35 Burst results for "suzuki"

Coleman, Vasilevskiy Help Lightning Take 2-0 Series Lead

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | 3 weeks ago

Coleman, Vasilevskiy Help Lightning Take 2-0 Series Lead

"Under best Levski stopped forty two shots to lead the Tampa Bay Lightning to a three one win over the Montreal Canadiens in game two of the Stanley Cup Finals Montreal dominated play for much of the first two periods outshooting the lightning twenty nine thirteen Anthony surreally scored first for Tampa Bay Nick Suzuki answered with an unassisted power play goal then with less than a second left on the clock and I'll stretch Blake Coleman made a diving shot that beat Carey price stick side that would become the game winner under plucked up the insurance marker with less than five minutes remaining in the game Baltimore's again Tampa

Levski Anthony Surreally Tampa Bay Lightning Nick Suzuki Montreal Canadiens Blake Coleman Montreal Tampa Bay Carey Price Baltimore Tampa
Shifting From Limbic to Liberating Intention

Tara Brach

01:56 min | Last month

Shifting From Limbic to Liberating Intention

"Now. I'm a stay in welcome. I begin tonight with one of my favorite stories that took place in two thousand and one and this was a three weeks before the twin towers were bombed in new york. There was a conference that i attended in the twin towers. I still have the little pen that i took from the building. It was a buddhist conference. And i was asked to help open. The conference with six other are five other teachers and they were all elders. I was by far the young end of the spectrum in my dorm experience and also the only woman and i was really nervous about this. This is this is stressing me out. We at ten minutes each and we're asked to address really the question of what is it that most helps to serve awakening and freedom so we at ten minutes to riff on that one and i was the second second person in line and i thought that's great. I get a chance to kind of compose and collect and so on. But i get the thing done with you know and so The first person went up. There was richard baker. Rocha who has suzuki rochus dharma heir very very well-known and and beloved. And so he gets up there to do his talk and he said awakening comes down to two things intention and attention. Thank you very much and all of a sudden. Like oh my god. I'm on cyrus done in frozen. And i got up. I have no idea what i said. I wish i had said like. He said i did remember what he sad. That awakening comes down to intention

New York Richard Baker Rocha Cyrus
Price makes 26 saves, Habs top Vegas 4-1, one win from Final

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | Last month

Price makes 26 saves, Habs top Vegas 4-1, one win from Final

"Montreal you stifling defense and timely scoring to beat the golden knights for want to T. mobile arena leading one nothing against the recall condemning marker but for a rich told me to to nothing in the second period tonight was a good step not all the squishy and not be with the fourth one's gonna be the hardest and we're fortunate to have the opportunity at home and we'll be ready to go in the insects former university of Wisconsin stout Cole Caufield netted three nothing Montreal with a power play goal just over three minutes later former have Max bench already cut the lead to three one of the four oh nine mark of the third period before former golden knights first round pick Nick Suzuki scored with an empty net to round out the scoring the Canadians can advance to the Stanley Cup final with a win at home Thursday night I'm John the third

T. Mobile Arena Golden Knights Montreal Cole Caufield Max Bench University Of Wisconsin Nick Suzuki Stanley Cup John
"suzuki" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

01:36 min | Last month

"suzuki" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Suzuki, a first round pick of none other than the Vegas Golden Knights, back in 2017, the 13th overall selections second draft pick ever in franchise history. So it's a big assist for him Edmundson for Montreal back in his own zone. Ahead for looking into rifles through the middle of the ice, and Gallagher just couldn't handle that pass a little too much mustard on it. That comes Alec Martinez for Vegas on the left side written off the puck by Philip to know, but he turns away to keep possession, trying to get it to tuck. And he forces it to the corner shoveled along by Mark Stone Stone, still looking for his first point of this series around the boards potential. Oh activates off the right side but loses it down Low and LinkedIn sneaks it ahead for Gallagher into the Vegas sewn on left wing finds a trailer coming in late. That shot came over top of the net as cocaine. Miami got that one away. Kept at the right point. Okay, Naomi goes to the front of the net. Gallagher can't get it back, though, as the night's clear to center, a little regroup for the habits and Weber sends it back in offside. Another goal by Caufield, You know what goes into my mind? Johnny, is this So you're telling me We've got a chance because before that, you would say there's no chance whatsoever. That's why it's a 60 minute game. That's why you work hard defensively to get blocked shots that get lanes. And again the past by Suzuki. He led Caufield. He put it out in front so coffee could skate onto it did not want to risk the stick to stick past Caufield with points in five consecutive playoff games. Remember, he was a healthy scratch the first two games of the postseason. His second of the playoffs. Caufield leads all rookies in points.

Alec Martinez Mark Stone Stone 2017 LinkedIn Philip Naomi 60 minute Caufield Weber Johnny Vegas Golden Knights 13th Gallagher Edmundson first round first two games five consecutive playoff games Miami first point second
Canadiens Rout Jets 5-1 to Take 3-0 Series Lead

AP News Radio

00:29 sec | Last month

Canadiens Rout Jets 5-1 to Take 3-0 Series Lead

"The Canadians have a commanding three games to none service lead after downing the jets five wild at the bell centre special teams getting it done for the habs on this night particularly the fourth line yeah well our meal the former judge on a line with veterans Eric Staal and Corey Perry had a pair of short handed goals and finished with a three point not very ordinary love Canada Nick Suzuki how the other Montreal goals I will not worry was the only chance to beat Carrick trunks game boards of Montreal Monday not I'm John of the

Bell Centre Special Teams Habs Jets Eric Staal Corey Perry Nick Suzuki Montreal Canada Carrick John
"suzuki" Discussed on Sports 600 ESPN

Sports 600 ESPN

02:24 min | 2 months ago

"suzuki" Discussed on Sports 600 ESPN

"Were brought to you by Good year helping you discover the road ahead. Goodyear more driven back on SportsCenter all night with playoff pox first Toronto Maple Leafs captain John to bars back on the ice skating Thursday, a week after suffering a concussion and knee injury in a scary collision. He was checked to the ice before his head made contact with Corey Perry's knee last Thursday, and he was events. Really stretchered off. Meantime, the least were looking to wrap their syriza against the Canadiens in the original six match up with Montreal looking to stay alive. The halves were up late, but Toronto got even Justin Hall back of the net, starting out with it slowly on the Neil Andr requite pass for Muslim but password Galchenyuk and the shots go. Let's go check your weather John on the left flank with much of going to the front of the net, and it beat Price. Five whole. This game is tied. Holy blacken on about that. Jake Muzzin scored twice for Toronto that help send the game to overtime. But in the extra session, Montreal kept the season alive. Hold. Caufield has a breakaway with Suzuki to know Caulfield, Suzuki and the Stars. Accessing key wins it in overtime from Montreal and Game six, his on Saturday as Nick Suzuki scored 59 seconds into overtime. Heard on T s and six and 90. The Canadiens beat the Maple is 4 to 3, rebounding from blowing a three goal lead to force Game six. In the original six first round matchup. Cold Caulfield intercepted Alex Galchenyuk. Some pass in Montreal zone moved up, which is okey Thies of the two young stores for the haves Suzuki made the feed to Caulfield got back and put it a home, beating Jack Campbell of Blockers Side Montreal cut Toronto seriously tow 3 to 2, so the Canadians stay alive. Can the Preds do the same? They were up a goal in the third on Carolina, slaving with boxes. Tank thing smoking back door and alright, handle team the Canes of Titan three they had indeed you heard the name Slavin. Well, when they went to overtime, he would be heard from again Hope again and terrified it up front. Hamilton is slaving who connected on the goal. Hamilton with.

Jack Campbell Alex Galchenyuk Corey Perry Jake Muzzin Nick Suzuki Thursday Justin Hall Hamilton 59 seconds Maple 3 Toronto Saturday Five Neil Andr 4 2 six Caufield Montreal
"suzuki" Discussed on Photography Radio

Photography Radio

03:09 min | 3 months ago

"suzuki" Discussed on Photography Radio

"So <Speech_Male> i mean clearly. <Speech_Male> There's <Speech_Male> no harm being done <Speech_Male> here. Just <Speech_Male> an odd reaction <Speech_Male> to <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> a style of shooting <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> it'll <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> It's an <Speech_Male> ordinary thing. That <Speech_Male> happens in the course <Speech_Male> of them choosing <Speech_Male> what <Speech_Male> they want for their advertisements. <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Male> i want to make <Speech_Male> clear that. There's no <Speech_Male> ongoing <Speech_Male> bad blood or controversy <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> between myself <Silence> and fuji. Film <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> very cool. <Speech_Male> I like that a lot. <Speech_Male> The <Speech_Male> last <Speech_Male> two questions <Speech_Male> in <Speech_Male> the back of <Speech_Male> friction. As <Speech_Male> i'm looking at the <Speech_Male> thumbnail pictures <Speech_Male> i noticed <Speech_Male> that you label <Speech_Male> some of them portrait's <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> some of them <Speech_Male> not even <Speech_Male> though they're clearly <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> headshots <Speech_Male> or face shots. <Speech_Male> Is there <Speech_Male> a difference <Speech_Male> when you're doing street <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> work between <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> what you call a portrait <Silence> <Advertisement> and what <SpeakerChange> you don't <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> muslim <Speech_Male> it'll <Speech_Male> other looking <Speech_Music_Male> with <SpeakerChange> full <Speech_Male> today today. <Speech_Male> This is a good question. <Speech_Male> There's a <Speech_Male> little bit of ambiguity. <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> feel like the <Speech_Male> basic distinction <Speech_Male> between a <Speech_Male> portrait. And maybe <Speech_Male> what would be considered <Speech_Male> a candid photo <Speech_Male> in a portrait. <Speech_Male> The the bottle is <Speech_Male> aware that the pictures <Speech_Male> being taken right. <Speech_Male> And it's it's very intentional. <Speech_Male> Whereas <Speech_Male> a a candid photo <Speech_Male> is not <Speech_Male> necessarily <Speech_Male> when it comes <Speech_Male> to street photography. <Speech_Male> I rely <Speech_Male> on mostly <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Male> feeling of <Speech_Male> the picture <Speech_Male> in making that distinction. <Speech_Male> But <Speech_Male> one of the things that i <Speech_Male> do is <Speech_Male> if it's a picture <Speech_Male> where the subject <Speech_Male> of of the picture <Speech_Male> had my <Speech_Male> attention or <Speech_Male> like heard my voice <Speech_Male> and then and then <Speech_Male> was reacting to <Speech_Male> that then i would <Speech_Male> tend to label <Speech_Male> that portrait <Speech_Male> because it's a little <Speech_Male> bit more of <Speech_Male> that and of intentional <Speech_Male> photographed <Speech_Male> whereas <Speech_Male> the the ones that <Speech_Male> are more natural. <Speech_Male> I would not <Speech_Male> apply that label <Speech_Male> to <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> with <Speech_Male> that kind of <Speech_Male> transactional <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Idea <Speech_Male> are portraits <Silence> more revealing. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I saw this an awful. <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I think that both <Speech_Male> portraits and candid. <Speech_Male> Photographs <Speech_Male> are equally as <Speech_Male> as emotive <Speech_Male> and equally <Speech_Male> as effective <Speech_Male> at conveying <Speech_Male> an atmosphere <Speech_Male> or feeling. <Speech_Male> It's two <Speech_Male> methods <SpeakerChange> to <Silence> the same thing. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> That <Speech_Male> is very cool. <Speech_Male> Okay we are <Speech_Male> coming into an <Speech_Male> era. Now where the vaccines <Speech_Male> are coming <Speech_Male> out. People are getting <Speech_Male> their kovic shots. <Speech_Male> The mood of the <Speech_Male> street is going to change <Speech_Male> dramatically in <Speech_Male> the next few months. <Speech_Male> What are you <Speech_Male> working on now. <SpeakerChange> What what's <Silence> what's for you. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> It took <Speech_Male> a snail. Does she <Speech_Male> follow. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> So the next thing for <Speech_Male> me and this'll <Speech_Male> especially true. <Speech_Male> Once covid <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> is i'll be shooting <Speech_Male> for a periodical <Speech_Male> for magazine <Speech_Music_Male> and doing <Speech_Male> a series. That's <Speech_Male> upcoming <Silence> so that <SpeakerChange> would be my focus <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Very <Speech_Male> cool thank you <Speech_Male> very much sir. I <Speech_Male> have learned a lot. <Speech_Male> I admire <Speech_Male> your work greatly. This has <Speech_Male> been a wonderful time. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Thank you so much <Music> <Music> else <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> frames <Speech_Music_Female> because <Speech_Music_Female> excellent photography <Speech_Music_Female> the <Speech_Music_Female> lungs on paper <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> visit us at. Www <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> dot <SpeakerChange> read frames <Speech_Music_Female> dot com. <Music>

today two questions both one muslim two Speech_Music_Male next few
"suzuki" Discussed on Photography Radio

Photography Radio

04:50 min | 3 months ago

"suzuki" Discussed on Photography Radio

"I wanted to really bring to life almost kind of consciousness of the environments that i was photographing and the personal stories. The personal documents in photography of the subjects. That i'm photographing one of the ways that this friction sort of manifest suit is between people and the environment that they're moving through the focus on the human subjects of best captures. That feeling. I think that is really really interesting. I love that before we get to the controversy. I wanna talk about your process of bringing this about a little bit. You have become famous not only for your work but for your style of shooting. Some people have called it intrusive or offensive. Some people have called it absolutely appropriate so talk to me about the way you approach the act not the product but the act of street photography much duplan day. no. I don't think that my that my style is aggressive. Taking photographs is capturing an instant and you're just capturing this this one specific moment so focusing on that second obscures the larger context. No i don't feel like. I'm i'm aggressive or intrusive went on taking pictures on the street. Tatsuo your reputation you're working your body of images became really well known and really well accepted and you became an ambassador for fuji film. You became the spokesperson for the new x one hundred z. And then a film came out that showed you doing straight photography that showed you approaching people on the street and some people did not take well to your style of shooting that you were too close to people that it was a little bit. You know offensive to invade their space and stuff. Tell me how this whole thing came down from your point of view and tell me what from your point of view is really going on here. Too key night auto. Some the film that was put together. It is just a part of my process. It doesn't really fully reflect the whole thing and so partially. It's an issue of of the the way that the portrayal kind of came off..

one fuji second Tatsuo hundred
"suzuki" Discussed on Photography Radio

Photography Radio

05:35 min | 3 months ago

"suzuki" Discussed on Photography Radio

"Covid affected street photography for you. The personal mazda. Because in the buddy last year everyone was affected by kovin. Obviously and for me at first there was a lot of uncertainty about whether or not i could even take pictures or what the process would be as cova continued though. I wanted to get out into the street into into town to try to capture the atmosphere of covid. And the kind of key thing that that emerged. There is just this sort of quietness. Vat is reflected on the street as a result of covid very cool. I wanna talk about the final product. The images themselves and i wanna talk about process and i wanna talk about the little bit of controversy lurking back there. So let's start with just a number of the images if we could. The images are all black and white. They are all low key that they are all fairly dark. Tell me what kind of a steady let me tell me what kind of mood or style you would most like to see attached to your name when people are talking about street photography. I muslim Seat you think these pictures were taken between twenty eighteen and twenty nine thousand nine hundred and the theme of the book which is friction. Which has this connotation of dischord or strife. And that's something that i really wanted to capture as a reflection of the feeling of these places where i'm taking pictures it's also sort of a reflection of my attitude as i'm doing the photography and the places that i find most compelling are ones that have this sort of feeling almost like a slum the sort of back alleys if you will places that are a little bit out of the way that i think capture this essence really well. That is tremendously interesting. Tell me if you would. The story of the image that wound up being the cover of friction. The young woman looking through the vinyl umbrella. Tell me beginning to end how that shot came to be closer concept for it'll security more sangomas danny the cover image. I felt like captured. This theme of friction dischord the best of the ones that i had taken. And so that's why it ended up being the image for the front of book so that for that particular image was one. That just happened by chance. It was this sort of candid image. That just happened on this. Sort of fortuitous opportunity. I wanted to do a portrait. And so shot it in that style. And then as i was looking through the images that i had taken for this collection later which again the organizing principle with these images was that steam of friction congress. So friction dischord kind of strife struggle sort of all of these things and i felt that that image that ended up on the cover best captured that feeling that i was trying to convey with this collection but the image is a beautiful image it. It's very moody evocative. Where do you see the friction in that particular image..

last year twenty eighteen twenty nine thousand nine hund congress Covid first covid cova muslim
"suzuki" Discussed on Photography Radio

Photography Radio

03:32 min | 3 months ago

"suzuki" Discussed on Photography Radio

"He says in two thousand and his website is tops. Okay dot com. T. a. t. s. u. su z. u. k. i. dot com. I really recommend go. Check it out. His reputation is everywhere. He's been shown in paris in france in portugal in london channel. He's got awards all over the place including the lens. Culture street photography awards finalist including a winning the fence competition for street photography it. It is a tremendous tremendous body of work topsoil. Good morning how are you sir. How good mining. I've got Wonderful well let's speak in not only with the work but with the ideas behind the work. You say that your aim is to show the world. The streets is beautiful interesting wonderful and sometimes cruel. What do you mean onnell clincal. When i'm taking pictures out in the street and i'm walking around. That's the main way that i do my process and obviously there's lots of different things. Didn't you see. I see happiness. I see beauty. I see people going about their daily business. But then you also see things that sort of stand out to you things that catch my eye and when i take pictures i want to transport the viewer to that place. I want them to feel emotionally what it was like to be walking around the street at that time. Is your subject more emotional or is it more. Let's say anthropological slow much superstar. No so when when he's taking pictures he wants to get a glimpse of the interior of the subject that person's world that person's interior world to sort of give give a glimpse of that person's experience and if that can come through in the photograph that is his highest goal How much of the street work that. He's doing reflects his own emotions and his own sensibility. And how much is he. Trying to bring out other people's stories it'll kentucky a whole lot to generally. It's it's more his feeling. His emotions are kind of shining through the photographs. However the subject of the photographs is going to have a big impact on what he is feeling and so what. He photographed the sort of a reflection of that emotion that he's going for and when those two things align in other words when he is trying to convey a certain emotion and his subject also has that emotion about them whether that be in in the atmosphere or expression or or so on. That's when he feels like he gets the maximum effective with his street. Photography dot solo in your writing for frames magazine new say the.

paris france portugal two thousand london two things clincal dot com com
"suzuki" Discussed on Photography Radio

Photography Radio

01:58 min | 3 months ago

"suzuki" Discussed on Photography Radio

"Are talking this morning with topsoil sukey who is phenomenal. Who's new book. Friction is receiving all sorts of praise. And clearly we know his work from the first edition of frames magazine. His style is distinctive his style of media recognizable born in one thousand nine sixty five. He started shooting. He says in two thousand and his website is tops. Okay dot com. T. a. t. s. u. su z. u. k. i. dot com. I really recommend go. Check it out. His reputation is everywhere. He's been shown in paris in france in portugal in london channel. He's got awards all over the place including the lens. Culture street photography awards finalist including a winning the fence competition for street photography it. It is a tremendous tremendous body of work topsoil. Good morning how are you sir. How good mining. I've got Wonderful well let's speak in not only with the work but with the ideas behind the work. You say that your aim is to show the world. The streets is beautiful interesting wonderful and sometimes cruel. What do you mean onnell clincal. When i'm taking pictures out in the street and i'm walking around. That's the main way that i do my process and obviously there's lots of different things. Didn't you see. I see happiness. I see beauty. I see people going about their daily business. But then you also see things that sort of stand out to you things that catch my eye and when i take pictures i want to transport the viewer to that place. I want them to feel emotionally what it was like to be walking around the street at that

elijah bender japan elijah scott olsen Today one o'clock tatsu suzuki Friction scott olson today first edition one thousand nine sixty five this morning One one frames magazine two grandfathers concordia college minnesota Ten o'clock in
Street Photography With Tatsuo Suzuki

Photography Radio

01:58 min | 3 months ago

Street Photography With Tatsuo Suzuki

"Are talking this morning with topsoil sukey who is phenomenal. Who's new book. Friction is receiving all sorts of praise. And clearly we know his work from the first edition of frames magazine. His style is distinctive his style of media recognizable born in one thousand nine sixty five. He started shooting. He says in two thousand and his website is tops. Okay dot com. T. a. t. s. u. su z. u. k. i. dot com. I really recommend go. Check it out. His reputation is everywhere. He's been shown in paris in france in portugal in london channel. He's got awards all over the place including the lens. Culture street photography awards finalist including a winning the fence competition for street photography it. It is a tremendous tremendous body of work topsoil. Good morning how are you sir. How good mining. I've got Wonderful well let's speak in not only with the work but with the ideas behind the work. You say that your aim is to show the world. The streets is beautiful interesting wonderful and sometimes cruel. What do you mean onnell clincal. When i'm taking pictures out in the street and i'm walking around. That's the main way that i do my process and obviously there's lots of different things. Didn't you see. I see happiness. I see beauty. I see people going about their daily business. But then you also see things that sort of stand out to you things that catch my eye and when i take pictures i want to transport the viewer to that place. I want them to feel emotionally what it was like to be walking around the street at that

Topsoil Sukey Su Z Portugal Paris France London
"suzuki" Discussed on MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

02:45 min | 7 months ago

"suzuki" Discussed on MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

"I had a career in science. But i began my mike. What i didn't know would become my career in television and media in nineteen sixty two and my goal at that time. I felt that you couldn't be informed if you didn't take science seriously. You had to be scientifically literate to make informed decisions because the biggest impact on your life is going to come through the application of science through industry medicine in the military and i really believed that in a democracy citizens should be able to register. What how they they want to see. The science applied. So i began my career trying to educate people about science. And it's insights. So you come to today when People now in a in a cheap cell phone have access to virtually any bit of information ever accumulated in human is three like you can get the american library of congress innocent with a through the internet like and what happens people now. They don't have to be informed they just turned through it all till they find a website or some of thority. That says the same thing. They believe they don't have to change their mind. And i've had more people come up to me and say listen. Suzuki you know. The global warming is a hoax. I found a doctor. So and so that says and i say well You know who's paying him. How do you know. This website is is credible. But people don't change their mind look at the whole anti vaccine movement now and non and all of this stuff. People don't have to think anymore. They just have to go and find somebody that says what they wanna believe. It's so you're looking at a total failure. If you want to assess much success. I just say the important thing is that we try. I no longer say that. I have hope i just. I'm one person who the hell do. I think i am. If one person out of seven billion you think. I'm just trying to do the best i can. That's all and that's that's the only standard for you know. When when i met the end of my life. I want my grandchildren to know. Grandpa did the best god. That's all anyone can right. It's that's all you can do. And i you know we'll never win in the sense that you win a game. David suzuki for spending time with us. Today well thanks for having me. I'm sorry i went on way too long and didn't let your other experts.

american library of congress Suzuki David suzuki
In Celebration of Zen Mind Beginner's Mind

Everyday Zen Podcast

05:48 min | 8 months ago

In Celebration of Zen Mind Beginner's Mind

"I'm really happy to be here with you celebrating beginner's mind which is such a terrific book and so important for so many of us and i've read this book many many many times over many many years in the beginning i couldn't understand it at all. What is he talking about. And yet i was so intriguing that i was completely hooked. Right away suzuki row. She has a way of saying things that seem so true even though you can hardly know what he's talking about actually zen mind beginner's mind is not really suzuki. She's work if you actually look at his talks. The whole talk the raw transcription which you can actually find fairly easily online at san francisco zen center website or at david chadwick's wonderful crooked cucumber website. You'll see that's a superhero. She talks actually long rambling. Very hard to understand. It's like he's thinking out loud and a lot of the times. You really have no idea what he's talking about. Because he's in the process of trying to figure out how to speak english trying to figure out how to talk about dharma and english and trying to figure out how to talk about dharma to a bunch of young americans who have no idea at all about buddhism. so he's wandering a lot. he's experimenting with different ways of saying things very often. He laughs at his own jokes. And you have no idea what the joke is. His talks are kinda like that. And and and so that's why zinnemann beginner's mind is a really a co creation of suzuki row. She and mainly. I think trudy dixon who is credited with editing the talks. And i'm probably. I'm guessing although i'm not one hundred percent sure that richard baker who suzuki she's leading american disciple and my own ordination teacher. I'm guessing a big hand in a two. And no doubt there were many others whom i'm not aware of all these people love suzuki rosie a lot and i think we're really respectful of his words so i doubt that they changed anything to speak of. They probably cleaned up the english grammar a bit. But they did do a lot of cutting and shaping and framing and that's really what makes in my beginner's mind what it does. It is a labor of love and devotion. And i think you feel that in text and that's one of the reasons why it is such a marvelous text. My guess is that the young students listening to sapiro. She had him because he respected them and they loved them probably in a way that none of them had never been loved before he saw their beauty and he saw their confusion. And i think he loves them just as much for their confusion as for their beauty and i think that was a unique experience for the people who were in his presence as i said when i first read zen mind beginner's mind. I was intrigued. But i didn't understand and later readings. I was surprised at how seldom and lightly suzuki wrote. She mentions buddhist teachings improvising. but then still later. I marveled at exactly the opposite thing. How much everything that he says. Everything is a clear reflection of the classical and later classical early and the later on and doggone teachings yet he never sounds like. He's repeating teachings that he has studied and it never sounds like he's teaching you about buddhism. It sounds more like he's just talking about the way he sees and feels things and as he says. Many many times there are no teaching to stick to. there's just life and living life and then if you see life and live life truly and carefully. It's going to come out sounding a lot like the buddhist teachings instill later readings. I came to appreciate just being wishes. Lewke row she just hearing his voice. A voice of calmness and stability kindness but very very low key no fanfare. His dharma expression is very quiet and subtle. He really is not trying to impress or make a big deal out of anything in fact most of the time. He seems to be gently trying to disabuse his listeners. Of the big deal. They seem to have in their minds. About zen or spirituality. Or the powers of meditation. Just keep saying over and over again. Just just do it. Just do the practice just live. Just be sincere just constant

Suzuki David Chadwick Zinnemann Beginner Trudy Dixon Suzuki Rosie Sapiro Richard Baker Dharma Confusion San Francisco
Obon and Halloween

Yokoji Zen Dharma Talks

06:03 min | 8 months ago

Obon and Halloween

"Morning. Hope your oh well. Today i was asked to give it to accompany. Osan suzuki sig aki halloween. Slash day dead. The dead ceremony. And whenever whenever. I think sermons. They usually look at it from the outside and how. He viewed from from the view of society but again. That's just really my projection on on Ceremony the kid. I never really liked ceremony. And i didn't. I didn't really understand it in seeing human beings. Though i've seen that we need something to sort of help. Gather on minds together to to either face up to Difficulties or to face up to rites of passage or to face to our responsibilities that we have in in in in this life you know ceremonies usually no come from From nowhere they just remember. Recently i was reading Somebody's views on on ceremony. How they how they have. They looked today and for me. It really really didn't really show the spirit of Ceremony you know if you look at the words you know. Obviously the english was ceremony. It comes from the latin would carry monia to kill or if you look at the would ritual. It means to make right. How do you. How do you do that as a human being this a very tricky thing and then i don't think i want to spend the entire period of time so that going over the ceremony thing but i wanted to read a koan or at least parts of cohen which to me is is what a ceremony is an bookmark there on one. No go get attention emperor. She could asked national teacher. Chew one hundred years after you die what would you. What would you wish the national teacher said. Build me a simple. A seamless to seamless monument. So you may you may wonder what is this seamless monument to me really is it is the heart. It's the heart to practice. You know what. What is that Well really's the the desire to really appreciate this. Life may be starting off with. How do i and suffering. It could be you know. How do i reveal the mysteries of of this. Life could be you know how. How do i help people to to appreciate this life. I'm now ceremony deals with this. It it you know. A hundred years In many ways will maybe not remember the The attainment of massive this day but we will remember the heart the tends to continue through the approaches to to practice. Now this. this oldham's are need that we we've done. It goes back to the buddhist time where Apparently mouthed ileana the black magician who had to work awful lot of karma his. His mother apparently had this vision of his mother hanging upside down in help which is not the greatest thing i guess you know so Yes the balance in the buddhist said well brealey practice very strongly. We'll get everybody in this in in the Training whole to practice very strongly to and at the end will dedicate the merits to to to her and so they do this in practice. Very strongly in at the end of the training period then the mentally on using his supernatural powers. Goes back down to hell and finds that his mother is no longer hanging upside down in house. But it's been released you know. Maybe she's right way out now but at least it worked and and you know what in whatever way that's one and that's also important in terms of say a daily a daily practice one this maintained is that feeling for this is very important and the people that are around us again on on a mom to basis the second thing with that. Is you know. Many of those. Do have an idea of attainment a maintaining that attainment then holding onto that talent one thing that this particular On does is this. The ceremony does is the. How does it feel to give that away. If it's possible to do that house. It really feel to to get away. Whatever mary you have like. It doesn't mean anything i mean. If you can. That's great you know. Also looking at that is that what does he mean to give everything. Though i feel any different for me it really doesn't. I can hold onto feel and this way i retain this. I've done all of these things and i can list them and go into a lot better not to have it even there. You know slutty go let it let it be is

Osan Suzuki Brealey Cohen Ileana Oldham Mary
Seattle Mariners' Kyle Lewis awarded American League Rookie of the Year in unanimous vote

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

02:09 min | 9 months ago

Seattle Mariners' Kyle Lewis awarded American League Rookie of the Year in unanimous vote

"Are are in in and and there's there's no no need need for for a a recount. recount. Baseball Baseball writers writers have chosen the 2020 American League Rookie of the Year. COMAS Bill Sports says a Seattle Mariner overcame many challenges to turn the coveted honor. He's the pride of snow Ville, Georgia, Kyle Lewis left basketball behind to become the Golden Spikes. Best college baseball player of 2016. Seattle made him a first round draft choice and he started his pro career with the everyday aqua socks. Then came Challenge number one. An A C L injury. That was definitely a lot of dark nice in their work. No, it was rough for you. Don't sit around it. Shot, right right in my journal. Whatever I can to keep my nose away. I needed to be with No, it's Emily. I think you just gotta take it. One day at a time Louis Ascension and the Mariners organization was delayed. He spent summers in Modesto, California and Arkansas. At those stops, though, he met other 20 somethings who become part of Seattle's building blocks for the future, You know, definitely super excited about the potential that we have so I think if we could recognize that potential and come into it now has the opportunity to be a strong group in something that we could develop moving forward, But we don't really talk about it all the time. Louis finally got to call up to the major leagues in 2019 using that experience as a springboard for success in the future. I want me a time it had me a time Jesus for his nerves. Faras. Ah, ability to slow the game down. The 25 Year old has what Baseball scouts called the five tools hit for average hit for power. Muscled out out to to left left center center field. field. This This is is back back carrying carrying how how about about a a 10 10 number number three three campaign campaign Lewis Lewis and and this this fall flashed the leather in center field, a unanimous selection Lewis joints Ichiro Suzuki, Kazuhiro Sasaki and Mr Marriner Alvin Davis as the only Mariners to win baseball writers of America A L Rookie of the year. His message to youngsters out there, You know, Usually I try to learn the game and I'm still learning. I'm still working every day and trying to write my story. So that's just what I say to the young guys. You know anything can happen. I bill Swerts Comeau news.

Baseball Bill Sports Kyle Lewis Seattle Louis Ascension American League Mariner Mariners Modesto Basketball Georgia Emily Arkansas Lewis Lewis California Kazuhiro Sasaki Mr Marriner Alvin Davis
"suzuki" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

08:04 min | 10 months ago

"suzuki" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"This is Penn badly I'm doing some guest hosting today. If you want to learn how to take real lasting climate action like I do I, want to invite you to countdown. Ted's new global initiative to accelerate solutions to the climate crisis. Here is a talk from the countdown global onto event given by environmental educators seven Suzuki you're going to hear some footage from her speech at the nineteen ninety, two Rio Earth Summit where she I spoke as a twelve year old climate activist to hear more of these ideas and get involved. Out Countdown Dot Ted Dot Com and subscribe to the countdown podcast wherever you're listening to this. High Salim Russian Walla host of a podcast from Ted called pin drop. In every episode, you'll travel with local journalists and creators guides get lost in the new vibe and tap into surprising ideas. I up is one of the most remote islands on earth, Robin. Nui also known as Easter Island where they're asking what possibilities emerge when all the tourism stops. That's pin-drop from Ted to pin drop on Apple podcasts spotify or wherever you listen. I am here to speak for all generations to come. I am here to. Speak on behalf of the starving children around the world whose cries go unheard. I'm here to speak for the countless animals dying across his planet because they have nowhere left to go. I am afraid to go out in the sun now. because. Of the holes in our ozone. I'm afraid to breathe the air because I don't know what chemicals are in it. I used to go ice fishing in Vancouver my home with my dad until just a few years ago we found the fish full of cancers. A generation ago I was that twelve year old child. In Nine, hundred, ninety, two, five minutes to speak to the UN's Earth Summit in Rio de. Janeiro. My friends I had started an environmental club and we'd travelled to this huge international meeting about environment development. To tell the adults they had to change their ways that same year seventeen hundred scientists would issued the world scientists warning to humanity to tell us that humans and the natural world were on a collision course. Much Lake Greta Tune Berg, and her peers. Today we believe that decision makers should be acting on science and facts, and the facts were telling us that we were headed for ecological. All this is happening before is and yet we act is if we have all the time, we want an all the solutions. Back then climate change had been identified, but we had yet to really feel it. Today, almost thirty years later, climate change is no longer prediction. It is here and it happened far faster than even the experts predicted. We did not stop it. Today. The work that we must do is about mitigation trying to limit how bad it gets. In two, thousand, fifteen in Paris the world agreed to limit the planet's warming to one and a half degree Celsius as beyond would pose too great a threat to human life. To. Meet this we will have to cut our global emissions by half in the next ten years. I'm only a child and I don't have all the solutions, but I know I want you to realize neither do you. Young people are always at the frontlines of any revolution. And it's young people who ask me what did your speech actually do? Why didn't the delegates actually listen? Well. Looking back I think that the delegates of the conference actually did listen not just to me but to the thousands of voices calling for change if you look at the declarations, the documents that came out of real they are radical. They include the UN's Framework Convention on Climate Change set up to stabilize greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere and prevent dangerous interference with the climate system. Twenty three years before the Paris Agreement one, hundred and fifty four countries signed this legally binding `international agreement. I'm only child yet I know we're all in this together and should act as one single world towards one single goal. So, why didn't the World Take Action? Instead governments focused on growing the economy on. Interest and of course, winning the next election. It shows a crisis in human governance where our political systems make it in possible to act in long term interest for the people and future generations. Today, it's twenty twenty. Again, we have the momentum we have the Paris agreement to limit the earth swarming. We have youth and social justice demands we have called for divestment we have calls for climate emergencies. We have the science we have the solutions and we all are experiencing climate change. We are at a moment parallel to real. Now is the time to take action. If, you don't know how to fix it. Please stop breaking it. How. Do we ensure that this time? We Act on our words. History has shown us that in moments of crisis society can truly transform. We've seen this in times of war in times of economic collapse and in Times of disease. Today. We live in the time of covid nineteen. We've seen governments and institutions across all sectors working quickly working together. Humans like to think that we're in control of everything. But we have been reminded today that the laws of nature are the true bottom line. We've been reminded that science and expertise are crucial to our survival. covid nineteen has sean alight on inequity. And revealed are prejudiced infrastructures. It is a warning if we don't listen. If, we don't change. Next time could be far worse. My Dad always says you are what you do not what you say. Well. What you do makes me cry at night. You grown up seeing love us. But I challenge you please make your actions reflect your words. That last sentence summarizes my entire speech at real. Please, make your actions reflect your words. Today. I'm a mother. I have two little boys. Parents I'm speaking to you. Our generation is determining the lives of our children. We have ten years where we can still make a difference. We have ten years to cut our emissions by half. The Way to truly love our children. To, make our actions reflect our words. Now it's time to get to work. Thank you..

Ted Paris UN Rio Earth Summit High Salim Russian Walla Suzuki Penn Nui Lake Greta Tune Berg Vancouver Easter Island covid Janeiro Rio de spotify sean Apple
How The Fukushima Nuclear Disaster Affected Energy Industry In Japan

All Things Considered

08:05 min | 11 months ago

How The Fukushima Nuclear Disaster Affected Energy Industry In Japan

"On your it's not easy to get rid of nuclear power. Okawa is right. Taking apart. A nuclear power plant is not easy day CI has been in the Decommissioning process essentially since the disaster. And that means every day over 4000 workers stream into the plant, clocking in To tackle a vast array of problems. The radiation levels here are much lower than they were nine years ago. In most areas of the plant, you could walk around without special protective gear down by the reactor's, though the ones that exploded levels are still high, and visiting time to them is limited. Kozo Takahashi are TEPCO guide takes us down to see them, bringing into stark reality the challenges that TEPCO has faced here since the disaster. Crews of workers are bustling around in full protective suits. Takahashi points out each reactor, each with its own set of problems. He says a new robot had to be invented to get to melted fuel in one another had to be essentially rebuilt just to take it apart again. And then there's the problem of waste your time here at GH Eve, huge amounts of water pumped into the damaged reactors every day to keep them cool. In the end result is more than one million tons of that water piled up in storage tanks contaminated with radioactive trillium. Storage space is running out, and the Japanese government is considering dumping it all into the ocean, much to the dismay of local communities worried about environmental impact. This is all just a taste of what it means to decommission Daiichi, which will take an estimated 40 years and nearly $200 billion to produce no electricity. At all. The rest of Japan's nuclear power program isn't faring a whole lot better by 2011 nuclear power produced nearly a third of the nation's energy. But after the disaster, the Japanese government imposed new safety regulations that took every nuclear reactor off line. All 54 of them, and the Japanese public largely wants to keep it that way. Anti nuclear power sentiments friend rapidly after Fukushima. It was a very Great sense of betrayal. Alexander Brown is an Australian researcher in Japan. He studied the anti nuclear power protests that took off in 2011. He says that betrayal came largely from the fact that Japanese people had been assured that nuclear power was safe that no accident would ever happen. So it was much more than just about Ray, you have to pull out all the specifics of the accident itself. Huge protest broke out in Tokyo, tens of thousands of people marching through city streets and bright costumes, banging drums and Cymbals. And, of course, chanting the main slogans. Just give that one time we opposed nuclear power. The's big protests continued for months and spread to other cities. And even now, there's still protests everywhere. They're smaller, Brown says. And maybe not quite so eye catching, but it's sister and it's not going away. Which has left Japan in a kind of energy conundrum. With all those reactors offline, a lot more coal and natural gas had to be imported energy prices have gone up. As have greenhouse gas emissions. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and his party have been pushing hard to restart the nuclear power program promising safety But needing to bring down costs and tackle climate change. The government on YouTube keeps saying you could apply the cheapest parcels. People don't trust it anymore. Tatsuo Suzuki is a former nuclear engineer and now professor at Nagasaki University. He says that the disaster and Fukushima made people completely rethink the cost of nuclear power. In broader terms, the social costs ofthe separation in the family. Losing the land losing their jobs. How can you measure all these impacts estimating the risk of nuclear power, But Suzuki says the choice is still a difficult one. When you factor in climate change and needing to reduce the use of fossil fuels, he equates nuclear power with a strong medicine that also has a potentially strong side effect. So which you will choose You may have to choose the nuclear power eventually means Clement chain is absolutely event for the world so the world may have to take medicine on nuclear power. But we have to very, very careful. And you have other choices. I would recommend the nuclear policy last Japan doesn't have a lot of other choices. Slowly, A handful of nuclear reactors in the country have restarted passing new safety regulations. Many more are held up in court battles as local governments refused to take the risk, and even more are slated to be decommissioned as utilities give up on them altogether. Back in Fukushima near Daiichi nuclear worker Kazu Okawa stops the car. And gets out to look at a site. He never thought he'd see tons of radioactive topsoil scraped from the Earth during the cleanup efforts being piled high next to the road. This is in Futaba, his old hometown, where much of the land has been slated as a storage site for this contaminated soil. Okawa says he'll never come back even if evacuation orders for the town are eventually lifted. Another guy who wants to live next to this. This nuclear waste. He shakes his head, almost in disbelief that I thought nuclear power was safe. Isn't thought it was 100% safe. But now, like a lot of Japan, he doesn't want anything to do with it. I'm afraid of nuclear power. In one moment it devastated our home is your home and now, Ochoa says he's 100% against it. Cat Langsdorf NPR NEWS Fukushima, Japan

Japan Fukushima Kazu Okawa Japanese Government Alexander Brown Kozo Takahashi Tepco Daiichi Tokyo Youtube Prime Minister Shinzo Abe Suzuki Ochoa Tatsuo Suzuki RAY
Homers By Seager, Lewis Lift Seattle Mariners Past Texas Rangers 4-3

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:36 sec | 11 months ago

Homers By Seager, Lewis Lift Seattle Mariners Past Texas Rangers 4-3

"The Mariners beat Texas for three yesterday. Their third straight win over the Rangers fifth straight win overall, and they'll go for the serious sweep today. Texas Ah, Kyle Seager for the Mariners had Ah homerun and an infield single, moving past Jay Buhner into fourth place on the Mariners all time hit list. Yeah, is very humbling. It's I'm extremely proud. I'm extremely, you know, honored to be in that company. That's that's extremely elite, a company and You know, I'm very proud to be a part of the still trails Ichiro Suzuki, Edgar Martinez and Kang Griffey Junior. They'll try toe go for the serious sweep against the Rangers at 1 10 this

Mariners Rangers Texas Kyle Seager Ichiro Suzuki Jay Buhner Kang Griffey Edgar Martinez
How The Consensus Voting Mechanism Works

Data Skeptic

06:33 min | 11 months ago

How The Consensus Voting Mechanism Works

"So my name is Mush. Pot. Suzuki like the car last year a student at Yale University in Computer Science and mathematics and I'm supervised by Adrian Vata and from goalie. I'm very happy to be here and thank you for inviting me. I got exposed to your work. When I read the paper, I invited you to come on and talk about mostly today is how many freemasons are there consensus voting mechanisms in metric space so no less than three interesting ideas for me in the title maybe we should give some background to open up with consensus. What does that mean is that? Just the majority or how will we be using the word today? Consensus mechanism is Mecca Zeman which to select a candidate they're only if everyone agrees on it for instance, they said you're running for some group Peter, you get accepted only if everyone in the group agrees on it and you want you accepted otherwise. so that's like unanimity the Neha in here. Yeah. It's basically the same as unanimity but in different. Settings. Unanimity also implies that it's a property where you have if everyone agrees on that, you accept it but something can happen. If you know, let's say you can use different rules otherwise there's a different sort distinctions there, but it's basically the same as unanimity that particular choice leads to some interesting things and you guys are presented this really concise analogy to the freemasons. Well, I suppose getting down to the actual counter freemasons trying to conduct a census here that just formalizes. A funny title to give because as you know that freemasons are interesting sort of group there. Member only if everyone agrees on sort of it, fits our mechanisms today run their group through consensus voting Gotcha so it wouldn't surprise me if just given how much sort of folklore the surrounds the freemasons that there might be at least a few listeners confused about whether or not there are real organization. Could you throw a few facts Edis? have. Amazing temples in Montreal, phrases, I live in Montreal. So they have a huge temple here and they're very active and I don't know too much about their inner workings or I've never been inside the doors but they're very oh yeah you can go to their building for instance so real organization and in terms of getting accepted into it if I wanted to go in that building up there in. Montreal is this the actual mechanism they literally use or is this a sort of an analogy? So I don't know this for sure but I heard I read online that in order to get accepted that everyone in taboo are everyone in that group has agree on it. So is the medicine that they actually use. Cool. Well, I guess whenever that started it wouldn't be surprising that it could grow quickly. Right, if I was thinking of starting my own such organization and I I, invited my wife. Now we have two members and perhaps she and I can agree her sister joins and my sister joins. But at some point, someone's going to say no to the next member what can we learn about that and how do we study it? What are the interesting Totta questions? So you have two different settings. Here. So wondering is not remodeled people's opinions and you say I prefer my wife says I prefer my daughter you know or or so and so forth we need to the preferences of people. So one of the classic ideas in voting theory and actually just modeling through machine learning or any sort of the setting is this prioritizing people's opinion or privatizing people. So for instance, let's say you could be. Leaning like the political left or right. There's a spectrum for which you are lighted. Let's sure you can be at the centre or you could be very right thing or it could be a very level. So we can model that as any number between minus one and one, but two one being the right-wing minus one being the left-wing. So then that's one example of how you prioritize people right? Because you wanted to this rigorously and mathematically. So we need a method to represent people and our model is at. ISSUE, have this in which you represent urine. You couldn't space in some point. Is You your opinion and you vote for someone who similar to? Let's say you're very right wing than some candidate comes in then you're more likely to vote for someone who is right being than left-wing to someone who is closer to you in opinion or characteristic that's our model of but this question was asked actually before in one emissions but in one dimension. So you're basically just have an inch between minus one and one, and this was an extra Unin by very famous. Nogal. Yes. Paper in two, thousand, sixteen, two, thousand, fourteen I forget. But we did this in higher dimensions in actually specifically two dimensions because it introduces so much more complexity when you go up in a dimension, right so Francis, why do we need higher dimensions is because before you you're presenting people left and right but people are more complex than that. You can't just represent a person by just one number for instance you. have to use multiple features as people say. So you have this multiple characteristics of people and they become dimension. So we do this in two missions surprisingly the mathematical difficulty of asking this question John Huge becomes actually much more difficult in two dimension than one dish very interesting and I guess maybe the answers grounded in a lot of details. But is there an essence to what that challenges is it that there are more simulations or? Is there a complexity theory aspect of this? Why is a two dimension so much more difficult than one so for instance, if you look at random shape, you can characterize this voting as looking at something called random convex or some random shapes. The question bows down on understanding certain random shapes and here assuming that the candidates are appearing. Let's say uniformly at on interval you have existing group members and she accepts somebody then he becomes. Group member and you evolve. So the candidates are uniform at each time step and so to answer the question we knew looking at this sort of random judge shapes in one dimension there's only one shape is just an interval intimate conviction in one dimension is just an interval. Some number between attack could be minus zero point five to zero point one is, but let's say you go into the mission all of a sudden there's so Many different shapes so many different things second happen if the shape is convinced or even just not convex in two dimensions does different more complex shapes can get in one mission. You only have interested in two dimensions you have gone as you have China goals, you have something that approximates your face even that could be shade in two missions, but that's not going to happen in Wand mission

Montreal Suzuki Yale University Adrian Vata Mecca Zeman China John Huge Peter Francis
Intervention

Buddhist Boot Camp Podcast

05:05 min | 1 year ago

Intervention

"Years after I took the monastic vows trading all my worldly possessions for a pair of monk's robes I moved into a monastery that was off the grid remote and blissfully quiet one day. My friend Kim sent me a letter saying timber I. Understand why you love living there I mean who wouldn't but how can you honor your vows to be of service to others if you cut yourself off from the rest of the world and keep yourself tucked away in the mountain somewhere Kim didn't point out my hypocrisy because she's cruel or judgmental. She did it to shed light on what I couldn't see from where I was sitting that. My actions were not congruent with my words. There was no reason for me to get defensive because Kim wasn't on the offensive and fact Kim's comment had nothing to do with her personal needs or opinions it was about me saying one thing and doing another don't get me wrong I don't regret moving to the monastery in the first place. But after Kim's intervention, a couldn't justify staying envy see non violent communication considers unsolicited advice a form of bullying and judgment but Kim's comment wasn't unsolicited I have an understanding with all my friends that being supportive of one. Another does not mean blindly cheering each other on, for instance, if any of. US are about to repeat a harmful cycle that we swore. We wanted to break the drinking to excess getting into another dysfunctional relationship or deviating from a path. We have previously claimed we wished to follow we welcome intervention I. Mean I wouldn't tell my buddy John to stop smoking because never claimed he wanted to stop but I would definitely urge my friend Ashley to spend less money if she had previously told me that getting out of debt was her top priority. You see it's not about pushing my opinions on anyone. It's about supporting their decisions regardless of what I think and Buddhism we take refuge and what are called the three. Jewels, the Buddha, the Dharma and the Sangha the teacher, the teachings and other students on the path. My friends are my Sanga or my congregation if you prefer, and since you are my friend in your on this path with me, this month's intervention is similar to what Kim offered me many years ago. It's an invitation to reflect on areas in our lives where we are being hypocrites areas where we are not behaving in ways that are congruent with who we wish to be, and sometimes we even publicly claimed to be. We aren't always honest with ourselves because we often have too much shame or guilt around the decisions we make other. Times we are oblivious that we are out of alignment today. I urge you not to look back on your past behavior and wonder why you've done what you've done before but to decide how you can live from this moment forward. So that what you think what you say and what you do are all in harmony I warn you though something's going to have to shift to because you will either have to change what you think what you say or what you do before. You can live a congruent life and other words do your decisions reflect your values peck? Do you even know what your values are many of us never take? The time to write them down. For example, do we actually value being considerate or do we just like to think of ourselves as considerate neighbors even though we regularly run the dishwasher at one am in our third floor apartment with no consideration to our downstairs neighbors these little things make a big difference because the way we do one thing is the way we do all things. So let's do it all mindfully congruence consistency and transparency require us to be vulnerable and honest with ourselves about our strengths and our shortcomings. So go ahead and write down the kind of person you wish to be as well as the kind of person you. Currently are, and you will see for yourself where you have some work to do consider this your own intervention, which is defined as the action of becoming intentionally involved in a difficult situation in order to improve it or to prevent it from getting worse interventions like black lives matter and the metoo movement have forced all of us to examine where we have unknowingly unintentionally or unconsciously racist or failed to demand equality even while we claimed to believe in it and just like simply wearing amongst rove's does not make a monk or wearing a cross necklace does not make you a Christian in the words of Tyler durden sticking feathers up your. But does not make you a chicken. What we're talking about is having a strong conviction to live in line with our values so that we stay in our integrity and avoid all unnecessary suffering or battling with internal struggles. Suzuki row she said there are no enlightened beings. There's only enlightened activity. The people we consider enlightened are just like you and me they simply make enlightened activity part of their daily lives that is to say they walk the talk I think it's why my own teachers asked me one day. Why do you need the robes? Why can't you just be the guy in town with the bright is indeed why can't we all?

KIM Tyler Durden United States Sangha John Ashley Suzuki Rove
The Brain-Boosting Benefits of Exercise with Ryan Glatt

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

07:19 min | 1 year ago

The Brain-Boosting Benefits of Exercise with Ryan Glatt

"Welcome to the broken brain podcast I'm your host. Droop ruin and each week by team, and I bring on a new guest who rethink can help you improve your brain help feel better and most importantly live more. This week's guest is Ryan. Ryan is a personal trainer and brain health coach with over a decade of experience in the health and fitness industries. He currently works alongside clinicians and researchers to study the facts of cognitively. Enhanced and comprehensive exercise plants at the Pacific Brain Health Center, here in Lovely Santa Monica California Ryan constantly seeks to learn about the health neuroscience, research and Practical Strategies both health coaching and personal training in context, which is why we brought him here, Ryan has pursued education from aiming clinks the brain I training institute, the Neuroscience Academy that Kaddoumi for brain, health and performance and many other places. He's currently enrolled in. In a Master's applied neuroscience program at King's College of London, he actively consults with companies who leverage exercise for brain health and educates and fitness professionals with the first course to comprehensively address exercise and brain health called the brain health trainer, course talk more about that later on in which he's educated over a thousand health and fitness Professionals Ryan welcome to the brain podcasts. Thanks for having me drew and you also. And people really loved it. That's we've set the intention. We did a documentary by the way. If anybody hasn't hasn't watched that documentary before a broken bring to. Click on the show notes. We'll make it available for anybody who hasn't seen, and you can sign up and check it out and see some of Ryan's recommendations. rebuilt on today's conversation so. We set out the intention when we first did that interview that we wanted to do an interview for the podcast. I'm glad it happened at the first interview that I'm doing in person in the world of. Semi Corentin and social distancing so Thank you for coming into the office. It's an honor. Thanks for having me so I wanNA start off with something which is I want to talk about dance? DANCE REVOLUTION So tell US anybody who doesn't know what it is. Tell us what it is, and why he became passionate about. Yeah, so dance dance. Revolution is a video game. It's an extra game. Extra Games are things that incorporate. And Gaming And or active video games it was followed by the success of like Nintendo. We for instance that became very popular dance dance. Revolution's interesting because it was popularized when I was a kid. Probably before that I think in the eighties and nineties, and it's essentially a game where you're controller is a pad that you stand on in the middle is you're standing place? You have an Arrow pointing forward pointing backwards to left and went to the right. There's arrows coming up from the bottom of the screen, and you have this answer key at the top. Top with those different directionally facing arrows, and it's to music, and it was a Japanese video game developed by Nami, and it was super popular in Arcades at home on the playstation, two and I grew up as a very overweight sedentary kid I had a pretty severe concussion in preschool, and so that created some concussion induced adhd so I was addicted to video games, and I think I would then have met the criteria for video game addiction now, which is like it wasn't every day, but it was like four hours a day of video gaming. into early call of duty before it was like an e sports thing so if I kept on it, I could probably been pretty well right now. Playing golf duty but I actually came across the home version of dance dance revolution when I was a kid in high school, actually no middle school early middle school and I lost a lot of weight playing that in my living room and it got me into. That got me to lose weight and it was motivating had all the elements we might talk about being important for an exercise program that is sensitive to brain health. And then it got me into the gym, and when I was in high school I joined a gym across from my high school, started weightlifting, watching personal trainers, we can go into that later, but essentially kick-started my personal health, an interest in fitness, and with that fitness that is cognitively enhanced meaning that I wasn't on an exercise bike, watching the news or staring into space I was cognitively engaged in that program since then dance dance revolution has been present. Among a lot of research context and neuro rehabilitation in older adults. It's not really that accessible anymore. You can't just get it off the shelf as much as you could. Previously, but it's really paved the way for a whole industry of active video gaming extra gaming. And it has spun off also clinical or serious extra gaming games that are used for health and clinical contexts such as some of the solutions. We use it the Pacific Brain Health Center. For the listeners who are like way, why are we starting the conversation video game? This all make sense so you know in reading about your story and getting a chance to get to know you over the last year, or so as we've been introduced by our mutual friend, Dr Shawn Patel who's a regenerative medicine doctor here in Los Angeles who's been on the podcasts before linked to that. I got a chance to see how your struggle as child especially with weight fitness and being sedentary. You found something you found something that created joy inside of you, and that's actually really related to a big part of what you teach right now we'll start off with the basics and we'll talk about what brain health coaches and some of the science of it, but you found something passionate that you that got you excited to move. Move something that you enjoyed and I. think that such an important thing as simple as it sounds. This video game was the thing that got started. That was ultimately the thing that starting your journey down this pathway of understanding the power of really what exercise can do for the brain, so let's start there. Let's start off with the basics you know. We've done so many episodes on the power of exercise, but as a refresher. Tell US why exercise is so important and what it does for the brain. Yeah, and there's been an explosion of research and media coverage about this I. Like to say that the mainstream popularity around exercise. The brain was really kick started by the book spark by Dr John Radi ever grateful for the work. He's done in popularizing that and twenty eighteen, the second most popular Ted Talk. In that year was Dr Wendy Suzuki talking about exercise in the brain and a lot of mainstream coverage, and you know in New, York Times and medium covering on boosting these posts on exercising, the brain has become very popular, and that's amazing, because it's also jumping on the kind of. The coattails of neural plasticity research showing that the brain can change. I think this audience has been very well presented that information right we to our brains were fixed. We were taught in high school. They have a certain amount of brain cells. Will Never. It's all downhill from there and it turns out. That's not true exactly. Neuro plasticity, so the brain's ability to functionally or structurally change. In response to experiences,

Pacific Brain Health Center Ryan Nintendo Neuroscience Academy Golf Lovely Santa Monica King's College Of London Adhd Ted Talk Dr Shawn Patel Dr John Radi Nami Los Angeles Dr Wendy Suzuki York Times
Blood on the Street

Photography Radio

06:05 min | 1 year ago

Blood on the Street

"Hello my photographic France. How are you I was planning to talk about something totally different today Especially that the topic of today's podcast is not an easy one and I have to admit that I have been struggling and thinking very very carefully whether to talk about this or not about three days ago hours very close to my decision to pass on the subject and just move on with my life. I knew that whatever I say it would get in trouble but thinks has changed in the last three three days and I decided to do it. I think I have to. If you haven't guessed just the word we'll do want to talk about today here. That's okay but let me give you a short review a recap for those of you. Who are living under the Rock Fuji Film Released Brand New Camera Iteration of their x one hundred line there x one hundred v Calmer is is a truly truly great product In fact I have to say. That's my favorite camera for street. Photography and full learning photography. In general I highly recommend it and as with every release release. There were number of X.. Photographers who promoted the camera with the videos. And one of them out was taught sewer Suzuki. I hope I'm pronouncing the name right. So Mr Suzuki is a street photographer from Japan and the video In this video he's shooting on the street in what you can call role. I guess aggressive way as Sword of Bruce Guild in the way. I'm sure what you you know what I'm talking about. Of course. Many people took offense in this a med thought. And did you do some strong. Very strong comments Fuji Comb decided to take this video down. Well what happened next. We all know it before four. I continue I have to mention something about Fujifilm. I'm not an ex photographer. rougher and I have never been paid by Jill having said that yes I have the great along standing professional relationship with Fuji as well as with other calmer companies because I often test the gear and they loved shooting with the gear and I know some people in the food universe. I have many X. photographer France Lance and I have to say I have tremendous respect for the Fuji Film Team for the Passion and drive to create this great great products. We are using but going back to them. Mr Suzuki case I think that Fujifilm Fujifilm had the right to pull out this video. Whether it was a good decision or not I don't know I don't yeah no all the Fox Pearl bubbly. I would handle disgrace slightly differently but again I don't know oh all the details so I'm not here to judge this decision and all Nestle I. I don't think there is any great solution here. It's really hard to be a winner in this situation but this is is not what I want to talk about it today. I want to talk about what happened and is still pill happening after the video was pull out I a few words about Mr Suzuki. Uh someone who who should street photography and teach it. I have to say that. I'm not a fan of his medals. I wouldn't feel comfortable shooting this way Nado and I would never teach my students to you to do the street. Photography the way Mr Suzuki Dos Yes I guess I have to be honest list with you. That his methods cross my personal line. But the seemed time I'm not here to condemn him. So I really want you to know that. Okay I'm not here to condemn him two days after the scandal so if I can call it this way erupted. I want to his website and I found some of his images to be truly really spectacular or Abreu skilled would say you can smell the street in them. There is no question that whatever ver- waste Mr Suzuki's using to create his imagery. It works.

Mr Suzuki Fujifilm Fujifilm Fuji Nado France Bruce Guild Abreu France Lance Nestle Jill Japan
Jeep, Suzuki models found to have broken EU emissions rules

Paul W. Smith

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

Jeep, Suzuki models found to have broken EU emissions rules

"Word this week is that jeep and Suzuki diesel models broke emissions rules this time the road authority in Holland has ruled that the jeep grand Cherokee and Suzuki Batara must be fixed or face a ban on sales across Europe regulators across the world have been testing diesel models since Volkswagen group admitted in two thousand fifteen that used illegal software to cheat US emissions tests the scandal has spread from one region of the world to another and touched many brands five years later we know this much to be true VW was not alone they were just the first to get caught and the proof among others is the higher levels of harmful nitrogen oxide on the road make no mistake more brands will make the list in the dark cloud over the industry will continue to get heavier

Holland Volkswagen Group United States Suzuki Suzuki Batara Europe
"suzuki" Discussed on Skaana | Orcas and Oceans Podcast

Skaana | Orcas and Oceans Podcast

06:10 min | 1 year ago

"suzuki" Discussed on Skaana | Orcas and Oceans Podcast

"Live to that date I was horrified and I was paralyzed is for a week. I just said what the Hell because he was a scientist is evidence was very strong. And I thought if it's if if it's we can't do anything what's the point not I came out of it finally by saying that's just crazy. We don't know enough to say it's too late and I realized that you know there are a lot of climate skeptics out there. That don't believe we're affecting climate. And they do that by CIA deliberately ignoring the vast bulk of information and Cherry picking data and coming up with a coherent picture. Yeah it's bullshit. What this guy has done is cherry? Pick data the extreme edges and made a really frightening scenario. And it's a few look at all the data the data real but it's is yeast cherry-picked data. So I say we don't know enough I they have hope and that has got to just drive us on and the fact that people are saying it so late. Yes for Christ's sake. Listen to that we can pass around anymore. This is really really serious. I ain't gonNA be around but I know damn well. My grandchildren are going to feel the impact. If we do or do not do anything now. We can't wait any longer. What gives me hope? Is this the most prized species of salmon is is tonight which is the Sakai. SOCK is a bright red fatty flesh. We all love Sakai. The biggest run of sockeye salmon in the world is a Fraser River and We like to get twenty million or more coming back and in two thousand nine. I remember vividly turning to my wife when we heard the report. That just over one million Sakai. We're coming back and I looked. Aw I said that's it. There isn't the biomass to get them up to the spawning. That's one year later. We got the biggest run in one hundred years now uses uses not to show you how stupid I am. Nobody knew what happened. Nature surprised us and I believe nature's got a lot out of surprises a lot of not very pleasant but I think a lot of them like the Sakai if we can pull back and give nature a chance I I think she will. She will surprise us in ways. We don't deserve and so I have hope that is based on my knowledge. We we don't know that much where two ignorant I love. The approach to letters to my granddaughter came. Just say that about the advice you give people to follow and they're just just things that I've learned in a lifetime. You know every kid grows up. They've gotta make most of the same mistakes made in their lives. But I I hope I can maybe avoid some of the more egregious things But my most important lessons to my grandchildren are the hard won lessons that my mother and father learned they were married during the Great Depression. The Great Depression was very very tough time for people around the world world and because of that they taught us they just banged home over and over again. Live within your means. Save some for tomorrow. Help help your neighbors. You may one day need their help. Share don't be greedy. You have to work hard to make money to buy the things you need. But you don't run after after money as if somehow having more money makes you a better more important person. Those are things that they taught me and drilled into me because they learn from the heart experience and the lessons I've learned from first nations about our relationship with other other creatures it's about sacred water About sacred forests. All of that has been taught to me by people who've lived in those areas and who over thousands of years have learned value those things so they're all teachings from elders elders. I feel have have credibility that comes from the fact that you're no longer being paid by anybody so you can say it like it is. Nobody's going to fire you. You'RE NOT GONNA lose as a promotion or a raise. Tell the truth. What have you learned in a lifetime? I've learned a hell of a lot. I've made a hell of a lot of mistakes. I've had failures. I've had a few successes. God dammit if that's not important to pass on to my children and grandchildren what else is those are priceless life life lessons. So they're just lessons from an elder. What have I learned through the way that I've lived my life that might help children? Thanks again for checking scanner. If you'd like to show please spread the word. Join in our pod find us on facebook or twitter subscribe to our newsletter Jenner Medium magazine this very YouTube Channel for cool bonus material including how you can make waves. And if you'd like to help us make more podcasts. More often because I do every day I could join us. Patriot DOT com. Please click the subscribe button. You don't miss upcoming episodes with Peter Volleyball author the inner life of animals. ORCA author Eric to Kaya Blaney and Robert Bateman. We've updated our membership tiers with newer and cooler special offers. All our Patriot producers scan is produced as always by the always awesome rain new. Thanks can check nets Gannett and now. Here's David Suzuki joining local anxiety. On our son I'm five simple things. More invalid local anxiety DOT COM or spotify. All over the INTERWEBS. The things.

Sakai Fraser River scientist CIA Gannett David Suzuki spotify ORCA facebook Jenner Medium magazine YouTube Eric Kaya Blaney Robert Bateman twitter
"suzuki" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

09:41 min | 1 year ago

"suzuki" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"And he's happy staying fifteen thousand dollars a month in revenues and losing money every single month because he is learning so much from these experiments and once he's got it totally dialed then he's GonNa take his half million dollars in cash reserves and dump it into whichever channel or whichever strategy it is that's going to get him the most efficient and defective growth and then he's GonNa start making money so that's an example of how somebody that's almost a pre revenue startup can use a cost of growth announce assists to really educate what they're doing so that they're spending their precious capital in the most effective way well that sounds to me like the kind of task that a marketing division should be doing so the marketing division typically looks at the first half of the equation your customer acquisition cost and they'll say okay great i WanNa get you customers for as cheap as possible and on the surface that seems like a very reasonable goal right if you can spend as little to get customers then you get a higher Roi when the customers actually spend you don't have to recover as much in that expense but the issue there is sometimes the easiest customers to get have the shortest lifetimes or the smallest basket sizes or aren't going to give you good referrals and so if you get a cheap customer it's not necessarily GonNa pay out the best for you in the long run so this is why you need the full view of all AH proportionally higher lifetime value in the ad will when you come into a business does that threaten the mark getting department good question so it depends typically marketing teams aren't looking at the lifetime value side of things anyways and they don't want to look at the lifetime value side of things they're mostly care about getting new customers in the door and so to the extent that we can empower them by telling their manager their business owner hey these three channels are very effective for your marketing team to go after and we encourage you to increase their budget to do that then the marketing teams like us for that and the fact that we can tell guide them like hey these three are not effective for you we recommend pulling it back they're happy because we can get them better metrics for that so to the extent that you have to get alignment in the a full management team for what you're doing it's the same issue in the marketing department that's valuable that's that's very valuable so how do how do you go about finding companies that invite you in yeah so nowadays we actually don't really have to find anybody they're mostly finding us we get a lot of referrals get a lot of inbound traffic over the Internet and typically the companies were looking at our companies that you're working with to write their small businesses that are looking to grow and maybe they've hit a limit that they're having trouble getting over maybe they've just closed a fresh round of investor capital and they WANNA make sure that they deploy that fresh capital in a really smart and effective way or you know maybe they've just been coasting for several decades and enjoying the lifestyle business but they realize that just need to change because their market is shrinking or their markets shifting or they WANNA sell the business and it's not worth anything if it's a stagnant business so those people I usually come find us and they say you know I need help budgeting this growth I'm not sure if I have enough money to invest in the salesforce I'm not sure if have enough money to pivot into this new market I'm not sure how to plan this right one can I hire people and those are all questions if you're asking yourself that you probably need a cost of gross analysis worked into your budget and your forecast so I'm curious about how much what kind aimed of of of time does a leadership team need to invest what kind of resources in you know if you can help us understand what kind of cost is going to be here yeah yeah no those are all great questions okay so like so many things right like you kind of get what you put into it we can crunch numbers all day lawn but ultimately we need you as the business owner's expertise and your management teams expertise in how the business functions so that we can build the models correctly so typical project would look like US having a kickoff meeting to learn about the basis of your business reviewer historical financials and then understand what data systems you work with maybe you've got an earpiece system maybe you've got a different inventory system maybe you're entirely online on cloud based integrated platforms that all dump into a central database somewhere so we understand what that is we go mining through the data and then we try to make sense out of it that whole project of making the sense of the data building the model talking the team about it talking to the management coming back model and talking to management coming back usually takes about two to three weeks and we'll finish that two to three week cycle and present the just we share the information it's good to know and you know the team takes that and moves forward on their own sometimes it's this is really good and it's changing so we need to keep updating this on a monthly basis so then we'll continue to maintain that model once a month have a meeting and talk to people about it and sometimes the answer is hey that this is radically different than how we've seen the world in the past and because it's radically different and because it's innovative and useful we need to update our forecast dude this we need to update our budget to include this we need to update some KPI's or some other tools that marketing are using so that we have good visibility of this as we continue to move forward and so then that rolls into other projects where we assist with that now generally speaking you know the price the cost to the customer is going to depend on the complexity of the customer we've done this for as low as twenty five hundred dollars for some of our smaller startup clients we've done it for as high as ten to fifteen thousand allies for larger more complicated clients so it just depends good good in the value that they get from this would be a a mini multiple of off the of the cost yeah if you figure if you're spending ten thousand dollars a month on either sales people or on marketing budgets than this is a fraction of that there's like an insurance policy eh I how much time does like a seventeen million dollar company need to spend accumulating the data for you in terms of gathering the data or in terms of yeah so we we try to sports for some random consultants so typically what we try to do is get online on your systems so that we can pull the data and we can manipulate it and we've been talking about here today I want to see these metrics these cost of growth metrics customer acquisition cost customer lifetime value are you and the details behind them broken out in a statement that is published monthly with every company's financials including in the public happened three years but I would love to see some serious momentum some good traction out there with the finance and the marketing communities embracing this idea that we need some.

twenty five hundred dollars fifteen thousand dollars seventeen million dollar ten thousand dollars million dollars three weeks three years three week
"suzuki" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

06:44 min | 1 year ago

"suzuki" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Hot seasoning it's topped with melted pepper Jack at our sweet and Tangy slob served piping hot on a toasted corn bread roll yeah a corner you are listening to the pilgrim on the four oh five with will Chris join him as he and his guest discover how businesses thrive in California well welcome to the pilgrim on the four zero five on this beautiful day here in southern California we're going to be talking today with as a fractional CFO from Colorado who's got some very interesting ideas on on forecasting growth and finding out exactly what kind of return we can get from our investments so welcome L. Jason Zucchini welcome Eljay thank you L. Nice to be here so also little bit about your Your Company in your CFO share in in in Colorado Yep so cfo share we believe that small bits businesses deserve professional financial strategy so we are an outsourced finance and accounting department available on a part time basis for small but businesses that means every role that you'd have at a corporate finance and accounting department from bookkeeping all the way up to cfo work we have in our group available our customers to help them grow well so What kind of companies do you work with talk me literature ideal Yeah so we've worked with all kinds of small businesses from pre revenue startups all the way up to fifty million dollar manufacturing co companies that are private equity owned part of rolled up conglomerate a really my favorite customer to work with is closely held small business maybe somewhere between two million dollars in revenue and fifteen million dollars in revenue who's looking to grow who's looking to pivot or who's thinking about making a change maybe an ownership changing their business and that's really when there's a fair amount of risk and uncertainty and when having a financial expert on hand can really help you mitigate that type of risk and so now is your work done face to face or is generally done remotely yeah good question so we are here in Denver Colorado we have quite a few customers here in Denver that I like to meet face to face however we work nationwide and so the majority of our customers we work entirely remotely now I get it around the country here and there and I'll stop and visit people to say hi because I like to meet people in person but we do have some customers that we've never met with before we just you videoconferences talk on the phone Indian Southern California actually have quite a few in southern California so I'll give you a call the next time I'm down there Super London love to see you so you've got this interesting concept about analyzing the cost of growth so let me set this up for you as an implementer I work with lots of companies in in every one of them wants to grow I mean that's part of why the get involved with the entrepreneur operating system is is they've been hitting the ceiling something's going on that they're not getting what they want from their business and so there looking for assistance we give them the system and they're always looking to grow so when we look at what's your fifteen year twenty year twenty five year target it is generally a multiple of where they are right now in so we're continually looking at how much revenue they got at the end of the year that's one goal the second goal is kind of profit and we get in in in so that whole idea of profit I suppose from a fan family ownership prophet might be how much money did we were we able to sock away into the bank but from from a company that wants to grow they're always is investing that Prophet in the company in an you know help help leadership teams to recognize that their profit is really before they make all of those investments when what I'm hearing from you is that there are tools to be used to help people decide where they wanna make their investments what they can expect from returns on investments at right correct correct and in the finance world we've talked about return on investment before or when it comes to a financial investment so we think about it when purchasing stocks for example for our own personal retirement accounts what's the return on investment and in the business world will think about what's the return on investment for purchasing machinery or purchasing a new warehouse or something like that but I want people to start thinking about what's the return on investment from hiring a salesperson what's the return on investment from purchasing a google pay per click advertising campaign was th- return on investment from updating the SEO on my website and in the past marketers might of told us well it's impossible measure this are y are sales people would have told you well you just look at the revenue that I bring in greater than my salary than you're doing well and we've come up with some more sophisticated ways to do that that I would challenge entrepreneurs is to start thinking about okay this is something that once you figure out how to calculate the SRY you can start building it into your forecast you can start building and is your budget and you could say hey we're going to grow our revenue twenty percent this year although we're expecting our profits to go down because we're making these investments but we know these investments the payoff because we've done the math on it so this is a concept that has been pioneered originally buy the software is a service industry and they started looking at it in a very basic way through what they call the golden ratio you can google the golden ratio and you'll see it's the ratio of customer lifetime value to customer acquisition and cost of customer acquisition cost is fairly well known in fairly well managed? It's it's something that if you hire a marketing team to do your advertising enter your social media they will probably be measuring themselves on that on that metric and that is basically your total sales advertising marketing expense divided by the number of new customers that you got during that period that was the cost for you to acquire one customer great so that's the cost of the machinery that you're buying to grow your business but what's the Roi that you're going to get on that machinery that's where the other piece of the.

Chris fifteen million dollars fifty million dollar two million dollars twenty five year twenty percent fifteen year twenty year
Jerry Jones talked the talk. But Ezekiel Elliott knew Cowboys owner would pay up

PTI

02:21 min | 2 years ago

Jerry Jones talked the talk. But Ezekiel Elliott knew Cowboys owner would pay up

"Begin begins today with jerry jones closing in on a deal with ezekiel elliott as he said he would elliott has flown back from parts unknown and jones's put the money on the table. The dealers is reported to be somewhere in the neighborhood of ninety million dollars for six years which is a pretty nice neighborhood frank. Did the cowboys do the right thing by showing zeke the money yeah well. We know how it works tony. It's all about the guaranteed money so right now. If it's six years of actually being eight year contract because we being extension still has two years left. I think jerry jones and i think is equal. It all knew that he was going to be backed by week one. I think this whole thing all along him going to mexico wherever he was working out. He knew that he would be back. I think he's our most important offensive player and to the point point. Jerry jones is desperate desperate to win the super bowl and he thinks he needs ezekiel elliott and he didn't wanna missing one game so i'm gonna push back gently because they need suzuki and this had to be done. I'm not sure they need ezekiel elliott right now. This has nothing to do with money. In my mind i think they open with the giants the better team than the giants and the redskins. They're a better team than the redskins. I think what went on in jerry's mine is the specter of emmett smith when they went oh and two and he had to publicly sort of eat crow and go and give him the money now. I think you always want ezekiel elliott and to your point. He is their offense. This is not the kid from san diego dago melvin gordon yeah. They don't really need like you put dak prescott out there without zeke elliott and they don't really have a great offense. I'm just i'm just suggesting that it could have been because they're gonna. They're gonna give him the ball so much that he could get hurt. I could they wait for you. Want load management then in the n._f._l. N._f._l. I want him to make sure if i'm trying to win the super bowl. I wanna make sure i understand there's sixteen games before you get to the price. You're my lead guy but you're bringing being up. Emmett smith and emmett smith played with more battle-tested quarterback number one. Yes a better team. They went on to win the super bowl. This team has a long way to go before they can do that. I guess it's it's too important. You know the gauging your talk just chunking up saying they're they're guaranteed win. I don't i don't but that's how that's what jerry jones said. Maybe we'll get him back in a week. We need them in time for the playoffs. Yes you sure you're gonna make. I'm not saying i would wait till the playoffs. That's what he well. He made it sound like we don't need in the first few weeks. We'll play that is public. Posturing that jerry does very very well but the money's money's on the table

Jerry Jones Ezekiel Elliott Redskins Zeke Elliott Cowboys Emmett Smith Elliott San Diego Suzuki Dak Prescott Melvin Gordon Mexico Giants Six Years Ninety Million Dollars Eight Year Two Years
Toyota, Suzuki partnering in self-driving car technology

Mike Gallagher

00:25 sec | 2 years ago

Toyota, Suzuki partnering in self-driving car technology

"Toyota and Suzuki have announced their partnering and the development of self driving car technology Toyota will take a five percent stake in Suzuki valued at about nine hundred million answers okay will make a four hundred million dollar investment in Toyota Hyundai's new electric scooter is designed as an on board the last mile solution the size of a briefcase one pulled up and melts onto a Hyundai or kia vehicle to charge from electricity generated while

Toyota Suzuki Hyundai Toyota Will KIA Four Hundred Million Dollar Five Percent
Toyota, Suzuki partnering in self-driving car technology

Morning Edition

00:24 sec | 2 years ago

Toyota, Suzuki partnering in self-driving car technology

"Automakers Toyota and Suzuki say they're going to work together to develop self driving vehicle technology the agreement calls for Toyota to secure a nearly five percent stake in Suzuki at a cost of more than nine hundred million dollars not long ago Volkswagen announced it was investing more than two and a half billion dollars in the Pennsylvania economist vehicle company Argo which is owned largely by Ford

Toyota Suzuki Volkswagen Argo Ford Pennsylvania Nine Hundred Million Dollars Billion Dollars Five Percent
"suzuki" Discussed on MotoWeek - MotoGP, Motorcycle and Racing News

MotoWeek - MotoGP, Motorcycle and Racing News

03:15 min | 2 years ago

"suzuki" Discussed on MotoWeek - MotoGP, Motorcycle and Racing News

"As well as Alex fringe just simply having an abysmal start to the season or else he would compete for a top four spot as well, but they did perform some, and I think that balances out their general inability to win races and the confusion that cover the entire season. So when you take the awfulness and the high of the win put them together, you get to see. So that's what I'm giving him in as you'll see in a second. We get to the riders. I wasn't nearly as harsh on the riders as I was on Yamaha's a whole. That's why the some of those parts don't quite add up to as much as you'd think they would. And that's why the right in the middle. But we're Yamaha's great didn't really add up to what you might have thought. Based on the numbers. The opposite was true for the factory Suzuki squad. Yeah. Andrea known a was a complete wildcard every time out. I mean, he had some solid braces early on then that inflated Zego and his consistency. Went out the window. And then his frustration that being banished to apprecia- showed up in like he was terrible at the end of the year. But as you know, only stumbled through his season up in having ups and downs. Alex Rennes right about the middle of the year took off like a rocket. And by the end of the year. He forced all of us to consider. That's Zouqi had indeed build a bike. That was very. Very very close to being able to compete for motor JP victories. And it wasn't just rinse either. I mean, yeah, you donate was all over the map. But when he had good races. They were very very good racist. So even those kind of reinforced that Alex Rennes late-season success wasn't purely a fluke, and it was an incredible effort. I think on the part of Suzuki to bounce back from earlier in the season. But from two thousand seventeen I mean, it was a debacle in two thousand seventeen the team messed up the riders messed up. Nothing went right. And then now at the end of two thousand eighteen they had a rider who was fifth in the championship and would have been higher had they gotten everything squared away and eat avoid mistakes earlier in the year. So I think Suzuki did a phenomenal job and because of that easy one to give them an A fifth in the championship was primarily Coty. And you'll primary was weird this season Danilo pitching, Jack Miller combined for a grand total of one podium and seven top five finishes. But. Between two good riders one of which was on a current year. Do khadi and all of their top five finishes were in and done by the red bull boring nothing after that. But despite those scant numbers, they were still the highest finishing satellite team in the paddock. And I don't think many people would necessarily cues them of being slow. It's just that. It was hard to explain, you know, I'm tempted to give them a b overall because they did finish fifth in the standings and higher than any other satellites he Mets impressive. But at the same time, I don't think they were able to net the results that they should add. And most importantly, the GP nineteen got markedly better in the hands of Lorenzo and Dovy as the season went on and had Lorenzo knockout in hurt. I think that would have continued for him as well. But while the factory riders were getting better, pray MAC wasn't able to replicate that wave of results within Ella Pacheco and because of that and because they had a good year in the standings..

Alex Rennes Suzuki Alex fringe Yamaha Andrea Zouqi Jack Miller Suzuki squad Lorenzo Zego Ella Pacheco Coty Danilo pitching apprecia Dovy
"suzuki" Discussed on FanGraphs Fantasy Baseball

FanGraphs Fantasy Baseball

04:24 min | 3 years ago

"suzuki" Discussed on FanGraphs Fantasy Baseball

"Paxton just riding it out right out. He's supposedly supposed to be back in the next end as yeah, so she should be back in time. Like I said, either that he's series or the Texas one, he's he's a matchup proof guy just going to start in there. So it's unfortunate, but that's where we're at with Paxton. All right. Let's dive into our main topic here and we're gonna talk about these final couple of weeks. I think just and you said you can't feel any shame and cutting guys at this time of year because you just have to make tough decisions and you can't just go off of the long track record. You do have to get a little bit more short sample focus. So I wanna talk about some new studs versus some establish duds. Basically, we're looking at a second half performances here of guys at each position. Lor unexpected guys who are surging versus the established guys that you rely on who aren't coming coming together with their performance. So we'll get some WRC plus numbers as the jump off point, and I'll give you guys some stats on what they're doing this year. Let's start behind the dish catcher. And we have Kurt Suzuki versus Wilson. Contrary Kurt Suzuki for the season for the second half has won twelve WRC plus not crazy, but it's well higher than Wilson controllers seventy two Mark. And then if you look at just over the last thirty days, the split becomes even more devastating. One ninety three to sixty five Zukis on one and Wilson chairs cannot get anything going. He doesn't have a single home run in eighty four point appearances. Nine runs nine ribs. Whereas in fifty, seven plate appearances Zouqi has four homers seven runs ten rubies he is splitting time, but he's making the most of it when he does hit. So Justin where you're going to go between Suzuki traders coming down the stretch here. It's it's Suzuki and I don't think it's particularly close. I mean if you look at Wilson what he's done since August I he has one home run since August. I and it was on August. I wow. In that time he has. Thirty seven swing percentage. He's only making contact sixty eight percent of the time. It's not usually good conduct. There's nothing in this profile that nine homers on the year, jeez, sorry to interrupt you, but that's crazy. Yeah, he feels this feels like a situation that if there we were in may or June, and he was doing this that he gets sent down and I don't think the cubs right now can just do that to, you know, send him out somewhere to work on stuff, but he definitely needs to rework something because it's obviously not working. I think, yeah, I think you have to drop him in pick up a guy like Kirk Zouqi, Jason, you feel the same with control versus Kurt Suzuki. It's weird looking at contrary, because if you look like. If you look across like he's still getting on base in the exact same time of the power, something obviously not right for just for this, something's not right. We don't know what it is something right conversely with with Suzuki. My concern at thirty five. He's definitely displaying the old man skills at this point. A lot of fly balls. A lot of his poll percentage gone up three straight seasons now, these percents. Yeah, he's on forty five forty one forty five forty nine fifty three. And then as his fly ball ground ball, one, three one one one zero one zero eight and zero eight again. And so we're to the old man skills again and there's more risk associated with that. Continuing at his age. I do like that. He doesn't play every day doesn't have to. He plays in the plays in the match ups that are advantages to him and as always ready. Let's not forget. He platoons with another right handed bat tower fireworks. So as a matter of which which. Type of pitcher is he the guy, the faces, the power guys, Vanessa guys, the guys at work up in the zone, the guys that work down zone clearly land has something that they've been able to find with him and and get the safe Dessaint players, Suzuki. The higher upside is going to be contrast to me boy. Eating pumpkin pie scream boy just brought me so sorry. All right. Let's move over to first base. This was the only one where where the established died does have an WRC plus over one hundred just because his peak areas and some of the more dud guys that were at the very bottom just they wouldn't be any competition for talent white..

Kurt Suzuki Suzuki Justin Wilson Vanessa guys WRC Kirk Zouqi Paxton cubs Texas Zukis Dessaint Jason sixty eight percent thirty days
"suzuki" Discussed on We Watch Wrestling

We Watch Wrestling

04:26 min | 3 years ago

"suzuki" Discussed on We Watch Wrestling

"Comes into and then he just gets under my part is that they never vacuum under the bed you know it's zouqi he's like he's suzuki is like the guy in predator who shaves all the time with no shaving cream or anything just dry shire as or just dry raise a constantly did you see predators coming back what the remaking it or is it another sequel it's another sequel i i'm down with that i guess it was directed by motherfucking to shane black what is your lease a weapon movies he directed kiss kiss bang bang directed an iron man movie he's like really good injects a lot of theater soon it's going to be all nuru into his pocket little wadded up it's that picture of tom when you play with the weird frames looks at it i just like the like when when finally tom's dong makes it cv debut manolas yuki is going to be watching it he's going to take a screen shot of it with his phone and then he's gonna see you at the cow palace and be like and then he rips down your pants looks at you like you when we when we enter the room and we get over the fact that it's kinda musty and they were trying to pick beds tom's like should i take this one did you hear that i take what do you think this one are you guys hearing that and then we look over minore suzuki standing against the wallpaper painted like wallpaper yes opens his eyes and he starts shaking cores lights and he spring all over us tom's got the pillow on his face and he's like guys quit pushing on the pillow like we're not touching it and then i look and cameron i go check please and the the other match probably the curtain jerker yoshi hockey ghetto rocky romero showing you versus tim atanda tango takahashi chase owens and hot coup the last time you saw khoo wrestle if ever did we talk about tana high she is he on the car taishi and kushida versus page and scarlett gotta gotta count it no kata no kata and osprey versus these cans not playing you're you're because you're not even thinking of the matchups you're just looking to see tom has any name recognition at all of some of these kata is vince is favorite wrestler vince almost like a picture with the airport he's in love with him you win in love with okada he's a golden god butts a golden god speaking of drinking too many beers i remember there was a labor day over the course of the entire day me and my buddy mike to nerve he's like he's like i'm exceed come on over we'll drink some beers and watch movies and i was like great we'll have a labor day started early in the morning watch you know like blues brother's jaws you know like class classics the big blockbuster moves where like blockbusters only you know the whole day and the course of the day i drank twenty beers just straight up just just put him away and just i was like nothing and just walked home but i put a note on i kept all the empty on their counter and i put a note said my name is matt mccarthy and i drank all these beers i am golding god yeah there was caught up with me eventually always a few of those nights at the kissing booth where you're where you know off for fourteen miller lights and you're going why the fuck am i not feeling anything he homes why weren't you feeling i dunno i blamed it on the miller lane yeah there were i got us throw it out of that venue i got that show kicked up the lounge yes because i i would bring so much weight and i'd be like everybody come in this room and smoke the blackbox was more fun anyway when it moved over by the tank the tank right do you that night when the punch got made we don't talk about this now what happened when the punch cut made that there's a recipe for punch that involves a case of natty light a thing of powdered country time and a handle vodka and it don't taste like.

suzuki
"suzuki" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"suzuki" Discussed on 710 WOR

"The braves hitting up man harvey for three runs in the first inning kurt suzuki just seems to have his number two run homer in the first a double as welfare suzuki in the third of three running for the braves again in the third inning harvey ended up going six innings which is the most he's gone in a long time only he did allow six runs in that time in the mets really never in this game a twelve four loss to the atlanta braves and while another uninspiring performance from matt harvey he was looking for the positives after the game the only time i'm really going to speak of the time before as i've gotten such bad habits being on the mound and and you know in spring training you can get through those you don't really have that much riding on the line i mean obviously i did i need to make a squad but you know you can you can kinda slow things down and and really work through them and last couple starts obviously i haven't been able to do that and and i think you know those last three innings i really was i was able to really kind of breakthrough that that bad habit of and that kind of mental block that i kind of felt every time i was going out there so i know the results aren't there i feel bad that i couldn't figure that out earlier and done better to keep a damaged limited but there's a huge positive for me in those last three innings we heard a lot of that last year from man harvey then the results weren't there but i'm taking away a ton of positives coming up of injury and it was an injury riddled season in the metro already done at that point you know in september when he came back now the mets are in their in the race there off to a nice start this season thirteen and five after the loss last night and you're not going to be one of the five best pitchers in.

kurt suzuki mets atlanta braves matt harvey
"suzuki" Discussed on The Corner

The Corner

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"suzuki" Discussed on The Corner

"Byebye gets a lot harder lot more complicated so be interesting to see how this goes moving forward yeah that's card honor you wanna touch on new japan though we suck a little bit about dude okay zack sabre junior versus because we go kada completely different maxima okada's ever had this this was also very close to a five star match this was a very very well done match and like i said to you in the group chat it wasn't as actually junior showing up just to lose he showing up the prove that he's a major player and he's threatening g one climax i think this match stab that and especially with suzuki gun being probably the successor to minority zucchini when suzuki kun move on from him in or whatever i don't know if we're ever gonna retire gonna fight forever yeah i still go he's he can absolutely is love watching him go but i think this firmly established is actually i watched pro wrestling rila and like rev pro as a completely dick but who was at a phenomenal talent and a very unique talent that nobody wrestles exactly but you know that's true willie regal ask stretching people out in shape and just chilling very different style but it's working with the character that i always said i see title is or you know secondary title whatever promotions at is ceiling this character can change that and people change they should have it then you brian was brian before the move like sometimes you get caught in the right character caught rice situation at the right time way what do you be data brian was there for the what are you talking far as the push.

Byebye maxima okada brian japan suzuki willie regal