel taught at ABC news several special events are planned this month at the Abraham Lincoln presidential library and museum museum spokesperson Chris well so that says there are several unique artifacts on display one of them is Bible that Abraham Lincoln owned and the last couple of years of his presidency we were given that last year it's a great addition to our collection we also have a tiny little rang worn by tad Lincoln Abraham Lincoln's youngest son and it's made out of horse here from a one of his ponies visitors will get in free on Lincoln's two hundred eleventh birthday on February twelfth in WGN sports college basketball DePaul lost to Georgetown seventy six to seventy two Purdue beat Indiana seventy four sixty two so just getting underway actually getting underway five I should say Nebraska verses the Iowa Hawkeyes Indiana state verses Indiana Indiana state Illinois state that's at seven o'clock and we also have Missouri state versus Southern Illinois that's also tonight at seven o'clock in of course the Blackhawks visiting Winnipeg tomorrow pregame with Chris BoDeans at five thirty face off at six with John Wiedeman and Troy Murray on seven twenty WGN and WGN radio dot com right now thirty five and here thirty four at midway it's thirty five degrees out in Schaumburg thirty four along the lake front I'm Bob Kessler on Chicago's very own seven twenty WGN.

"tad lincoln" Discussed on American Elections: Wicked Game

American Elections: Wicked Game

04:47 min | 9 months ago

"tad lincoln" Discussed on American Elections: Wicked Game

"On March fourth. Eighteen sixty one. Lincoln stood at the stoop of his temporary quarters. The Willard Hotel with President Buchanan. They climbed into a carriage. That would take them to the capital for Lincoln swearing in ceremony along along the way they pass throngs of well-wishers because threats. On Lincoln's life still circulated uniform soldiers stood in the crowd along with several sharpshooters on the rooftops looking for anything suspicious. The presidential procession arrived at the Capitol Without Incident Platform had been built on the east side of the Capitol steps with seats for the inaugural dignitaries and guests tests. Lincoln and President Buchanan set in the first row of chairs with Douglas and Chief Justice Roger. Tony Mary Robert William Tad Lincoln sat in the next WPRO. Lincoln's longtime friend Senator. Edward Baker stood at the small table acting as a podium and introduce the president-elect to the nearly thirty thousand people gathered to witness the event Lincoln stood and came to the table. He fumbled with his papers and his hat was not enough room for both on the small Stan table so Douglas stood and politely offered to hold the hat quipping as he sat down. Well if I can't be president at least I can hold the president's hat soon. After Lincoln began his speech apprehension seems to exist among the people of the southern states that by the ascension of a Republican administration their property and their piece in their personal security are to be endangered. I declare that I have no purpose directly or indirectly to interfere with the institution of slavery in the states where it exists. Lincoln spoke of peace of loyalty to the Constitution and closed with a call for unity. We are not enemies but friends. We must not be enemies though. Passion may have strained it must not break our bonds of affection the mystic chords of memory stretching from every battlefield patriot grave to every living heart and heart stone. Own all over. This broad land will yet swell the course of the Union when again touched as surely they will be by the better angels of our nature. The crowd achier does Lincoln finished chief. Justice Roger. Tony stood and administered. The Oath of office Lincoln raised his right hand and promised I do solemnly swear that I will faithfully safely execute the office of President of the United States and will to the best of my ability preserve protect and defend the constitution of the United States. The crowd Algiers once more. Douglas handed Lincoln's hat back to him. But Douglas's graciousness and losing the election and his flight gesture didn't calm fears of southerners nor did Lincoln's call for unity. Reconciliation Richmond dispatched concluded that. Lincoln's speech nauseated not only president but inaugurates civil war war on March fifth. His first day in office Lincoln received an urgent message from a commander at federally controlled Fort Sumter in Charleston. South Carolina Major Robert Anderson told the president who supplies were running dangerously low and the people of Charleston withdrawing hostile towards the union soldiers in their midst. Time was running running out on a peaceful resolution with confederacy so from his very first day Lincoln inherited in America and ward with itself. The job of stamping out. The the insurrection and winning the election of eighteen sixty four would fall to Lincoln in pursuit of victory and in his attempt to put the country back together. Whole Abraham Lincoln Linkin pay the ultimate price on the next episode of game the election of eighteen sixty four with flagging popularity and his country country losing a war Abraham Lincoln also battles to keep the country together and to become first two-term president since Andrew Jackson? Don't miss a single week. Kabar march from seventeen eighty nine to twenty twenty. Hit the subscribe button on your podcast APP. Now this show is supported by you. Our listeners please give us a rainy and leave a review. The single best way to help the show grow is to tell others share with your friends and family find us on social media at Wicky Game Pod. I'm at Lindsey Graham. Another way to support this show is to go to wicked game. PODCAST DOT COM members there early access to add free episodes as well as bonus content only available to subscribers find find out more at wicked game. PODCAST DOT COM and about our reenactments in most cases. We can't know exactly what was said but everything. Our show is heavily researched based on surviving historical oracle documents. Wicked game is an airship action created hosted and executive produced by me. Lindsey Graham found signed by Derek Parents Co executive produced by Stephen Even Walters in association with ritual productions. This episode written and researched by Eric are Chila. Fact checking by Greg Jackson Seattle Salazar from the PODCAST history. That doesn't suck doc music by Lindsey Graham distributed by wondering..

Abraham Lincoln Tony Mary Robert William Tad L Lincoln president President Buchanan Lindsey Graham Douglas Chief Justice Roger Willard Hotel United States Algiers Union Charleston Edward Baker Andrew Jackson president-elect executive Senator Fort Sumter South Carolina
"tad lincoln" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

05:17 min | 1 year ago

"tad lincoln" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Date for head KLIF I'm Dave Williams with Scott said way who's in for Amy today and he's got the day off she's come back tomorrow and then I'm gonna be gone for a week so you know it's that time of year when people take the remaining days off that they have coming to him and we're gonna give time though yeah or have a good time on care less to stick with us say we talked about some breaking news on the White House earlier was on lockdown earlier is a airspace violation that was lifted after about fifteen minutes got some more breaking news from the White House and this comes from the white house's official Twitter account all this is the S. this is they're allowing Martin of the Turkey they're allowing you to vote on which Turkey president trump should part in this year at the national thanksgiving pardoning ceremony man between choice saying choice be the names Turkey ETS bread Turkey be is better I can't have one without the other that's why I said I I I I think I retweeted and said you know how this is going to and they're both going to get part it's a bread and butter probably you know the tradition started note by the way so president Lincoln was the first president Turkey because when the Turkey arrived for thanksgiving dinner his son tad became attached to it and tad tad Lincoln didn't want the Turkey to die so Lincoln pardon the Turkey there and it's become a tradition ever since see any to even time you give an animal you get you you have a food animal in name it's all over that's your any farmer will tell yeah yeah say forty one right now K. L. I. F. here's a name for you the most of you have heard Troy Aikman one time I was sitting right here in this chair and I watched him walk past the window here did you just hear you say hold on everybody we're gonna go to break what what is what I have no idea still no anyway was in here but he up he was on fox NFL he's calling the game he was called the game the cowboys cowboys and patriots you just said that and twice he said that Jason Garrett coaching with a was poor poor coaching what are you referring to on two different occasions and apparently Jason Garrett a excuse me apparently Jerry Jones listens to Troy Aikman yeah that may have something to do with why Jerry was as critical as he was after the game but on the other hand juries not a dummy and if he can he can see this game and he could see it coming and he's suffered as much or more than all Cup of cowboys fan so I I think Jerry Jones is is starting to feel the embarrassment of it went right his former guy like bass Troy Aikman outside of Roger Staubach is the spokesperson for Dallas cowboy alumni once you agree to that yeah maybe even above Starbuck at this point maybe to Michael Evans the hype man yeah he's a guy gets but as far as like the state of the cowboys when Troy can speaks everyone including Jerry listen so I think when he heard that on the broadcast he said okay now this feels bad I have to address this yeah and that's when he made the comments post game we said we've got the stars we've got the talent right why are we not getting the results it's good teams right and it was the first time he's ever criticized Jason Garrett was basically family to one at this point will J. singer got a chance to respond yesterday and he responded just how you think Jason here would respond it was a coaching staff you'll just have to put aside and and get your your sights set on the next opponent and you really have to live like Monday is Wednesday and you know the coaching staff make sure prepare the players as well as you can the players have to commit what that's a mindset that Dallas as we know he's not he's not saying anything else and there's nothing there's no and he's not going to get into any explanation about down decisions or is coaching per se now what he did say was that you can always coach better and you can always play better and and and so he just kind of the folder that in two well Hey everybody could do their job better everybody that that was kind of his answer for that with you know I give him up I give him credit for one thing and that is because I am such a freak for for clarity in communication with you're talking a writing I want people to explain to me what you're thinking don't expectativa your it out or read your mind please be very direct and and Jason Garrett he he can speak more eloquently and saying nothing than anybody I've ever met absolutely never ever call attention he's a robot a robotic football politician he could be a good politician if you just learn to smile a little more you think he goes before the end of the season no I don't think he goes before the end of the season it would be interesting because of how the season ends whether he goes or not right he would have to in in my personal opinion he would have to get to the Superbowl at this point the goal for the NFC champ because of his sick about it to get to the the NFC championship game is going to win with the five games left probably for the last five games then two playoff games right that that's a long that's a month and a half of winning so if he does that your sis but here's the thing though they don't have to fire J. singer he's on the last year of his contract right get your give me like all right you your contracts up it's not like they have to let him go giants Hiram is now that's an interesting I think that's a big old conspiracy to really think I'm putting on my tinfoil hat I.

Dave Williams Scott Amy fifteen minutes
"tad lincoln" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"tad lincoln" Discussed on Here & Now

"A place that's going to tell the story more fully than it's been told anywhere. One thing I point out to people is that Richmond was not only the capital of the confederacy. It was also the place within which forty percent of all the men who died in the civil war died within a hundred and fifty miles of Richmond. It's the Normandy of the north as well as the capital of the confederacy, and it's the center of the domestic slave, trade Virginia's the largest slave state. So what we try to show people as you can't pull those strands apart. You can't just sorta come in with the assumption that you have this theory, and it's going to be tested. Instead, we hope really and this museum is going to blow. People's minds is is the technical term that I would use it shows how it was a completely shattering experience. And we're trying to shatter your understanding of the civil war when you when you come in. So it's a bold statement that it's not in sepia. It doesn't have violins and fiddles. And that grounds it's about today. We'll let's talk about that, JoAnne. The current political debate does often end up going back to debates that have been around since the civil war. Well, right. And particularly I mean there are moments. I think generally speaking in American history that touch more profoundly on some of the deeper meanings of what the United States is. And what it means? I think we're engaged in one of those moments, and that's bringing in its train a lot of discussion about founding narratives and founding ideals and things like museums or monument. Wants or statues all of the things that people are really fraught about at the moment people trust museums more than any other form of knowledge about the past. Maybe our brief appearances on here now, which I think people would see anchors, but museums having a special responsibility for Justice, Joe him saying here are concrete things, you know. So we have a confederate flag when you come into the museum. But it's the confederate flag that was given to tad Lincoln. When he visited when Richmond fell and came with his father. We have an iron hand that was the model of an African American man that he made himself from the iron that he is forging in this in this aren't foundry is were the museum is located. So I think you know, one reason that people are skeptical that the north went to war against slavery is people. Can't imagine the north had the moral fortitude to do such a thing. Now people look and see how pervasive racism is- about the country. How? Well, you know, it seems everywhere you look that forces are arrayed against African American people. So they have a hard time imagining that at some time there were people who were willing to give their lives to end slavery. So it's not just a kind of come in and deflate things. It's also to remind people that some people thought for the highest ideals of this nation. Did you going to do civil worry ackman's at the museum? What was that reaction? Ed could. It was a problem. That's means. I don't really know the answer to that. But we won't do it in the way that that people think that civil war reenactments are for example, we have a young woman a teenager who sitting at a table, and she's making something with her hands. If you start chatting, weather, and it turns out that she is making cartridges for use by the confederate army. She's on the island across the James from our museum. And as you talk to her you realize that she was the one who set off the spark that killed dozens of people, including yourself in horrible fire. Right. So is that a civil war reenactment? Yeah. Is it hordes of of middle aged men coming over a ridge? No. So I think that gives you an example of how reimagining the civil war the cast of characters, but also the roles. People are playing when you think back about the civil war part of the thought is this must have been really very difficult for people who lived through it and had to deal with as you say, you know, having to go to war, perhaps give your life for for cause on the other hand when we look back at it..

Richmond confederate army Virginia United States Lincoln Ed Justice James Joe forty percent
"tad lincoln" Discussed on Assassinations

Assassinations

08:53 min | 1 year ago

"tad lincoln" Discussed on Assassinations

"To hit the subscribe button. So you won't miss upcoming episodes. Now back to the story. Abraham LINCOLN was born in Kentucky on February twelve eighteen nine. His family was poor and Lincoln had to work to support them from a young age, which meant he had a very limited formal education eighteen thirty when Lincoln was just twenty years old, he moved to make an county in southern Illinois. And then later to new Salem, Illinois, where he worked as a postmaster overseeing the town's post office at the time. A postmaster was a highly respected elected position Lincoln found that he relished the life of a politician and after four years as postmaster he ran for and won a seat in the Illinois state legislature in eighteen thirty four Lincoln was an unusual choice for the state Senate his humble background left him with far less education than his peers. And he struggled to gain their respect to many of the other legislators. Lincoln was a backwater rube with no place in the US government. Eighteen thirty six Lincoln at age twenty six prove them wrong by passing the bar exam and becoming a lawyer. This was a particularly impressive achievement. Given the fact that he never attended law school ten years later in eighteen forty six he accomplished another feat winning an election to the US house of representatives Lincoln entered the US government during a time of turmoil prior to the eighteen forties. There were two major political parties the Whigs and the democratic Republicans. But as slavery became a more important issue in the mid nineteenth century, the democratic Republican party fractured into two parties, the abolitionist Republicans, and the pro slavery Democrats, not long after that, the pro slavery Democratic Party split again between the southern Democrats who advocated for secession and the northern Democrats who preferred Nash. Oh, unity all this to say. By the time Lincoln was involved in national politics. There were four major parties on the ballot northern Democrats. Southern Democrats Republicans and Whigs Lincoln began his political career as a wig. He initially didn't consider himself an abolitionist he believed in preserving slavery and slave owning states and halting it's spread to new states as they joined the union, but his beliefs evolved during his time in the legislature as he met and spoke with black citizens, including former slaves when the abolitionist Republican party was formed Lincoln eagerly joined by the time Lincoln ran for president in eighteen sixty. He was firmly anti-slavery, however, he ran on a platform of slowly phasing slavery out instead of Bala Shing it immediately to prevent an economic crisis in the south this water down anti-slavery stance. Alienated everyone pro slavery voter. There's staunch abolitionists and also the more moderate Whigs who wanted to allow slavery to continue in the south to prevent secession. Several southern leaders announced they would secede if Lincoln were elected and his opponents use that against him in the election claiming that even abolitionists who believed in a unified nation had to vote against Lincoln. The election was split between four candidates one from each major party despite the fear mongering about succession when election day ruled around in the fall of eighteen sixty Lincoln edged out on top with only thirty nine point eight percent of the popular vote the lowest share in United States history, just as they had promised by February fourth eighteen sixty one a month before Lincoln's term began seven southern states officially seceded from the union before Lincoln was even sworn in. He was already facing an unprecedented challenge as the. Nog Eurasian grew closer. His officials were so nervous about the risk of violence that armed men were stationed all along the procession route Lincoln took the oath of office on March fourth eighteen sixty one and became the president of a divided nation. Once in office Lincoln refused to recognize the seven states of the confederacy as their own separate country a month later, the south sent back their response. Bloodshed began on April twelve eighteen sixty one when the confederate army attacked fort Sumter Lincoln authorized militia to support the union troops defending the Fords. The civil war had officially begun, Lincoln's militant response, incited, four more states, Virginia, North Carolina, Arkansas and Tennessee to join the secession. The confederacy was now eleven state strong Lincoln was being faced with an unusual conflict and had to vote unusual thority to manage it. Keep blockaded southern ports and suspended habeas corpus rights allowing the government to arrest and hold any citizen of either the union or the confederacy without an arraignment. The constitution allows for the president to vote certain wartime powers, but those powers are poorly defined and Lincoln's policies during the war were unprecedented in scope citizens and legislators alike questioned. Either Lincoln's actions were even legal when John Wilkes booth heard about how Lincoln was expanding the powers of the presidential office. His worst fears were confirmed Lincoln was a tyrant as the war raged on Lincoln needed away to offset the stresses of leading the nation. He found respite in the theater as the later. President Bill Clinton explains Lincoln needed to balance the challenges of the presidency with a continued appreciation of the arts. It did allow him to survive. Because he understood that every political leaders passion for progress must be tempered by an understanding of the universal human existence, the darkness and the light and the struggle to have the light, prevail. Abraham wasn't the only member of the Lincoln family to enjoy the theater once during his presidency. Lincoln son tad attended a performance of the marble heart starring one John Wilkes booth after his brief stint in the Virginia militia booth had returned to acting and hit found success touring in both the north and south during the war tad Lincoln was fascinated by booth performance. And during intermission. He went backstage and met the actor himself booth was a gracious host even gifting tad with a rose perhaps on tad's glowing recommendation ABRAHAM LINCOLN went to a performance of the marble heart with a few of his friends later on he'd seen booth. Form several times before and he was already a fan of his work, Lincoln's friend an actor named Frank Morton's new John Wilkes booth personally when Lincoln confessed his admiration for booth Morton and offer to introduce them. But when Morton tried to arrange the meeting booth refused he wouldn't lower himself to meet the man, he blamed for destroying the nation's piece Lincoln had larger concerns than a snub from an actor on September twenty second eighteen sixty two he announced his intention to sign the emancipation proclamation, which would make slavery illegal in the southern states. This was the first time Lincoln had advocated for mmediately freeing, all slaves without a transition period. The decision was tactical as much as moral the amounts of patient proclamation. Also allowed the union army to accept escaped southern slaves as recruits Lincoln hoped the proclamation would inspire more slaves in the south to escape further. Weakening, the southern economy and giving the north more of an edge on. Fortunately, the emancipation proclamation was unpopular across the political spectrum. Even most abolitionists believed that a gradual transition away from a slave based economy was more practical than freeing all the southern slaves at once. Some even believed Lincoln's announcement was a bluff to apply pressure on the confederate government. Congress was unwilling to approve any measure that would instantly outlaw slavery. So instead Lincoln invoked special wartime powers in order to sign. The emancipation proclamation into law on New Year's day January first aid. Eighteen sixty three.

Abraham LINCOLN Whigs Lincoln tad Lincoln fort Sumter Lincoln Lincoln family president US Illinois Salem John Wilkes Whigs Republican party Democratic Party Kentucky confederate army Virginia Republicans Bala Shing union army
"tad lincoln" Discussed on Tales of American History

Tales of American History

10:33 min | 1 year ago

"tad lincoln" Discussed on Tales of American History

"Completed. Okay. So did he move to Springfield when the capital was complete when this legislative session ended, and he now had been made a member of the bar, John? Todd Stuart ask him to become his partner. And so in April eighteen thirty seven he. Bid farewell to little new sale. You can imagine that party. I mean he'd gotten so close many people, but you see he still has his it's like this is like his attempts to fly from the nest. Finally in a real sense that I won now go out and really make my way in life. You all having done. All you've done for me. And it must have been a sad parting, but he left road into Springfield. And he took up lodging in a store operated by Joshua speed. Who is from Louisville Kentucky. We've all heard of the speed museum. The speed family lived at Farmington, which houses still standing off the Waterson expressway outside of Louisville. That's the home Joshua spayed and speed was had moved to Illinois. Like a lot of Kentucky. Had opened a store didn't stay long. But while he was there Lincoln got a room in the general store for from him rent free. So. Doing some legal. Probably and literally on the day, April fifteen eighteen thirty seven when he leaves new Salem in the sangam oh journal is printed, and they used to call these the lawyers cards, and they were the ads on the front page of the newspaper showing they're open for business and this one red J T Stewart and a Lincoln attorneys and counselors at law will practice con jointly in the courts of this traditional circuit that was on the front page of the second journal billboard. Yeah. Exactly, exactly. Times the analogous. So now, he's John Todd Stewart's law partner partner, this has to be how he met Mary Todd. Well, yes, yes. Indeed. You can you can just see now talk a bit about Mary Todd Mary Todd again was John Todd Stewart's first cousin both came from Lexington. She was rather polished well educated at Madame men tells school here in Lexington. She had moved to Springfield from Lexington in eighteen thirty seven to really then. Visit her sister. Elizabeth who was the wife of a Kentucky native name Ninian Edwards? Then he had Edwards would cut his own path in Illinois history as his father did also named any Edwards graduates of Transylvania university. And in eighteen thirty nine Mary Todd returned to Springfield to live and so- Lincoln is introduced to her in eighteen thirty seven and then she decided she would return to Springfield and live in eighteen thirty nine. Okay. She has she's living with her sister. And her cousin is Lincoln's law, partner writes all a great setup. Liken it had by the way. An interim between Ann Rutledge and he being introduced Mary Todd where he courted woman named Mary Owens who also was a Kentucky. But was was a heavy. A woman. It's funny. Carl Sandberg in his great volumes of the biography of Lincoln the chapter on Mary Owens, his called quote in love with the fat girl and quote. And. Carl's and I have seen letters. Lincoln wrote to her and that she wrote to him what he was in the legislature. And it's so funny all he does in these letters is complain complain about what work he has to do how he has to live just complaint after complaint after complaint, and she just imagine being nothing like, oh how much I miss you. It's just complaints. And so that courtship ended as you can say probably the best for both of them because both of them wanted over. Best. Put it that way. So Mary Todd was something quite different. And here's this polished educated. Young lady who comes from rather prominent family, and whose cousin is his partner, and this seems to work so to speak marry up right and actually planned to get married on the first of January in eighteen forty one. And then Lincoln gets the what is he he starts getting depressed and despond he called fee Koffi Koffi. He got coffee. I guess the best way to put it is coffee. And he she then said, well, then release me from the engagement and he did. But it seemed as though they left it open for being renewed. And member this crate letter, John Todd, Stuart had gotten elected to congress as a wig and Lincoln writes him a letter. And he says I'm now the most miserable man living says if what I feel were equally distributed to the whole human family. There would not be one. Cheerful face on earth. It is funded. See? Nevertheless in eighteen forty two. Abraham LINCOLN and Mary Todd were married. Okay. So it it all came round. Okay. Exactly. These fits of despondency. Does. But you know, tell you. I think if anyone who studies the frontier you see that evident in a lot of people. And I think it's from just how hard life is. And you know, we don't even think about that anymore today. We judge people because we can judge him by our standards, and you know, if he'd done this that the other wouldn't be that way, and that's not. So, you know, people reacted in those days to things because life was hard death was a common visitor and sickness usually lead to death. And so Ann Rutledge shock shock to him. Look at his own mother. Right. She dies of just the milk. That was that was poisoned by the cows eating. It's random random. Innis only. Was was Nancy Hanks Lincoln did she die but two weeks before that both her cousins died up there in Indiana of that the milk Schick? Yeah. And no sooner did they bury them then she came down. So it's it's rough and there's a random quality to the nature of things, right and ledge falling ill all of a sudden out of nowhere and a week gone. Right. Right. Is it's very shocked. Well, you know, the to Mary Todd and ABRAHAM LINCOLN air first quarters. Was it were in the globe hotel in Springfield? And. No long gone long gone. But there were there were four children born to that family, come all. Robert Todd name for Mary's father was born in eighteen forty three in the when they were in the globe hotel, then Edward Baker Lincoln name for one of Lincoln's close friends on in the legal business Edward Baker of of Illinois Edward they called him. Eddie Baker little Eddie. He he was the second one born. And then Thomas Lincoln was born Lincoln ABRAHAM LINCOLN nicknamed him tad. And he says I when when asked why you named him tab, Ted. It's he said is because when he was born he looked like a Ted poll. So there was tad Lincoln. And sadly, and then there was William Wallace Lincoln and little Edie died at the age of four. Probably to barky Lassus. And as we know William Wallace died in the White House tad died right after the war. The only one who would survive would be Robert the oldest and you speak speak of more of that tragedy. Yeah.

Mary Todd Mary Todd Abraham LINCOLN Springfield partner Nancy Hanks Lincoln Lincoln Todd Stuart Thomas Lincoln Kentucky William Wallace Lincoln Mary Todd John Todd Stewart Illinois Robert Todd Ninian Edwards John Todd Ann Rutledge Carl Sandberg
"tad lincoln" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"tad lincoln" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"On behalf of the White House stark association. It's my pleasure to welcome. You to the celebration of the two thousand eighteen presidents will cite summit, the Kennedy Center is the perfect venue for this. It's so fitting because it self is a presidential site, which is dedicated as living memorial to president John F Kennedy and to assure the authentic nature of this historical gathering, the Kennedy Center has brought us back to the eighteen hundreds in terms of the temperature in Washington DC. We wanna thank you for that. Also, we've been given authority from no higher source in the chairman of the board of the John F Kennedy center, David Rubenstein for gentlemen, and ladies relate to remove their jackets and be more comfortable, so please feel free to do. So. This year's presidential site summit is the largest gathering ever of presidential site representatives. These are Soreq sites include more than one hundred birthplaces and childhood homes memorials, and museums libraries and landmark from coast to coast, and we are grateful to have the site representatives here, and for your devotion to educating the public about the American presidency tonight, we have two outstanding panel discussions focused on the one thing that all of our presidents have in common, and that is life in the White House. Both will be moderated by the chairman of the board of the Kennedy Center and a good fan to the White House association, David Rubenstein, and although he still has his day job. David has emerged as America's interviewer in chief. So you're in store for a very special program. The first panel will feature the perspectives of those for whom White House history and family history intersect. Those are presidential descendants throughout America's history the. Our presence offspring have often played a unique and fascinating role. Their antics often in live in the stories of the presidency's tad Lincoln. For example, it used to drive goats in a wagon down the corridors of the White House Amy Carter roller skated in the East Room Alice Roosevelt gamble.

Kennedy Center David Rubenstein John F Kennedy center White House stark association White House history White House John F Kennedy White House association chairman tad Lincoln America Amy Carter Alice Roosevelt Soreq Washington president