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FDA Authorizes First Antigen Test to Help in the Rapid Detection of the Virus that Causes COVID-19 in Patients

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:49 sec | Last month

FDA Authorizes First Antigen Test to Help in the Rapid Detection of the Virus that Causes COVID-19 in Patients

"A new type of coronavirus test is reaching the market in summer expressing caution about its accuracy the first antigen test for the new coronavirus has been approved by the food and drug administration this Sophia to test from quite dell corporation looks for protein traces of the virus known as antigens from a nasal swab similar to screenings done for flu or strep throat the trade off is it's less accurate than genetic testing a former FDA official Scott Gottlieb says this test will miss about twenty percent of patients who actually have colluded nineteen but he and others agree the test will greatly expand screening capability needed to reopen businesses and schools they suggest though anyone with symptoms he tested negative undergo the more thorough genetic screening which takes hours to

Sophia FLU Scott Gottlieb Dell FDA Official
Gottlieb says newly approved test could be "game changer"

KYW 24 Hour News

04:00 min | Last month

Gottlieb says newly approved test could be "game changer"

"We heard from the FDA that they have given emergency use authorization for the first antigen test to discover cobit nineteen so that any substance that causes your immune system to produce antibodies against it how significant is this authorization how will this work well I think this kind of technology is a real game changer in this test was authorized by the FDA under leadership chipper Jeff Sherman who runs that device center in twenty four hours from receiving the application what it is it's a very rapid tests that can be used in a doctor's office doctors now have about forty thousand the Sophia machines already installed in our offices and you do a simple nasal swab and the test itself stands for the antigens that the virus produces the test is about eighty five percent sensitive so let's say a hundred people come into a doctor's office who have Kobe nineteen eighty five of them are going to be able to be tested positive with this has very quickly to cheap test will probably be about five dollars a test and you can get a result within five minutes for the other fifteen the doctors are going to have to have an index of suspicion that the patient may have covert nineteen and send off one of the PCR based tests which take about twenty four hours get the results back but for those eighty five patients that you can screen out right away you're getting a very fast result you can start to take action immediately the company itself said that they're going to be able to produce about two hundred thousand these tests starting right away but in several weeks they'll be able to produce up to one point five million a week so this dramatically expands our testing capacity as long as doctors are able to run these tests in their offices as long as they can run them how different is this kind of testing from what we've heard so much about where states are struggling to get capacity and they're looking for you know reagents and cotton swabs does this solve those challenges well it helps solve the challenges I mean every test paradigm is a little bit different has pros and cons of PCR based tests with the states have struggled to get the testing supplies those are more accurate but they also take more time and it costs more to perform the reimbursements about a hundred dollars maybe if you do that at scale you can get the cost down to fifty dollars there is point of care based systems like the abit machine at the White House is using the gene expert which is very reliable those take a little longer to get a result their sensitivity isn't as good as the PCR based machines with the exception of the gene expert which is very accurate these energy based tests aren't as reliable meaning they're not as sensitive so they're going to miss some patients who have code red button hands of a doctor who already has a high index of suspicion that the patient may have the disease and if they get a negative test may still think the patient may be infected they'll send off a PCR based tests allow you to dramatically expand testing and they're very cheap they're very easy to perform and again most doctors have these machines already in their offices are using for strep throat and flu the challenge is going to be what the guidance is from the CDC and public health agencies about how doctors test in their offices if turning over positive case in your medical office means that you have to do a deep cleaning and quarantine nursing staff and close your office doctors are going to be testing and that would be unfortunate because there's a big installed base of these tests already in place so CDC has to come out with flexible guidelines and how doctors can protect their offices and protect their staff and also be testing in the community because we can't do that then we're not going to have access to testing the challenge will be the platforms will be plenty of capacity to perform tests the challenge will come where can you go get the test you said this could be more accurate than a testing system the White House is currently using let me ask you about these aides who had been testing positive at the White House our top three medical officials in the U. S. government are now in self quarantine because of possible exposure they work in the White House at the fortress but the virus is still made it inside I want to play for you you what president trump said this week when he revealed one of vice president pence's aides tested positive she tested positive out of the blue this is

FDA
The Latest on Testing

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

10:12 min | 2 months ago

The Latest on Testing

"When you were a kid. Did you ever make one of those pinhole cameras? Were you cut a little hole into a piece of cardboard and then look through it on some ways. That's kind of how we're looking at the corona virus nowadays through a tiny little window part of the reason. We haven't been able to get a bigger picture because this is a new corona virus and we're learning as we go along. We have also had inadequate testing across the nation so the inability to know the true extent of this outbreak becomes a major barrier in terms of getting the country back to work. We need clear vision and so far we haven't had that. I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta. Chief medical correspondent and this is corona virus fact versus fiction. There are currently only two types of corona virus tests available in the United States. Because I'm a healthcare worker. Who still takes care of patients in the hospital? I've had both of them. I'm GonNa give you a little poke over Uruguay. Don't okay. We're all done it. Okay early on there. Were some significant delays in testing and there was also the release of a flawed test. Which really put us far behind since then there have been a lot of unauthorized on validated tests. Which have flooded the market the most common and most accurate test we have is called a PR test. A polymerase chain reaction tests. Now that's the one that detects whether or not someone is currently infected with Kovic nineteen. It involves a saliva test in some cases or more commonly a nasal swab. Cnn's Brooke Baldwin referred to it as a brain Taylor so that gets sent off to a lab where the genetic material is extracted. And because there's such a small amount of genetic material it is then amplified. That's the polymerase chain reaction. If all goes well results usually come back within a few hours but it can take a few days if you have to send it to a lab somewhere then. There are the antibody tests. Those are the ones that can determine whether or not someone has had cove in nineteen in the past and might have some immunity to it now. Those involved collecting a small blood sample either through a needle in the vein or three blood spot sample. But here's the problem. Antibody tests have not been consistently accurate. There are a lot of bad tests out there and it's still unclear how much those antibodies might protect you from the virus in the future. When you're testing for the virus the biggest problem would be having a false negative. Why because you would think that you don't have the virus and then you might go back out into the community into a nursing home into a hospital and potentially infect people with the antibody test which you really hoping to avoid is a false positive. Then someone might feel that they have the antibodies thus feel that they are protected. Go out into the community to a hospital to a nursing home and spread the virus so with the diagnostic virus test. You really have to reduce false negatives with the antibody test you really have to reduce false positives. The promise of the immunology test to find out we have. The antibodies is huge. That's Kevin Delay on senior fellow at the University of Southern California's Schwarzenegger Institute for State in Global Policy. The institute supports test sites across Los Angeles. This can influence policymakers at the local state and federal level. That can actually inform us. When it comes to social distancing if I'm immune in scientifically I've been proven to be immune then I can re enter the workforce and I could play a bigger role and make sure we're safe for a company called Roche announced that it received emergency use authorization. Eu A for an antibody test it claims is more accurate than most Roe says. It has already started shipping. Its new test to leading labs around the world. Here's Rosillo Severin Schwan. It's really special. Because it is so accurate. It's it's almost perfect. Accuracy and allows us is to really reliably test whether a person has been infected by the corner virus or opt irrespective of whether you had symptoms or not now. There's another kind of tasks they could be useful here. It's called an antigen test again. The test for the virus is the PR or diagnostic tests. The test for the antibody is called a serology test. And now the antigen tests look for a protein on the surface of the virus. You may have already had one of these if you've ever had a test for strep throat or the flu. Here's the problem. A reliable antigen test for the corona virus isn't yet available in the United States. But the hope is that will soon have something that works kind of like an ad home pregnancy test. Were a test strip. Would change color detail if you might have the virus. Frederick Nolte is a pathology professor and the head of Corona virus testing at the Medical University of South Carolina. Antigen detection has been part of the diagnostic landscape for a number of years and it has a number of appeals. It can be done relatively quickly. it's inexpensive. It can be deployed in a number of clinical settings outside of the laboratory near the patients but the chief concern with it has been the sensitivity and they low sensitivity means a high false negative and with high false negatives people feel that they don't have the virus and they go back out in the community and potentially continue the spread so how available. Rpcr antibody tests to the general public is probably the question. I get more than any other as of Monday. Johns Hopkins University's Kovic Tracking Project was reporting over seven. Million people in the United States have been tested and they mean the diagnostic or PCR tests in this case but again the initial rollout of those tests was fraught with problems and that caused major delays in the country's early response to the pandemic. Those problems are being addressed now but there are still supply chain shortages the PR requires certain transport mediums reagents and yes nasal swabs and those things have been in short supply but just last week. The mayor of Los Angeles announced free diagnostic testing for all of the county's residents because we know the ten million residents county need that it's critical for US opening up in the future. That's Mayor Eric. Garcetti on CNN and we wanted to be the first big city in America to take the advice of doctors around the country saying you have to find the silence spreaders. This is a silent killer that people without symptoms who can spread. This are critical piece of knowledge in order to open up in the future and in New York City mayor. Bill de Blasio says the city will produce its own cove in nineteen tests kits in partnership with Three D. Printing Company. We realize we had to find another source. Global Market wasn't working. There weren't sources around this country that were reliable enough so we decided we would make our own and this has had been put together very quickly. So we're really an uncharted territory. Creating these tests kids in New York City again. It's these nasal swabs that have been in such short supply in so many places around the country. Now there are also plenty of antibody tests floating around that have not been reviewed or validated by the FDA. The agency said Monday that it was tightening. Its policy to keep unproven and even fraudulent tests from entering the market. It's been a big problem in one. Study of twelve antibody tests. Four were shown to deliver false positive results more than ten percent of the time. Remember if you're testing for. Antibodies and you get a false positive people may incorrectly. Assume they now have the antibodies and are protected and then go out into public and keep spreading. You really want to get that false positive rate under two percent as low as possible. Really the future could lie in at home. Testing Antigen tests would be the easiest to mass produce for home use but again like I said we don't yet have a reliable antigen test for Kovic Nineteen White House Corona Virus Task Force member. Dr Deborah Burke said this last month on. Nbc's Meet the press we have to have a breakthrough innovation and testing. We have to be able to detect antigen than constantly tried to detect the actual live virus or the viral particles itself and to really move into Antigen testing. If an antigen test is approved and mass produced it may serve as a valuable screening tool. But it's probably not going to replace the P. C. R. Saliva or swab tests when it comes to diagnosing Kovic nineteen the Antigen test in this case would be used to screen the PR test would still be the most accurate according to the Guardian scientists working for the US military have designed a PC test. That has the potential to detect the virus as early as twenty four hours after its contracted that could help stop infected people from spreading the virus before they even show symptoms and keep in mind. A lot of people never show symptoms but can still spread the virus. It's another promising maybe and remember this. Testing does need to go hand in hand with contact. Tracing once you find out who's infected that person needs to be isolated and then everyone who has had close contact with that person needs to be traced and sometimes those people need to be quarantined as well test trace and hopefully treat

United States Corona Virus Task Force Los Angeles CNN New York City Dr Sanjay Gupta Rosillo Severin Schwan Roche NBC Johns Hopkins University Brooke Baldwin Uruguay Bill De Blasio Dr Deborah Burke Medical University Of South Ca Guardian EU Kevin Delay
Providing Cost-Effective Quality Consumer-Driven Healthcare with Henry Legere, CEO, Founder at Reliant Immune Diagnostics

Outcomes Rocket

06:56 min | 3 months ago

Providing Cost-Effective Quality Consumer-Driven Healthcare with Henry Legere, CEO, Founder at Reliant Immune Diagnostics

"What inspires your work in in healthcare. Henry I mean so there's not just one thing but one thing that I can say Is definitely a seminal moment was when I was in the fourth grade? My Dad had a stroke right in front of me out at a restaurant and so over the course of from being in the fourth grade through going to college. My Dad was in the military at the time so he was considered a hundred percent permanently disabled after that and Had been veterans benefits that when The Radio Administration froze veterans benefits in the eighties. They hit our family. Pretty hard and so Trying to find access to healthcare when the veteran's hospitals and clinics were closed and then actually be able to afford healthcare. You know just being a child and watching your your parents struggle like that was very impactful so when I went to college. It was halfway with a sense of purpose to you know one day. Try to practice healthcare and be compassionate and and just be mindful of the challenges that families with healthcare burdens experience. Wow that's a story man. I I didn't even know that. So at one point during the Reagan administration the VA closed. Yeah so it was. It was one of those things where it was one of those things where the government didn't have a budget and they were playing hard ball and so I think that the Reagan administration and I'm not playing politics. I you know. I think that I think the Reagan administration so there were a lot of entitlements that they needed to be cut when you're trimming the the belt and try to figure out how to balance the budget and get people to come to the table and it was a bargaining tactic and it just went on and on and on so they ended up being about. I don't remember if it was six or nine months. But you know when you're looking for a doctor you're trying to pay those medical bills. It was a long time to end. It wasn't just the you know the medical benefits it was also the factual salary my dad guy as a disabled veteran so it was even just the stipend that we lived on and then suddenly we were. We went from very little money almost no money. Oh yeah that. I'm sure that was hard. I'm sure that was hard. And you know it's Really really thank you for sharing ad. pizza history that you know. I feel like maybe some of us didn't know like me or some forgot and it's worth remembering but more than anything Henry. It's it's the impact that it had on you. And how what you're doing today to improve access and make things easy for people it's really inspiring so this is a great opportunity for us to zoom into your company and help listeners. Understand what exactly it is that that you guys are doing. And how is it that it's helping the healthcare ecosystem? Yeah great so telemedicine in general has so much potential and it had this potential since it was conceived of more than fifteen years ago and the biggest challenges earlier in Telemedicine telehealth technology regulatory so early on even if you could get patient to connect on their phone to perform some sort of medical consultation in many states. It wasn't legal. You had to have prior physician patient face to face relationship and so there were. There were legal regulatory barriers in place. And then how you actually conducted the visit. Whether it was over a land line or computer was was different in different states could actually conduct the visit whether had to be board certified physician or if it could be one of the mid levels like a nurse practitioner or a PA working under the direction of the position that also different statements state and so with those hurdles in place and made it very challenging to utilize. What has the potential to be something very much more affordable and also something they can almost immediately increase access and so One of the positive developments over the past couple of years technology has caught up so with Bluetooth connected triage devices so everything from blood pressure. Cuffs to blood glucose monitors to pulse ox senators to devices that can allow you to image eardrum. The back of the Throat Medical Stethoscopes. That are Bluetooth connected. All of those can be integrated onto a software platform that can then give live accurate information to providers that could be sitting remotely and state by. State. Those laws have caught up so that now you can actually establish a patient provider relationship through telemedicine visit so the promise of telemedicine. It's just on the verge of being realised even Federal Government in. Hhs has relaxed regulations on conducting. Telehealth is it's because they realized that our current health care models not sustainable men in order to really be able to cut costs. You have to take advantage of these cost-saving technologies without compromising the quality of care and so at the end of the day everything still has to come back to the quality of the care that's been delivered but for simple visits things like cold and Flu. Differentiation strep throats ear infections initiating birth control science pressure pain rationality pink. They're just so many types of visits that you can tackle using the tools that you already have in front of you and so we tried to do is go even a step further and create an entire network nationwide of physical locations where we will. We can do what we call hats. Telemedicine visits so instead of just being a simple visit. That's limited to the information that you can convey you know with a phone call or with a video call. We WanNa make sure that we have all the tools on site so that we don't compromise any aspect of the patient visit so that we can actually get really high quality lung sounds capture. A HEART RHYTHM performing K. Jeez on sites get pictures in the mirror drum. And so we've set up these pods that we call Are Empty box pro version and really what they are just enhanced telemedicine visit and it works through a partnership with either a doctor's office that don't have access to specialists or with other non traditional locations like a pharmacy where a pharmacist or or member of this team can be trained by our practice. The telemedicine extender and so they go through a credentialing process and training process and we basically show them how to be a medical assistant in our medical practice and then we maintain their certification on our administrative platform and then it becomes shoe partnership so when people are on site in any of these pharmacies they can initiate a doctor's visit or visit with one of our other practitioners like nurse practitioner or a physician assistant so Exciting Times it really is and you know as you think about that moment when your dad didn't have access to care what you're doing today is just like incredible and it kind of reminds me of Howard Schultz his experience with his dad. Not sure if you know that experience historic now yes so Howard Schultz the CEO of starbucks his. His Dad got hurt at work and it was a real is really bad. And they let him go and they didn't cover any of his bills and it was really bad and it really affected the family in a in a severe way that because of that he made a decision that every employees even part time at starbucks would have

Coronavirus Latest: Testing Challenges And Protecting At-Risk Elderly

Short Wave

09:11 min | 4 months ago

Coronavirus Latest: Testing Challenges And Protecting At-Risk Elderly

"Hey everybody emily here so obviously. The biggest story in science is the corona virus and rising cases of its disease cove in nineteen. In the coming weeks. We're going to cover it a little more with regular updates on the latest news and science and today to help us do that. We are lucky to have not one but two colleagues from the NPR science desk correspondent Nell Greenfieldboyce. Hainault Hi Emily and correspondent John Hamilton page on high so krona virus. It's already impacting American society. And you're each going to focus on one part of the Krona virus story this week. Now why do you got for us? So one of the things I've been thinking about a lot is who is most at risk of severe illness from this virus and while there's a lot we don't know about exactly how deadly it is overall. We do know there are some things that we need to do for the most at risk people to keep them safe yes and John. You're recently in Washington state in Seattle. Which is the site of one of the biggest outbreaks in the nation? Votes rate is where the first use case of corona virus appeared back in January. Now it has hundreds of cases dozens of deaths and no efforts to slow down. The Corona virus have have really largely. Shut down the entire Seattle area. It's not quite a ghost town but it's pretty quiet there all right so in this episode. We'll talk about all of that efforts to get tested for the virus up and running in Washington state amid the slow roll out of testing kits by the Federal Government. And how we can help people who might be the most vulnerable to the virus. Okay now before. We dive into some of the details from the week. What's the latest on the virus and it spread and I should say we're taping on Thursday morning and things are moving. Pretty fast they are they are. I mean just in the past twenty four hours. There have been some pretty dramatic developments and you can kind of feel a shift. In tone as the nation grapples with this president. Trump has this travel ban for visitors from Europe that he unveiled in an Oval Office address the NBA has suspended its season here in the US in Germany. You've got soccer leagues just playing to empty stadiums. Even Tom Hanks and his wife announced that they had corona virus. And so you can see as testing increases cases across the. Us are going up. There's this real sense that things are accelerating here and people are paying attention in a new way. Yeah and we should say that neither of US actually here in the studio with us right now. Yeah so I'm feeling sick with the kind of sickness that like normally you might sort of like you know take some cold drugs and go to work but like these days they say to stay home so I'm staying home will. I'm feeling fine but because I was around people who might have been exposed to the virus during the time I was reporting in Seattle I have been encouraged to stay home for a couple of weeks just to make sure I'm not contagious. So now I want to ask you. Oh I hear a dog. Yeah that would be. This is Bella. Bella Bella has been wanting to be on shortwave for most of my life. This was an opportunity and she sees did so John Yourself Quarantine Nell. You're keeping yourself home to make sure you don't get anyone sick. You're both so responsible. Thank you So John. We mentioned earlier that Seattle. It's the center of something called a community outbreak. There's a few of those right now in the US. Tell us what that means. All it really means is that the virus is spreading in the general population. Right so in Seattle you know the first case was brought in from China and then there were a bunch of cases related to a single nursing home but those are both sort of isolated. Now it's all over the place so while I was in Seattle. I saw the public health system stop focusing on tracing individual cases. Start looking at clusters of cases and they are also emphasizing community wide efforts to slow down the spread so that Seattle's response and hosts a little more of what it all looked like when you were there. He used to live in the Seattle area. And I never saw the traffic so light as I did the past ten days at rush hour on I five you know. It was a breeze and a couple of days ago I was. I was walking through Seattle's Chinatown the Pike Place Market. These are both big tourist areas and it was strangely quiet. A lot of the restaurants were closed. There were signs explaining that Kobe. Nineteen is the reason and I should also say people's behavior Seattle has changed You know they keep their distance. They wash their hands. I passed a couple of bars that were still open. And you could see people sitting there but it was every other barstool. Yeah our people trying to get tested for corona virus in Seattle. Yeah definitely I mean everybody wants to be tested in a whether the symptoms or not and the problem is it is really taken a while to set up the system to provide all that testing. And why is that? Well you know my my colleague. Richard Harris has been reporting on that and one reason he's found is that testing for the kroner virus. It's not that simple. You have to extract viruses from samples taken from patients. Then you have to use this device that creates lots of copies of the virus. Then you need another instrument that looks to see if the virus is a genetic match with the corona virus so this is something that is sophisticated lab can do but a doctor's office really can't and John. Why is testing so important with a couple of reasons is really important? It's how you pinpoint an outbreak. You need it for contact tracing because you have to know somebody has it to go and look for other people who might have got it from them and later on as as things spread it tells you which communities are getting infected that sort of the point where Seattle for instance is right now within Seattle. What areas is the virus showing up and finally it tells you what percentage of people who have symptoms actually have corona virus if percentage were to go up over time. It would tell you that you're not winning but the testing is what gives you clues that allows you to follow the spread phillies have a trail. You now what do you think about that? I think it's interesting. It's a different way of thinking about diagnostic testing than most people. Normally think about it. Like normally you feel sick you go to the doctor. And the reason you're getting a test is so the doctor can determine your treatment like maybe you have strep throat in that. Means you need antibiotics. But in this case we have no proven antiviral treatment against this new virus. We don't have vaccine. All the treatment is basically the same kind of supportive treatment you would give someone with another respiratory virus. So it's kind of weird situation. Where the testing that sort of everyone's clamoring for is really of most use for protecting the community and giving public health workers information about what they need to do on a community-wide basis rather than individual patient basis. Yeah and initially the CDC. It wasn't even permitting private labs and universities to do testing that dramatically reduced available capacity for testing. But that's changed recently right. It has and now certain labs so called high complexity labs are they are allowed to run their own tests. But that's not really actually the biggest problem. The biggest problem is setting up the system to collect samples for testing because they have to be sent in for a lab. You don't want people to sort of descend on some doctor's office or a clinic where they might spread the disease yet. You have to test a lot of people really quickly so one solution I saw. Seattle is What they call drive through testing. It's something that they used in Asia and the idea is that you can get tested for corona virus without leaving your car and I actually spent a morning watching this happen. I it was in one of these multilevel level. Parking lots you know next to a hospital in northwest Seattle. So the morning I was there a nurse named Jeff. Cates would walk up to each car. He was in full protective gear. You know with the disposable gown the Globes a clear plastic face mask and he would greet each person as they arrived by name. Jeff and then play health. Now we're going to be doing your swabs today. So he takes these these two swabs one from each nostril. Lean your head back with a little so you know he. He collects these samples and seals them up in plastic tubes and they will be processed by a lab. That's only a few miles away so we're going to be testing for flu. Ab IN SV when we're also testing for covert wriggles. Back to you as soon as we can. Thank you feel better soon now. Only healthcare workers are being tested his way right now but it's important because they're the people that are on the frontlines of fighting the virus and so you gotTa make sure they're not sick still they don't take the infection to other staff or patients in healthcare system. Also there has been talk of expanding this kind of drive through testing to for instance first responders who might have been in contact with somebody who had the virus and eventually even to

Seattle John Hamilton United States NPR Nell Greenfieldboyce Bella Bella Washington Soccer Tom Hanks President Trump Federal Government Phillies CDC Jeff Globes Europe Kobe
Inside the 24 hours that shut down the sports world

The Big Story

08:52 min | 4 months ago

Inside the 24 hours that shut down the sports world

"Michael Grange is senior writer at sports net he covers the NBA or at least did before was suspended. Hi Michael Jordan. I'm doing all right. We're just trying to keep up as I talk to you and I'm sure you've seen it the. Nhl HAS JUST SUSPENDED. Its season as well. It's just remarkable How the pace of these things. It's almost kind of a symbol or an apt emblem for the problem. That that's Kinda confronting everybody is is you look at how this this issue affected the sports world and it was you know just to the pace of three or four days space three or four days? It was kind of incremental. You know people were paying. There's a little bit more urgency around it and then you know everything's just kinda come on like a tidal wave and You know that's roughly I think How the kind of manifest itself through populations is You know it's sort of a little bit of a creep a little bit of concern and then all of a sudden. It's too late and things kind of spiraled and Guy Can't really recall anything. Released a sports where the things and news and developments have come so quickly and rapidly and suddenly described the scene at the NBA game that forced the suspension of the season because that seemed to really be the tipping point. Four all of this very interesting. I mean The Oklahoma City Thunder were hosting the Utah Jazz. There was some concern that there is sort of like the Star Center for the Jazz. You know was ill. He'd been kind of exhibiting signs of I think he'd been tested for strep throat was exhibiting signs of being unwell and he was given a task for Kobe nineteen I believe the day of the game and he so he never went to the arena was home but had turned out the team's hotel but had that test been negative that he simply had a kind of a more common kind of flew his expectation plan was to play the game and the So the two teams are floor. The music is playing. Crowd is in the building. You know the the tip is approaching and right around the time when the ball would've been going up and and all of that you know one of the The team medical officials for the Oklahoma City centre kind of came running out of out of the back of the building onto a data. Deficient gathered to coaches and my understanding. Is that the player tested positive for covert nineteen. You know those are responsible came very quickly. After that it was determined they would have to at least have to postpone that game. It takes them a while to figure out how to relay that information to the crowd they did and you know within the hour almost of that decision the NBA realized that had to suspend operations for the possible. What had the discussion around this virus and the MBA or even to this virus and sports In the bigger picture being leading up to that what kind of measures I were being taken. What were people considering? Because I got the sense that this escalated very quickly you says correctly you know the NBA has gotten a lot of credit for being very proactive and a little bit ahead of the charge as a release the other North American sports. I don't know if she claimed. In this instance you know we saw how rapidly this escalated in parts of Asia and Europe and is of last week you know the the first kind of acknowledgement of the virus by the NBA was You know kind of an internal memo that was never made public but kind of out saying no players Daffy be conscious of Of you know sort of shaking hands and kind of dropping slapping hands you know. Go with a bunch of bumps fist-bump when your own or don't feel obligated to sign autographs. So he's doing about the players. I mean themselves from you. Know actions with the public The next stage of that but it wasn't taken seriously and I certainly saw players can figure doing that and The only really making a big deal of it. Which goes I think the way while people were kind of looking at it as recently as a week ago. I believe it was on Tuesday that you know the lead and and in conjunction with the other Major North American sports panel putting New Measures. About how the media would interact with players. You know they're out to keep a certain distance between players during interviews and that there wouldn't be no more scrums I'd access everything would be kind of a press conference type setting and again. That was all seen as a preventative. Measure to keep the players distanced. So that's Tuesday on things by this time we're really escalating. Really think was sort of you know where where a lot of news is really coming out and the pictures getting more grim and so on as of Wednesday afternoon the Board of Governors of the leaks representatives from each of the franchise are kind of represented. The owners of each of the franchises themselves were on conference calls in hand and trying to come up with a plan and at that point the plan. Wise try to keep playing games but maybe one to limit fans or maybe role you also game is supposed to be in Boston. Concerns about it out. Great maybe the game can be played in Boston and Detroit. It'LL BE BOSTON DETROIT. Sorta thing road game until Home Game. So you know again. It's sort of like half measures but when newly found out a player was positive then they their hands were forced because if he kind of you know the NBA is such a small community and says his travelling circus tall man. You know they they are kind of bounce around the continent gone and you. Do you know somebody on twitter. She did an exercise like this. And show that if you only need to go back is about five or six days and you see all the players that go bare played against and then all the players. Those players played against any almost entirely covered within a five day span. Certainly ten days so at that point you know it. Writing was on the wall that they you know they couldn't simply couldn't continue because you don't know who else is in fact good and it's turned out one other player it's been infected with the jazz and all the teams that have been a better played the jazz including the Toronto Raptors in the past ten to fourteen days are now kind of are now being tested so tell me what that means for the raptors in particular because they played the jazz and what it means for sports in Canada well as it relates to the raptors. I mean you know it's just a kind of a complete one eight You know they played in Utah Monday night and I was sort of the end of the longest folks up to the season and you know the raptors were to form their short handed goals. Whatever reason not to win the game getting there on the road and played the four or fatigue and all the rest of it and You know their usual kind of plucky courageous thing and won the game and and came home on the on a red eye. Charter came after the game. So theraflu red eye type flight landing in Toronto early Tuesday morning and I'll be right and they weren't scheduled to play again until this coming Saturday. So they had a few days off which is right there in the NBA schedule that you got consecutive days off and You know a couple of the coach. Nick nurse had had his own into this charity scheduled to the hotel to in our other player charity events and all that went off without a hitch around nine thirty pm ever getting -CATIONS and The of what's going on and by you know by midnight a number of players are good number of the players had contested at a Toronto Hospital. The all the traveling party with the Raptors so broadcasters medical personnel seems security personnel You know there's a party for fifty people They all were required. They've been tested. My understanding most have today and so they're just waiting for the results of that. I think my understanding is should take twenty four hours from the time the test and you know and that'll dictate next move. Seventy this in the media term advised to Not only quarantine but isolate. So you know. It's sort of isolate themselves within else but the expectation is you know about your community or your home you know and just kind of hope for the best regarding the outcome of these tests. But it's you know it's a it's a massive development as it relates to the

NBA Raptors Michael Jordan NHL Boston Strep Throat Toronto Raptors Michael Grange Oklahoma City Oklahoma Writer Nick Nurse Twitter Utah Jazz Toronto Star Center Detroit Board Of Governors Kobe
Red Flags for Raw Vegans

A Healthy Bite - ThatOrganicMom

03:53 min | 5 months ago

Red Flags for Raw Vegans

"He it's Rebecca and on today's episode of a healthy by. I am going to tell you all about how I went from a standard American diet to a vegetarian diet. And then in part. Two of this podcast. I'm going to tell you about how I transitioned from being a vegetarian to a raw vegan lifestyle. And you're GONNA WANNA stick around to the end of this podcast because at the end. I'm going to tell you some of the red flags that you can be looking for if you are following a raw vegan diet or really any other extreme type of Diet I'm definitely not Putting this podcast out there As an affront to anyone who does follow the RAW vegan lifestyle instead. I just would like it to be considered a warning to proceed with caution Because you know that's fine if you choose to follow a Vegan lifestyle or even a raw vegan lifestyle. There are benefits to doing this for a certain time but I do want to talk about some of the red flags that you could be looking out for so that you don't end up with some of the problems that I created by ignoring these red flags in my journey as a raw vegan and so it started out about seventeen or eighteen years ago when my oldest son was diagnosed with spectrum disorder and shortly after he was diagnosed. I ended up with a kidney stone. I will spare you the horrifying details about the Kidney Stone. But let me just say that at the end of this after. I had surgery to have the kidney stone removed and after I was the victim of a doctor and nurse error. I decided that I would do everything possible to avoid ever putting myself in that position again. You know I did not I did not want to end up with another kidney stone and when my urologists said to me at my last appointment well. I'll see you soon or I'll see you again sometime or something like that. I looked him in the eye and I said no whatever people can do to avoid kidney stones. I will do it and I don't plan to ever see you again and it was nothing personal. It was just that it was the most traumatic experience. And if you've had a kidney stone you know what I mean if you had a surgery for kidney stone you know what I'm talking about so after my son was diagnosed and after I had this kidney stone I began to do a lot of research research about healthy eating different styles of healthy eating and it was at this point that I came across a book called natural cures. They don't want you to know about and possibly I bought this book as Hoping to find a cure for my kidney stone at this time I was probably eating things like Taco kits from the supermarket shelf and lunch ables and PB PJ sandwiches And just fast food restaurants The Standard American diet the everyone eats I grew up eating. A lot of sugar had a very very strong sweet tooth and so I did have a weakened immune system as a child I had strep throat and tonsilitis a lot hammer tonsils removed as a child and so i. I wouldn't say I was the healthiest person but I was slender and I really didn't have a lot of pressing problems really none that I can think of. I had had four healthy pregnancies. And I you know I was doing fine so I thought until I got the kidney stone

Rebecca
For Her Head Cold, Insurer Coughed Up $25,865

Morning Edition

05:38 min | 6 months ago

For Her Head Cold, Insurer Coughed Up $25,865

"There's no question that medical bills are often higher in expensive neighborhoods and there's no question that this corner of New York City not far from grammar see park is one of the most expensive bits of real estate in the country but still you have to ask if you go to a doctor with a cold and a sore throat should you expect the last bill that tops twenty eight thousand dollars that's what a doctor at Manhattan specialty care just off Park Avenue south charge Alexa cast the I caught up with this forty year old public policy consultant at an office uptown I start getting a really sore throat and so I decided just to go the doctor to see if I had strep throat I was leaving on vacation that next week overseas and so I just wanted to like have some antibiotics in case it didn't go away the appointment with doctor Roy thought a lot he was quick she says a throat swab and blood draw and she was out the door with her prescription for cold went away pretty quickly and she enjoyed her vacation I get back about ten days later there's several messages on my phone and I have an email from the billing department at doctor Patel he's office the teller that BlueCross BlueShield this mailing her family a check for more than twenty five thousand dollars to cover some of the out of network lab tests the actual bill was over twenty eight thousand dollars but the doctor says they will collect the twenty five hundred dollar copay I thought it was a mistake I thought maybe they meant to hundred and fifty dollars I couldn't fathom in what universe I would go to the doctor for a strep throat culture and some antibiotics and I would end up with a twenty five thousand dollar bill this is perfectly normal the doctor's office kept assuring her and they sent a courier over to our house to pick up the check did the doctor tell you what test she was running now did you tell you that she was sending things to a clinician alright that lab that was out of network now definitely not yeah he went back and forth a little bit with the billing people right you were that you made it clear that you're unhappy about this yes I made it very clear that I wasn't happy about it in fact she told him she would report the doctor to the New York state medical board the test in question turned out to be DNA probes that were looking for a smorgasbord of viruses and bacteria Dr Renae majority professor of family medicine at the Georgetown University school of medicine sees no reason to run them in my twenty years of being a doctor I've never ordered any of these tests let alone seen anyone of my colleague students in other physicians order anything like that in the outpatient setting I have no idea why they were ordered maybe for a patient in the intensive care unit or with a difficult case of pneumonia there could be a reason to run these tests he says the ones for influenza are potentially useful but there's a cheap rapid test it could have been used instead there about two hundred and fifty viruses that cause the symptoms for the common cold and even if you did know that there was virus a versus virus to be it would make no difference because there's no treatment anyway so no reason to run these tests Alexa Kasdan also wondered whether running these tests and running up her insurance bill is even legal or show marking an attorney in overland park Kansas who specializes in medical billing says that depends on the details there are a lot of state law issues that can be involved and there's a lot of contractual issues that can be involved in this particular issue New York state has a surprise billing law patients need to be informed if they're in network doctor is referring a test to an out of network provider and to warn people that they could end up with a big bill state laws also limit cozy relationships between doctors and labs that could be at play here once companies also have contracts with doctors say making sure lab tests are done in network but billing expert marching says insurance companies aren't monitoring those claims as they come in most claims processing even for something a claim like this that you and I would read it after the fact and think gosh this just seems outrageous to pay this much money for these types of lab services are often completely automated there's never a human set of eyes that look at the bell and decide whether or not it gets paid the list prices in this case or about twenty times the going rate in that Manhattan zip code marking says and if the threats wanted been sent to lab core which is in network for Castin I'm courses that would have charged the insurer about six hundred and fifty dollars rather than the more than twenty eight thousand dollars for essentially the same tests Dr fought a lot he did not respond to requests for comment and even though a lexicon aspen didn't have to pay practices like this still cost us morning says she may not be paying anything on this particular claim but overall if the group's claims and costs rise everyone all the employees and and their spouses paying into the health plan may eventually BPP paying for the cost of this after we started asking questions about this cast and Kerrier Blue Cross blue shield of Minnesota launched an investigation they acknowledge that the review process failed to flag this extraordinary bill this at the doctor's office had not cash the check so they put a stop payment on it well they dig deeper morning says people can take issues like this to their insurance company or state regulators or do some of their own legwork before leaving the doctor's office I always ask where they're sending my labs or where they're sending my images so that I can make sure that that's in network with my health

New York City Twenty Eight Thousand Dollars Fifty Dollars Twenty Five Thousand Dollars Twenty Five Thousand Dollar Twenty Five Hundred Dollar Twenty Years Forty Year Ten Days
Miley Cyrus Undergoes Vocal Cord Surgery

Colleen and Bradley

06:04 min | 8 months ago

Miley Cyrus Undergoes Vocal Cord Surgery

"Mystery apparently Miley Cyrus is at home covering Ono from vocal cord surgery I and she's doing so with her trusty sidekick slash boyfriend Cody Simpson interesting they've both shared on social media that she is resting her voice that she's home recovering now here's the deal remember it was like two weeks ago she was hospitalized for you member she was hospitalized yeah she was in the hospital don't tell me I'm going to get them I just have to figure it out or in the neighborhood when I see people who cord surgery she had a cold no it was a cough no it was strep throat tonsillitis because you're never going to get there I'm here for you so she was in the hospital for tonsillitis we're all like that's weird like you go to the hospital and you stay overnight for days because you have tonsillitis well apparently according to the story they're telling she also they discovered when she was there for tonsillitis she also was suffering from tonsil or from a vocal cord issue okay that required surgery and then she was notified then that she was going to need that vocal cord surgery before the end of the year but his vocal cord surgery has caused her to have to cancel some recording sessions in the studio etcetera etcetera etcetera but she had this vocal cord surgery and now she's recovering at home with Cody Simpson interesting okay I have a question for you yeah the girl who tells us everything including you know what I mean she does there's nothing that she doesn't share she has her hand down her boyfriend's pants in photographs that they share the Instagram she's you know broken up with her husband and is making out with a and to move yeah like she tells us everything yeah is it the slightest bit suspicious that she allegedly knew ahead of time should be having this vocal cord surgery and she didn't share that yes and I would also point out that she hasn't posted anything on her actual Instagram feed her for a week so that's odd to rate yeah that she wouldn't say anything and it was you know all about her posts with her mom and then what's is not name I think it would be seven yeah so that is a little weird to me right yeah so it makes me wonder just what I never bought the tonsillitis thing in the first place when it well okay look I don't know but here is what to tell us what I would say when I saw the story it's a mouthful Phelps what's really going on because when people magazine is reporting something we know that that generally means it's coming from inside the house yes which means that Miley's people are putting in the story out now I don't know when this particular story fit credits like her people directly or if it says a source a source okay which means it's probably wise so because otherwise you would attach your name to it but you wouldn't attach your name to a lie right when I saw this I said to myself well this is interesting I didn't really think that like she didn't have the surgery or that the the sick the illness wasn't legit to me my conspiratorial mind went to huh I wonder if we knew all along that she was going to be in this down swing in this period where she was going to end up having to have surgery and she wasn't going to be able to do a lot of other like actual Miley Cyrus see things and so if maybe that had something to do with like all this you know like Caitlyn Carter stuff and Cody Simpson stuff like all the lead and I like trying to get us talking enough that it carried through it just gives her other things to talk about them you know what she does for a living I mean I don't know it's it's very hard to tell because we're reading tea leaves but clearly at the end of the day we know that something is not as it seems it just isn't adding up at all yeah at all also can I just show you the last picture of the two of them together that was taken a week ago it was captioned after party by Cody Simpson and I don't know what kind of party they were having but it doesn't look like the kind of party that other people were invited to you see what I'm saying it's a dirty party it's a real dirty party she's like naked and he's half naked how dare they those sexy young kids know what this is SO them like they were just doing their they were in that like post everything sort of stage which I think they're still in and that's the other thing I find curious right she was allegedly in the hospital for a couple days and she she's literally documented that entire experience from beginning to end he was posing live videos he's allegedly on vocal rest now which to me says why is she she would be posting more right yeah what you think I mean unless she's in pain or something I mean again I just I would take anything with a grain of salt when it comes to what's actually going on because again I don't know that we have much reason to trust Miley Cyrus these last few months I'm just very curious what actually is happening he said he said I'll think things are what they seem is doing pull ups so on his hand and and his last Instagram post is of him singing a song in the studio yeah so he's clearly getting geared up to release more stuff and this is all just

Miley Cyrus ONO Cody Simpson Two Weeks
Amazon launches Amazon Care, a virtual medical clinic for employees

Morning Edition

01:42 min | 10 months ago

Amazon launches Amazon Care, a virtual medical clinic for employees

"Amazon is launching a new health care clinic an app really for some of its employees of the test Amazon care it's called is a pilot for Seattle Amazon employees only and it'll allow them to video chat with doctors and more market places Merial segera has been following this how will it work let's say you're an Amazon employee in Seattle and you sign up for this program and then you get a sore throat you could open up the app and message or video chat with a health care provider like say a nurse practitioner. and if that providers is like well I really need to do a test for strep throat you could have a nurse come your house or meet with you in a room on Amazon's campus and then if you need a prescription for antibiotics Amazon can send that to your pharmacy or delivered to you obviously this is Amazon we're talking about and are these doctors and nurses where they're coming from a they on staff at Amazon they'll come from a family medicine clinic in Seattle called away says medical group Amazon's partnered with that clinic we don't know all the details though lake whether Amazon will have access to its employees healthcare records we do know that the program isn't required at this point it's often and this is another ever by Amazon the great disruptor to get into healthcare yeah Amazon does have ambitions in the health care space it bought the online pharmacy pill pack last year and C. N. B. C. just reported that Amazon's working on your buds that'll include health and fitness trackers this particular program though is just for employees you may remember last year Amazon partnered with JP Morgan and Berkshire Hathaway to start a nonprofit that would work on cutting healthcare costs for its workers and in

Amazon Merial Segera Seattle C. N. B. C. Jp Morgan Berkshire Hathaway
The Future of Healthcare with Voice Technology

Voice First Health

11:52 min | 10 months ago

The Future of Healthcare with Voice Technology

"Turned the tables a little bit and in fact i was recently asked to appear on another podcasts the data talk podcast which is hosted by mike delgado and we talked about all types of scenarios scenarios and implications of the intersection of voice technology and healthcare we actually even get a little bit futuristic and i paint some of my own pictures as well as some pictures of some colleagues and people that i've interviewed on my own pod podcast about where we're going with this technology so mike was really generous chris and allowed me to share the content of his podcast episode here with you the listeners of my podcast so i hope you will enjoy it and with without any further i do. Let's get right to it. This is the data talk podcast with mike delgado and myself enjoy. Hey friends welcome to talk a show where we talk with against science leaders from around the world today. We're talking to dr terry fisher. He's a physician. He's a professor at the university of british columbia. He's also the host and founder of voice always first health podcast as well as alexa in canada. He is super busy doing tons of things and have not gary fisher. You're with us how you doing terry. I'm doing great. Thank you so much. Thanks so much inviting me. It's a real pleasure to be here and if there's one thing that's the most accurate of anything that you said there. Is that a busy so i like okay your doctor like you're busy enough being a doctor and then like to add to that you're teaching courses which which is awesome that you're doing how to help the next generation of doctors and then you're like as a hobby. You're leading these tech podcasts. <music> around boys and healthcare is is curious like how do you do it all which had an easy answer for that. I don't know it's i. I guess the biggest thing that i can say that is simply. It's i love it right. It's a passion and it's a hobby so all the stuff outside of my professional practice my medical practice. I got involved this voice technology thing the more learn about it. The more i love it the more i become enthralled with this technology and i guess that makes it easier to spend a lot of time and i do spend a lot of time on it. I've got a young families well. So of course you know wow so your dad to dad yeah so i thought that my my wife and my two kids and so obviously within all of this there the priority to so i wanted to spend time with them so but but really to be honest you know when not focused on my family. I'm working on my hobby which is voice technology and podcast that sorta stuff so tell me about. How did you get interested in invoice technology. That's a great question so i would say first of all that my my three base passions. I've talked about this a little bit already but is israeli technology healthcare and education <hes> before i did medical school. I did an education degree. So i became a teacher then it went into medical school but it was about a two to three years ago when i started i hearing a little bit about voice technology in being a podcast sort of a techie at heart that sort of got me intrigued and i started looking into a little bit and and actually that time <hes> for example wasn't even available candidate and i am i am in canada <hes> <hes> in vancouver and so i thought oh that's interesting but yet i'm still very interested in what amazon's doing this technology so i started to look into a little bit more and and i realized that there were hints that was going to be starting to come to candidates soon. I thought this might be a really interesting way to put my passion together of technology. <hes> <hes> education and also health started thinking about the healthcare implications of this and that's when i decided to launch my websites started with alexa in canada <hes> which is more of a a consumer base but also <unk> voice professional based website where talks about generally what alexis all about what it can do. It's also very applicable to people in united states by the way even those called lexin in canada. If there are any concerns i do try to highlight those and then as that developed i am. I launched what's flash briefing which is like a mini podcast you subscribe to on alexa and then with my medical background. I thought this is start to learn more about it. I thought this is really going to change healthcare and that's what i thought okay. Now i need started podcasts called voice. I health and that's how that started in. It's really highlighting anything that has to do with the intersection between healthcare and voice technology <hes> <hes> and ultimately it was a way to combine the three passions right healthcare technology in education because that's kind of what i see as as what to do with these with these bathrooms you mentioned before we get into this. You mentioned that you were a teacher first and then you went to medical school. Tell me about that. That's interesting yeah i. I was in school for a long time to throw it to make things even seen little more crazy. If you want to put this is not gonna surprise me with you. You know i actually actually hold four degrees so i did. I did a bachelor of science in anatomy and cell biology and experimental medicine and and then i did a masters of science in <hes> sorry i said that wrong batter science in anatomy cell biology biotechnology than i did a masters of science science in experimental medicine then i did my education degree and then i did <hes> medical school followed by family practice residency and my sports medicine fellowship so i've been i literally in school for for our wasn't school for decades. Yeah your whole life pretty much so yeah yeah but it's not which is one of the really interesting thinks everybody's got different life experiences and i've been able to now to bring these together into this this field which is just a click together and what can i say. It's a it's a lot of fun so when you first started looking at alexa voice technology what were your initial reactions to type of skills that were available double or things that you could do with it. Yeah i think the first thing that sort of struck me and again it goes back to the education. Idea is that when it comes to the medicine because he is every knows you can do you can listen to music you can set timers you can set alarms and all that kind of stuff but i started thinking about it in terms of being a tool for education education and how somebody can ask the device whatever it is it's on their mind to learn from the device and so whether that is is like what are the symptoms of strep throat right <hes> that's a very basic basic skill and that sort of thing that i was starting to think about another a skill that sort of took a little bit to the next level was a skit out that can provide you with. I eight advice so you're chopping up a carrot. You cut your finger and rather than having to foot flip through first aid guide. If you don't know how to take care of it you can simply ask the device. How do i do i do with a cut finger and so those sorts of educational and informational skills i think we're the first level where really got me started started thinking about it but as i sort of delve into this a little bit more i realize that it's is not just about education because we're we're now having conversations with these devices and that brings the the <hes> the available all applications to a whole new level particularly now recently in the last couple of months at amazon announced that the devices are hip compliant and so now they can store to store personal health information. So what does that mean. It means that you can now start to to use these devices as surrogates for care providers mean give example <hes> is a skill out there that can can give you medication reminders based on your medication schedule so one area or one population one segment of the population that is really finding finding he's beneficial are people that are aging and there's this whole movement called aging in place where people want to maintain their independence than want to stay home but sometimes that's difficult because for example eh forget to take their medication that may forget when they have appointments they can become forgetful but various things and they need people to remind them about these things and also remind them of what they should be checking as far as health well now. You don't need to rely on your doctor a carried us put a device in your home and it does that for you and so these devices i think and i believe the way we're going. We're going to gradually take on more and more of a rule of care ada care provider <hes> somebody who can somebody see that's the way i use the term now somebody who can who can help take care of you. I think that those are some beautiful examples and i mean i can certainly see myself or something like that in the future i wanna get a reminder on something something but i also love the example you gave around getting some information on how to diagnose something like is this something i need to go to a doctor about in trying to like go through some sort of conversation with the ball around my symptoms right right. Well let me i'm going to paint a picture for you. I think we're going to kind kind of this. Is this is not here yet but i truly do not think that we're too far off so here's this here's the scenario magin you wake up and you have a sore ortho. You don't feel well. You know something's wrong. Something is not right and so the way it is now. You know what would we do. We would think okay well now. I'm going to have to make a call. Dr make an appointment go on in need not to call into work sick. They make arrangements for my kids. Get in the car drive to the doctor. Bla-bla-bla get history. Maybe the doctor does a throat swab. Says yeah looks like like you might have strep throat. I'm going to send you know the pharmacy. Get your drugs. Go home and check in. If things go bad whatever it's quite an ordeal when you're feeling probably all that stuff is the last thing you wanna do so. Let's imagine though you were just a little bit further in the future and what happens is you wake up and your voice system says good morning to you you say good morning and just by the tone of your voice it can tell the something's not right because it knows your voice and thinking back to that. It's a very fascinating area called vocal biomarkers will come back to that but i ask you questions like how are you feeling and you say you know what i'm actually not feeling. That great got a sore throat doc shivering and start to ask you about symptoms just like your physician does so you go through that and using some algorithms some a._i. The natural language understanding it gives you sort of a probability and says you know what based on what you've told me. There's a high probability that you have strep throat. How would you like it. If i were to order a strep test to your home had delivered right now -sego sure to what does this word ties into amazon amazon's brilliant here quite frankly so this amazon amazon so it automatically orders a strep test drone on. You've got it a drone lance at your home. You pick up the strep test now. The strep test west is wi fi enabled the smart old so it automatically taps into your home wifi network and you do the test and your voice assistant talks to you. It tells you how to do it. You do the strep test it then analyzes it it gives you the results and it says yes. You have strep throat. You need some antibiotics. What is now. I know from our previous interactions that you're allergic to penicillin. I already know that 'cause i know your personal health record and so i'm not going to bother to ask him questions about that 'cause we. We will be efficient but i'm going to if it's okay with you. I'm going to order some antibiotics for you. We're gonna have those delivered to your home fantastic so little while later another drone drops drops off your antibiotics. You go to your front door. You pick them up. You start taking them and your voices starts talking you through

Strep Throat Alexa Canada Mike Delgado Amazon Dr Terry Fisher University Of British Columbia Gary Fisher Professor Founder United States Penicillin Chris Vancouver
"strep throat" Discussed on How Men Think with Brooks Laich & Gavin DeGraw

How Men Think with Brooks Laich & Gavin DeGraw

02:52 min | 11 months ago

"strep throat" Discussed on How Men Think with Brooks Laich & Gavin DeGraw

"Do you think that upon passing away within hours the first thing that my closest loved ones and my wife and everybody decided to do was oh my god we're a grieving ryan's death but we should get onto his g mail and put an auto response on there to make sure anyone emails donates to the strep throat awareness awareness fund which by the way mary. I don't believe that exists. It's like the most ridiculous one point so but knowing you knowing you. It's possible that you have fifteen of these emails already cooked up for anything in case you do pass away wait. The staff isn't a real thing. The strep throat awareness fund in my family is asking to donate to the fund in lieu of flowers and by the way that i died from complications due the structure. I don't have a metal to a medical degree. That's all you you guys but like pretty sure you can't die from strep throat and let's not miss the obvious here anyone that knows. You knows that you would insist that you get flowers rather than some donati. I wanna give upper offer. Mary is gifts death language. What is it called. He's probably got his own <hes> <hes> <hes> what's it called in the paper obituary you probably have you written your own obituary in case you do pass that. You're just like you have it in your will or your your trust or something that is picked. There's a picture he's got a glam shot. This is my good side. It's been touched up. I'm wearing the gavin degrom merchandise. Yes uh so this this really so basically when you talk to this mary you're basically like you're welcome. Yes i said you you you did them a good service to you and and obviously in the way i'm telling you now it comes office being condescending but there's a very good chance i could have died. Uh-huh i on the right after you got about this. She cancelled two days of appointments midst. Those are people that were actually sick that could have had something serious happened to them yeah. Did you apologize for that. Did you say i'm sorry or just go. You're welcome no now. I said the doctor is a very intelligent person. She went to an undergrad and medical school. I find it hard to believe that she did not implement laments a single shred of common sense into this equation to deduce that well even if i have a question as to whether this is a legit email. Why don't my call him dead yeah by the way into that like. Mary called me why she on a dead guy. If you really thought i was dead. Why are you calling well because mary saw right through your ruse. In your defend ryan's defense they say that strep throat is a child's disease and you certainly acted like a child child.

strep throat Mary ryan gavin degrom two days
More Flesh-Eating Bacteria Cases in the Gulf of Mexico and Elsewhere Are Likely Because of Climate Change

KCBS Radio Weekend News

03:48 min | 1 year ago

More Flesh-Eating Bacteria Cases in the Gulf of Mexico and Elsewhere Are Likely Because of Climate Change

"Necrotizing fasciitis flesh eating bacteria is on the rise as a record amount of Americans have contracted the infection this summer at least nine Americans of reported that they've had the rare disease which is also because three deaths in recent weeks KCBS to Scotland Terry spoke with doctor mark sh lice who is the co director of the infection and immunity research program at the university of Minnesota talk to us a little bit about this infection I mean the what's it all about and then have people contracted yes so necrotizing fasciitis it translates into deaths of the tissue in the fast show the fashion of being the layer between the skin and the muscle and so we've known about necrotizing fasciitis of course for a long time and a variety of different bacteria can cause that most famously perhaps strapless group they stripped the plain old strip that causes strep throat what we've seen this summer now is the emergence of an another bacteria called Vibrio bonus because this is a bacteria that lives in brackish water in estuaries and other high salt water environments and is as you pointed out in your intro it's resulted in a lot of serious infections and a number of death on eastern seaboard well you know when I think of strap I think of children as well as this you know infected any children not yet for reasons we don't understand completely bit brio ballistic tests is an infection that is more common in adults over the age of forty more common in men than women and so far all of the victims have largely been older man and it also has a predilection for causing problems in people who have other chronic underlying diseases like diabetes liver disease it can be contracted by actually being in the water he can get it through your skin or it can be contracted by eating contaminated seafood most notoriously shellfish and so in fact it's the most common infection that causes deaths in the United States from contaminated ceases so what's a you know what's the precautions that we can take you know you know what was also interesting to me is are there certain regions of the country that you that are more susceptible to this yes this bacteria first really hit the landscape in a big way after hurricane Katrina when the flooding in New Orleans predispose people who were waiting in brackish water with high salt content to develop this infection largely it's an infection of the southeastern United States and coast but what we've seen is the movement of the bacteria this year up the eastern seaboard up in the Chesapeake Bay and into Delaware Bay and there's been a number of cases in New Jersey which was quite surprising because it had formerly been thought that the water was simply too cold there to support the growth of the bacteria it's rare but I think the the common sense advice would be on the eastern seaboard regions to not go into brackish water bottle in the water if you have cuts scrapes or other kinds of rashes on your skin and it's probably safe precaution for anyone who's been in the water to wash with soap and water after leaving the water and I think we're going to see more of this because of man made global climate change which is now created the environment that allows the bacteria to flourish in regions of further north that was doctor mark sh

Necrotizing Fasciitis
"strep throat" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"strep throat" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"<hes> we learned I think I think it was when we recorded the very first episode and I was researching. It and I couldn't stop talking to you about it before we recorded and then we were both like wait a second. We need to stop talking about this and casher this like we should be recording first of all. That's like twice the amount of work if I have to to learn biology of something on my own <hes> I don't WanNA learn the history. That's why that's why you view it and so yes it is we we do go into a blind and yes there are some things of course that that we might know more about him than others but there are so many other things always that that were <unk> each going to learn yeah. I think that's we we decided to do that because we wanted for this podcast to be conversational in an relax and I think that's one of the things that keeps it that way is that we get to learn what you guys are learning at the same time name which is really really fun yeah yeah. I'm not lying when I say what some people think. I'm faking it. I'm no we're not thinking. I'm terrible actress so okay okay all right this. I am so excited to read this email. This email was so cute that we wanted to read it out. Specifically Yeah Okay here we go this. This email has been dictated by nine year old autumn with help from six-year-old read. I'm dead already. Yes I know I know dear errands. Your podcast is so good. I want to listen to it every night. Even if I get scared like with the yellow low fever episode I like that you tell the history and biology of dangerous pathogens please do another crossover episode with indefens- of plants you're welcome and maybe maybe an episode about strep throat. That would be a great idea definitely on our list. I want to know if you go to your local library to find information because my mom is a teacher of Librarians and we love the library <hes> yes. I love love to go to my local library..

strep throat nine year six-year
The modern anti-vaxxer movement, explained

The Conspiracy Farm

12:02 min | 1 year ago

The modern anti-vaxxer movement, explained

"So Jeff if you wanna give me your views real quick on on what you're thinking about the vaccine. The debate is very, you know, like, you said Champa, very very controversial subject, and, you know, very, polarizing, you know, we see the news. I have an article right here on unvaccinated air, Oregon boy had severe tetanus nearly died. Basically, I think it was a reaction to then you've got the measles outbreak recently. So I mean, it winds up becoming unfortunately, this kind of binary conversation of either your four vaccines or you're completing against vaccines. And I'm just not that binary with it because I know the application of vaccines is medically sound introducing certain substances even body to make human body create a kind of immune defense if you will. But it gets more into for me. What's in these vaccines as our experts going to speak today? I mean, you got live monkey viruses. You got aluminum you got the Marisol which is mercury and there's a lot to this conversation. And there needs to be more education about it. So here we go so Brickley. Please inform us a little bit more about what I have not mentioned in terms of your qualifications in this row. Tom. There are I think that great introduction. So that he for that person. I'm a mother I'm gonna mother read Unical healthy children. My middle daughter was backing injured. And so that was really the old shit were doing what fall delayed schedule the a lot of conscious your answer teasing. Either spread backing out or do a little bit of late schedule making get into the nets bolts of how the schedule increased riot increase in you know, when somebody that's older than even something might find thirty six Yuan. I was it'd be eight vaccines child today will get thirty six axes by the first year of life. Fifty a forty nine by the age of five in seventy two by eighteen in that schedule has never been interested in crews will abdomen form here. And I would say first and foremost mother protecting my children, and the research, I did floored me on it really woke me up out of this haze. That vaccines are safe and effective. Vaccine save lives near the marketing ploy that offered you know, second grade and it. Roure will be into just a tremendous amount of research. So I've been researching vaccines every single day for the last decade Flatow on. Out of reaction that he decided out Emily that we were no longer going back seat. And I think one of the things that we're seeing in the meteorite now, the big anti vaccine Bush, but most urine said are speaking out against axioms are actually Xboxes they're they're your maximum needed their children. They believed in the system. They believed in the FBI and something terrible happen to their child after vaccines. So I think it's a mole issued feed into talk about those details. This is something that for me. I gave us some some deep thought at one point because I'm married to a doctor of chiropractic, and when she became pregnant with our our oldest daughter. My mother was a nurse nursing director. She ran the the college of nursing in my area at Molin public hospital. So she was obviously on the side of vaccines at the time. And that's all I knew I knew nothing nothing else. And so I asked my I asked my wife, I said, you know, what are we gonna do here because I knew I know you see things differently. And my wife's just said, listen, go do research on your own with an open mind. That's all I ask you do to do. And so I went, and I did that in the further I dug into it, it it it, really. Did. It scared me. And so I made the decision as a parent with my wife to not vaccinate our kids. And now our kids have been very healthy, very resistant to any whenever the other kids getting the flu strep throat, and a lot of other things are kids seem to be a lot more resilient than the than the heard in terms of that stuff. And I am criticized I'm criticize I'm not afraid to say it, you know, that this is the decision that I made, but at the same time, you know, I think about if a roller coaster, and I don't know the exact numbers of minor injury compared to death and everything in that spectrum in between. I know some of the statistics I know that one in six children now have learning disabilities that is that is Onda unacceptable, but that's just just one of the statistics. But so if somebody said to me, all right, you're gonna put your kid on this roller coaster. There's a one in fifty thousand chance that they might get hurt. You know, the roller coaster does go awry every once in a while and kids get hurt. And sometimes they actually get killed are you gonna put your kid on their roller coaster. No, you're not putting your kid on that roller coaster. Now, I'm using a little bit of an extreme example. But you know, please take that and and kind of throw out some facts for folks a little bit. Sure. Well, I think one of the things that we need to be consciously aware of just as a American population is not so much fearing the diseases that we've accident for because that's real bear. The pharmaceutical industry has strong will this is they thrive on fear and a fear. Everybody with the flu chickenpox in. You know measles. The big fear. Measles right now. Measles is a five day rash for most healthy individuals. And you have lifelong immunity neat. Measles was Brady bunch episode. Their books. Sally the needles Toomey measles. I guarantee you guys both have chicken pox at some point. So did I were still living breathing have lifelong immunity. So we we tend to add the culture only fear the diseases that we've accident for right? And that's a brilliant marketing system designed by the pharmaceutical industry. Now, the reality is that parents should be conscious of diseases that vaccines cause and at one of the things that I teach all around the world. My inbox is always full of asking questions about vaccines in. So to me that shows a huge problem with the system that they have to actually reach out to me through social media every single day hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of people from all different walks of life searching for answers. But one of the things that so critical to understand is that most of the diseases that we currently vaccinate for are not deadly their illnesses. They're not diseases, so they're temporary asses. And we are trading are are beautiful healthy children whose immune systems are. Still growing functioning for this false reality that they they're going to be saved in some way. They're going to be protected from all diseases the way, that's just not the kiddies and in the process of backsitting because there's so many back scenes in. I know somebody mentioned a minute ago. Just the agreements we can get into that. But you're looking at dozens dozens dozens of vaccine related lifelong diseases lifelong disabilities, and like you said, you know, one six children has a neurological neurological. A learning processing disorder, but in actual neurological disorder that we never seen that in our history. We had the the sickest generation of children ever recorded. And my belief is a huge amount of that has to do with vaccines. Now, there is a part of it. That's also GMO's in fluorinated water. You know, that's a better topic. But the fact is that we've all been exposed to this one thing in the one thing is the current CDC vaccine schedule. So there's a lot of there's a lot of moving in that. I go down whatever avenue you wanna go down. But yeah, I mean, I will be here. It should be very very fearful and office of diseases and lifelong disabilities that axes how are proven by law to caught and we can get into the laws. Well, there's a pretty direct correlation when you start talking about. I mean, what was it like you said hundred eighty five there was basically DP Emaar, basically three or four vaccines now like you said from ninety one on it's like almost fifty fifty different. Doses. Like fifteen sixteen vaccines. And the thing is trips me out is that they hit these kids like fresh out of the womb like they're not even kind of developed, and they're just hitting them with all these toxins that and then and then kind of the larger culpability or lack of accountability are these are these vaccine courts that congress has basically prohibited people from any legal recourse, there's no way to sue them. And they know your own CDC's own children that they're not even following these schedules because they know it goes back to almost the tobacco study or the sugar study. They know the information is there, but like you said with the firm Asuka companies and everything else there's so much money in this. And I take like I say, I take a constitutional stances when the government can mandate, you know, that's that's my fear is that, you know, with all these people pushing for this that the government can mandate that a medical procedure done on my children. And this is a medical procedure make note make no mistake in a one size fits all medical procedure. That. That's not none of those. No medical procedure is a one-size-fits-all for every patient. Right. The beautiful thing now chant they don't I mean with they almost a lot of states, and I did this with my stuff years ago with my oldest daughter there forms, you can fell out religious exemptions. And things are some states have personal philosophical exemptions there. So he's trying to remove that though. Well, no, you're right. But at least it's not the federal government mandating it quite yet. Tenth amendment states rights are still being invoked. And I think that that's where I mean like congress met the other day in talked about vaccines, and that was a huge deal. We've got you know, the letter that Adam Schiff just wrote on to the US house saying how important back seeds are. He just like, you know, pharma, mouthpiece really poster boy for bomb suitable industry because in one of my biggest insurance they're violating their own law, and one of the reasons that the schedule expanded like we've been talking about is the nineteen eighty six congress was bought out by the pharmaceutical industry so vaccine manufacturers were going bankrupt. Because so many people were doing that from the debilitating effects of the DTP, which the wholesale protests at diptheria ten is in protest vaccine, which now we have the tap, which is a different version. But at the time, it was is d and Sony kids were developing seizures in dying that they had millions and millions of dollars lawsuits in. So the Zukile industry was gonna go bankrupt. And instead of making a safer more effective product providing education going back to the drawing or. Frigging something out. They just went in and bought a congress in created the nineteen eighty six childhood back seen injury Protection Act, which like you mentioned totally stripped vaccine may earth from liability. Now, there is not another product in the world that I can think of that is mandated by law to be injected into east that has no civilized -bility attached to it. So when you talk about public health, this was really about public health for about parents would be informed. They're they're supposed to be informed about the nineteen eighty six law and the vaccine insurance before accepting or declining vaccines so across the board medical professionals in this country are violating the law that was put in place in the nineteen eighty six production act. So you insert those inserts themselves even list, these these toxics through mariesville on mercury on them will actually so under the left that law is in the inserts, but you can't actually pull the ingredient list on the inserted to suffer documents, which I so interesting because if they were really being transparent with their product ever. Just the document, right? But they have an additional document called the CDC media excipient summary, and that's on the CDC website in that has every listing griant of but the actual routes in back scenes are not listed in the inserts, which also builds your mind because what other product when we buy a product were so big on labelling laws here. Right and everybody wants to know what's in their food now. But yet at the same time, they don't wanna know what's in their medicine. And some of those ingredients are

Measles CDC Congress Tetanus Champa Oregon Jeff FLU FBI Neurological Disorder Molin Public Hospital Director Unical Roure TOM Emily Federal Government
"strep throat" Discussed on KNSS

KNSS

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"strep throat" Discussed on KNSS

"Baby girl was diagnosed with strep throat and influenza Tuesday morning that led to cardiac arrest that afternoon. She was air lifted to Cincinnati children's hospital, but it was too late. Our hearts are completely broken. We will share a funeral details. When we have them for now, we are trying to live out what we say, we believe and stand on the hope of life and peace that we have in Jesus, please. Please please pray for our family in this dark time. We can't imagine our lives without our baby girl. Thank you to the hundreds of people who have texted called and visited. We love you. The Gibson family. We think we. Have problems. We think we've got it tough. We think Christians Bill never experience tragedy. And hardy. Oh, they do. We do. But with Jesus Christ. We can make it. Amen. With Jesus Christ. We have victory and the promise of eternal life. I turned to Lois. And I said, you know, that mom and dad don't have much time. For grieving grieving. They've still got five. Children two parent parenting goes on. What a tragedy, but. All of her organs. Were donated. People who needed. Other.

strep throat Gibson family Cincinnati hardy
"strep throat" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"strep throat" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Flu and strep throat ten year stable Gibson went into cardiac arrest Tuesday afternoon passed away yesterday everybody at the school was invited to wear pink. Today that was her favorite color to support her family and friends Franklin police say they have a shooting suspect in custody now thirty nine year old Jessie James is accused of shooting. Forty year old Timothy laser who suffered a gunshot wound to the head on Monday, but survived. His current condition has not been released. Still no arrests have been made. After a thirty seven year old woman was struck and killed by a pickup truck and Avondale yesterday. Now, the family of Holly burns is calling for the driver of a red Chevy Silverado to surrender to police if you can help police find the driver call crime stoppers at three five to thirty forty college basketball last night Xavier musketeers were winners for the third game in a row beating Seton Hall seventy to sixty nine tonight. The Bearcats take on UCF at fifth third arena. Our pre game coverage gets underway at six thirty on Wall Street. The markets are down to start the day. The Dow was lost thirty eight points. The NASDAQ as dropped fifteen while the s&p has dropped five. Our next update will be at ten o'clock. I'm Rick eugenol, NewsRadio seven hundred wwl w. Have you ever wanted to speak another language whether you want to speak Spanish, French or German? Babbel's ten to fifteen minute lessons can get you. Speaking confidently in your new language within weeks. I just started learning Spanish with babble in. It's really helping you with my pronunciation, KOMO Komati yomas did on the it is they don't they address. Got it. I'm amazed though confidently. I speak Spanish now. I wish I tried babble sooner. Babbel's award-winning technology gets he's speaking right away. Ten best of all. You'll remember what you've learned. No wonder babble is the number one selling language learning app in Europe. Try for yourself and see why babble is the quick way to get conversational in a.

Babbel Jessie James Flu Rick eugenol Timothy Franklin Avondale Gibson Europe Holly burns Seton Hall Silverado Bearcats Xavier UCF thirty seven year thirty nine year fifteen minute
Superintendent charged with fraud for helping sick teen speaks out

Len Berman and Michael Riedel in the Morning

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

Superintendent charged with fraud for helping sick teen speaks out

"An Indiana school district is backing up a school superintendent who was charged with insurance fraud because she tried to get a sick child some help Casey Smith of the Elmwood school district was charged with insurance fraud and a density deception prosecutors say she used her son's insurance when she was unable to get treatment for a sick teenager. Because she wasn't his guardian superintendent said the student had symptoms of strep throats, so she took him to an emergency clinic where she was denied treatment because she isn't. The child's guardian. He had no health insurance of his own. So what she did. She take them in at another clinic under her son's name used her insurance to get some treatment for the kid now, she's facing charges. But the school district says they're going to stand by

Elmwood School District Superintendent Indiana School District Casey Smith
"strep throat" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"strep throat" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Monica lindstrom. Joe heisinger Informatica, Gaydos. The guys will be back in twenty nineteen. They're going gonna take a nice extended holiday vacation here that much deserved. Oh, you know that sounds so crazy twenty nineteen twenty and nineteen. I don't know. It sounds crazy. Well, you know, something else. That's crazy. Is that? Now, we have a second second migrant child who has died in US custody and customs and border protection is really under fire for this. Because we add a seven year old you mentioned just a little bit ago. Joe that died in custody. We now have an eight year old boy from Guatemala who died shortly before midnight on Christmas Eve, he was in a detention center in New Mexico, and he was coughing appeared to have some glassy eyes. You know, he just came across too sick. He was treated he was released a little bit later. Well, it wasn't. So good officials say the eight-year-old Guatemalan boy and his father were in custody on Christmas Eve. Eve when an agent notice the child showing signs of sickness, the boy was then taken to the hospital where he was diagnosed with a common, cold and a fever. He was released but later readmitted to the hospital and died shortly after midnight. So I've read a few different things about this eight-year-old Guatemalan, boy, one person says here that he had a three degree fever. And I mean, people children, of course, get bad fevers, and you're not going to be admitted to the hospital necessarily just because you have one hundred and three degree fever. So he was given some medication. They said he had called which the virus. You gotta wait for this fever to spike. And then you hope it goes away. They gave him some medication and they released him. Well, unfortunately, the boy didn't get better. He got worse. And he ended up passing away second time in a couple of weeks. Now a couple of weeks ago. It was a seven year old little girl. Yep. I have an eight year our seven year old and he is sick today. Right. He's not feeling good. He seems to have a a low grade fever definitely not one hundred and three but lower. He has a headache. You know, he feels a little kind of out of sorts, right? I've taken my children to the doctor before. And the doctor says, well, you know, it just seems like a cold just rest and fluids. And if it gets worse, you know, maybe take some medicine over the counter stuff. So I'm not sure if we can completely fault the doctor for saying, look, it's just the cold they ruled out strap and then going ahead and releasing it. I don't think we can I've been fighting something for two or three weeks on and off. And when I went and saw a doctor after a few days of it. They said, yeah, you've got a cold. It's a bad virus? We can't really give you anything for that. Go home rest eat some soup. Take it easy. And if it lingers after a week or so, then we can put you on some antibiotics this boy was tested for strep throat. I don't know what the results of that were. But what doctors say is unless it lasts on the order of like seven days. Plus, then you really don't wanna start taking an antibiotic or anything like that. Because it won't do any good. You know, I understand that customs and border protection is under fire for the saying that they didn't have enough medical staff medical attention. And that may be true. But we need to remember that it was a doctor that discharged the child. It wasn't some random person and border and border and customs it was a doctor who is educated in doing. So so, although there are some challenges here that need to be fixed in an problem that needs to be fixed. People do get sick and unfortunately, children do die. And it was just a matter of time before we started hearing about this less than twenty four hours after the death of an eight-year-old Guatemalan boy the second migrant child to die in US border patrol custody. The agency announced it is developing policy changes going forward US customs and border protection officials will conduct secondary medical checks on all children in custody. So.

US Joe heisinger Informatica fevers Monica lindstrom Gaydos strep throat Guatemala headache New Mexico eight-year seven year three degree eight year twenty four hours three weeks seven days
"strep throat" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"strep throat" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Eliminated at least five of the really annoying rights that all Americans have because we have a Bill of rights, you know, ten original twenty-seven. Now will he's narrowed it down to five writes in his platform and one that we really find interesting is the right to health. I'm not sure how he's going to pull that off. If you've seen any details on that yet. Can you guarantee that we don't get cancer? Yes. I don't know if you know this there's another candidate who ran a long time ago on healing the sick. His name was Jesus. Huge candidate still popular today. Did very really well. In fact, percentages of the vote, and what he did is he would have people come in with like leprosy and stuff, and he would heal them. And they have the right to help. Right to hell the right to help that was the first leg of his platform. So style is going to do that. He basically how? Oh, yeah. That hasn't been pulled off much since that particular candidate of which you speak. It's so crazy because it works. So well, you know, he's he's had a really good legacy stiers picking that up what he's going to do is like if you have strep throat your kid has strep throat. Maybe you bring him in Tom will touch his his his his neck, and it's all it's all gone. He'll be gone. It's races right to health proposal. That's great. And I think it's gonna work out. Well, because the government does a really good job when they take on things like they're so good. It's just really good at it. If we just let them run everything. Oh my God. Things would go so smoothly with it would be so easy. What do you want to do things like earn money? No give that to the government. Let them pay you for for just being alive. Right. And then you can go, and you can do music and art. Yes. Paint on your own like Nancy Pelosi. Let us now. And this is this is the future we need to embrace it..

strep throat Tom Jesus Nancy Pelosi
"strep throat" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

Talk 650 KSTE

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"strep throat" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

"Company. Glenn beck. Has eliminated at least five of the really annoying rights that all Americans have because we have a Bill of rights, the ten original twenty seven now will he's narrowed it down to five writes in his platform and one that we really find interesting is the right to health. I'm not sure how he's going to pull that off. Have you seen any details on that yet? Guarantee that we don't get cancer. Yes. I don't know if you know this there's another candidate who ran a long time ago on healing the sick. His name was Jesus. Huge candidate still popular did bury really well. In fact, percentages of the vote and what he did is. He would have people come in with like leprosy and stuff, and he would heal them and the right to hell hell, they have the right to help that was the first leg of his platform. So it's going to do that. He basically. How? Been pulled off much since that particular candidate of what you speak. It's so crazy because it works. So well, he's he's had a really good legacy stiers picking that up what he's going to do is like if you have strep throat your kid has strep throat. Maybe you bring him in Tom will touch his his his his neck, and it's all it's gone. He'll be gone right to health proposal. That's great. And I think it's gonna work out. Well, because the government does a really good job when they take on things like they're so good. It's just really good at it. If we just let them run everything. Oh my God. Things would go so smoothly with me..

strep throat Glenn beck Tom Jesus
"strep throat" Discussed on KHVH 830AM

KHVH 830AM

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"strep throat" Discussed on KHVH 830AM

"Waist. Another news update east next on NewsRadio. Eight thirty cage VH. Tom Steyer has eliminated at least five of the really annoying rights that all Americans have because we have ability rights, you know, ten original twenty-seven. Now will he's narrowed it down to five writes in his platform and one that we really find interesting is the right to health. I'm not sure how he's going to pull that off. Have you seen any details on that yet? Guarantee that we don't get cancer. Yes. I don't know if you know this there's another candidate who ran longtime ago on healing the sick. His name is Jesus. Huge candidate still popular today. Yes. I did very well. In fact, percentages of the vote, and what he did is he would have people come in like leprosy and stuff, and he would heal them. And they had the right to hell right to help the the right to health that was his first the first leg of his platform. So style is going to do that. He basically how? Oh. Hasn't been pulled off much since that particular candidate of what you speak. It's so crazy because it works. So well. He's he's had a really good legacy stiers picking that up what he's going to do is like if you have strep throat your kid has strep throat. Maybe you bring him in Tom will touch his his his his neck, and it's all it's all gone. He'll be gone right to health proposal. That's great. And I think it's gonna work out. Well, because the government does a really good job when they take on things like so good. It's just really good at it. If we just let them run everything on my God would go so smoothly with..

Tom Steyer strep throat
"strep throat" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"strep throat" Discussed on WLAC

"All right. Tom Steyer has illuminated at least five of the really annoying rights that all Americans have because we have a Bill of rights that said, you know, ten original twenty-seven now will he's down to five writes in his platform and one that we really find interesting is the right to health. I'm not sure how he's going to pull that off. Have you seen any details on that yet? Guarantee that we don't get cancer. Yes. I don't know if you know this there's another candidate who long time ago on healing the sick. His name is Jesus. Huge candidate still popular. Yes, did really well. In fact, percentages of the vote, and what he did is he would have people come in like leprosy and stuff, and he would heal them. And they had the right to hell hell, they have the right to health. That was the first leg of his platform is going to do that. He basically. Uh-huh. Been pulled off much since that particular candidate of what you speak gets so crazy because it works. So well, you know, he's he's had a really good legacy stiers picking that up what he's going to do is like if you have strep throat your kid has strep throat. Maybe you bring him in Tom will touch his his his his neck, and it's all it's all gone. He'll be gone says right to health proposal. That's great. And I think it's gonna work out. Well, because the government does a really good job when they take on things like they're so good. It's just really good at it. If we just let them run everything on my God things would go so smoothly with it would be so easy. What do you want to do things like earn money? No give that to the government. Let them pay you for for just being alive. Right. And then you can go, and you can do music and art, yes. On your own like Nancy Pelosi. Let us know this is this is the future we need to embrace it..

Tom Steyer strep throat Nancy Pelosi
"strep throat" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"strep throat" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Beck program continues on five seventy K L I. All right. Tom Steyer has eliminated at least five of the really annoying rights that all Americans have because we have a Bill of rights the tan, original twenty-seven. Now will he's narrowed it down to five writes in his platform and one that we really find interesting is the right to health. I'm not sure how he's going to pull that off. Have you seen any details on that yet? Can you guarantee that we don't get cancer? Yes. I don't know if you know this there's another candidate who ran longtime ago on healing the sick. His name was Jesus. Huge candidate still popular today. Did very really well. In fact, percentages of the vote, and what he did is he would have people come in with like leprosy and stuff, and he would heal them. And they have the right to hell. Right to hell. The the right to health that was his first the first leg of his platform. So it's going to do that. He basically what he's. That hasn't been pulled off much since that particular candidate of which you speak. Yeah. It's so crazy because it works. So well, he's he's had a really good legacy stiers picking that up what he's going to do is like if you have strep throat your kid has strep throat. Maybe you bring him in Tom will touch his his his his neck, and it's over, and it's all gone. He'll be gone is right to health proposal. That's great. And I think it's gonna work out. Well, because the government does a really good job when they take on things like so good. It's just really good at it. If we just let them run everything. Oh my God. Things would go so smoothly with.

Tom Steyer strep throat Jesus Beck five seventy K
"strep throat" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"strep throat" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"Get breaking news, traffic and weather at the top and bottom of the hour on NewsRadio eight ten WG wine. All right. Tom Steyer has eliminated at least five of the really annoying rights that all Americans have because we have a Bill of rights, you know, ten original twenty-seven. Now will he's narrowed it down to five writes in his platform and one that we really find interesting is the right to health. I'm not sure how he's going to pull that off. Have you seen any details on that yet? Can you guarantee that we don't get cancer? Yes. I don't know if you know this there's another candidate who ran longtime ago on healing the sick. His name is Jesus. Huge candidate still popular today. Did really well. In fact, percentages of the vote, and what he did is he would have people come in with like leprosy and stuff, and he would heal them. And they had the right to hell that was the first leg of his platform is going to do that. He basically. That hasn't been pulled off much since that particular candidate of what you speak. Yeah. Gets so crazy because it works. So well, you know, he's he's had a really good legacy stiers picking that up what he's gonna do is like if you have strep throat your kid has strep throat. Maybe you bring them in Tom will touch his his his his neck, and it's and it's it'll be gone right to health proposal. That's great. And I think it's gonna work out. Well, because the government does a really good job when they take on things like they're so good. It's just really good at it. If we just let them run everything things would go so smoothly with it would be so easy. What do you want to do things like earn money? No give that to the government. Let them pay you for for just being alive. And then you can go, and you can do music and art. Yes. Paint on your own like Nancy Pelosi. Let us know. And this is this is the future we need to embrace it. Glenn beck. Mercury. Health kids in the capital region. Donate to WG wise. Christmas wish details at W G, Y dot com..

Tom Steyer strep throat Glenn beck Nancy Pelosi Mercury
"strep throat" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"strep throat" Discussed on WTVN

"WTVN. All right. Thank you Marshall is fifty four right now. We're about a half an hour away from another edition of celebrity. What are they worse? But we're back to your phone calls. What have you seen regarding? Where is it? Inappropriate to eat. I mean, I've actually seen people eating a sausage cheese, an egg biscuit at church, I've actually witnessed that. And some people would even say, well, you shouldn't even be drinking anything when you go in there either. But they sell drinks on the outside of where you walk in to the the actual auditorium. I don't know, man. I there's just all kinds of. I guess thoughts that go bouncing around in your head? And we Marshall just talked to sit in the bathroom on your cell phone women denying it. But I know they do, and I know there are there are people, you know, those people obviously that don't even wash their hands. I mean, I it can get on and on and on Ron thank you for waiting. You're on six ten WTVN. What you got on this, man? Jim. Thank you for waiting. You're on six ten WTVN. What do you got on this? Hello, jim. Yeah. Are you in the bathroom? Driving? All good. Just ask establishment. I just passed it a strip joint that serves food. Food and strep throat. To hygenic to me. Imagine name salad sandwich..

Marshall strep throat Jim Ron
"strep throat" Discussed on Against All Odds with Cousin Sal

Against All Odds with Cousin Sal

04:33 min | 2 years ago

"strep throat" Discussed on Against All Odds with Cousin Sal

"And I'll tell you I want this is the podcast Salvin dreaming about where I sit enlist players who were on a league that nobody cares about. Well listening, you know what you want, then he have brought me wanted to get Gopi cares about you. Everyone cares truth are here now I enjoyed. I really did. I really did. Brian. Actually Bryant we have. We have curry. We have Donovan Mitchell drafted in the rookie draft. Last year, big Brown here you would Whiteside Nikola Jokic Devon Booker. I mean, our team is ridiculous. I would say, got like Whiteside has maybe affair throwing for this trait if you want to look him up as to just to see if he fits your, let me study some a little bit. Let me what I wanna do. MBA teams horrible. Won't happen. Miami, not horrible. Your horrible well to each his own, but Tori, Tori and prints. Baden bogdonovich Terry Rozier Nelken broad, Brandon, Kelly, Oubre junior, Evan forty-eight the ngelo Russell. I mean. Yeah. Crank up that ipod and think of a trade proposal. On ipad. I get it. By the way, there's not enough made a Brian. He wasn't even gonna come on the podcast his his housekeeper MS was was ill. I think she had like strep throat or something or. Thank you for bringing that up. Here's a one bedroom apartment and he can't even clean it himself. All All that's that's all. all. Yes. All that met memorabilia chief compensated fairly. We have, you know, in New York City, not Cleveland or with the boondocks in Texas wherever you live. You know, we have a high standard of living that we sometimes you need to have our apartments cleaner than you know, whatever podunk town in Texas. You're living in a castle in Austin. So if you need me, I'll be here. I know you left cafe MS or whatever it was called in LA. Yes. Omar MS. Thank you. Chatto. Tomar MS. All right. God can listen to this for hours, but we have to go. We just have to at this point Brian, what do you have to plug? You plug something. Yes. Well, I mean NAMA standing. I imagine. I mean, you can't wait to fly. Well, you won't have to wait because I'm going to say right now, did you did you sell a? So finally? Yeah. Are you making you're, you're actually doing your job for several three us. This. Would you sell what go lay it on we? Yeah, we've got the titan games coming out in January on NBC broadcast that Dwayne Johnson is executive producing along with seven bucks off Danny Garcia. Ace Smith creators of American ninja warrior. It's going to be coming out in January two thousand nineteen. All right. It's going to be very exciting. When all the, what did you do? They? What was your job? Because I feel like the rock and Danny probably did most of the work, and then you put your name on it. Now, my job is to do all the athletic competitions, personally, sure. Real athletes can handle it. Make sure that the, you know that it's challenging enough and then you know, they devise them in actually get actual people compete. I don't know about that. Is that true that I don't think that's true? Is it? It's totally true and our, you know, our podcast, what really happened, Andrew Jenks that's coming out sex season to September nineteenth. All right. All right. See a lot to look forward to MS and maybe MS MS. Would you have him on that podcast? And maybe he can pre sign a release so there's no shenanigans. We don't really. We don't. It's not really a guest kind of interview podcast. It's more of like a deep dive into beguiling, you know, stork moments like like, how did MS fantasy baseball team becomes so horrible. So quickly, that would be a good, you know, example to do a deep dive on because there's really no logical explanation for it. Right. Okay. All right. Here's a lot when I'm gonna win. I is not who I win this league. I can't wait till I win the whole. The very short casting MS, suck the end MS. Would you rather beat Daniel Bryan or win the football basketball leg of legally. Leagues. So that's a good question. I would rather be Daniel. Bryan get paid more now..

Whiteside Nikola Jokic Andrew Jenks Brian Daniel Bryan Texas Danny Garcia Devon Booker Donovan Mitchell strep throat Gopi Tori Baden bogdonovich Terry Rozier Bryant LA NBC Miami Omar MS. Dwayne Johnson
Meat allergy after tick bite may explain severe allergic reactions

Ologies

03:59 min | 2 years ago

Meat allergy after tick bite may explain severe allergic reactions

"Well, let's actually find out what's going on, especially in children. There's that there's panda's which is a brain encephalitis caused by strip that has children are susceptible to which can cause like immediate behavioral changes. Right. I wonder if there was something like a strip outbreak. I think it was just fragile masculinity, but what possibly. Just to just depend fear of witching Zack. Aki wants to know is antibiotic resistance, a critical issue, heck yes. Okay. Oh, I can say hell hell yet even say yes. We don't cuss on our guests. So this is new the microphone? Fuck. Yes. It's a huge problem. Oh my God. It is. It is one of the scariest problems for sure. Like antibiotic-resistant strep in or staff in hospitals is massively huge antibiotic resistant. My dad got sepsis from antibiotic resistant UTI infection. It was awful antibiotic resistant to rookie Lucy's is Terry. XT RTD. It's what they call it. And what about Mercer Mercer. Exactly. That's staphylococcus aureus in. So now the the fixed that is stopped taking antibiotics, medium viruses. Yeah. So there's definitely like the the doctors shouldn't be prescribing antibiotics for things that they don't know our bacterial. But a large part of the problem too is like the agriculture industry and they're, they use antibiotics profile prophylactically. So we're just going to give all of our cows antibiotics so they don't get sick. And so- prophylactic antibiotic uses a huge issue a well that is helped driving it. So it's not. It's kind of the same thing when you talk about like, how can we solve climate change or stop putting trash everywhere like, yes, we have personal responsibilities, but there's also this systemic responsibility that is not being addressed as much. Right. So on the personal side of things, if you are prescribed antibiotic for something, take the entire course of it, don't don't save a few pills for own case. Next time I have us do that lady that people will do that all the time. Don't do that. Take. Every single pill because that what that does is it basically when you take, let's say, three quarters of your antibiotics, you're gonna kill. This is very basic, but three quarters of the bacteria in your body and your your, your body will fight off the rest of it, but those or it might just be selecting the ones that are resistant. Strongest ones are like, yeah. Oh my God. It's the people who are left at your party at like two in the morning and the worst people go home. Oh, yeah, exactly. I should've left forever ago. Yeah. Yeah. So, okay. So keep kicking him out. It's funny in our healthcare system is such a beautiful thing that I have friends who are like actors who don't have health insurance who are like, oh, if I get strep throat, I just order fish antibiotics online, and you're like, oh, America. You use them in fish tanks, but you can also take him for like, yes, people do that. Like there are whole read at sub threat. Like it's about like this is such a good learning extreme like veterinary antibiotics that you can get for your dogs and cats that are China remind. Yep, don't Don't do do it. it. Well, okay. Jon Wurster an Stephanie Hancock. Both wanted to know, is there any care for the Lone Star tick bite that makes you allergic to me? And do you think there's a possibility that the Lone Star take is Evelyn's way of helping with global warming moving to a red meat produced society? Oh, that's a fun thing to think about, but it's that's just not how evolution works, but you can answer this. Take one. I actually do love every time. It's always brought up as like, oh, every time that someone says, oh, the red meat allergy from onstar. They're like, maybe that's a and I'm like, well, yeah, it's kind of a good thing. I mean, it could be a good thing. So the almost dying part and not a good plus I have. I have some anecdotal evidence, not not personally, but so it seems that the strength of the allergy varies depending on who you are and it might depend on what tick bit you, but some people, it seems to be last decades or even a lifetime. And anytime they re expose themselves from red meat, it's a really bad reaction like NFL axis at cetera..

Lucy Stephanie Hancock Mercer Mercer AKI Zack Jon Wurster NFL China Evelyn America Three Quarters
"strep throat" Discussed on WLOB

WLOB

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"strep throat" Discussed on WLOB

"At health food stores anywhere internally if this is like a you know a throat infection which lots of people are having difficulty with right now maybe it's maybe it's just a strep throat or something as should be cultured if it doesn't get better but you can also use internally a guard golden seal and echinacea as a botanical which bolstered immune system garlic we love and herb called hcc now let me address this because you're somebody who sings i have treated a lot of singers and professional singers on an ongoing basis a rolling i'm gonna suggest from here on out that you know in between and during the days you know you're going to be straining your voice that you consume just take with you in a thermos a hot thermos of red raspberry leaf tea there's something about readdress bery leaf tea that has the affinity to help heal vocal chords that are stressed and when i was on the lecture circuit when my book came out and was lecturing to hundreds of people all over the country and giving talks and training people and then i had the radio show on top of that these vocal chords got traumatized in a big way and i luckily had the red raspberry tea with me drink it cold or hot it's better hot though on your stress and that will help your vocal chords they your vocal chords love this red respirate leaf tea which has been used for a long long time in folklore if you can see it in the literature so there are some hints for you give those a try and always if you're not responding or getting better you should check your doctor one last thing there is an acupuncture point on your finger on the middle knuckle of your middle finger on the little finger side the very first knuckle on your hand and if you can probe around in there which side of your throat is this pain on roland on seems to be on the left side and tell me what i think you said it was red raspberry team is that correct.

strep throat roland
"strep throat" Discussed on KARN 102.9

KARN 102.9

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"strep throat" Discussed on KARN 102.9

"It reminded me of so uh yeah look i'm believe me i feel for everybody up there because i know that uh even you know down here for a couple of days we had three days in a row were didn't get about thirty two and we were freaking and i'm saying we and i include myself and i'm used to that kind of stuff growing up or i did but does so there you go everybody settle now on the whole bomb thing the bomb cyclone there you go all right so much to talk about you know one thing is uh something frustrates me here you know we've got the whole budget talks coming up in dhaka and all this and it it gets to the point of it just i just wish at times republicans would ask the right questions and demand answers have democrats and they never really do we come close to doing it but we really never will we do here but the republicans really never tried to nailed them till the wall and i mean in a totally legit way not using political rhetoric but just finding out where they stand specifically on initials so we'll get to that and more plus your calls and comments if you'd like to get in we would love to hear from you because it just me and you eric south today we wish him well we hope we hope it's not strep throat you said it will cope with a very very bad a sore throat and that's what he was scared of sos headed to the doctor so hopefully it isn't bad and he'll be back tomorrow war hopefully monday at the the latest but aunt what's one thing i've never had never had strep throat i i i have i think everybody i know as a strep throat but i've never had it myself so knock on wood did i everybody white down the studio here anybody get the lysol bring it in anything that eric has touched i don't want to get it but we love to hear from you eight six six ninety red eye george with red eye radio toll free at eight six six be red eye.

dhaka eric south three days
"strep throat" Discussed on Stronger

Stronger

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"strep throat" Discussed on Stronger

"End up with antibiotics were medication to treat one ailment or another whether it was strep throat bronchitis or eventually science salmonella one point and all those things started kind of chip away at what we now talk about his gut health and then as i got older and out of college and cooking and working professionally i wasn't taking very good care of myself and certainly wasn't eating very well and i think that all that really serve to add up to a picture of illhealth in which something eventually broken my case i mean system said uh you know uncle i'm not doing this anymore and the way that that presented itself in my case was with the classic presentations of of rheumatoid arthritis where my joints would swell from acute attacks and i had kind of a general high level of of inflammation or in my entire body it's interesting because i also got chronic strep throat and sinus infections then everything when i was little and my parents lation wanted antibiotics every single time to the point where i would get immune to certain antibiotics and i had generally good health when i was little by i was just chronically sick and i think it's really a cycle yeah no definitely as they move your it's not as if there is no place for antibiotics antibiotics are a really important in many cases but when you're when we take them over and over and over again you definitely start to compromise the the makeup of the of your gut bacteria which is a really important element in our immune system which then lease exposed to further infection whether it's a virus hoards of bacterial infections he not as well prepared to deal with it and usually the solution ends up being more antibiotics it is a vicious cycle and continues to get you into a rod that's really difficult to get out of and when the gut becomes disrupted in that sense then that's when really really bad things can happen yeah so how did you get out of the riot of bad gut health and bad eating well i mean i i got to appoint honestly is pretty easy vermeille mimica change i didn't really have a choice and he.

salmonella strep throat immune system
"strep throat" Discussed on Season 4 - Christy Harrison - Intuitive Eating Dietitian, Health at Every Size Coach,

Season 4 - Christy Harrison - Intuitive Eating Dietitian, Health at Every Size Coach,

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"strep throat" Discussed on Season 4 - Christy Harrison - Intuitive Eating Dietitian, Health at Every Size Coach,

"And they're asking me what else can we do so it's still it sounds like they're still of beliefs or you know the belief hasn't been totally put too bad yet diet there's something wrong with fat bodies our there's something different about fat bodies that they need to be treated with different kind of a different kind of medicine in our debt fat bought so there's this idea like you people compare factor smoking it really common inflict such a ridiculous compared that because mocking everyone who is a smoker smokes right they've won a habit that they have in common that's been shown to have these health issue or is that people what we have in common is a body size it'd be like thing all paul people have the same behaviors all brunette have the same behavior but there's this believed that if you look at the fao body you can tell what they eat how they exercise how healthy they are and that belief that bigotry va we can look at somebody's appearance than make what are actually wild guesses about their lifestyle have at some level of health is at the root of this problem in medical care the belief that if i'm looking at a thin person i have to ask them about their exercise habits about their eating habits about their help if i'm looking at that person i already know and so we've got it you know make them a thin person first before we can treat them with basic evidencebased medicine and like that's the root of the problem right yeah so evidencebased medicine didn't work on a larger body yeah i may have told a story on the last one but i i went to the doctor for strep throat any asked me what i was doing lose weight um told me that i said we've pounds and i was like so just blown away and i didn't feel good until finally like we argued about and i was like what you give thin people with structure and he was like well antibiotics rather go let's try some of those like just on the offchance that they appear stratford in fact people heats but i will also say that there is a problem in that and it's not a fat people but also people have different racist people who you know have.

medical care paul strep throat