35 Burst results for "sudan"

A Modern Day Escape From Egypt

Israel Story

02:23 min | 2 weeks ago

A Modern Day Escape From Egypt

"When people ask me where my home is I find it quite hard to unser but i originally come from south sudan. That's that's that's where. I know. I come from but i don't really know where my home is. That's christina christina zia. She's tall has bleached cut hair. Dark skin and fierce is. That somehow don't seem to match shyness of her smile. She's nineteen years old but listening to her. You'd think she was much older. Or maybe i should say much more mature. I just feel. I've been so many places and every time they tried to call a. Place my hall. It was snatched away from me. Christina was born a refugee in fact. She's what un agencies call a second generation refugee and as is the case with many other refugees. It's hard to know where exactly to start her story. I could go all the way back to one thousand nine hundred ninety eight. When christina's parents to clean and philip took their three year old first born daughter viola and fled war-torn sudan. Search of a safer future this time might genocide could attorney typically begin in beirut lebanon where the bas wound up and where in two thousand and one christina was born or else i could fast forward a few years and starred in maadi a bustling suburb of cairo where christina spent her early child but instead i'm going to open with a scene which to christina to felt like a true beginning a modern day exodus from egypt. It's june two thousand and seven and wearing the sinai peninsula. It's pitch black night bedouin. Smugglers have just instructed. Six year old christina twelve-year-old viola. Their father they're pregnant mother and a few dozen other sudanese asylum seekers to climb onto the back of rickety pickup truck and they covered us. And they're like don't make any noise and If you do it will be problem to us and t- you of so just don't risk

Christina Christina Zia Christina South Sudan Maadi UN Viola Philip Beirut Lebanon Cairo Sinai Peninsula Egypt
Kenya Orders Closure of Two Refugee Camps and Gives Ultimatum to UN Agency

BBC World Service

01:25 min | 2 weeks ago

Kenya Orders Closure of Two Refugee Camps and Gives Ultimatum to UN Agency

"Kenya has ordered the closure of the country's largest refugee camps and given the United Nations 14 days to come up with a road map to do so. Only half a million refugees currently live in that the dab in Kakuma refugee camps, most of them from Somalia and south Sudan, respectively. Countries which are of course, still unstable. We could speak now, if the BBC's Kenya correspondent Fernando Monte who joins us from Nairobi. Hi, Ferdinand. We've been here for 4%. Suddenly, this is not the first time the government's made an announcement like this is a lizard third time. The first mentioned about 2017 when they all had be concerns about that. That particularly being a place where terrorists to recruit people to then conduct attacks in king about that here. The high control the unconstitutional for the government to close the come, which has mostly people fleeing the unrest in Somalia, Because can you also had international delegations? The government sitting the appeal in 2019 again said that and they came to an agreement with the United Nations to do what Linda repatriation but that hasn't seems to work. So now again, they into that secretary say that this time there will be no move for further negotiations on they want now. Not just Kakuma crossed, not just adopt coast but also Kakuma, which would affect at least close to half a

Kakuma Fernando Monte Kenya Somalia United Nations Sudan Ferdinand Nairobi BBC Government Linda
Israel holds 4th parliamentary election in 2 years

BBC World Service

03:24 min | 2 weeks ago

Israel holds 4th parliamentary election in 2 years

"Has claimed a huge win for the right in Israel's fourth election in two years. The exit polls suggest he may fail. Secure majority in parliament. His campaign focused on Israel's world leading covert 19 vaccination program and his diplomatic success in normalizing ties with some Arab countries. But his opponents from across the political spectrum argue he should not remain in office while standing on corruption charges he have caused denies any wrong doing. Let's speak to Richard Peter. Off the person Israel Communications and Research Center in Jerusalem. Who's monitoring results as they come in Richard. He's claiming of victory. But it's a victory of sorts, isn't it? Because he will have to strike a deal with many people are raising concerns about far right groups. Tol have a majority. Good morning. Thank you very much indeed for having me Well, first of all, let's be clear that at the moment all these projections are based on the exit polls on so we don't have the actual results yet a tool on DSA The exit polls are suggesting a very slim victory to the pro Netanyahu camp. But I think we're going to need to wait even for a few more days for the picture to become clearer. Okay, So let's talk about what might happen then. Should he just get over the line but need he needs 60 seats for a majority looks that you might be around. 53 seats at the moment. They're all concerns that he's going to have to go it get into bed with ultra Orthodox parties Showers party, for example who have anti gay views and two women and two women views. They want to expel disloyal Arabs from the state. What are people saying about the kind of coalitions he may have toe Ford? So, yes, you're absolutely right with the person with the caveat that we don't have the results. The chances are that the parties that exception Netanyahu are the ultra religious after Orthodox on by the end of one particularly hard, hard right party that has some quite unpalatable views on those on those issues, thistles the nature of the politics that Netanyahu will try and kind of move. Move the government to a more centrist position on gay try and limit the influence off the moral order off the more extreme elements within his, but it within his faction, But it's no no doubt that he is reliant on those parties to form a government. Has his success in the vaccination program is is that why he has seemingly as you say, appreciates any exit polls, But he has done quite well. You know, Israel has led the world in managing to Vaccinated population. I think you were right in your opening comments that it's a combination off bringing the vaccine. I mean, he has devoted a large part of his campaign, emphasizing the fact that he personally did it. The CEO of Fiza gave an interview on Israeli TV a couple of weeks ago when he described in Tanya, whose insistence being obsessive over over it, which usually obsessive. This has Majority of overturned But in this sense, he was so so committed to bringing it that it has produced a dividends, and some people appreciate that on the full peace treaties that he's brought in the last year, the normalization agreements with the U. S A on bath rain, as well as Sudan in Morocco are significant diplomatic achievements, which Netanyahu's supporters definitely recognize and appreciate.

Richard Peter Israel Communications And Rese Israel Netanyahu Camp Showers Party Netanyahu Parliament Jerusalem Richard Ford Fiza Government Tanya U. Sudan Morocco
Myanmar Ambassador to UN denounces military coup

UN News

01:39 min | Last month

Myanmar Ambassador to UN denounces military coup

"The un special envoy on myanmar has strongly condemned continuing bloodshed in the country after dozens of protesters were reportedly killed at the weekend in a on sunday. Special envoy christine strana burgener said that she had received accounts of killings mistreatment of demonstrators and torture of prisoners. The development comes as the myanmar military continues to face international calls including from the security council for restraint dialogue and full respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms. After the first february military coup according to reports violence continued across myanmar over the weekend with thirty eight people killed on sunday alone on monday. The un independent human rights expert on myanmar also reiterated his appeal to you and member states to act to address the crisis special reporter. Tom andrews said that he was outraged at reports that so many protesters had been murdered by myanmar security forces in a single day. You and rights chief. Michelle basch on. Monday called on the south. Sudanese authorities to hold accountable. Although supporting local militias in to jonglei region ms bachelet appeal follows a wave of attacks on villages across jong lie and greater administrative area between january and august last year organized and heavily armed community based militias from the dinka nuer and merlin communities carried out the violence according to the report issued by the mission south sudan on miss and the un rights office wage chr the military and political figures who supported the local armed. Groups should be prosecuted. Ms bachelet said adding that they had deliberately fueled unexploited legalize tensions among our stations. The high commissioner said it was of paramount importance that the government stopped the supply of weapons to these militias.

Myanmar Christine Strana Burgener Security Council For Restraint UN Tom Andrews Michelle Basch Jonglei Ms Bachelet South Sudan Government
The Cabinet Of Curiosities

Not Another Horror Podcast

04:10 min | Last month

The Cabinet Of Curiosities

"Let's talk about dr eugene. Boyne de fall victim to mysterious. Infection was his death which in nineteen thirty two investigation but liberty magazine refers to as the strangest the most bizarre and the least no circus tragedy of this generation a result a supernatural revenge before his career as manager. The you bungee duck built savages star attraction and one of the most infamous kosher misguided. Have flat out. Racist circus sideshows in american history. The doctor was carving a place for himself in the history. Books of african exploration by the time he bought the social of tribespeople so america nineteen thirty key becoming much decorated explore having among other adventures served as naturalists on the nineteen twenty four nineteen twenty five black cruise one of two expeditions sponsored by francis citron company to prove that it was possible to cross africa by motorized vehicles of his you buggies. They were actually members of the sarah tribe in modern day. Chad the monica you bunker came from a ringling brothers and barnum and bailey combined. Our bbc circus spin-doctor female contingent practice lip extension stretching. Both there and laura lives over the years with increasing larger wooden disk former circus historical society president. Richard riddles rice at the explorer. I encountered the tribe in africa during the black cruise. What happened upon his particular group in paris at an ethnological show where he used to be their manager before leading them on a tour through the americas and the united states. You buggies were rb. Bbc sensation shown as part of the circuses. African village exhibit. Because you know. Human zoos were thing which visitors walked through in that concluded with lemons from an actor playing captain callaghan a brave and durable who survived being horribly tortured by aether rochas group of savages and the cameroons who were about to fling his ravaged body until steaming pot of boiling water. After a sadist bees had capitated his penis and testicles. Wow where relations. Between the doctor and his star soon grew sour they accused him of pocketing their salaries which i mean in all fairness he was doing and if you're is exchange in sudan attent witnesses say the doctor emerged badly shaken terrified even a few days later the explorer fledged chicago to sarasota. Florida reportedly fear for his life. Surely after arriving to sarasota on october thirteenth nineteen thirty. He died suddenly of mysterious causes in the end coroner's attributed his death to septic pneumonia possibly brought on by an infection from a pimple on his leg but witnesses who overheard the argument in chicago spread rumors that the sarah tries people who put a black magic curse on him. Ape reported quote from one of the u. buggies possibly generated by the circus spin. Doctor he don't die. We made him die ran. Newspapers and help to perpetuate the rumors of a curse. Liberty magazine describes the explores final moments as spent suffering and agony on his deathbed the victim of an unidentified curse the doctor knew he was doomed. And why but his lips remained sealed and they're in a buys a horrible and fantastic tale. Speaking dark tells and death have you ever heard of a doctor labeling the cause of death as fear. Well that is what happened to the twins. Chang and inc

Liberty Magazine Dr Eugene Francis Citron Circus Historical Society Richard Riddles Rice Boyne Captain Callaghan BBC Aether Rochas Ringling Brothers Africa United States Barnum Sarah Chad Monica Bailey Sarasota Laura Americas
Violence engulfs South Sudan

UN News

01:18 min | Last month

Violence engulfs South Sudan

"Extreme violence involving thousands of fighters at a time has engulfed. Most of south sudan a decade after independence. You and human rights council appointed investigators said on friday. According to the commission on human rights in south sudan the bloodshed and exactions faced by civilians are the worst recorded. Since the country's civil war began in december two thousand thirteen some of the most brutal attacks have been carried out in the states of central equatoria jonglei and greater people administrative area with up to fifty thousand fighters involved in one attack on the village of liqun. Gory in jonglei. Here's commission chairperson. Jasmine super we have documented the new levels of militia violence engulfing more than three quarters of the country at localized level in which children carry weapons and women. At traded as spoils of war like chattels abducted. Boys have been forced to fight. And in some instances forcibly assimilated into rival armed groups. The commission's warning comes two years. Since the revitalized peace agreement was signed which masuku had led to a reduction in hostilities nationally without resulting south sudan increasingly bitter polarized identity where ethnicity was prized above. All the commission on human rights in south sudan is due to present its report to the human rights council in geneva on the tenth of march

South Sudan Jonglei Commission On Human Rights Masuku Human Rights Council Geneva
Rights expert appeals to countries to return nationals from Syrias squalid camps

UN News

03:32 min | Last month

Rights expert appeals to countries to return nationals from Syrias squalid camps

"Of women and children who remain an arbitrary detention without end in camps in northeast syria must be helped homes the countries of origin atop independent ryan sex but has insisted an appeal to well over fifty countries. Whose nationals languishing. In the alcohol and roy centers because of their alleged links to isolate extremists. Special reputa- finola neo loin. Told you news's daniel. Johnson that many western european countries could do more to bring them home. So the scale of the challenge facing in syria is that we have over sixty four thousand people mostly women and children who are being held in camps in northeast syria in alcohol and regs camps primarily. It's been heartbreaking. Hasn't it listening to the grandmothers of those who are still detained in these camps. What are they telling you. So my mandate has had a lot of engagement with families including grandmothers grandmothers who are literally watching their grandchildren and their daughters starve on cell phones watching at sat with these grandmothers. And watch these images. And this is. It's it's profoundly heartbreaking because more than anything else they are completely powerless. Their governments are refusing to intervene and if those grandmothers were to send even packages of food or clothing or even any money to their daughters or their grandchildren to take them out of the extremity of the situation. They're in they would be prosecuted for assisting or giving material support to terrorism in multiple countries fifty seven unnamed countries. According to your last press release. Could you be a bit more specific about where these countries are always all regions of the world. It's across the globe. I mean we go from a to y afghanistan. Albania canada china denmark egypt poland portugal romania spain. Saudi arabia sudan to gca stan united kingdom of great britain and northern ireland. The united states and yemen. So these are countries that are spread across the globe but it is notable that. There's a really significant number of nationals from western states countries. Who have both the means and the capacity to bring their nationals home and are refusing to do so. Do you think there's an appetite to bring these people home. Though i think you have to create the conditions conducive to bring them home we the mandate i've been in countries where they have been brought home and the one thing i have seen is that governments are prepared to spend political capital to make the case for children and to accept their responsibilities to women and children and that requires an act of political will. It requires the language of compassion. It requires the language of comfort. It requires the language of calling children. And what's most challenging here. Is that a number of states. The states who called themselves human rights activists the states who say they have human rights foreign policies states who say that they are feminist in their foreign policies are not prepared to bring their women and children home. And so that's profoundly disappointing.

Syria Ryan Daniel Johnson Albania Romania Sudan Yemen Saudi Arabia Denmark Portugal Great Britain Northern Ireland Poland Afghanistan Egypt United Kingdom Spain China Canada
South Africa halts AstraZeneca vaccine rollout

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:57 min | 2 months ago

South Africa halts AstraZeneca vaccine rollout

"South africa has halted its rollout of the oxford astrazeneca vaccine just a week after the country received. Its first million doses. It seems the vaccine offers limited protection against a new variant of the corona virus. That's now dominant in the country. Salim abdul karim co-chair of south africa's ministerial advisory committee on covid nineteen spoke to a world health organization briefing yesterday. We don't want to end up with a situation where we vaccinated million people too. Many people would have vaccine that may not be effective in preventing hospitalization and severe disease in total more than one point. Two billion corona virus doses have been allocated for the continent. But it's not clear when all those jobs will arrive. The longer any region remains unvaccinated. The greater the chance that more variants arise vaccines though can be tweaked in a formulation of the oxford vaccine targeted at the south african variant could be going into arms by autumn. What scientists cannot address is the long run damage to africa both in human and economic terms so far continent to have been spared from the worst case scenarios predicted early on in the pandemic but the longer term picture remains bleak many ways the impact of the pandemic and africa is worse than it appears on the surface around the official numbers. Kenley salmon is one of our africa correspondent based in dakar. It is the case that having a young population has to some extent protected the continent from the virus africans and died from it that americans europeans but the true scott of infection. Death is really hard to gauge. Studying sudan recently showed the perhaps only two percent of all the covid desk for a quoted in the official tally and the economic impact is worse than it looks last year. The region's economy shrank for the first time. In twenty five years tourism has been badly hit as have commodity exporters things like oil in nigeria and taken together. Gdp per capita fell below twenty ten levels last year so things are perhaps not quite as bad as some other parts the world but certainly still very tough and things may get tougher house. What are the particular challenges to africa. Africa faces quite a number of challenges in the next few years as it tries to recover from the pandemic but the biggest i of the really is vaccines. Some african governments have perhaps failed to grasp the urgency of the situation in tanzania for example the populace president john food even casually cast out with a vaccine work but i do forgive aside claiming the postman precautions such as steaming nation were better than vaccines and even added that if the white man was able to come up with next nations then. Vaccinations for aids. Malaria and cancer would have already been found. So it's not so much a question than of supply. I mean given that quite a few vaccines have been essentially booked at the stage. A number of vaccines have been booked but the big question is when will they arrive because right now there aren't anywhere near the number of axes required forever on in the world and rich countries are of course the front of the queue for those vaccines have been produced africa's going to need perhaps two point six billion doses to vaccinate everyone and those are not being made locally so they have to rely on supplies elsewhere for the moment so that means joining the queue. All this means that whereas rich countries aim to vaccinate most of their people by the middle of this year the african. cdc a public health. Bali in africa's aiming for sixty percent of africans to vaccinated by the end of next year. But even that may be too optimistic. For the poorest countries. The economist intelligence unit sister organization estimates that in most african countries most people will not be inoculated until mid twenty twenty three or even early twenty twenty four and there must be serious consequences of it being that long until the continent is on average vaccinated. Africa is likely. It doesn't get those vaccinations into suffer. Further waves of the infection while after the disease may have amped in the rich world. And that of course will cause more death and more suffering. Doesn't risk that. Having the virus transmitting between people frequently africa could allow new variance to evolve. We've already got the south. African variant and these new variants could endanger people even in rich countries if they prove to be resistant to vaccines and then finally of course not having vaccines could force. African policymakers to continue with these very difficult economic lockdowns curfews even after many other countries around the world set free of those kinds of restrictions and if the public health concern lasts that long then surely the economic concerns will last at least that long. That's right in many african countries facing pretty severe crises at the moment just getting finance to pay their bills. Africa has very limited fiscal space on average countries in sub saharan africa. Spending more than thirty cents on every dollar. They raise and text revenue paying their debts. And that's up from twenty cents on the dollar before the pandemic on the debt side to over half of low income sub saharan african countries are now classed as in distress or at high risk of distress. According to the imf and what about countries with bigger economies the two biggest economies in africa nigeria and south ever both in pretty deep trouble nigeria for example was described by the world. Bank is being an unprecedented crisis. Recently the bank is not normally quite so blunt in nigeria. There has been a legacy of management for a number of years and pandemics really accessible that quite badly. Now focused suggested by twenty twenty three. Gdp per capita may go back as low as it was in one thousand nine hundred eighty time when the oil price was some high on so africa too is in trouble that have been in recession twice in the last three years before the pandemic hit of course now is dribbling itself with a particularly heavy toll from the pandemic so both countries in fact are facing a difficult road out of the crisis. And what about outside help in terms of financing has been quite a bit of outside help although the crisis of course is very big but in twenty twenty the imf for example provided sixteen billion dollars in loans most of that came with relatively few strings attached and this help frigging countries to respond to the pandemic to avoid some of the liquidity crises that were looming the world bank also dispersed another ten billion but many countries got that funding to if the imf under emergency allocations that came quickly and relatively easily and those allocations for many countries will soon be exhausted. The rich world has been trying to help when it comes to debt. They've provided liquidity to countries through some bits of suspension initiative that basically allows poor countries to put off debt repayments until july. Twenty twenty one. This is of course helpful but the trouble is that those payments just suspended and they have to be paid back with interest in about five years time so as the chief economist for africa the world bank put it to us. It may just be kicking the can down the road to. How do you see this playing out. Then how high could the human cost of all this be while the stakes are pretty high. The pandemic has already done lower damage to people's health and africa. it's hitting their economic prospects and they wealth and it's also affecting education of course. Hundreds of millions of students in africa have been affected by school closures. This increases the risk of dropouts and reduces the prospects for africa's largest every generation so overall the costs here really quite significant. There are some reasons for optimism. We may see vaccine rollouts accelerate. There's also hopes that commodity price rises could give africa real boost as the global economy recovers been on balance. The evidence probably points to at pretty difficult road ahead with several more waves of the virus hitting already struggling health systems and perhaps a form of economic long covert in africa. So you know africans have come through this showing remarkable resilience but it may be toughest years are still to come in. Thank you very much for joining us. thank you

Africa Salim Abdul Karim Co Ministerial Advisory Committee Kenley Salmon Nigeria Oxford South Africa John Food Astrazeneca Dakar Saharan Africa IMF Sudan Tanzania Malaria CDC
Stopping human traffickers in the Sahel

UN News

05:16 min | 2 months ago

Stopping human traffickers in the Sahel

"The work of the un and its partners never stops to prevent human traffickers from exploiting desperate people in west and central africa as they embark on dangerous journeys across these heart desert in search of opportunities further north and in europe to explain what is being done to tackle smuggling gangs. I spoke to vessel coastal. He's the un refugee agency's special envoy for the central mediterranean situation of concern to us are refugees. War already formed protection in the country normally neighboring country or four gene but because of the issues relating to covid many lost their job loss sometime their shelter on some may consider moving on to try to find better protection elsewhere. One thing. I know that people might be keen to find out about how cold it has affected or impacted on migration. Because what's clear from the report released. Is that human smugglers human traffickers. They haven't had any trouble in going around the restrictions have they know absolutely. It's a market opportunity for smugglers traffic yesterday diversified. Their will for try to make some more attractive for these people to embark on those donates on in order to sit come vent a border closure in particular land border closure. They take higher risk on some of the people unfortunately trapping those journeys. Could you maybe tell me some life stories that are featured in your report from the u n refugee agency. There's one that really struck me a somali boy who was travelling unaccompanied from somalia to ethiopia to sedan and then to libya than ultimately to malta. Absolutely on we get to lia people like that they don't stop at the first country of asylum because editor condition are not there editor because they were confronted to incident in the first place. They arrive on the feel. It's not safe address some time. It's because the traffickers has light to them and told them well. We have a job lineup for you in libya. Make you cross through europe on. Those people don't realize that even before reaching libya they're going to get into trouble while crossing swatter countries because the so-called gentle smugglers actually turn very quickly nasty traffic years. Yeah let's just back that up with some data. I know you're report. Says more than five hundred people died trying to cross the sea from libya and twenty twenty often on overcrowded inflatable boats. So what is the. Unhcr the urine refugee agency trying to do with local governments when with local governments. We try to tell them to combat trafficking activity because there are too many known human traffickers that have never been brought to justice on that applies to many coastal states but we trying to work also with communities to tell them to offer another alternative that there might be other solutions on the weights too late when the people reach libya which wisden sarah territory because going to be tempting for people to want those boats on belief the traffic yourself telling them pretty. Tell me about some of your community initiatives. There's one that you cool telling the real story that tries to prevent smuggling and trafficking exactly debts targeting eastern africa mentally eritreans on somali we have mobilized diaspora in europe on the square to let people tell their story. What up to them. So it's sunny filter. Dissolve videos disarm chat forum where people talk to people in their language on. Tell them exactly what has happened to them to try to demystify. On debunk the narrative of the traffic use. Where's your focus at the moment because libya's being in turmoil for so long and it was such a poll for migrants. But we hear that bikini fast has a really growing displacement crisis to yes. there's been a significant increase. In displacement in the western side countries i mean most trillion people displaced because of the conflict. Not that many people leave the region. Manley malians few citizens from rookie. Necessa but many stay-at-home was displacing. Nesia stay nesia. They don't on baucom those dangerous johnny. So that's one area of focus western sale. The other one is the crisis linked to what has done in tigray recently over the last two months on the displacement weariness you appear on ensued. How can you tell me about some of the solutions for placing people who need international protection with their families and talking about family reunification. There are some pilot projects that you've launched with egypt sudan and others. Yes we try to look again at the narrative of many states saying you know but legal pathways exists. People need to use them rather than to embark on the dangerous journeys on. We realized that in reality goes legal. Press quiz extremely difficult to access. If you are refugee camp in eastern sudan you may not get the commission to leave the count to go to the capital city. Where you know. The unbe skilled the country where you have release may not be open or may not exist at all so what we try is facilitate access to the documentation on simply procedural four people. Could we quickly go back to the unaccompanied somaliland. Do you know what happened to him. He ended up in multi indian. Didn't he yes he did you. I don't know what happened to afterwards but the majority of those unaccompanied children from somalia depending where they come from. They will get a protective status in europe in principle

Libya Central Mediterranean UN Europe Africa LIA Somalia Ethiopia Malta Unhcr Nesia Baucom Sarah Manley Tigray Sudan Johnny Egypt
China gets in on the SolarWinds act

The CyberWire

03:50 min | 2 months ago

China gets in on the SolarWinds act

"Reuters reports that the fbi investigation of the solar wind supply. Chain attack is looking into evidence that chinese threat actors successfully exploited a vulnerability in the company's software to compromise the national finance center a payroll system operated by the us department of agriculture. The department of agriculture's reaction to the story is ambiguous. The agriculture department emailed reuters to say that. Usda has notified all customers including individuals and organizations whose data has been affected by the solar winds orion code compromise but a second departmental spokesman said after the story broke that there was no data breach related to solar winds at usda but offered no further clarification the vulnerability the chinese threat actors are believed to have exploited is said to be different from the one used by. Unc twenty four fifty two. The thread actor widely believed to be a russian intelligence service. Reuters anonymous sources told them that the campaign used and infrastructure that have been previously deployed by state backed chinese cyber spies as the washington post observes many have suspected another group was also actively exploiting solar winds but reuters. Report is the first to suggest that this second threat actor was connected to the chinese government. The chinese foreign ministry denied any involvement observing i and in fairness correctly that attribution is a complex technical issue the ministry then moved onto unlikely insistence on the usual pieties. China resolutely opposes and combat's any form of cyber attacks and cyber theft. It's doubtful that any government on the planet even say the holy sea or san marino resolutely opposes any form of cyber attack unless cyber attack is construed narrowly as to rule out any form of interception surveillance or retaliation if any pure cyber are running any government. It's doubtful that government is in beijing. Some have said that majors cyber attacks are often more like riots than bank jobs with multiple actors going after the same targets for their own reasons. Reuters quotes former. Us chief information security officer retired air force general gregory to hill. Who thinks it's not that unusual for more than one group to hit the same product. He prefers the racing metaphor to the criminal. One quote it wouldn't be the first time we've seen a nation state actor surfing in behind someone else. It's like drafting in nascar. To heal said it's worth noting that while the national finance center is housed in the department of agriculture. Its responsibilities aren't confined there. The nfc also handles payroll for other government agencies. Some of the more interesting ones from the point of view of national security are the fbi the state department the department of homeland security and the treasury department the nfc claims on its website to payroll more than six hundred thousand employees and also provides customizable and flexible financial management services and integrated shared service solutions. The data held by the nfc would include social security numbers phone numbers personal email addresses and banking information and also associations between individual employees and their agencies. Such information is useful for building. Human target dossiers of individuals of interest and chinese services have shown an appetite for such sweeping collection in the past against the us most notably in the office of personnel management breach of two thousand fifteen

Reuters Us Department Of Agriculture NFC Chinese Foreign Ministry Department Of Agriculture Agriculture Department Holy Sea FBI UNC Washington Post San Marino Beijing China Department Of Homeland Securit Treasury Department United States Office Of Personnel Management
Dershowitz nominates Kushner, aide for Nobel Peace Prize

Chris Plante

01:24 min | 2 months ago

Dershowitz nominates Kushner, aide for Nobel Peace Prize

"Harvard law professor emeritus. That's right, Alan Dershowitz that nominated Jared Kushner for the Nobel Peace Prize because, after all, he was able to cobble together four separate Israel peace deals in the Middle East with the United Arab Emirates and with Bahrain with Sudan and with Morocco, and if President Trump had remained in office, Saudi Arabia was next in line. But Biden will get back to bombing and war and dying because that's what the Democrats do. You know they inflicted how many things that they inflict upon us A whole lot of things. I think whole lot whole bunch. Unbelievable harmony. The um you know, they bombed the Obama. Biden People Libya into oblivion. It's a failed state to this day. Pretty amazing stuff. They bomb and bomb and bomb and they get the Nobel Peace Prize. And no problem, not a not a thing they target missed last night American citizens and they got the Nobel Peace Prize. The Trump Administration for Mideast peace deals Historic each and every one of them and in combination historic on an epic scale and was President Trump will have President Trump was nominated actually four times for the Nobel Peace Prize. Not by anybody in the United States, but good for Alan Dershowitz for doing the right thing

President Trump Jared Kushner Nobel Peace Prize Alan Dershowitz Biden United Arab Emirates Harvard Bahrain Sudan Morocco Middle East Saudi Arabia Israel Trump Administration For Midea Libya Barack Obama United States
UNICEF chief’s appeal for access to children caught up in Ethiopia’s Tigray

UN News

00:57 sec | 2 months ago

UNICEF chief’s appeal for access to children caught up in Ethiopia’s Tigray

"Three months since fighting began in ethiopia northern state of tigray great concern for the plight of youngsters there. The un children's fund unicef has warned in an alert on wednesday the agency's executive director henrietta. Four said that the very little was known about the impact of the conflict was deeply troubling because of difficulties getting humanitarian access. The warning comes almost two weeks since unicef and partners dispatched twenty nine trucks filled with emergency nutrition health and protection supplies entity gray where central government soldiers have confronted tigray people's liberation front forces. That convoy was a step in the right direction but nowhere near the level of access and scale of support. That is actually needed. Miss four said unicef cited reports of three hundred unaccompanied or separated children among the more than fifty seven thousand people who fled to neighboring sudan the are potentially many more among the approximately two hundred eighty thousand internally displaced in tigray and neighboring regions the un agency said

Un Children's Fund Unicef Tigray Unicef Ethiopia Henrietta Sudan UN
Biting the hands that would feed: Ethiopia

The Economist: The Intelligence

05:10 min | 2 months ago

Biting the hands that would feed: Ethiopia

"Humanitarian crisis is unfolding in ethiopia's northern region of tigray. The turmoil began in november when civil war broke out between the federal government and regional forces led by the tigray people's liberation front or teepee aleph within weeks troops had entered the regional capital of mckelway and prime minister abe committed declared victory but the fighting continued. Thousands have died in the conflict and more than two million civilians have been driven from their homes. Some sixty thousand fled to neighboring sudan now. The threat of starvation looms most of the regions. Roughly six million people have been without adequate food water or medicine. For weeks. ethiopia's tigray region is facing an alarming -tarian crisis. Basically because aid workers are not able to get essential supplies to those who are affected by the war which is essentially the entire population of the region. The vast majority. Tom gardner is abba correspondent a top regional official and that's one appointed by abby himself. He told aid workers a private meeting on january. The eighth that hundreds of thousands might starve. Meanwhile a western diplomat told me we could have a million dead there in a couple of months if humanitarian access is in opened up significantly urgently. And what is daily life like in tigray right now outside of michaela the regional capital where things are marginally better banks closed. Markets have stop shops shuttered. Fuel is run out. That's been the case. Since the war began really in early november. Last year i met one man who fled from tigray to addis ababa and he said to me even if you have the money you don't have a bank if you have grain you don't have a mill if you have mill you don't have power and that seems to be pretty representative from the accounts. We're hearing on top of that. Hospitals are running. mt hospital. staff have not been paid since october according to medicine some volunteer doctors without borders. You've had more access than most every hospital. They've been into they found entirely looted. All of this is just the knock on effects of the conflict and tigray which it sounds is still going on right so the war began in the start of november. It was the culmination of long standing. Tensions between the which ran the region and for thirty years was the dominant force in the federal government. In addis ababa the capital as well until two thousand and one thousand nine when they were pushed out following mass protests and replaced by abby half mad prime minister the abbey and the pilaf simmered for two years before rupturing eventually towards the end of last year. More than two months later. The left appears to be in. Disarray is being ousted from the regional capital and it's waging something akin to an insurgency in the countryside now it's troops control of the countryside particularly in the center of the region. It doesn't control major towns its leaders including the ousted. President have been essentially a well. We haven't heard from them for over a month. And some of the founding members of the been captured or shot dead so the fighting continues especially in central tigray but the prime minister. I be met. He believes it's only a matter of time now before the rest of what he calls. The gender are captured or killed but this whole conflict was the result of the federal government looking to take control of restive region. Now they have arrested region where the humanitarian crisis. What are they doing about. That does with dispute these accounts all the humanitarian crisis earlier this week. A spokesman for the federal disaster management agency said in an interview that there is no starvation in ethiopia alec baldwin. Dr a couple of days ago the federal ministry of peace claimed it was distributing a to almost two million citizens northern ethiopia. And the minister of peace told me that even reaching central tigray which is live under the control of forces so that seems implausible. I mean our forces regularly attack military convoys so it's impossible for the government to deliver supplies safely and then on the other hand emergency supplies being delivered by the un and international ngos. They can't get into these areas either because they're not allowed by the army which controls access an agreement that the un signed last month with the federal government which was supposed to allow them and allow aid groups to travel freely throughout the region. That's basically not been honored for. Un staff was shorter and detained last month. For entering areas which senior government official later said they were not supposed to go and an points to the key question. Here which is is the government being deliberately obstructive and a lot of people in the diplomatic and humanitarian community. Recommended is one u. n. Diplomat told me that the lack of humanitarian access is part and parcel of the war campaign.

Tigray Ethiopia Mckelway Tom Gardner Federal Government Abby Michaela Sudan Ababa Addis Addis Ababa Federal Disaster Management Ag Federal Ministry Of Peace Alec Baldwin UN Army
Examining The Diplomatic Deal Between Israel, United Arab Emirates

Morning Edition

06:29 min | 2 months ago

Examining The Diplomatic Deal Between Israel, United Arab Emirates

"Newly established diplomatic ties between Israel and the United Arab Emirates are having an effect. The U. A. E is welcoming thousands of Israelis President Trump's administration. Promoted these diplomatic ties as a historic breakthrough, which was true Israel had been isolated from many Arab nations for decades. Israel's leaders says the agreement proves that peace does not have to come at a cost. NPR's Daniel Estrin traveled to Dubai and the U. S a toe ask just what kind of peace is being promoted? It's not hard to spot Israeli tourists and devise busy gold market way. Silas are very noisy, and they understand us here. I feel no tour guide. Lisi is wearing a sequined shirt and a blue scarf around her strawberry red hair she poses for pictures with elaborate gold wedding garments in the window displays. Later, she'll ski at Dubai's famous indoor ski slope in Jordan. I don't know if I will feel like this Not in Egypt Way make fine here and next month I come again. Egypt and Jordan share a cold peace with Israel and most other Arab countries refuse relations with Israel, as long as Palestinians don't have independence, but the U A E. I gave Israelis what they have long sought. A sense of acceptance in the region were wanted in our country Don't feel wanted by the Arabs. And here they want me here. L a needs Ziegel Boy Wonder's Dubai Spice Market. With six friends, all elementary school teachers and Moratti's in the market are reluctant to speak on tape about their countries embrace of Israel, which is still controversial in the region. I asked the Israeli school teacher is this piece? I don't know if it's a real piece or not. I think that both countries have interest in this peace because we need them. They need us. The Israelis gain business opportunities. One Israeli I met, signed a deal to grow lettuce using pipes and the Emirati desert. And the Emma Ronnie's Get Israel's blessing to buy American made F 35 fighter jets, Bahrain, Sudan and Morocco also normalized ties with Israel. And it was the U. S offering the incentives without concessions by Israel so long to watch a loom. Which alone middle. What's MMA Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu promoted the U A e deal as peace for peace instead of the old paradigm land for peace. He says It sets a precedent. Israel doesn't need to give up land to the Palestinians to win friends in the Arab world. But I Moratti's still want Palestinians on their side U A e ambassador to the U S. You said fellow Taipeh. We still want to see a two state solution. We still want to see a negotiation between the two parties. Perhaps just perhaps we might be able to have more influence and more leverage when we do have a relationship with Israel. Emirati commentators say the love fest Israelis feel Just the honeymoon. Tough love will come later. But Israelis are seeing it more Netanyahu's way. Everybody by him from then a tourist to get just his first name to discuss his political views, says the Moratti's embrace proves Israel doesn't need to make sacrifices. Rather, it's the Palestinians who will feel pressured to follow their Arab brothers and make a deal with Israel. Even a prominent Israeli peace advocate returned from a trip to Dubai, saying, I think that the Palestinians need to rethink the way they treat Israel. Femi Paris The son of the late Israeli President Shimon Paris, runs the Paris Center for Peace that reaches out to Palestinians. He wants to promote business with the eh Moratti's and approach he wants Palestinians to adopt. I think Their point of view has being that's first sold the political issues and then we can start normalizing things and move forward. I think those days have gone. I believe that the only way for us to really, really achieve peace, comprehensive peace And save the region from backwardness is to focus on moving together forward. I put that to Nabil Shaath, adviser to the Palestinian president, He says. Palestinians can't just move forward and ignore their day to day realities is an occupying our land. Israel continues to Great second mints in our villages destroyed our houses. And yet It is legal had 23 is very better. Who is it? That should be doing what to whom the occupied the occupiers. Palestinians and many countries say real peace requires Israel to compromise land for peace. Shot says the U. A e deal removes the incentive for Israel to do that, Even if the Emirati say they'll keep pushing for it. There's radiated out of the problem, not us on the right. Is that looking for exclusive or what? There's not sisters myself and lewdness. Be that fan board down a desert dune. Their Palestinian Arab citizens of Israel, not from the occupied territories. And they're thrilled to finally visit a part of the Arab world that have been off limits to them as Israeli passport holders with the azure Allah Allah Dolly are a beam can look hope. Jewish travelers to Dubai with see Arabs in a more positive light. Could it lead to less discrimination against her community at home? Or would it all just be for gotten on the flight back commotion on the runway and Duke? By Lee's Eve, the Jewish Tour guide You heard at the beginning of the story happens to be sitting across from me and does not want the flight attendant to crowd the empty row in front of her with an Arab couple and their baby. Also tourists from Israel. A second Arab couple accuses her of racism. Give your time CC Zaeef says. Are you psycho woman? Can Lieutenant Mark going up? And Israeli flight attendant gets on the loudspeaker. Respect each other. A young Arab dad stands up and addresses the plane. Okay, mate committed. I don't being bumped out of it. No, but they must you all were just in an Arab country. Not in Las Vegas. Look at what's happening here. Disgusting. A Jewish man shouts back! Don't generalize. Quarreling passengers don't make amends or apologies. They spend the flight back to Israel in a kind of cold piece. Daniel Estrin NPR news Dubai

Israel Moratti Trump's Administration Dubai Daniel Estrin Dubai Spice Market Israeli School Emirati Desert Emma Ronnie U. Prime Minister Benjamin Netany Egypt Jordan Taipeh Lisi United Arab Emirates Silas Femi Paris Shimon Paris Paris Center For Peace
Many Tigray refugees entering Sudan with nothing but their clothes: UNHCR

UN News

05:56 min | 3 months ago

Many Tigray refugees entering Sudan with nothing but their clothes: UNHCR

"Nearly sixty thousand people. From ethiopia's volatile tigray region have now crossed the border to remote southeastern sudan optimal than two months of fighting many with just the clothes on their backs. The emergency has created a massive protection challenge for the un refugee agency in sudan. Unhcr which is doing everything. It can't provide what they need as spokesperson. Xl bishop tells us news is daniel johnson. I've just been on a mission to the east. Where i have looked at the response in relation to the refugee influx from ideo. Peel right. so we're going to talk about the refugee influx which comes after two and a half months of fighting water. The numbers now that you're seeing seeking shelter over the border of sudan from ethiopia's northern region of tigray so we have about fifty eight thousand at europeans. Which are actually entered into saddam at the moment the influx is between two to five hundred people daily coming across the border. They're coming in through to border areas Diet and lewke that number coming over two to five hundred a day. That's a lot less than it was but you suggesting that perhaps people are just too far away from the border to get to safety across the border now yes the first influx which resources came from the villages on the western side of tigray at the moment the people which we are seeing of people who have walked for some time what we see is that maybe we have an indication that the western side of being emptied and the people seeking shelter not come from further away. What are they telling you what are their needs. So i mean. Most of the people have Actually entered sudan without anything so they come with their clothes but many many few coming with no possessions at what we hear is that many come without documentation which is also something which we are trying to address the first influx came in relation to direct fighting the influx which we have now. The people are telling us that it's more in relation to the fact that they don't feel safe in tigray not so much because of the fighting because they are from the gray area. So do you have an idea. About what the level of fighting is in tigray today. What is your access you know we are working on the sudan side and our office in addis. Ababa is actually trying to gain access now. What we are doing is trying to relocate them. From the border areas further inland. We have two camps at the moment which are some distance from the border where border conflict should not be a problem. Okay but i'm just concerned that there's no access to hundreds of thousands potentially of people on the other side of the border of sudan with. He need essential food. Water and other services reported rising malnutrition from the office for the coordination of humanitarian affairs and they cited bureaucratic obstacles in in getting access to people who need it so. What's the latest you have on tensely getting help to these people in need as we are sitting here on the sudan side we are focusing on the influx which has come across the border from at the opium and we also have offices in the opium which are dealing with the people who have moved inside the tigray area but also inside at your more at large. So let's talk about two and a half months into this conflict. In the northern region of tigrayan ethiopia. You're trying to relocate tens of thousands potentially of refugees because you've got camps further inland in sudan. Could you may be explain what the difficulties are first of all. It's always a challenge to actually find. Land land something which is owned here by individuals but also by government and we have been working together with the government of sudan. We go a piece of land which is old campsite which is called ambre kuba what we have placed about twenty thousand refugees at the moment here. We have within. I would say short span in able to at least all stem in attempts but also ensure water health and food the second site which we have because kuba has been saturated is tenable. it's further way than kouba and it takes about twelve to fourteen sometimes. Sixteen hours to actually have the buses leaving the border area arriving at the campsite. Which therefore makes it arrivals in the middle of the night now. The campsite is located in a very remote area where we don't have any electricity and we are concerned that actually offloading these amounts of people in the middle of the night with no lights is something of a concern to us. We are trying to do this now. In such a way that we have larger area rub whole set up where we host people until we have the song light out again and then we give them the tents which have been set up for them. Sure and final. Question to you mr bishop. We are two and a half months into this conflict refugees telling you that. They are hopeful. Being able to return amid this fighting between two grants and the marines in the northern region of ethiopia. Refugees are still hopeful. But i think that what we see Is that people are here for longer term and why we have had some people expressing hopes to return they would like to return to the tigray. Which was there some three months ago not to the new situation which stay. I've heard the bald.

Sudan Tigray Ethiopia Daniel Johnson Unhcr Tigrayan Saddam UN Ababa Office For The Coordination Of Addis Ambre Kuba Kouba Kuba Mr Bishop Marines
Sudan says it signs pact on normalizing ties with Israel

NPR News Now

00:55 sec | 3 months ago

Sudan says it signs pact on normalizing ties with Israel

"Sudan has formally signed what are known as the abraham accords to normalize ties with israel treasury secretary steven mnuchin was on hand for the event. Npr's michelle kellerman has details. The trump administration has been encouraging arab states to normalize ties with israel in exchange for separate deals with the us in sudan's case the us remove the african nation from the state sponsors of terrorism list in order to ease sanctions after sudan agreed to compensate victims of several terrorist attacks in africa. Mnuchin also says he signed a deal to provide a loan to sudan to help it clear about one point two billion dollars in arrears to the world bank that could provide much-needed international help four sudan which had been a pariah state during omar shears thirty year role. He was ousted in twenty. Nineteen michelle kellerman. Npr news

Sudan Steven Mnuchin Michelle Kellerman Israel Mnuchin Abraham NPR Treasury United States Africa Omar Shears Npr News
UNHCR relocates first Ethiopian refugees to a new site in Sudan

UN News

01:21 min | 3 months ago

UNHCR relocates first Ethiopian refugees to a new site in Sudan

"A second refugee campus opened in sudan for people fleeing violence in ethiopia's tigray region carrying little more than the clothes on their backs the un said on tuesday. Nearly six hundred new residents are being taken to to nate camp. According to the un refugee agency unhcr. After nearly two months of ongoing conflict across the border in ethiopia between federal government troops and the tigray people's liberation front teepee l f. unhcr spokesperson andrea. Mitchell told journalists in geneva that it was impossible to gauge the level of fighting inside ethiopia amid continuing access restrictions. Right now we are unable to exit the border from the gop. Inside as i said refugees tell our staff when they arrived to saddam the Many of them traveled for days. Many of them have faced armed groups along the way many speakers violence many speak among the among them obviously women and girls have been mentioned sexual violence so this is what we know as to the intensity of the conflict inside copious tigray region. There is nothing i can help you. This stage around eight hundred people have crossed from ethiopia's tigray region into eastern sudan so far this year since addy november more than fifty six thousand ethiopian. Refugees fled the country

Ethiopia Nate Camp Tigray Unhcr UN Sudan Andrea Geneva Mitchell GOP Saddam
New Sudan government acceptable to the people paves way for UNAMID drawdown

UN News

03:04 min | 3 months ago

New Sudan government acceptable to the people paves way for UNAMID drawdown

"Council on tuesday voted to end the hybrid. Un african union civilian support operation for dr four unit beginning. The draw down on the first january marks the end of a force that can withdraw knowing the government is now in the right hand according to the un joint special representative jeremiah. Mama bolo although he tells news in this exclusive interview it does not mean the un is leaving and you assistance mission. Unit will continue to support peace building efforts with most of the violence killed some three hundred thousand endow four and displaced millions. Now apparently over. Mr lamela began by telling del mckie of. Are you a new arabic team. What unit achieved. Since two thousand seven beyond fulfilling its coal mandate of keeping civilian safe as part of that professional civilians were also responsible for mitigating the conflicts that you have seen so many of in who but also to to mediate the violence conflict the government of some van and i'm groups in that pack. The it's not easy. But i think in terms of all that the ability to create this security and barrowman to do those in emissions achieved or beat in the non time comey as you can see in ten years now that we can now. Finally the peace accord ten years coming. That came out of the mission exiting as a peacekeeping mission which means in a sense of the security being no community address country realized that perhaps is no need this emission now that objective has been achieved and i think back you can put down as part of the success of that we have been able with the problems to navigate very difficult situation and imagine a situation where we now have peace not over completely neutral. But you now have a new government in place that is committed to what's peacedale and ensuring that you can forever get rid of the problems that way contact and phase an app development has so let's turn to the other side of the coin. What have been the major challenges for you need like a major tenant was said before. Now what we're dealing with a column in acceptable beat with the government You were dealing with an oppressive regime that was not prepared to give any combs so hands. Perhaps what can come for the length in which we have taken to come to an agreement piece that this was a game that was problematic for the people.

Un African Union Mr Lamela Del Mckie UN Comey Jeremiah Barrowman
"sudan" Discussed on African Tech Roundup

African Tech Roundup

11:00 min | 1 year ago

"sudan" Discussed on African Tech Roundup

"And your mission as an organization. Fees strutted into southern. Anita's say when the piece was sign and everybody was into the aesthetic trying to participate in the development of the country. So around that time mm-hmm five enterpreneurs came up and putting their resources to start a solution understood very well by twenty thirteen. We already had four branches But unfortunately that's when the first conflict broke out and by two thousand sixteen we were forced to close three. Three branches were these. All in south Sudan Sudan all those south Sudan it was really very disappointing period because I think we lost not less than three hundred thousand. US dollars at that time boss because of inflation and because because most of our plans to call to to refuge and that's when we sat with the board and said what do we do. Do we close this to show we we keep it going. And the idea finally came in that lists follow up our clancy into Uganda and see whether we can provide them also financial services in such a setting so i. I traveled to Uganda and followed up a stressful. It was not that difficult difficult and by February seventeen. We are set up. Our branch of costume was a bit apprehensive. Because I mean if you talk to finance institutions nations providing financial services to refugees is north something that everybody wants to do. We fear that they could just leave that country and go to another one or because they do enough security to secure a loan so most likely they met before and it's nothing nothing much you can do but we had event to that the refugees we are dealing with some moved them way our clams and most of them. We understood where they're coming from so so the new US in south Sudan we knew them from south Sudan so sort of there was a link and there was understanding between us and Franklin Wrangler new stuttered way a bit apprehensive but just after six months realize that it was a market niche of that was really in and need of service and we have to mobilize resources for a fuss to make sure we meet this. This market niche so. Oh from ten to seventeen up to now we have been working with their effigies and right now actually a lot of financial institutions begin to realize that you can serve the refugee and they pay even as well as the local pass on so we still maintaining that and also contending our activities in in in south Sudan because all of us have hope that one day peace will come and definitely people will need financial services so right now we're maintaining operations in the main town providing the common businessmen have been talking about financial services especially especially loans in such an environment and then they're Davantage Lazlo walking into countries that there's always linkage because because they come from south Sudan and the AINU Ganda so it's very easy for us to even use a collateral that they have in South Sudan for them to secured loans in Uganda and they also families along the way who want to send money from south Sudan into Uganda to their relatives in the refugee settlements. I saw parentally even before again. What we have not planned for is something that will realize this happening? We are becoming a very good link for families and refugees and for other relatives who are back in the country in south Sudan essentially remittance service. Now Yeah exactly. We are especially from Juba to one of the settlements in a place called Perot arena. We have really been very very wherever much appreciated by their fees and even the business people because some business people want to buy certain woods from South Sudan which I know. They're in Uganda. So they can easily remit the money from our settlement and then withdraw it from from south Sudan. So they're really found it a very important service. I'm I'm curious to know. What gap existed? That allowed you to come up with. This idea was not a formal banking infrastructure. That was serving the people and if did was there. Why wasn't it serving the kind base you? Currently so in Uganda or in south Sudan in south Sudan so when you first launched in south Sudan and what was the state of banking infrastructure and at what extent was it making lending available to I suppose the business people when when we set it in two thousand eight there was busy Kelly the very fuel okay. We had some bonds and most of these thanks. We are way of foreign banks and of course they are just in the town of Juba. So you find out if you go to some of the outskirts or settings things. There was no financial service providers. And that's why we found out that it was necessary. Then due to financial EST may at the microfinance microfinance level that we also in south Sudan but also realize they're just within the town but the service that started with took them to the outskirts. We we started in a place called Kaji which was about to two hours drive from Juba and the people appreciated it because yes. It was something that they've never expected coming in. And of course we realize people needed it because everybody was the mystic about building the development all developing the country so some of them needed money to be able to do that and they found that our service of trying to provide loans at that time was was raided. The truth is most of them had never heard before so it also involve desk trying to do some financial literacy for them to understand ending and times about security and all that but ultimately it picked up and actually because of that effort we put in. That's why when we came to Uganda down the understood that we have really tried to help them and frankly we when we came in the some of them asked us why didn't do. Just what is it that drives you. YOU HAVE MITT losses in south Sudan and again following trying to come and provide services in in Uganda so people didn't understand but we have calling which is like a social calling because realized there was also in Uganda. That was under sowed so it was basically trying to be part of the team that is building the country that really drove these five inte- preneurs to start and grow the company. Moving into Uganda was sort of like desperate. Move because You've lost a lot of money but you said okay list also throw some money there and see what comes out but surprisingly as we talk now is being well in Uganda. That was going to be my next question. Inscription is clearly have you recovered from that loss. And the limits to altruism contend here to what extent is this is this a calculated for profit entity and to what extent are you perhaps willing to sustain further losses in the name of of the boarding your people. No I don't think we are not. We are not ready to sustain more losses losses. That's why we we actually right now as I talk. We decided to maintain operations in new gun in south Sudan at only two branches inches. We don't intend to expand or open those branches reclosed until we see that there is permanent peace and then the south Sudan is Spohn has really gained some value always a bit stable against the foreign currency. Well in Uganda of course is and then they. They don't see link Israeli stable against the local on foreign currency so this is a very big chance of expanding because even now in both countries we are sustainable bowl. Yes in Uganda Norwood being better now. We have four branches. We have three branches opening their force in February. So we have a high hope that I I built aspects much as again we are dealing with refugees and also some host communities is so much more high in Uganda at the moment then in south Sudan so his profitability in sight. Nice insight since I. How many people do you serve with right now? In Uganda we have who two thousand three hundred and fifty clans that we we are working with and the about seventy five percent of these refugees and then we have forced communities communities we not entirely targeting refugees but because we work mostly in the settlements the new final that a lot of our work is also going going towards serving serving refugees then in south Sudan. We have about one thousand eight hundred because most people move out of the country so as you said South Sudan Dan we are moving cautiously. We don't want to have our fingers bent for the second time saw really the strategy is to make sure the operations are continuing and then until final piece comes in. That's when we have ditch us now to expand and open the other branches that we're we're closed strategies also to make sure that when the refugees go back they can continue with the services that they have been getting from Uganda because when they come back they'll find NASA they and then we'll be able to continue to to provide them with services as an again them losing the services that have been getting and then taking go back to zero so we are trying to place that cross-border strategist to make sure that we provide the same services they go back. We're taking a quick breathe to tell you a little more about spark. The presenting sponsor of the series spark is a Dutch. NGO with a difference since being founded by two Dutch students a little over twenty five years ago the organization has grown delivered expert job creation services in fourteen of the world's most conflict affected regions including Libya Palestine nine and South Sudan. Spa Creates job opportunities for young people by.

south Sudan Uganda Sudan Sudan Uganda Norwood US Juba Anita NASA Perot arena clancy Wrangler Kaji Libya Davantage Lazlo Spohn Kelly
"sudan" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"sudan" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Today on the world after weeks of protests and violent sedans military rule is the greatest share power would be opposition until election can be held many in sudan doubt the generals will give up their power and many of them have to because they were part of this eighteen year regime of the sheer so they want to be empowered to protect themselves and they have also visited the museum of the palestinian people in washington and blogs from the white house and we want some people will dome and hot right to come in have an issue it doesn't matter if they're not the most important combination i'm marco werman those stories plug a preview of the women's world cup final on sunday all of that today here on the world i'm marco werman and this is the world celebrations in sudan capital cartoon today after months of massive sometimes violent protests pro democracy advocates in the ruling military party have reached a deal the two sides agreed to create eight joint council and share power for the next three years until elections were held an soya senior africa correspondents the bbc she says the deal comes after a long stalemate between the two sides so finally they agreed that each side would gave a five members to day suffering council i'm these and eleventh member who we understand would be a civilian but may or may not be a military leader has closed skepticism skepticism and a shoe they supportive of their position lance because they say he's a retired military officer so he's he fully civilian to who does he or she pledge allegiance so they have.

washington white house marco werman officer sudan africa eighteen year three years
"sudan" Discussed on Worldly

Worldly

03:09 min | 2 years ago

"sudan" Discussed on Worldly

"Back in January, we talked about protests and Sudan, now half a year later those protests, continue, and while demonstrators have seen some success events recently took a very dark turn. This is wurley a part of the vox media podcast network. I'm Alex ward hosting the show for the first time along with my co host friend, who you just heard. Woo, Jen Williams. The Zach is on his honeymoon, which may somewhere on earth, but someday, he'll come back to us and that's hopefully next week. In the meantime, Jen, and I are going to do our best to get you up to speed on the roughly seven months of sedan protests that have taken such a deadly turn recently. So before we get there Jen, do you mind giving us just a little bit of a backstory. Yep. So for those of you who didn't listen to our last episode on Sudan, we forgive you for this view, who didn't have just forgotten. We also forgive you. So, basically, in December twenty eighteen protests erupted in Sudan. Originally. They were over the price of food, but they pretty quickly turned into a protest about the country's really bad economy. And then they kind of spiraled into this protests about the leadership so about that leader. That guy's name is Omar al-bashir. He was in charge of Sudan from one thousand nine hundred eighty nine and the spoiler alert, he was not good, basically ran the country into the ground after he took it over in a military coup. You may remember the genocide of Dr four in the western part of the country, that was his brain child. Right. So there was a uprising in the western part of the country. He used a very brutal militia to quell that uprising and basically it's led to him being known as one of the world's most brutal leaders and even being referred to the international criminal court. So not the best guy, right? Yes. So he literally in the process of putting down that rebellion committed, or at least accused pretty credibly of having committed multiple counts of genocide work Ryan's in crimes against humanity. So brutal guy brutal dictator now these protests back when we covered it in January were new, and it seemed like a really big, and if new thing that was happening. We didn't know really wear. They we're gonna go whether they were going to be successful and they were really inspiring. So there's a great piece on box dot com about how there was a big contingent of women in the country who are leading the protest movement. There are all these like, amazing inspiring scenes of women and children and just all sorts of people into Dan from all walks of life coming out into the street like dancing, and singing, and it was a very positive movement. And, and Jen, I remember us talking about that in the newsroom and just thinking, like this is such a different sort of view. We have of these kinds of, of protests. These protests have been going on since December, and they've been holding onto the pressure and continuing the pressure on Bashir and the regime for quite some time and to the point that even like military members. Effectively told him to step down last April. So that's a coup, right? I mean. No, no. If ands or buts about it. It was a coup, even though he said he was never going to go. He's gone. And so, yeah. Victory, jen. Yeah..

Jen Williams Sudan Bashir vox media Alex ward Omar al-bashir Zach Woo Ryan Dan seven months
"sudan" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

08:49 min | 2 years ago

"sudan" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"Sudan Good Industry You've got your Bank God bless you Wait You got Some Bag I've done my sentence Thanks June and. Everything Thank you Thirty five Weekends we rock and we'll rock on if we check best Joining anywhere fast we've got, problems on seventy eight both. Sides of the highway this morning eastbound side in new accident just can't do a couple of moments ago on seventy eight. East coming up to exit twenty four in through Whitehouse station. So delays there with two lanes blocked on the westbound side we, have construction just a little bit west of two eighty seven..

Whitehouse station Sudan
"sudan" Discussed on The Tiny Meat Gang Podcast

The Tiny Meat Gang Podcast

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"sudan" Discussed on The Tiny Meat Gang Podcast

"I he goes i don't wanna see you die and he liked gently grabs his hand on the barrel and convinces them to lower it i'm like no because the people who do that shit or like mentally so far gone like not to go even darker but i'm like i've ever watched the columbine footage know it's fucking awful i it's it makes me sick you know like i've made here's one thing i'll say is like after watching that made me not want to joke about school shootings in your like period okay maybe that's what it took i don't know not like you know what i'm saying is it's funny because that to me makes you makes me think like all my jokes before about skull sudan like that and that was the time where i'm where i made me wanna stop joking about school shooting because before every single joke man it was about school i had so many arsenal jokes sorry no bad language a whole arsenal arsenal jokes shooting kind of animated about this but like i don't know no it wasn't that it was just more like i i looked at that and i'm like now you know what now school shootings are just so far like they're now romanticized they're like the they're so far beyond like what they should be like before i would like right tweets and shit about it to try to be like your what hello flexes keep happening and like now it's the fact that it's that anyways finally they're making a fucking video game yeah it's just like sorry go with your final yeah my my just my final thought on all that is just like in columbine those kids were like antagonizing everyone and they had like intent and it was so obvious and i'm like yo you cannot put media out there that is like telling people like stand up to a school shooter and you know if you're gay and and and someone beats you up or like calls you gay.

sudan
"sudan" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"sudan" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"A lot of different south sudanese tribes who had never been able to participate in any kind of joint activity as a nation to come on stage and to do something together so the production that was put on was intentionally mixing the tribal dresses of all these different tribes and literally enacting a kind of unity that they were still having to work through and still all having to work through in a very real sense in the in the political domain but this was creating a story which was a story of nationbuilding and a story that was bringing all of the different parts of south sudan together so it it was an extraordinary autistic moment could you envision sitting with a at a at a venue filled with enthusiastic locals watching a shakespeare play in the local language and fell through dan what would this theme be live and i can just imagine the play having been adapted to the cultural struggles of this generation people just getting into it and whooping it up what would that be like if you happen to be able to witness that himself sudan yesterday did perform the production many times back in in juba after it had been performed at london they were largely outdoor performances although the strangest part of the stories that so central to the early part of south sudanese identity formation was this play the shakespeare play that there there was a plan it may still be in train to build a replica of shakespeare's globe would you can visit in london in juba in south sudan with slight south sudanese adaptations but yeah i mean it it's definitely a a production that draws you in you know those extraordinary moment in sibling when posthumous the male hero is is approached by imaging that heroin with whom he is deeply in love with who he's wronged but he doesn't recognize him and he he knocks down and.

sudan juba london shakespeare heroin
"sudan" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"sudan" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"This is one of these countries that is kind of the result of colonial border drawing generations ago which was a norring ethnic realities was at fair to say oh absolutely yes essentially the two british put together two administrative regions for their own convenience which shared very little in terms of a historic coach at the north is a very arabic influence place a with cultural influences from egypt and the middleeast whereas the south is filled with a much will bantu influenced culture that the look south so if we think of the most desperate struggling falling apart countries libya syria iraq sudan a lot of their problems do go back to careless selfish colonial line drawing century go don't they oh absolutely i mean i i think a lot of these places are are living through the consequences of decisions that will meda a long time ago so now we have this bold little country breaking away from the majority of the sudan because they are ethnically different and they have an affinity for shakespeare you know i would imagine you can take some of the themes of shakespeare's great plays swap out a few of them proper nouns and have something that provides for a communal identity is is that actually a part of shakespeare's purpose in south sudan is just helping people relate to the struggles they've had with colonial overlords just like combating forces did centuries ago in shakespeare's plays yes at one of the extraordinary things about this translation of of cymbeline which is really not very well known shakespeare play it's one of the the greatest hits was not only it's a story about the formation of british identity as britain's separates from the roman empire acid it's a story of rebellion the british rebellion against the roman empire so it's really a story that thinks about the violence of war and national identity and and and the relationship between the two but in putting this play on it was also beat an experience which allow.

egypt sudan shakespeare britain libya syria iraq
"sudan" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"sudan" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"It was quite expensive to hop into a taxi or quite expensive to stay in a hotel oh yeah i mean because the state in large part everyone there is on a a governmental expense account usually because the only travellers on development travellers so as a is so often the case in africa when a a new nation is being born in aid money is is flooding eytan there are small operators who are pretty kenny it turning up and providing the services providing taxi writes in hotels and even does abdullah supermarket which had a pretty wide selection of champagne magnums as long as you are willing to pay in dollars but for the average south sudanese if there was very good live the structure now do i understand english is the official language of south sudan english is now yes is the official language of southie don't and in fact as an extraordinary shakespearean story behind us in that one of the reasons that they chose english to be the official language it was obvious he impart a rejection of arabic the arabic language of of the north which had been the official language of the country for which they had left but one of the brigadier's in the south sudanese people's liberation army who was central to making this decision to move to english fell in love with shakespeare volume of shakespeare that had been given to him by a missionary when he was fighting as a boy soldier in the civil wars in in the 1980s our guest on travel with rick steve's as edward wolff and lee he's a professor of literature cambridge in the author of shakespeare in swaziland in search of a global poet his website is edward will finley dot com.

africa kenny shakespeare rick steve edward wolff professor swaziland abdullah official sudan
"sudan" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"sudan" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Spirit cambridge he returned to east africa to explore how the writings of william shakespeare paid a defining role in the region from colonial times to the process of establishing new nations his travels included a stop in juba the capital of south sudan it's the world's newest nation born out of decades of civil war but whose challenges are far from over edward outlines what he found in his book shakespeare in swaziland edward wilson lee thanks for joining us thanks for having me on wrecked so tell us a little bit about your love of shakespeare in your connection with east africa so i grew up in east africa i went to boarding school in switzerland and then university in the united kingdom i fell in love with shakespeare during my teenage years nenette university in ended up teach in that but i didn't think until i stumbled upon the beginnings of this project that i'd be able to connect these two parts of my life growing up in east africa but um i found the beginnings of the project in this one of the earliest text presidents while he was a lation of charles and mary lambs tales from shakespeare so i went out to east africa to zanzibar to research that and just found from there that was a threat i could talk at an stories just kept coming and coming and it covers read the whole history of eastern africa from the mid nineteenthcentury to the present day in an has just an endless cost of colorful characters involved in it in your your book shakespeare in swaziland his reference to the language that spoken through most of east africa and sudan just barely makes that terrain talk about uh just briefly to set the stage the story of south sudan it's been in the news in the last decade yes o south sudan historically because of how the british divided the region up during colonial period and afterwards had been part of a single country with what is now just known as sued on but the northern part of the country is a very arabic influence an arabicspeaking nation whereas the southern part is much more bantu hsieh's much more with the countries to itself so the south sudan declared in.

cambridge civil war switzerland africa swaziland hsieh south sudan east africa william shakespeare edward wilson lee mary zanzibar
"sudan" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"sudan" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"After five years travelling overland to every country in africa francis tap on has some amazing stories when i told them i wanted to go there and drive across had no way you're you're going through a war zone basically coming up we'll find out what kind of journey he ha fit balanced my car on fixing canoe when edward wilson lee went to south sudan he found that a local shakespeare production has had a big part to play in establishing their new nation it was an experience which allowed a lot of different south sudanese tribes who had never been able to participate in any kind of joint activity as a nation to come on stage and to do something together in here why the region of normandy as one of the favoured countryside getaways in france you see cows everywhere happy cows so we have lots of cheese an epic journey across africa finding shakespeare in south sudan and the pleasures of normandy it'll just ahead on travel with rick steep it's a favorite we can get away from pierce in the region comes complete with great scenery important historical sites and its own tasty specialties we'll explore what makes normandy such a great destination a little later in the hour ahead on today's travel with rick steve's and adventure traveler and filmmaker francis on checks in with us from the end of the road in egypt he's just completed his fiveyear long quest to visit every one of the fifty four countries in africa has joins us from luxor where he's been celebrating with a cruise on the nile in just a bit first let's explore how shakespeare's been playing a role in the decolonisation of africa as the new nation of south sudan forges its own identity we're joined now by an english literature professor who found that all the world love shakespeare even in africa's newest nations he grew up in kenya with american and british parents who worked as conservationists there today edward wilson lius a professor of literature who teaches shake.

france sudan rick steve francis luxor english literature professor kenya professor edward wilson lee normandy africa shakespeare edward wilson lius five years fiveyear
"sudan" Discussed on World Cafe

World Cafe

02:51 min | 3 years ago

"sudan" Discussed on World Cafe

"Sudan's so leave to love need to leave two squarely two a yeah john no way stewart sure we should this shown so three his shock weird she's journal she she's shown i don't know after swinging eggs the low so i do at a piece of chocolate sown by tory amos off her new album called native invader until he slinger linger i'm tori i know that raising awareness about sexual assault is a caused that's really near and dear to you you cofounded rain which is the rape abuse and incest national network it's an organization that holds awareness campaigns and manages a sexual assault hotline that was sort of sparked by your song me in a gun from little earthquakes your album in 1992 that song was about your own experience being raped when you were 21 and i know that there is a period of time when you were performing that song every single night uh telling your story every single night so obviously writing a song like me and a gun that you choose to sing every night and reporting a sexual assault for the very first time are two different things but there are also not um and i guess i'm wondering why have you at this particular moment what you would say to somebody who's on the fence and thinking about coming forward for the first time well coming forward after you have.

Sudan assault stewart rape
"sudan" Discussed on Pod Save the World

Pod Save the World

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"sudan" Discussed on Pod Save the World

"I cannot stress enough there's no backstop here i mean i think people soon well there's some grown up somewhere right who will make sure he doesn't know screw up too bad or something this now there's no this is it like you're in the office you decide whether to take a strike to kill somebody you decide whether to start a war he will have to make hundreds of those decisions that will happen every week here and there is not anybody else will make decisions warm make you feel better tony's i remember having that conversation with you in two thousand nine we had all these meetings about sudan policy and one time after one of them are talking just like holy fuck like you always think when you're us at a government there's another room where the important people are really calling the shots and suddenly you're in the room minutes not always the best feeling has trumpian as bad as you guys feared when that night both in terms of unraveling what obama accomplished climate iran cuba but also just for generally doing damage to our reputation i i'll take this one as sure i get first crack at this he's been worse in in in you here's why like yeah the scorecard paris iran cuba pull out of paris half robot cuba not quite be smart enough to figure out how to get overrun but he did a lot of red meat in their form sorry about that they've deep sitter but but i would is more concerning to me is underneath that.

obama cuba paris tony sudan iran
"sudan" Discussed on Counting Countries

Counting Countries

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"sudan" Discussed on Counting Countries

"Along with his mother uh lady violent bay clam that was the name of his mother so they were gonna come together under it in an initial version of this they were actually going to finish the countries of the world's a he was meant to be finishing the country's in serbia this this was going to be his great uh but then he didn't show walk as you said in serbia he he won't come back and um he had set well not he but his assistance sent an email to one of the travellers saying that william has been hospitalized he's very ill he's not gonna be able to be in touch for awhile uh of the assistant will try to keep us in thought you know about developments and that's it you're not out of the blue this message in case so two things stood out in somewhat of a short period of time his noshow in sudan slash south sudan and uh several weeks after that he didn't show up to serbia which was going to be his last un country with his mother in the now are the warning bells going off in your head at this all yeah yeah yeah it went when he was in there i'm like okay uh i knew then i'm like okay we're talking about prompting seriously wrong and i'm going to find out what it is uh because there were many travellers vat it was easy to have an initial kind of discussion about it with the other people that at this conference give or take how many extreme travelers went to the conference in how many of them give or take had interactions with william.

serbia william sudan
"sudan" Discussed on WGTK

WGTK

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"sudan" Discussed on WGTK

"Scoring the backbone of southern resists through and they were able to mobilize people in the anger she charged with this is a kind of a hold e or and that those who participated in it could follow the rules of jihad which move a clue until enslaving robbing a cow go any kind of move with movable property including people and women and children were particularly i you know you school and they were all they were abducted taking into slavery in this route carried on until the war ended in two thousand five but the end of the war didn't bring about the release of the slaves so there are still by our uh as far as we can tell there are still some tens of thousands on women and children equi killer who are who were left behind uh who were not liberated they stayed in north sued northern sudan with their their masters and during this period of time of course they give birth so there are little baby slave crying we're born in the north had never lived in southern sudan and john allied you need the comprehensive peace agreement that was signed in two thousand five why didn't stop that practice this well it didn't stop her practice in the sense that it's not the slave rating that was one of the achievements so do the rating of villages from the taking of slaves stopped but it did not bring about deliberation and x creation of those who had been enslaved didn't do so because the issue was too hot sensibly.

sudan
"sudan" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

PBS NewsHour

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"sudan" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

"Civil war is emptying huge swaths of south sudan the violence has uprooted four million people including two million who fled to neighboring countries in the last year more than a million south sudanese have poured into northern uganda alone crossing makeshift bridges like this one to flee fighting hunger and brutal attacks on civilians dis contribued fighting british rule midafternoon disputed our properties to defraud when similar pies family went to one of the refugee camps initially he stayed behind to look after the families most precious commodity their cattle he hit for a year to escape the violence the refugees carry whatever they can salvage mattresses parts clothes note folks remnants of once peaceful lives turned upside down pat's checkpoints ugandan soldiers searched their belongings for weapons before the refugees proceed to reception centres after entering uganda the refugees sign in a smaller way stations for many it's the first night spending safety after walking for days to escape fighting levy etiquette fled with his wife and four children new did not run aground sort started we lead under a tree with the former because there was nowhere else to hard we waited for the forty two style and then we gotta started walk into your garden uganda now shoulders most of the burden of africa's biggest refugee crisis managing a constellation of camps which require food water health care and policing at in that be camp now home to more than one hundred twenty thousand south sudanese new arrivals receive vaccinations hot meals and basic items such as seoul and plastic tarps to build a house the government also gives each refugee families a small plot of land about a twentieth of an acre where they can build attend shelter and grow crops to eat or cell but the land often proves to rocky for farming after completing the registration process the new arrivals will receive their plot of land.

Civil war sudan uganda pat seoul africa
"sudan" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

SOFREP Radio

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"sudan" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

"A wall because right now they're not and said if put them on the concept line you just allow on all the room in the world for russia to cement victory and it will for sure i will moving on to another continent here i and another area of expertise for you with what's going on in africa this is our really under reported story from last month you sent me over this article from business rider south sudan rebels say us reporter killed by government for photographer photographing the fight chryst for allen a twenty five year old freelance journalist was among nineteen killed on saturday morning once again this is from last month when fighting erupted between opposition and government forces along the border between south sudan and uganda so they're saying that on that it was could that this man along with the nineteen eighteen others were killed by the government i there seems to be some discrepancy there uh but it's not something we've covered on the podcast yet even though this is an old your story said like to get into it and get your perspective i mean m first off jerusalem was was a good friend of mine oh wow air not i didn't i just knew that you sent me this article that i wasn't it's okay spoke briefly with that a gun on the body when he wrote to species i actually spoke to sahlin twelve hours before found out he was dead.

russia reporter sudan uganda jerusalem africa us allen twenty five year twelve hours
"sudan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:58 min | 4 years ago

"sudan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The icc can than interview and where it cannot if we talk about syria today syria is not a state party to the rome statute matter i mean you've you've got countries where they're not statement it is like the sudan and the president of sudan bashiti's has been in doubt because i say syria because people say that the selective justice in 2014 65 nations called for the syrian conflict to be referred to the court and it was vetoed let me just them mm back to the the fact that the un security council for the sedan case to the idea with the one about five million why we were example clarify the fact that in the sudan is not a state party to the statute and did not only we do not have territorial jurisdiction but saddam was referred to the icc in one of the ways that can be geared to collusion security council i wasn't sharon acid when sixty five nations called for the syrian conflict to be referred to the court held was into india this is what i learned but i think would ideally be asked of the un security cutting shows you that the selective justice and you are part of that framework means that were you upset that syria wasn't referred not i beg to differ that we are part of the process the fact of the matter is even though un security council under the rome statute country for cases to the icc but when these cases thumb we subject to the same test as we do by making sure that our crimes have been committed the allegations of and that is this within that all the legal requirements are met for us to open an investigation so it will fly the president sharon acid forces have not being guilty and this this this is far from what i say one thing is that even if a case for by the un security council as the saddam had been done under league libya we subject them through the same test.

icc syria sudan president sudan bashiti un security council saddam india libya rome sharon acid