35 Burst results for "stanford"

Why Dr. Kumar is Changing The Wellness Game

Outcomes Rocket

06:24 min | 1 d ago

Why Dr. Kumar is Changing The Wellness Game

"Welcome back once again, see the outcomes, rocket podcasts where we chat with today's most successful and inspiring health care leaders. I really WANNA. Thank you for tuning in again and I welcome you to go to outcomes rocket dot health slash reviews where you could rate and review today's podcast because he is one outstanding individual and healthcare is name is Dr Rajiv Kumar he's the president and chief medical officer at Virgin Pulse during medical school he realized that many of the worst health problems we face as a nation diabetes heart disease cancer hypertension. Et, CETERA. I related to the collective unhealthy lifestyle, and so he has pledged to make a difference in this industry. He's done and as a frontline physician and now through various different companies, some amazing things and so what I WANNA do is open up the microphone to Raji to fill in any of the gaps of the introduction and then a so we could get into the podcast. Reggie welcome to the PODCAST. Think saw glad to be here. So Rajiv, what would you fill in in your intro that I that I left out? I think that was pretty comprehensive. Just, a little bit about virgin pulse. You know what? I think that may not be familiar name to a lot of folks on your that are listening to your podcast. We are an employee wellbeing company. We work with large employers all around the world, and our goal is to help them activate their employees to lead healthier lifestyles which had to kind of go around the healthcare system a little bit, and go direct to the employees and figure out ways to motivate them to inspire them and to help them sustain behavior change over time, and it's not just about healthcare cost reduction. It really is about how do we help people be? Healthier, happier and more productive at work in their personal lives. So that's really what our mission is. That's beautiful and listeners for those of you who haven't connected the DOTS virgin pulse. One of Sir Richard Branson's Virgin Group companies. So you know with the gentleman like that behind something like this and and Rajiv as part of the executive leadership team, you can imagine some great things are happening. It's an exciting time for us. We definitely are inspired by Sir Richard Branson leadership in his philosophy is if you take care of your employees, they'll take care of your business, and so we're trying to empower employers to take better care of their employees. So strong, and and you know it's really interesting that you guys are tackling this employer perspective of the entire health career equation because costs are soaring and aside from labor costs, it seems like healthcare cost is oftentimes double digits in that front. What are your thoughts on what should be on every medical leaders agenda today? Well, I'm biased but I think it has to be a behavior change remember too often looking for a magic pill or magic device or something to kind of stem the tide of rising obesity, diabetes and heart disease in our country and at the end of the day, there's so much. We can do to actually change people's behavior a lot of what we're facing as a result of our diet, our physical activity or lack thereof the stress that we have in our lives just how we how we treat ourselves and how we don't take care of ourselves, and so I think it's not necessarily a hot topic I. Think it should be and and I wish there was more focus on it is the perennial that if we can change behavior, we can prevent a lot of disease and we can produce significantly greater outcomes and Reggie. What would you say right now at at at Virgin? Pulse. Is an example of how you guys are improving health outcomes. Well, I think we really tried to think outside of the box I think traditional health interventions and and health and wellbeing platforms have largely been ineffective and they've been around for decades. So we sat around and we said what if we took a different approach rather than making people feel like they're failures rather than telling them that they're sick what if we actually make them feel successful what if we make them feel good about themselves right off the bat what would that do for self esteem for their motivation and for their ability to change. Most of what we see in our industry is a heavy focus on screening, and so employers asked their employees to take health risk assessments and do biometric screenings and so forth, and the problem with that is they take a health risk assessment tells them you're sick. You know you have high risk, your unhealthy needs to do more change your lifestyle, get your biometric screening results and you have high blood pressure. You may not like the results that you get back and that can be very demotivating, and so we've said is, is there a scientist out there? Is there a behavior change model that focuses on success? We found a scientist by the name of Dr Bj fog out of Stanford University and Dr Fog is sort of a new guru of behavior change and he's come up with a behavior change model that he caused the fog behavior change model and it's very simple as model is is a formula to it is called B. Equals M. A. T.. Equals motivation times, ability times a trigger, and so what he means by that is to get somebody to do a behavior that we want them to do or they want to do. First of all, they have to have the motivation to do it. Second is they have to have the ability to do it, and a third is you have to trigger them. To trump to do that behavior and too often in the in the kind of behavior change space, we ask people to do things that require either too much motivation or too much ability. So we say something like go to the gym four times a week and exercise for sixty minutes. Each time you go that takes a lot of motivation and some people may not even have the ability a really know how to do that where to get started so forth so Dr Fog says, well, motivation is hard to change. Your motivation waxes and wanes on a daily basis on an hourly basis, we can't really change somebody's motivation that easily what you can do is changed the behavior you're asking them to do to make it easier. You can change the ability to perform the action, and so the idea is if you take a behavior like washing your teeth and you break it down to the smallest tiniest thing that somebody could possibly do like floss one tooth and you ask them to do that they can actually do. That very easily, it doesn't take a lot of motivation is very quick to do, and if they do that and you celebrate the fact that they did it, you can help them build what we call success momentum, and then they're going to feel better about going to the next step and try something harder and so in our entire approach to behavior change, we break behaviors down into their simplest most basic action we ask people to do that would trigger then and then when they do it we. Reward them make them successful. We give them social status. They might get some kind of points or some kind of reward, and then we ask them to do something harder the next time around and stuff feedback loop that builds up momentum, and it changes behavior in a very sustainable way in a very habitual way, which is really the key to behavior changes creating habits.

Dr Rajiv Kumar Virgin Pulse Sir Richard Branson Reggie Dr Fog Scientist Virgin Group Dr Bj Fog Raji President Trump Medical Officer Stanford University Executive
Trump's lawyer threatens defamation suit over critical Stanford open letter denouncing the qualifications of Scott Atlas

Democracy Now! Audio

01:22 min | 4 d ago

Trump's lawyer threatens defamation suit over critical Stanford open letter denouncing the qualifications of Scott Atlas

"One study by the center, for Economic Policy, research found widespread mask use across the united, states would have saved forty five thousand lives in the months of April and May alone the official US death toll from covid nineteen rapidly approaching two hundred, thousand with more than six point six million confirmed corona virus cases. On Thursday New York mayor. Bill de Blasio delayed the start of in-person classes for K. through twelve students until at least the end of September amidst a major staffing shortages schools. And teacher protests about Corona virus safety measures. Meanwhile, The New York Times reports recommendation by the CDC to radically back Corona virus testing was not written by scientists and was published over there. Strenuous objections last month the CDC's website quietly changed its guidance to recommend people without symptoms should not be tested even if they've been in close contact with an infected person, the new CDC guidelines contain basic scientific errors suggesting they were drafted by a political operative rather than an expert in infectious diseases. One unnamed federal official told The New York Times quote that was a doc that came from the top down from health and Human Services, and the White House task force they said.

CDC The New York Times New York Corona Official Bill De Blasio Covid Economic Policy United States White House
Los Angeles - Nothing Preventing USC, Pac-12 Teams From Playing This Season, Gov Newsom

Mason & Ireland

02:44 min | 5 d ago

Los Angeles - Nothing Preventing USC, Pac-12 Teams From Playing This Season, Gov Newsom

"A very weird day when it comes to PAC twelve football future of it got earlier this morning, the big ten announced they're coming back. They're coming back on October twenty third they they're confident that with their testing and the way that college football has kind of gone over the past couple of weeks at other schools that they can safely bring kids back now you and I both gone on record saying, we don't think it's the smartest thing in the world to play college football. So I'm not saying that I want college football to come back I don't. US He really wants to play their players. All wrote a letter to Gavin Newsom but here's why I'm bringing this up the big ten and outs were coming back Larry Scott the commissioner of the pack twelve immediately she's a statement that says because of the governor's guidelines we are not allowed to practice in the state of California which means USC Ucla Stanford and cal all would be unable to practice about an hour later Gavin newsom the governor California was doing a press conference and he was asked is that true that you won't allow those teams to practice? Here's part of what newsome hadn't his answer quote. I WanNa make this crystal clear. Nothing in the state guidelines denied the ability for the PAC twelve to resume quite to the contrary. This has been a misrepresentation of the facts and quote. What is Larry Scott and the PAC twelve referencing when they say. They can't play because of NEWSOM and NEWSOM says, it's not true who's telling the truth here newsome. Governor ain't Lion Larry Scott I. I've never been a fan of I think he could screw up a ham sandwich. But I but I do think that newsome is telling the truth and I think we're at the point John Now with the big ten resuming along with the SEC in the big twelve and the ACC, I think it is time for the PAC twelve to seriously consider resume or starting the season starting it earlier. They've got access to this rapid testing program. They're able to test players in in very short order really quick tests. I don't see any reason why the PAC twelve shouldn't be playing right now the. Monroe. Saint Brown Graham Harrell Bunch of USC. People have tweeted this letter out basically to goose to newsom saying, please let us play and newsom saying, no, you're you're allowed to play. It's it's up to your it's up to your athletic directors. It's up to your chancellor's I. Think it's time to have a vote among twelve PAC twelve schools and get a season started.

PAC Gavin Newsom Newsome Larry Scott Football Larry Scott I. California Saint Brown Graham Harrell Chancellor USC SEC Commissioner Monroe John
High-tech ship set for launch on 400th Mayflower anniversary

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 6 d ago

High-tech ship set for launch on 400th Mayflower anniversary

"The truth to see Vera's and scientists have gathered in Plymouth England to mark the four hundredth anniversary of the departure of the Mayflower the ship that carried a group of puritan settlers to new life across the Atlantic Ocean technology expert Andy Stanford Clark says unlike its wooden fruit assessor the special is a sleek high tech crime on top of the song and steered by artificial intelligence because it's autonomous doesn't need any crew and therefore the disconnect space for sleeping quarters of food supplies or counties or toilets or anything so the whole space given over science experiments the sixteen twenty journey would launch a new chapter of expansion and impart for Europe and would bring disaster for the native peoples who lived in the Americas for millennia Charles Taylor that's not London

Vera Plymouth England Andy Stanford Clark Europe Americas Charles Taylor London Atlantic Ocean
'Stop work' order issued at parking structure that collapsed in Atlanta

Atlanta's Morning News

00:37 sec | Last week

'Stop work' order issued at parking structure that collapsed in Atlanta

"Collapse involving the same Midtown parking deck, the city of Atlanta issues a stop work order. I plan to fire Sergeant Cortez Stafford tells me. Workers were inside the parking deck at 5 30 West Peachtree Street. Shoring up the structure from the collapse that took place Friday when one or two he beamed from near the area that collapsed hand kick down in the centre of the structure. One worker happened to be on one of those upper floors and came down with the concrete. Stanford says The worker fell 5 to 7 floors. He's at Grady with serious but non life threatening injury. WSB Cheryl Castro says six workers were hurt Friday. At that same deck. The city says it's too dangerous to work on site area. The

Sergeant Cortez Stafford Cheryl Castro Atlanta Grady Stanford
Yahoo's Ugly Death

Malicious Life

05:59 min | Last week

Yahoo's Ugly Death

"The name is synonymous with a time when all of our lives were simpler when facebook was an actual books full of students faces computers made weird sounds when the connected to the Internet and downloading a one minute long video can take all night. Eddie tight yet who was one of the four or five most popular websites in the world with billions of views, every month and evaluation well, over one hundred, billion dollars. But as the two thousands turned into twenty tens, the web changed massively and your who was faced with the difficult task of changing with it. Their web portal service model was going out of fashion. We all moved to g mail and Google Search, McCain the front page of the Internet. Despite the fact that ask Jeeves was obviously way better. Many of Yahoo's services remained relatively popular, but they were no longer trendsetting no longer growing and the company's market capitalization dropped to a fraction of what it once was any remnant of the mindshare or what we might refer to as v Cultural. Capital they once held fell off. So to those of us on the outside yeah, who's fall seemed utterly quiet gradual and most of all inevitable but was it really Forget what you think. You know at least for a moment and consider this from the peak of the DOT COM bubble. Some say the beginning of the end for Yahoo to two thousand, eight, their revenue increased tenfold that success was no fluke either as print publishers struggled with the incoming revolution of online advertising, Yahu was very much on top of it. They were positioned Willie enough that when Microsoft attempted to buy the company for forty, five, billion dollars in. Two Thousand and eight CO founder and CEO Jerry Yang swiftly rejected the offer it was over the following few years that things would start to ten at the company transitioned through five different CEOS in just four years, and in the meantime Google took over the Internet. This would seem like the end of the story except in two thousand and twelve yen made arguably the most significant tire in its history and new CEO who could finally get things going again. Marissa Mayer. was distant for such a role from the beginning. Some college students have hard time in the job market, but after completing her degree at Stanford, Marissa was offered fourteen different jobs including teaching Gig at Carnegie Mellon One of America's leading engineering schools and consulting role at Mackenzie. Arguably, the world's premier consulting for the Young Maria turned down both those offers to become the twentieth employees at a fledgling startup called Google. At Google, she was star in fact, there's hundred percent chance you've run into her work. She oversaw the design of Google's homepage. You know the one you use probably ten times a day she was also one of the three people behind Google Edwards. It's difficult to overstate the importance of Edwards to the Internet as a whole and to the company itself to give you some sense of it. Though, at one point Edwards provided ninety six percent of Google's entire revenue. In fact, you could argue that Edwards and by proxy Melissa Samaya was at least partly responsible for the fall of. yahoos revenue multiplied tenfold between two thousand and two thousand and eight in no small part because of their online advertising. But he declined even faster when Google they're smaller competitor designed a better wage, you connect advertisers with users based on search results. Edwards. So, by the principle that if you can't beat him, you should join him Yahoo in two thousand and twelve hired Marissa Mayer. It was bald and popular choice. The company's stock rose two percent. The day of the announcement Meyer instantly became an icon for women in an industry dominated by men. Then, she got to work changing the company culture. She opened an online portal for employee complaints a system whereby any office problem given sufficient votes by employees would be automatically investigated by management. She oversaw a personnel shift which brought remote employees back into the company's offices Fortune magazine put her in their forty under forty list and ranked her as the sixteenth most powerful businesswoman on the planet. In short things were finally looking up for Ya. At least from the outside on the inside, however, the really really inside a very different story was about to be reading.

Google Edwards Marissa Mayer Yahoo Facebook Marissa Mayer. Eddie Marissa Jeeves CEO Fortune Magazine Jerry Yang Carnegie Mellon Microsoft Maria Mccain Willie Yahu Co Founder
New Fitbit Watch Tests Your Temperature  And Your Stress Level

Business Wars Daily

02:18 min | 2 weeks ago

New Fitbit Watch Tests Your Temperature And Your Stress Level

"The last few months chances are you've had your temperature taken more often than you had in the last few years from the hair salon if you're allowed to go there to the doctor's office, a quick forehead scan is often required before you set foot in the door today more than ever having a fever means you shouldn't be around others. But by the time you actually get to your destination and find out that you're running hot. You've probably been in contact with other people that includes the person holding the thermometer. And if there's one thing we do know about Couva, it's that contact can spread the virus wearable device maker fit bid is trying to cut off such exposure before it happens. The fitbit sense is equipped with sensors that may be able to detect covid nineteen and flu symptoms before you can even feel them the device has a new temperature sensor. It can also you monitor your breathing heart rate changes and blood oxygen levels. FITBIT has been part of ongoing research in Covid nineteen prevention. The devices are already being used to detect symptoms at health organizations like Stanford. Medicine, and in May, the company launched the Fitbit Cove Nineteen study. fitbit users can opt in the devices apt to answer a few questions and share their biometric data goal is to help it build an algorithm to definitively detect covid nineteen before symptoms start and speaking of Covid nineteen fitbit cents is also designed to help you manage stress levels one sensor measures, small electrical changes in your sweat, which can help you monitor your body's response to stress. The FITBIT APP can help you understand your response and then take action maybe a guided meditation or a long walk perhaps. The did sense will ship later this month as far as pricing the device will set you back three, hundred, twenty, five bucks. That's about seventy dollars less than its biggest competitor. The Apple Watch apple still dominates the wearable device market making up more than half of global smartwatch sales. The Apple Watch six is expected to be available for sale later this month. Apple cider predicts that the watch will have improved heart monitoring capabilities. No plans for adding temperature sensors were reported just how effective wearables could be in preventing covid nineteen spread remains to be seen. But as device makers learn more about the virus and its symptoms, they may be able to pinpoint the biometric changes that matter.

Covid Apple Fever Couva Stanford
Why Gianna Nino-Tapias Embodies Labor Rights

Latina to Latina

04:48 min | 2 weeks ago

Why Gianna Nino-Tapias Embodies Labor Rights

"Yana. Nino thought BS planned to spend the summer before her first year at Stanford Medical School doing contact tracing working retail. But when her job search a dead end, she went back to seasonal fruit picking work. She's been doing since she was fourteen. At the end of one long day she tweeted about farm workers like her being paid seven dollars for two gallons of blueberries. She then asked how much do you pay for your blue various? I had talked to her I did and learn so much about her path to medicine as a first gen college student indigenous rights farm worker's Rights on. We'll consumers need to know about the people who make their food possible. Jeddah. Where are you right now? I'm Linden from California Palo Alto our new you're back at school ivax going out here. I always remember those summers during college going home in it's. It's so strange because you have all this independence when you're at school and then you come home and your parents. Treat, you like you're still in high school, right? Right and every time I go home. It's just there's just a large expectation fairly for my mom is my own expectation that I should be like helping my mom in linked doing some chores and like lightening her load guy at school it's like you're right like complete freedom I do whatever I want whenever I want. Do you perceive your mom to have a heavy load Yeah absolutely. I think she's our only period and. I think that you know we go to work and she has to come home and make them some meals for everyone. There's five of us and she kind of like cleaned for Yooglie of she loves house being cleaned. So I help out with all those things whenever I can. To Lot Yeah You're born you're born in Eastern, Oregon, you grew up in eastern Washington state. Told me about where you grew up. So Eastern. Washington is very different from Seattle. I think that's why. Like columnists conception that I. Get is that the thing it's just like satellite super rainy it's actually not. So eastern Washington Eastern Oregon both desert in the rain shadow of. E mountain range. So we get like very little rain, it's very conservative. There's very little diversity out there I think the main communities of color that live out there my farmer communities in the needle in communities I think it was a great place ago by the you grow up because it is so rural. There's so much nature around there so much like the outdoor activities to do Saigo peron alarm really enjoyed around a lot of fields. So my working in the field I love Eastern Oregon eastern Washington I would love to go back someday is that the plan to go back? Yeah. Absolutely. How old were you when you started working in the fields? I was fourteen years old. What was your first day of work like? I. Think I was super excited for my first year. We're ten years ago. And they all super excited because I would get to contribute. Tie Household I, think the causes for me was like, okay I can use this money to go to my mom to make your life easier and then she would let me keep some of it so that I could spend it on what I wanted to nature's like take my siblings than I on a shopping spree for for school. So he went to buy school supplies in. We were very excited like Bonnie backpacks unlike brand name markers and stuff like that. I have three younger siblings. So they were all little and they were excited because we had never done that like I think I'll. Getting. The bare minimum that we need for school and now it's finally like being I was able to get them whatever they wanted. Is there a story from childhood that captures who you were as a kid. I think one story though remembering like me, my mom and my sister was. Going to do this activity called Battle of the books where there's a selection link. Eight books that read it's handling a quiz bowl style where you just like recall parts of the book and I've always loved reading and so we were remembering that I read all the books like my sister was on my team even though she was two years younger than me in the elementary school and she was like, yeah, you just carry the team and you like because remembered everything and I think that that was super emblematic of just who I was of like my love for reading my. Or. Competitive data. Just like a real enjoyment for school and like why The promise of my mom always wanted to go to school didn't get the chance to and so. She was always telling me and my siblings like, Oh, you go to school a you do all in school. It's GonNa take you to a Lotta places in. So I guess those just carry me through life

Stanford Medical School Washington Oregon Yana. Nino Yooglie Eastern Jeddah Saigo Peron California Palo Alto Seattle Bonnie
Biden turns attention back to coronavirus and reopening of schools

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

08:03 min | 2 weeks ago

Biden turns attention back to coronavirus and reopening of schools

"President trump. And his administration had done their jobs. Early on with this crisis, Merican schools would be open and open safely. Instead American families all across this country are paying the price for his failures. Mr President or are you? Where are you? Why aren't you working on this? We need emergency support funding for schools and we need it now. Sue. President. That's your job. That's your job. Today Joe Biden called the opening of of schools quote a National Emergency Joe. Biden said that if he were elected president, he would direct. Federal Emergency Management Agency to provide emergency relief funding to immediately help K. through twelve schools with ventilation personal protective equipment, and hiring more teachers in other words, provide federal government funding to give schools and teachers what they need to actually reopen schools and what parents need to trust the reopening of schools joining us. Now, is Linda Darling, Hammond President, and CEO of the Learning Policy Institute and a professor at Stanford. University. She is one of the education officials who briefed the vice-president Biden about his school reopening plan also with us Dr J. Blackstock an emergency medical physician. She is also the founder and CEO of advancing health equity and a Yahoo News medical contributor. Dr Let me start with you. What do you think is the science requires for the reopening of schools. So that there are several factors at play. The most important factor is the community transmission rate currently the CDC in whol staying five percent competivity rate anything about that. It's not safe to open and so looking at that number only are a number of areas throughout the country that are prepared open New York City with positive rate of less than one percent, and then after looking at community transmission rate have to think about the resources that schools have spent elation math being able to a separate cohort students into smaller groups having faith as well as school nurses. So all those factors are incredibly important for parents to consider. When deciding to send their kids to school Linda Darling Hammond. Did you advise Joe Biden. A needed to be done for the reopening of schools. Well, there's a couple of things that we need. Certainly, we need all of the things that the doctor just listed. In schools in order to make them safe and there are costs associated with those things. Thus far, the Recovery Act that has been passed has spent less than one percent of all that money on supporting schools to get the resources that they need to be able to open in addition to the things that were just mentioned. There's the need for additional cleaning and disinfecting and there's the need for adequate testing and tracing so that if there are cases they can be immediately dealt. With in quarantine So we need the funding that's been held up in the Congress ought to get to school so that those things are available We also need clear guidance from the CDC about the level of infection at which a community can safely open schools and the ways in which they should treat cases for quarantining and closing down when there are cases that occur in schools. All of those things are being taken up by the states but right now, the states have had quite a big hit in terms of the economy and so they are operating quite often in deficit and need of the federal support in order to be able to do the job that needs to be done. Let's listen to what Dr Anthony Veltri told Andrea Mitchell today about the infection rate and how it is still running much too high. About forty, thousand a day. Right around forty thousand new cases. That's an unacceptably high baseline. We've gotta get down I'd like to see a ten thousand or less hopefully less. So Really WanNa use this opportunity almost to have plea to the people in this country to realize that we really still need to get our arms around this and to suppress these types of surges that we've seen.

Mr President Federal Emergency Management A Linda Darling President Trump Linda Darling Hammond CDC Merican Founder And Ceo Hammond President New York City Yahoo Dr J. Blackstock Dr Anthony Veltri Congress Stanford Vice-President Whol Learning Policy Institute Professor Andrea Mitchell
Serena Williams opens bid for Grand Slam No. 24 - again - at U.S. Open

KCBS Radio Midday News

00:36 sec | 3 weeks ago

Serena Williams opens bid for Grand Slam No. 24 - again - at U.S. Open

"First round continuing today. Number three seed Serena Williams play Stanford's Christie on early this afternoon. A number two seed The Australia Open champions Sofia Kenin plays her first round match this afternoon, along with number seven Madison Keys number 26, Sloane Stephens and Venus Williams. Last night. The number four seed Naomi Osaka, the two time Grand Slam champ, beat Masaki Dois 6 to 5762. Showing no ill effects from that hamstring strain that forced her to withdraw from Sunday's final of the Western and Southern Open. NBA playoffs. Utah

Serena Williams Masaki Dois Venus Williams Sloane Stephens Naomi Osaka Madison Keys Southern Open Sofia Kenin Christie NBA Stanford Utah
The Scoop on CBD With David Krantz

The Essential Oil Revolution

04:16 min | 3 weeks ago

The Scoop on CBD With David Krantz

"Hey everyone. I am here with David Krantz David thank you so much for being with us here today it's good to have you back on the show. To push back, really appreciate you reaching out and setting this up. Yeah. Well, for those who don't know you, you've been on the show. But you are a sought after certified EPA genetic coach. Last time you're on the PODCAST, we talk specifically about epigenetics. Specialize in personalized nutrition, genetic testing optimal. You are the two thousand Nineteen International Forum on Healthcare Advancement, top one, hundred health innovator nominee, and your best known for creating the appear on genomics indicate cab annoyed panel. So you know a lot about the economic system, CBD EPA genetics all these sort of Geeky side things that I love to just like dive down deep into especially when we sent her that around. Because there's so much there. So I'm excited and let's dive in last time you talked about certified your work is a certified. Coach can you briefly share your journey a little bit of background for those that may be missed that episode WanNa know a little more about who you are and how you got here? Absolutely. So I like a lot of people who find themselves in the healing world had to really kill myself and figure out my own stuff I, and that's really what led me into the path. And My background is actually in music and electric music production performance, and in my early twenties I was touring musician and Meyde lifestyle and all the stressors not taking care of my body really just 'cause my health to crash and I started having these weird symptoms I was passing out randomly, which was not fun like wake up and realizing that I was just unconscious for a little bit. I saw a number of the mainstream doctors and they're basically like well, you're like a healthy young guy in his twenties like you're not. GonNa. Die of a heart attack. We can tell you that you're not gonNa you know. You don't have diabetes. We can tell you that right and beyond that there wasn't a lot of actual useful actionable information, and so it really forced me to do my own research and figure out what's going on. I've been listening to this podcast with the Guy Dr Dan Stickler, who is a world renowned expert in genetics and epigenetics sand I listening to all of his podcast episodes that he had out. And there wasn't anyone really talking about this stuff in this angle and I took a walk on my lunch break one day at work and realize the logo of this podcast that I've been listening to was literally on the building next door. Like one hundred yards from whereas working and the doctor had an office next door to me that I didn't know about. So wild. And so I immediately booked a time I wanNA blood work done with them. I wanted to work with them and it turned out they're actually looking to hire someone with an audio background to help them develop meditation programs and stress relief programs for this experimental sound chamber. They've built in this clinic and I turned out I had the perfect background you know immediately want to. Start working with them and right around the same time. This Guy Dr Dance declare who's he's a consultant to Google lectures at Stanford. He started a training program for teaching genetics teaching epigenetics and I haven't the replaced at the right time basically, and he was like, Hey, you should you know be a Beta tester refer this program like you kind of have a basis for it. Me Can pass his knowledge on to you actually said no at first I was still in the I`Ma musician. Kind of mindset and sure enough I actually ended up being the first coach that he trained. He's trained about three or four hundred worldwide now, and so that's really kind of what launched me into what I'm doing now, and since then I've gone on to develop a genetic test for economic function like you mentioned with Dr. Stickler and so it's really been a battle one eighty Cana journey for me in terms of going from someone who? Really needed help to kind of being on the other

Wanna Dr Dan Stickler EPA Consultant David Krantz David Nineteen International Forum Diabetes Meyde Google Cana Stanford
Scientists blame climate change for wildfires, extreme weather paterns

Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

00:55 sec | 3 weeks ago

Scientists blame climate change for wildfires, extreme weather paterns

"Scientists Scientists are are hesitant hesitant to to point point out out any any single single event event and and blame blame it it solely solely on on climate climate change. change. But But the the director director of of Stanford Stanford University's University's climate climate and and energy policy program says extreme weather conditions air testing the country. Michael Ware, a says it feels like the climate has it in forests. With Hurricane Laura wildfires in California. Ahh heat wave that produced a reading of 130 F and inland hurricane that hit parts of Iowa and Illinois and a tropical storm that left parts of the New York region in the dark for a week or more where it says this is exactly what scientists have warned us to expect in a warming world. La vio liner of the National Center for Atmospheric Research, says a lot of the climate impacts that scientists anticipated are playing out as they thought they would sometimes increasing in frequency as in heat waves, sometimes in intensity, intensity, As As in in extreme extreme precipitation precipitation events, events, he he says, says, this this will will only only get get more more intense. intense.

Stanford Stanford University's Director Hurricane Laura Michael Ware Atmospheric Research New York Iowa California Illinois
Scientists blame climate change for wildfires, extreme weather paterns

Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

00:55 sec | 3 weeks ago

Scientists blame climate change for wildfires, extreme weather paterns

"Scientists Scientists are are hesitant hesitant to to point point out out any any single single event event and and blame blame it it solely solely on on climate climate change. change. But But the the director director of of Stanford Stanford University's University's climate climate and and energy policy program says extreme weather conditions air testing the country. Michael Ware, a says it feels like the climate has it in forests. With Hurricane Laura wildfires in California. Ahh heat wave that produced a reading of 130 F and inland hurricane that hit parts of Iowa and Illinois and a tropical storm that left parts of the New York region in the dark for a week or more where it says this is exactly what scientists have warned us to expect in a warming world. La vio liner of the National Center for Atmospheric Research, says a lot of the climate impacts that scientists anticipated are playing out as they thought they would sometimes increasing in frequency as in heat waves, sometimes in intensity, intensity, As As in in extreme extreme precipitation precipitation events, events, he he says, says, this this will will only only get get more more intense. intense.

Stanford Stanford University's Director Hurricane Laura Michael Ware Atmospheric Research New York Iowa California Illinois
Climate change may make extreme hurricane rainfall much more likely

Bloomberg Businessweek

00:55 sec | 3 weeks ago

Climate change may make extreme hurricane rainfall much more likely

"Scientists are hesitant to point out any single event and blame it solely on climate change. But the director of Stanford University's climate and energy policy program says extreme weather conditions air testing the country. Michael Ware, a says it feels like the climate has it in forests with Hurricane Laura wildfires in California Ahh heatwave that produced a reading of 130 F and inland hurricane that hit parts of Iowa and Illinois and the tropical storm that left parts of the New York region in the dark for a week or more where it says this is exactly what scientists have warned us to expect in a warming world. La Vio Lehner of the National Center for Atmospheric Research, says a lot of the climate impacts that scientists anticipated are playing out as they thought they would sometimes increasing in frequency as in heat waves, sometimes in intensity, As in extreme precipitation events, he says, this will only get more

La Vio Lehner Hurricane Laura Michael Ware Stanford University Atmospheric Research Director New York California Iowa Illinois
Addiction in the Age of Covid, with Dr. Amer Raheemullah, M.D.

Diffused Congruence: The American Muslim Experience

05:47 min | Last month

Addiction in the Age of Covid, with Dr. Amer Raheemullah, M.D.

"Honor Rahimullah It really happy to have A. On the show we've known omair out, of course, outside of work for quite some time as well. But I, myself didn't know about all the really interesting area of expertise that he dabbles in omair is a clinical consultant at Lucid Lane which is a startup. He'll be talking about relevant to the topic at hand today, which is addiction. and Dr Amirah Hemas, a clinical assistant professor at Stanford University. School of Medicine and Director of the Addiction Medicine Consultant Service at Stanford Hospital. We're GONNA be talking a lot about addiction as expertise today. Given all the stressors that are happening in the world right now, armor is board certified in Addiction Medicine Internal Medicine, and he completed his training at Stanford University School of Medicine in his internal medicine training at the University of Illinois College of Medicine. So as I said, his specialization as OPIOID, N., Benzodiazepine take. Notice that tapers off. You'RE GONNA have to educate us on on the right promotional US now say. We call it the Golden Ben Zozo Okay Ben says, and treating substance use disorders in residential and outpatient programs as well as in patient and office based setting. You're welcome super interesting to talk about this very important although under not as much talked about topic. So really important and interesting to dive into that. Thanks for having me Yeah and Omer touched on this or alluded to this Excuse me I'm we obviously know you personally out beyond just having you on the show full disclosure armour's my cousin and I think, Omer, you've got an interesting sort of linked to armor as well. Raise your brother in law and armor Western. Or Medical School they went med school together. That's right. My brother-in-law they went to med school together and. we live we all live in the bay area, of course. Ten to happen with this show but Yeah. Of course, you know my I live right across the bridge from Stanford in Amer works at Stanford. So but but again, really interesting really really interested to dive into some of these talks I didn't even didn't even I didn't even know all these things about her so Yeah. Yeah for sure for sure. Absolutely and as we often like to do err on you know I guess tell us a little bit about yourself Obviously we we we heard University of Illinois being mentioned there You are originally from Chicago Illinois maybe talk a little bit about your background, and then we can get into your professional life. Sure. Absolutely. So So you know born and raised in the Chicago. Land area. We moved out here a couple years ago to the Bay Area California, to pursue some extra training and addiction medicine and started working at Stanford, you know loved the weather and the work I was doing out here and I stayed on to launch an addiction consult service at Stanford. Hospital. Addiction concert services are a way of intervening and increasing access to addiction treatment in the hospital setting. So for example, you know we have a drug overdose epidemic you'll have things like drug courts because people with addictions commonly get arrested for things are run. INS with the law so they'll have drug courts where they'll have. treatment associated with these Felonies her charges that people get such this. It's this concept of intervening where there's a large population of drug addicts and people with alcohol problems. Save the hospital people with addictions also have a higher prevalence of higher incidents of hospitalization. So by intervening at the hospital level rate to. Intervene on a large concentrated population of people with addiction. So we we go in and we talked to people in the hospital who have a medical consequence of their addiction, and this is you know crystal meth heroin, alcohol cannabis issues as well. So psychiatric complications of their addiction or medical complications of their addiction, and they're really in more reachable and teachable moment just like you know after they have a legal consequence with the drug courts, there are much more reachable and teachable moment. So in the hospital we come in, we'll do a brief intervention get your family involved, get them started on treatment therapy medications, and then linked them to ongoing treatments. It's really new, cut a model, but it's rapidly increasing all over the country to address it's the idea of their. They've Kinda hit this low and you're kind of turn the leverage that low point to and make into a turn around moment, right? Absolutely. Absolutely. A lot of our patients are just going on about their business. Some of them have been thinking about salvaging and alcohol for some time others not even a thought, but once they come to the hospital. Their lives are such somewhat disrupted, and now they are in the hospital away from drugs and alcohol minds clearing up a little bit and in some sort of pain and suffering from their medical consequence. So now they're a little bit more teachable, reachable, frustrated, sick, and tired of being sick and tired. Then we come in and tell us and we start to have a real collaborative patient centered discussion and go from there.

Stanford University Addiction Medicine Internal Me Director Of The Addiction Medi Stanford Hospital Stanford University School Of University Of Illinois College School Of Medicine Chicago Omer Drug Overdose Dr Amirah Hemas Clinical Consultant University Of Illinois Ben Zozo Clinical Assistant Professor Medical School Bay Area California Illinois Benzodiazepine Heroin
This is What Most People Get Wrong About Willpower

Optimal Living Daily

04:21 min | Last month

This is What Most People Get Wrong About Willpower

"This is what most people get wrong about willpower by near a all of near and far DOT COM. You come home after a long day of work. Can you immediately curl yourself up on the couch and binge the latest Netflix's craze for hours while you scroll and Scroll your social media feeds and snack on potato chips even though you're on a diet, you look around and see that garbage needs to be taken out. Laundry needs to be folded in your child's toys are strewn across the living room floor. The list of productive things you could be doing seem endless. You can't seem to find the willpower appeal yourself off the couch to do them. Is a regular occurrence for you. Do you realize that you are in this? rut But can't seem to find the willpower to overcome it. You're definitely not alone in this situation this is called ego depletion. Ego Depletion is a theory that willpower is connected to a limited reserve of mental energy, and once he run out of that energy, you're more likely to lose self-control. The steering would seem to explain your post work defeat. But new study suggests that we've been thinking about willpower. All wrong. At the theory of Ego Depletion is true even worse holding onto the idea that willpower is a limited resource can actually be bad for you making you more likely to lose control and act against your better judgement. The real nature of willpower. In, a study conducted by Stanford Psychologist Carol to Wack and her colleagues published in the proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences too I concluded that signs of Ego depletion were observed only in those test subjects who believed willpower was a limited resource. They studied how people reacted when they were fatigued and told drink lemonade was sugar in it to give them a boost after the participants drank lemonade, the researchers evaluated how they reacted. It wasn't a sugar in the lemonade, but the belief in its impact that gave participants an extra boost people who did not see willpower as a finite resource do not show signs of ego depletion if to conclusions are correct that means that ego depletion is caused by self defeating thoughts and not by any biological limitation, and that makes us less likely to accomplish our goals by providing a rationale to quit when we could otherwise persist. Michael Ends liked professor of psychology at the University of Toronto and the principal investigator at the Toronto Laboratory for social. Neuroscience offers an alternative view. Dwight conclusions is like believes that willpower is not a finite resource, but instead acts like an emotion just as we don't run out of joy or anger willpower ebbs and flows based on what's happening to us and how we feel for example, to determine how in control people feel regarding their cravings for cigarettes, drugs or alcohol researchers administered a standard survey called the craving belief questionnaire. The assessment is modified for the participants drug of choice and present statements like once the craving starts, I. Have No control over my behavior and the cravings are stronger than my willpower. How people rate these statements tells research is a great deal, not only about their current state but also how likely they are to remain addicted participants who indicate they feel more powerful as time passes increase our odds of quitting in contrast studies of cigarette smokers found that those who believe they were powerless to resist were more likely to fall off the wagon after quitting. The logic isn't surprising but the extent of the effect is remarkable a study published in the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and drugs found that individuals who believe they were powerless to fight. Their cravings were much more likely to drink. Again, the same theory could be applied to other things as well such as working out dieting, self control and a relationship, but CETERA. A new, decision, making tool. Seeing the link between temperament willpower through different Lens has profound implications on the way we focus our attention. From one if mental energy is more like an emotion than fuel in its tank, it can be managed and utilized as such. For example, a taller might throw temper tantrum when refuse a toy but will as they age gained self control and learned to ride out bad feelings. Similarly, when we need to perform a difficult task is more productive in healthy to believe a lack of motivation temporary than it is to tell ourselves we're spent and need a break.

Netflix Journal Of Studies On Alcohol Stanford Toronto Laboratory For Social National Academy Of Sciences Dwight Michael Ends Principal Investigator Carol University Of Toronto Professor Of Psychology
Designing Your Work Life

Good Life Project

05:29 min | Last month

Designing Your Work Life

"Let's give a little bit of context just to who you are and how you came to work together because you come from sort like different walks of life and somehow ended up originally teaching this course together and trying to figure out. Okay. What is this thing called design thinking and why is it being used in this one domain but we're not really applying this process this way of thinking to actually creating a better life. So how does the marriage I happen here? Under the origin and through to you in spring of two thousand. So. Going all the way back to when I was a Stanford Sophomore here seventy five thousand years ago when they retire on the plaza and struggling with the question, what do I do with my life? I found most of the grown-ups were supposed to be helpful not helpful at all and I found it really difficult to figure my own life and get into my career and apple in the early days and find myself on the first corporate culture. Committee was Steve In one, thousand, nine hundred because we're worried about what makes apple won't be apple anymore someday, and over the subsequent thirty years noticed everybody's got this question particularly workplace about I wanted to many for work on to work for you. Want, it to work for me. I want this to be generative used language with that's what they were looking for and with. So everybody's got this question fast forward many years. Later I'm having coffee with a guy named Randy over at Berkeley and he says Gosh have you should teach a class on this. So minor problems I'm not of the Faculty don't of a PhD don't have any contacts there I can solve everything but the lousy commute I said deal. So I taught a course experimentally one student said, are you teaching in the spring because my roommate wants to take I said sure I made a deal the universe of the kid show up I'll show up so fourteen semesters later. I'm teaching this class of Berkeley called finding your vocation and then how platinum David. Kelly get together an event. This thing called the D school decided to invent the school, which is where we are now and in order to focus on that David Kelly s this Guy Bill Burnett run the design program, and so in two thousand and seventy heard bill was coming here to run the design program said. Hey. Bill Gates. This kind of stuff he cares about students in Stanford's a lot less terrible from me. Let's have lunch and so we had lunch in two thousand and seven in the spring, which was the first of ten lunches over a year talking about this ambiguous idea of students find their way and about a minute and a half bill goes after great idea it's a huge problem. We should totally fix it design. Thinking is the way to solve this thing. So take all that stuff you're doing and flip it ended design give me a proposal will teach it. It will prototype at the summer we'll teach at this fall. Let's go I gotTA gotta run so it was a two minute meeting and I guess an appointment we gotta go. So what are the few times the bill talk faster than I do and so then we start that spring thinking of ideas and that fall teaching design students, which eventually teaching author students. But in particular design thing really did work why West go? Why did design work? Design is inherently human centered. The way we teach it and both of you and I have been working with students for longtime I started I finished my masters in eighty two I started teaching part time eighty, three I'm doing this for like thirty. Six years or something. And in office our after office hours after office. Our really smart capable students going I don't know what to do. I. Don't know how to launch. is working to suck as much as everybody tells me. How. Will I find something that I want or I like or might even be meaningful people keep asking me stupid questions like what's my passion and I don't know. So wrong broken. With me professor and it's nothing wrong with you. And then Dave, this experience over Berkeley and you know basically the class happened because he wanted a shorter commute and I wanted to. Free up my office our time but no, it's a real. It's a really big problem I. Mean you look around look at the data around the world sixty United States sixty, eight percent of the people say I'm just engaged from are highly disengaged from my job. I hate my job eighty-five percent worldwide people hate their jobs, right? So the students you know we started with students and then pretty soon after we pick kind of gone all over the university and by the way now we and we give the class to any university that wants it. We're not being taught at one hundred, fifteen, some universities and courtesy of that wonderful woman over there Gabrielle. Runs our studios. Everybody's got the same question like life be meaningful. Will this be interesting? What's work? How does work it into this big thing called life? And it's essentially a human problem because we're trying to. But designers do is make things that have happened in the world. You know, hey, this is an iphone never happened before how do you do it while you build lots and lots of prototypes and figure it out because you can't get any about the future. So when you want to do something in the future that's brand new. You need a process design thinking process it works over and over again if you apply to your life, well, what are you trying to do something new in the world your. Future. Right you've never you've never been there before you don't know what it's going to be like you probably are a little anxious or you're at a point of change we started working with thirty and forty something. I. Have This career thing but it's not exactly what I didn't really work out the way I thought or it's okay to go faster. So everybody's got this problem. How do I invent the future? Well, design thinking and design is a wave in Benton your future. I tell the students you I wanted to choice. Whether Students Twenty launching a thirty in board or fifty, and thinking about their own career you got only two choices the futures coming. You don't get to choose that. You, get the default future stuff happens in you react to it. or You design it, you put your intention in the world and you try to make the world do things that you're interested in and

Berkeley David Kelly Apple Bill Gates Bill Burnett Stanford Bill United States Randy Benton Steve Professor Gabrielle Dave
All The Fun Stuff (That Shouldn't Be in Your Drinking Water

Important, Not Important

03:26 min | Last month

All The Fun Stuff (That Shouldn't Be in Your Drinking Water

"Our guest today is Maury Walker and together, we're going to talk about what's in your water and more than ever. That answer is stuff that shouldn't be Maury. Welcome. Thank you. It's great to be here. We're so happy that you're here. Could you maybe just tell everybody who you are what you do? Yeah. So I am actually at Duke University, I make graduate students starting my fifth year studying micro-plastics. So my doctoral dissertation is in civil and Environmental Engineering Department. Uh studying chemicals associated to plastic and how they end up in. Things like our fresh water or the stomach acid in a bird or fish, and just understanding how those chemicals transform in possibly more toxic than the original products. But yeah, I'm a engineer and chemist. Chemists, Great Brian it's just like you. Same as me yes. Amos me you said, you went to Duke and Queen you love Duke Right look. It's not that I don't love. Duke. It's one of my good friends growing up as like a UNC basketball guy and so. I know I know I know I know sorry about this Amari. Like. We. Don't have to high. It's it's it's different than. Saying. My undergrad was at UC. Berkeley. So my to rival his Stanford right now. Oh Nice Nice Nice my wife. And my wife went to Stanford but she also doesn't care about sports and so people are very confused on they're like Berkeley's terrible. She's we can all be friends. Yeah. We we can work on it. Said holy cow quickly as a reminder to everyone because we haven't done this in a while Our goal always is to provide some context for what we're talking about today and then dig into a action oriented questions that we can all ask to help support today's topic and and Amaury Yup that sounds pretty great to me. We'll see if he can remember how to do this been a little bit of a hiatus. which is which things have been a little a little crazy out there. Just, a little bit just a little bit anywhere anyways Ann Mari We like to start with one important question to set the tone for the chaos follow Instead of saying, tell us your entire life story we like to ask Amari wire you vital to the survival of the species. If I just had like a compilation of guests making that noise after first reaction we need to do that. Yeah it's great. Great. The the easy answer there is that I'm just one person in a collective of people that care about leaving the world a better place than it started, but I I kind hope to. Be Relevant in the fact that I am a black female environmental engineer in chemist trying to change the world as far as micro-plastics in water quality and you know I'm trying to be an inspiration to other people who may not have considered a career I'm like this or you know a the that you can't be a scientist or engineer and even a science communicator. So I'm hoping to take a little bit more of a public facing way to show people that there are people out there trying to change the world

Maury Walker Engineer Stanford Duke University Maury Berkeley Amari Basketball Environmental Engineering Depa Ann Mari Scientist
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

11:15 min | 10 months ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Are still really young. So you know you have choices in those moments and again I love having a good team around me you that will not be cowed that we always go back to our values. What are your values? What are the things? Is that you as a human being value for me. It's love it's grace. It's compassion its integrity and so when I focus on my values that always helps me know what to do next. And I I feel good about coming mean through those moments without hopefully parodying the vitriol and name colleen that this president does yes but to be very clear an unapologetic about the values that I hold and that I believe the vast majority of my residents hold.

colleen
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

13:23 min | 10 months ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Giving me the chance to myself. When is Michael Tubs The mayor of Stockton California much like Mayor Chef Stockton is who I am. A big part of Hoya royal was born and raised. Its home. I spent four years here and my master's and bachelor's and soon as I could while complete my senior year I went back on the Stockton Radford City Council for for four years I've been married for the last half. I think much like Oakland. The things that I love best about stock north things are how I live my life. So Stockton's doctors resilient city. It's a working class. City is a city on. That's used to people are expecting big things. From surprise people is to see that leads from the heart is it's a CSI afraid to fight to see that understands. That seems like ours are really kind of where the rubber meets the road row in terms of our values of social justice or inclusion and equity arm and then I think personally nothing much like the mayor of great appreciation for the work. You all do. Is that growing up. I was often the beneficiary services. Group like yours provide my among them as a teenager. My father incarcerates so when we have conversations about poverty or mass incarceration or gun violence. Those aren't things I've learned about that Stanford or say yes Stanford. Because of the things I lived I came to Stanford they learn about structures and policies the road that policy and programs can have and changing those. So that's what motivates my work. That's what makes me up every morning as mayor and more importantly I'm soon to be a father in six weeks and.

Mayor Chef Stockton Stockton Radford City Council Stanford Stockton California Hoya Michael Tubs Oakland
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

09:56 min | 1 year ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"You. I'm thinking of Sarah Corbett. Yeah. You explain it by the main, okay? So we're massive fans of woman named Sarah Corbett who is a craft avast. And which we for when we first heard about his where I work we were a bit skeptical, but she was working to she had been invited by an organization to try to change board's perspective on whether they should pay a living wage or not. And so in about this work. She said, of course, you know, what we wanted to do is make Rudolph and throw them at the invasive angry, but we quickly recognized that that wouldn't make a difference. So what they did. Instead. That they looked at each of the board members who they were hoping to get on board with this idea and became obsessive in learning everything they could about what they cared about. And then they went to the store the that the board was the advisory group for and they what handkerchiefs from that store to demonstrate that they were customers, and they created a custom embroidered handkerchief for each of these board members as and wrapped it beautifully as this beautiful gift. And they wrote a note with that said you have an incredible amount of power. You have an influential job and an important one. We are your customers, and we love your employees. And we want you to pay them a living wage, we ask this humbly as your customers who care about the people who work in your stores, and she did this was such love. Of all the board members continue to carry the hacker Chaves they met with them over a series of months and actually did agree to raise the minimum wage that they were paying their employees. And I think what is inspiring to me about that story is that she approached it with incredible love and humility and ask them to be a better version of themselves rather than calling them out for not being the best version of themselves. So I think anytime we're trying to get somebody to do something that they're not doing. We have to show them. How this is going to help them be the person that they hope to be. I told you she sells it way better than I do. Hi, I'm from Los Angeles. And we. Over the last couple of years have done a big public campaign around homelessness and really quick shout out. One of the things that was really has been helpful for us is that there is the storytelling sort of curriculum that folks who live in supportive housing Goto. And then they are there to talk to the board of supervisors or fill in the blank stakeholder. And it's been it's been good. We successfully put together this campaign to put together a quarter sales tax generates about three hundred thirty five million dollars a year as well. As a a sister piece of legislation at the city level to make a thousand new sport of housing units per year. So that was really great. But now we can't say any projects and one of the things that are researchers are telling us is that some of the messaging that we use to get legislation passed is like backfiring because have certain images in their mind. When these support of how? Housing sites are gonna come to their. Their neighborhoods. And so you you mentioned in your definition that it's like this word of transcendence. I love it. If you had any more like thoughts about how to like, we did focus we focus on like, we should not have folks. Leaping on our streets. And we got a short term win. That's really really important. But it feels like it's not getting us over the finish line. So do you have other questions that you should be asking? When you start to develop that strategy. I think the reason that we want your strategic communications plan to live on the back of an envelope. Is that you have to constantly right it, and so the communications plan that you had worked for the system in which we're working, which was policy changed. Now, you're working in a new system, which has culture change. And so you need to answer the questions differently. And so I think it's really important when you go through these questions that you've versed as answering question number one that you really think about which system we're working in who is influential or a decision maker within that system. And what are we going to do to get them on board? So I think that that communication strategy solve that challenge. Now, you need to go through the process again. Hi, my name is Diane I work with the youth ally into and. You might have just answered that question for me. But. We work with young people and. Working with specific issues that. Regarding public school safety community safety and one of the issues that has been coming up, especially I mean nationally as you mentioned with parkland is the issues of law enforcement on school campuses. And what that means to young person for being really truly safe and that interaction when we've had issues with law enforcement and the families have come come to us. We've spoken with young people and they've shared those stories. The immediate responses while that was in one particular instance, that's not how it happens all the time or we'll have administrators rushed to the defense of the law enforcement. We've had police chief say. Well, it's those kids it's those families. So every time we try to bring up a story. It seems to get shot down with rationalization or well, how presenting it well enough and one of the context contextual factors of our community. That is probably important is that we live in a suburban community rural suburban community that means low housing costs. And so we fifty percent of our population at any given time probably has. It has a lot of law enforcement that lives there retired law enforcement and law enforcement that lives there. So it's been a very difficult thing for us to figure out how to craft the narrative or the communication strategy that doesn't say what's those kids? It's not an issue all the time. And so that doesn't get shot down. So I just want to help think through that strategy of the culture shift or the communication strategy. What is it that we need to think about differently and have the young people share differently in order to get that across? Yeah. I would go back to the process and really figure out what it is. It's like you're not completely while you understand us. Use your clear that you we all want there to be zero shootings in school. And we never wanna lose another child. But I think in terms of answering the first question, you've got more work to do to think about what is the system that's in place that you're really trying to change. And what are some of the things that are going to make a difference there? So I would be trust the process there. But it's interesting to me because I'm hearing you describe the psychological phenomenon that we talked about which was when we see people who are not in the in group, we ascribe to them the most extreme perspective. So it seems like maybe some contact theory would be really helpful here as well and really getting people in the same room. Yeah. I also think that it would do us some service to take some time to study the worldviews identities values of your target community that you're trying to influence. We recently worked with organization and they're trying to persuade mothers in Appalachia to think differently about higher education for their daughters. And we used a lot of the academic research around worldview in values and identity to sort of evaluate where do they fall on that continuum? Do you have an individualistic worldview or an egalitarian world? Do what are the underlying values of those five that we mentioned, and we found that they have a mix of individualistic worldview, pull yourself up by your bootstrap, but very strong communal worldview, and they have a fear that if you say higher education that means my daughter's going to think she's better than the community, and she's not gonna come back, and they don't. I want them to leave the community because they have such strong ties. So now that they have that insight about what's happening on unconscious. The gut intuition that shaping their judgments they can think about stories they can tell that override those assumptions, but also resonate with them. So they're connected to how they see the world what they value, but they also assure them that those perceptions and perceptions of harm are unfounded. Thank you. You've been listening to a podcast by Stanford social innovation review, a part of the center on philanthropy and civil society at Stanford University for more podcasts articles and other content about innovating social change. Please. Visit our website at dot org. Follow us on Twitter or like us on Facebook. I'm Eric ni. And thank you for listening.

Sarah Corbett Stanford University Rudolph Los Angeles Chaves Twitter Facebook Eric ni Diane I Appalachia three hundred thirty five mill fifty percent
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

05:30 min | 1 year ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Situations. There's another question here. Hi. So there's so much to unpack from everything that you said and connecting to a lot of what we heard yesterday as well. First of all disabilities. You were spot on left completely invisible. A lot of the time yesterday. We heard some gentlemen, speak about funding for mental health another area that is almost completely invisible. And I do believe that it's because makes us nervous. It makes us uncomfortable. It talked a lot about that. In terms of the communication strategy yesterday. What kind of information were willing to receive in what turns us away? So I really appreciate that. And would love to know more about how to identify and and connect with disabled populations because in my community. I will tell you. They are invisible. I don't see disabled people on a regular basis in my world. But certainly they're they're twenty percent. I absolutely believe that that is true. And so I would like to know more about that. And then the other thing in terms of how we deal with intersection -ality the last keynote yesterday talked about the strategy of dividing and conquering, and I think sometimes we are almost enemies in that sense. It's our issue. That's most important. And so you talked about some efforts that you made to diversify the crowd, and you talked about board. It's so my question is I feel like one of the things that we all have to challenge. Ourselves to do is to make ourselves Volna Rable. So if you're invited to be on a board, if your first response is my just checking off a box. Well, maybe it's okay to check that box off because we need to be vulnerable. And so I wonder how you feel about that. Like if you were to take the risk if we were all to just take the risk to be vulnerable and try to educate and build release. Ships as we go does is it necessary for the relationship to be built first. Because then I feel like we're just continuing to be stuck where we are in. Now. It's really good. I just think that for for myself. There are some groups. That's like, yes, I would love to be on your board. I can. And I know what I want to add myself. But if I don't know that organization, I don't have a relationship if if someone asked me to be on a health service board, and I'm an arts person. I would have no clue why they would ask me. So yes, we do need to be vulnerable and say, yes, and I have done that where I felt if I didn't do it who else would. So I cannot complain when something happens and the oh look at them. They just did something that they should have known not to do. So I know that's my responsibility. Either one of you should of question for you. Well, that that is a really good question. Where are you located? Dayton, ohio. There are disabled people in Dayton. I probably have some Facebook prince. But I think starting with just Google, you know, we're so lucky that we have that resource because, you know, Google disability organisations, Dayton, Ohio and see what you can come up with. You know, I'm professionally interrupted able still even though I'm retired Judy and access stance dot org, and I'm also always really happy to try to connect people with resources or answer questions. But I think he'd just have to start with the research part. And I think ticking boxes is fine. But if you you know, you go and you find the disabled person to be on your board. But you're not doing anything that really engages them or their community or reflects them, then it's not going to be successful. And I think that's where we have to really take responsibility. You know as organizations to get. Training on race to get training on disability to you know, break down our own our own 'isms. You know? And and that's something that I wish I had done more of when I was at access, but I also understand that we're all like, you know, forty hour weeks or a joke. You know, let's just say sixty. So I know that we're all really overburdened. But you know, and that you know, you've got to be prepared to make the investment of time. And I want to thank all three of you for your incredible generosity and your experience and your your time here. Thank you for the full trajectory of your work. And for everything you've done to make our field, and our our lives actually, much more better by your efforts. So I appreciate you taking the time to talk with all of us, and thank you so much. Thank you everyone for being a. You've been listening to a podcast by Stanford social innovation review, a part of the center on philanthropy and civil society at Stanford University for more podcasts articles and other content about innovating for social change. Please visit our website at SSI dot org. Follow us on Twitter or like us on Facebook. I'm Eric ni. And thank you for listening.

Volna Rable Dayton Facebook ohio Stanford University Google Twitter Eric ni Judy twenty percent forty hour
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

06:02 min | 1 year ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Hi, I'm Eric ni. Managing editor of Stanford social innovation review which aims to inform and inspire leaders of social change. Learn more at SSI are dot org. What practices made the arts more or less impulsive? At our two thousand eighteen nonprofit management is to conference leaders from the San Francisco Bay area art world discussed how they run their organizations and shape the performances to be more diverse and welcoming to all panelists Tim Seelig artistic director of the San Francisco game ends chorus says that's the next big shift. If we are to survive to go under the community knocked down those norms and be something that is accessible leak was joined by non Tara San manager of cultural strategies with race forward. Judith Smith, founder and director of access dance company and Sherry young executive director and founder of the African American Shakespeare Company. We're delighted to be here. And I'm certainly just thrilled to be joined by my illustrious co-panelists over here. I'm your moderator for the day. I'm going to take a just a quick second to introduce myself for more fully. And then we'll actually have everyone say a bit about their work. So you have a sense of who you are. And what we do and what we've done and also just a note that more full bios are are certainly near program, and you can take a look. So my name is Nancy says, and I'm the manager of cultural strategies at race forward the center for racial Justice innovation I'm recovering arts administrator and artists and a large portion of my work is running innovation labs for racial equity in the arts. I currently do. So in New York City where we have sixty different arts organizations of all types, everything for museums to theaters to small community based groups going through. Offensive racial equity boot counts, and my job also involves organizing in the arts and culture sector in the nonprofit arts and culture sector for increased racial equity and really delighted to be here to have a pretty expensive conversation about diversity inclusion and equity the arts, and I wondered actually Tim if you would introduce yourself, and then Sherry and Judith a little bit as well. Sure. The artistic director of the San Francisco gay men's chorus, and as a that, I am a cat herder of the gays and. So it's a challenge I actually have two hundred seventy five gays that get together every Monday night, and that is about a thousand opinions on any given topic. So I find myself as both conductor and coordinator, I've been the executive director and the chief operating officer. I've been conducting gay choirs for thirty one years, and it's been a joy, and and also rocky road in many ways. And I know you're excited to hear about the rocks. That's it. My name is Sherry young. I'm the founder and executive director of the African American Shakespeare Company, we were just voted the best life gator in San Francisco for two thousand eighteen thank you. I started the company when I was about five years old. So. We do Shakespeare in a different cultural vein that connects to a diverse community specifically, the African American community has always been my targeted goal, and we kind of branched out into doing American classics, which includes not only August Wilson and George wolf, but Tennessee Williams, and I don't know some others, but we do that. And we're now opening up for colored girls with into sake. Sean gay tomorrow night in San Francisco. So if you are in town, please drop by but we only have about thirty tickets left, literally. And we look forward to our twenty fifth anniversary coming up next season. Thank you. My name is Judah Smith, and I am the founder and director America. I'm also a recovering arts administrator. I just retired in February. I started the company when I was ten. Seriously. It was thirty one years ago. Access started. Listen group of us. They got together really with the idea of just saying what would happen when you brought people with and without disabilities together to explore movement. What we didn't realize that there was a whole really important, social and political implication that what we were doing right away access started alongside artistic program engagement work teaching because people would come say where do I go do this? And we had nowhere else to send them. We also realize that because it's virtually impossible then and still today for disabled dancers to get training that we were going to have to train dancers, and alongside that advocacy became a really important part. So access mission. As I exited was to change the face of dance and disability through artistry, engagement, and advocacy. And I'm thrilled to say that the company is continuing they replaced me with two people an executive director and artistic director, and you can find out more about access on the website, a D A N C E dot org.

San Francisco African American Shakespeare C executive director director founder and director founder and executive director Sherry young San Francisco Bay Tim Seelig Judith Smith administrator Tara San Eric ni Stanford Managing editor African American community New York City director America Judah Smith Nancy
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

06:49 min | 1 year ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Most people go to work for a foundation as as as PM mentioned, you know, people kind of like us who came from the outside born with the name gates or buffet, right? And they go there to try and do good and do. Well, the argument about how bad things are from my community. Is not as powerful as this is the vision we have for serving our power. This is what we want to see. I mean, especially since you election of November twenty sixteen. We're really knowledgeable. What would we don't like? But what what's what's the shared vision of narrative for promoting forward? I mean, if you know, Cheryl, I wonder probably a conversation or bottle of wine, but if how many fellows, you support now, we've got a global community of over eight hundred and so if you went to if you went to ten thousand what would be different. To what research the foundation research the program officer, you're engaging. Those are real live. Human beings are not green green. Shape accounts. Find out what that foundation is looking for in terms of defining success kind of build a relationship from that. And then you can teach him something to where you're in there. So I just I just I just want to. You know, maybe again, maybe I've been in for three too long. Maybe what I'm saying. Now tells me it's time for me to go. But most Sunday Sion's wanna do well and want to do the right thing. Well, and to sort of want to be accountable for it. And so you just have to sort of show up like that. And I can't I can't walk into a boardroom status that you said, and that turns into a grand strategy or grant program got to be sort of a positive vision or outcome of something that we can assert and just wanna 'cause we hear a lot of that you should fund our community because we're only getting point zero one five percent of all foundation of lengthy funny. Well agree with that. And yeah that sucks, but I'm not giving you a grant. Because you told me that I'm just want to be honest and candid about that. And that I think we need to assert the positive shared vision of missing Linda this. This is why I love the young people. They're much more naturally sort of intersectional and bridge builders, then then certainly my generation, right? They'll go to a black lives matter of into on Saturday and LGBT event on Monday and metoo event on Thursday, and they're down with all of right? And we saw it after the shooting and parkland right member before minute, it was just a bunch of white kids talking about it and young people, wait a minute. What about us and by the time to March on Washington showed up do- young people of color at the podium. I don't know how that happened. But it wasn't because we gave them a grant. There's something I want to interrogate in their doctor Ross grow, and then we have to because. Got to get in a fight with a pregnant woman. We strong. I'd agree with you. No. I mean, just like in because in the spirit of listening as someone who also was on the non-profit side for a long time. This idea that we're supposed to research every opportunity and then research like the personality. Oh, she's Philipino. She's pregnant maybe I'll bring up that. I have kids that kind of stuff. It sounds again like the onus is on the applicant who has less time in his looking for money. So I want to say, yes. And like I do believe that a positive vision for what we wanted to chief. That's not just resistance is really powerful. And I also want to say what is the accountability? And responsibility of our of our sector to both stop operating in a silo way ourselves. So we have no idea like what other people fund or why right? We don't fund collaboratively most of the time we have all these super individualistic processes. So I think both of the vision you just put forth, I think that that vision that demand or that request can be made of Flint as well. Like, I think we can operate more as a collaborative ecosystem and less like how many foundations exist? Now. It's way more than two thousand hours and Plum, k sixty thousand individual mountains castles on top that people have to figure out how to get to the top of. And then ask their, you know, ask their ask. I think that there's a different a different constellation with which if we operated collaboratively in differently, and I just wanna say one hopeful thing because I I've level some critique of my sector, which is. I started this job for years ago with the mandate from our great partners to get other funders to behave better. Right. Act right medicine or something. I was I was pretty skeptical, but you know, over time, and because actually the Trump election has lit a fire under the feet of many of our friends who maybe didn't feel like they had to do anything differently. I think there's been like a migration towards asking about what edible practice looks like in real in real life like embodied, practices and approaches, and we went from like, a, you know, this tiny little you've never heard of us the Whitman institute. Now, you know, this tiny little foundation the bay area to there's eight or nine foundations that of all different scales and sizes that have signed up to not just model these practices, but advocate for them, widely invasive FRA sleep our sector, so that's just one of the many initiatives influence that actually does exist. That is pretty parallel values aligned with the conversation. We've been having this remote. So while we can be very critical of both the nonprofit sector and the philanthropic sector. I really wanna. To say that I feel more hopeful than I thought I would feel for years into this job of like try to change Flannery. You've been listening to a podcast by Stanford social innovation review, a part of the center on philanthropy and civil society at Stanford University for more podcasts articles and other content about innovating social change. Please. Visit our website at dot org. Follow us on Twitter or like us on Facebook. I'm Eric ni. And thank you for listening.

Stanford University program officer Washington Twitter Cheryl Sion Facebook Eric ni Flannery Linda Ross Flint Plum Whitman institute zero one five percent two thousand hours
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

06:45 min | 1 year ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Hi, I'm Eric ni editor and chief of Stanford social innovation review which aims to inform and inspire leaders of social change. Learn more at SSI dot org. Research shows that wind talented social innovators lack invisible capital the so-called, right pedigree, right passport, right skin, color, right gender. They may fail to get the attention and vestment they need to succeed. How can leaders in philanthropy improve access to capital? What tools can help nonprofit leaders overcome these barriers and get the support they need at her two thousand eighteen nonprofit management institute conference social entrepreneur author and Stanford University lecturer Kathleen Kelly, Janice lead, a panel discussion with echoing green president Cheryl Dorsey Whitman institute, co executive director Pia in Fonte and Californian dominancy EEO Robert Ross as we heard from a lot of the questions throughout the day. It's impossible to have a conversation about diversity equity and inclusion without interrogating. Some of the invisible barriers that prevent capital from getting into the hands of so many people who are fighting on social Justice issues on the frontlines. I I became really passionate about this issue myself as doing research where my book social startup success of elible on Amazon. And so for the book, I went out and interviewed hundreds of organizations. They're leaders are staff their boards to try and understand how organizations scale, and as I was writing at my interviews and writing them for the book, I realized that so many of these stories sounded very similar that someone would graduate from and Ivy league university they would get capital from someone who took a chance on them. They looked a certain way talk to certain language had a certain pitch deck. And it occurred to me that although talent and good ideas can come from anywhere that we have a funding system that preferences, things like social innovation and certain degrees often at the expense of so many community based leaders or people with lived experience or people who are connected to the communities that they are serving and arguably a much better position to solve so many of the issues that we care about. So I became really curious well who got left off of the pages of social startup success. What are we leaving on the table because they never get funded, and I started to research this question of invisible barriers to capital and learned that divers leaders are significantly underrepresented in the social sector today. Well, thirty percent. Of the population is black or Latin necks only ten percent of organizations are led by black black and Latin x individuals. We also know that diverse leaders are under invested and the social sector today. Just four percent of grants and contributions, go to diverse led organizations and forty one percent of leaders of color struggled to find access to funding. Sources I think that that number is probably very low. There's also new research from digital undivided that talks about the challenges of being a black female leader lack women led organizations and companies raised just thirty six thousand dollars angel funding versus a three million dollar national average. They have statistically received only zero point zero zero six percent of venture funding, which I think we can only infer that similar disparities exist, and the nonprofit sector if you look at who is distributing the capital the picture becomes very clear. Eighty five percent of foundation. Trustees are white ninety four percent of foundation presidents or weight and seventy six percent of foundation stuff are wait. And then we also we think about despair this invisible barriers. To capitol have to talk about the wealth gap and this country to set an important barrier for represented leaders. The average white household has a total worth one hundred sixteen thousand dollars. While the Jeff can American household is just eleven thousand and this is problematic. When organizations are so often relying on friends and family for Sabe capital. I learned yesterday that the seed capital is sixty billion dollars annually in this country. And if you want to access that capital, you have to have family and friends who have money to get. Divers meters were to be capitalized at levels commensurate with their presentation the sector, we would need twenty two billion dollars in additional grant funding. So that's where we are. Flan therapy is reinforcing many of the very forms of inequality that we are all working so hard to solve. I'm really excited to talk about new approaches today with our incredible panelists who are addressing these and many issues in their work as funders, and I wanna start by giving them an opportunity to introduce themselves. And then we'll dive a little bit more into teasing out some of these challenges and barriers that exist, and then we'll talk a little bit more on a positive note as well. Cheryl, even a certain sure, thanks Kathleen. Hi, everybody. My name is Cheryl Dorsey. I'm president of echoing green echoing green is a leading angel investor. In emerging social entrepreneurs we provide a startup capital and wraparound support to amazing social entrepreneurs

Cheryl Dorsey Kathleen Kelly president Stanford Eric ni Amazon Stanford University Fonte editor Ivy league university Whitman institute Sabe Pia Robert Ross executive director lecturer Jeff Janice lead one hundred sixteen thousand d
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

09:52 min | 1 year ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Where culture plays out a little differently. So whole truly because I work with means stream organizations chamber of commerce community foundations the powerbrokers community that culturally I have to look a certain way in dress a certain way in order to be heard in that room at the same time. I'm being brought in because there is a disconnect between their work and what they're trying to achieve in their greater region. And so it's an interesting kind of dynamic to have to show up as one of my friends would say suited in booted. So that you can hear the words that I'm saying at the same time the words that I'm saying are going to make you uncomfortable because it requires to do work that you're not. Already doing or else? You would not bring me in the room. And so the cultural thing is like way bigger than like, you said just a simple, pedigree or school or things like that. But it is are you creating an environment that allows people to have those type of conversations that get you to better place at the same time being aware of the cultural identifiers that you're putting out there that folks like me have to recognize in order to be able to have. My message heard something that's a good point that culture is more broad than to say like organizational, and when you're working in communities having lived in New Orleans for a number of years, which was a big adjustment from Chicago. It's like community takes on different manifestations in means different things from ward to ward neighborhood to neighborhood. I guess my final question is. I recently read broadened the Angelo's book white for Jilin. Why why people have a hard time talking about racism and having grown up in New Hampshire? Like, I'm I'm surrounded by whiteness. I'm you know, I was like one of two kids and elements school it was black. So that being said the way that she lays out the book, she talks about how we have this false idea about like racism and racist just being like, independent individual actors like bad people, but not thinking about the overall structure, and like the history of our country founded on white supremacy, etc. Etc. That really is like in the air, we breathe. And so I'm wondering given that there is the like the personal work like adding onto your point like the individuals that you're going to have those conversations with need to do some soul-searching and really like interrogate their assumptions their ideas their values etcetera before they can necessarily maybe engaged with what you're recommending as far as them changing. So there's like this personal level of change that needs to have. Open. And then there's an interpersonal dynamic because you know, we're in community with people, but then institutionally and organisationally there's another structure, and then there's like the the medicine doctors. And so recognizing the complexity I guess of like how to affect change and really make D I not just like a bumper sticker, which I feel like it has become in the last five years like everyone's talking about yet. There's a whole lot of sizzle. But not a lot of state with the concept. And so my question for you is what like across those four areas whether personal or interpersonal structural institutional like where do you think the first domino? Is that people could like consider if they want to start making more actionable in real? That was loaded. It was very loaded like big old baked potato with sour. He's all on there. I don't know. There is a one domino. So I don't expect when I enter into community to do the work that I do for people to have done the interpersonal work or the inner work. It's great when I start using talking about systemic racism and policies like redlining and the GI Bill and all of that where there's a foundational understanding. That's great. But that's not my expectation. I brought into communities because they do not wanna Ferguson. That's why broaden I'm not brought in because there's been a mass of Piff une- by the powerbrokers that this is a necessary transformative moment in order for their city to have resiliency. Those are really cute words. But the reality is no one wants to be a ticker. Tape on CNN saying their streets are on fire because another black man has been shot. And so for me, I want all of those dominoes to fall. But I don't know if we're going to get there. And so my work is to hit it wherever I can and hope that there's so much somebody else on this day j- or who who's been on this day or in this room, that's working on the other Domino's at the same time because all are needed. But I think it's a it's a little I don't know. I'm just not that idealistic to believe that all of those Domino's can happen at the same time. My initial thought to your question Mckee was leadership. Like, I wholeheartedly believe. And if you want to see change, it has to start with the leader pick, your nexus of what that is is is that the organization is at the person is a department is a something bigger than that. But it has to start with the leadership and the leadership has to decide what's important to him or her and authentically in the in the context of d I really what's important. Like, do you believe diversity is important because at least a better outcomes? Okay start there. Right. That's a value. If you don't believe what you are spouses it will come through. It will fall short it. Oh, hit a wall. Pick your pick your metaphor. Right. It won't go far. But it starts with the leadership's asking a team the individual what's important to me with important to us. And how are we going to? Carry that out that I think is the first step in the start of that. And then similar to crystals point it is really about deciding where you want to star and thinking about the organization's assessment or again, whatever that unit is like what can I what can I take on? What are we willing to take on? Where do I think the organization is? So do you want to tackle representation? Okay. Go for it. Maybe you don't wanna start with representation because you want to start with the culture of equity and inclusiveness. Like, let's not bring more folks into our stuff. Right because she'll just send them right out the door. It'll be a revolving door maybe work on both of those because you have capacity as an organization to change the same thing at the individual level. Do you have relationships with people that you're willing to go deeper and take risk and go farther? Once you get to that. What do I value is this really important to me? And where do I want to start? I used to teach training program called personally fishing at Kraft Foods, and what always say when you have this really big task. They set us the salami approach. Right. You never eat the whole salami at one time you actually slice off pieces of it. So when I think about this domino. It really is thinking about where you it's a whole lot of work that we have to do that we are trying to achieve socially if you think about where those couple of things I want to slice off. And then eventually will be ready to go back and. Slice additional pieces. I just wanna just second everything that you will said. And I the one thing I'll say is that she crystals point I watching to Dr king as a quote or how to quote, it's since been like, I don't need a man to love me. I just need him not to Lynch me. And so I kind of take philosophy which I'm not as interested in sort of getting into whether you believe in you don't believe, and I do think that behavior comes first then belief this idea of like, I need you to really believe in. It's like some of the organizations with the longest versity statements and inclusion statements and this and that and the beautiful color Benneton ads on their big like they're actually engaged in some of the most Rick systemic practices along so many different dimensions. Like, that's actually where your commitment shows up in terms of actual systems so much more interested into your point just taking one system at a time and saying, okay, what are the str? Pictures we can put in place here that will allow us to achieve a different result as opposed to focusing on the inter- the personal belief systems. I I think that actually comes after people have certain seats have seen certain results. You've been listening to a podcast by Stanford social nation review, a part of the center on philanthropy and civil society at Stanford University for more podcasts articles and other content about innovating for social change. Please visit our website at dot org. Follow us on Twitter or like us on Facebook. I'm Eric ni. And thank you for listening.

Domino New Hampshire Angelo New Orleans Stanford University CNN Stanford social nation review Twitter Chicago Kraft Foods Facebook Eric ni Jilin Lynch Dr king Ferguson Mckee five years
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

09:48 min | 1 year ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Hi, I'm Eric. Knee managing editor of Stanford social innovation review which aims to inform and inspire leaders of social change. Learn more at SSI dot org. And I'm Mike publisher of Stanford social innovation review. This podcast is part of our power of feedback series produced for SSI are with the support of the William and flora Hewlett foundation. It might be an exaggeration to say that Paul John is a citizen of the world. I often and different parts little bit them fiddle Teela, but a seal Columbia Ecuador, my father used to travel very much. Okay. Maybe Paul is just a citizen of the part of the world between Guatemala and tear. Del Fuego except that are traveling father. Who was an engineer was born in Mexico and Paula currently lives in Texas. She enjoyed the travelling as a child she learned Spanish as well as Portuguese than English. But at twenty two during a visit to family friends in Houston polo began to think that the only way to achieve independence from her father was to get married, and I said to him the first person who pass I wanna marry. I mean, that's what I say. And they he say you will. Not do that. And I say, yes, I will. And I did it. I I should it did the marriage lasted twenty five years and in the fullness of time Paula had a son and a daughter. She took advantage of the opportunity to become a different sort of parent from the ones she'd known high believe, I'm more flexible. I listen to my kids I like to laugh with them because my father, he really it was not a talk in. He was just a person who say do these do these these. Because Paul and not only laughed with her children. But listen to them and paid attention to how they were responding to her. She could use their feedback to inform her parody unhappily in the fullness of time Paulo began having some physical problems, including arthritis serious enough to keep her off her feet. She learned that she could get some assistance with their medical expenses in Harris County, Texas where she was living. If she applied for a card, which gave her access to the healthcare system. It was called a gold card. Eventually Paula her that she could get help with the form she needed to fill out at a piffling community health outreach services echoes for short Paul is first visit to echoes was about as frustrating as it could have been the FBI wait the full Bod while about four hours, maybe more when they're closed they find I find out that I cannot do not thin. I don't get the paperwork. I don't got nothing. Right. So I. Got frustrated I wing home died to cry so much because I was in pain, and I didn't know what to do more visits resulted in more frustration the staff at echoes was perhaps almost as frustrated as the clients were. Fortunately, they decided to ask people like Paula, John how they could better serve their needs. Like it. When you come to give you paper, and that paper, they ask you how we can do better what we do wrong. And you know, they don't ask for you to put your name scientists like that. So you feel free to say, well, what you feel you know, fuller wrote that she felt members of the echoes staff should be more friendly. First of all, I believe, you know, he's the more important things is going to say Hello that's very important because when you come to a place the matter what place it is. Anyone? You are welcome. I believed you know, that open door polo also wondered if the process of applying for health care could be streamlined and made more consistent. So that clients weren't constantly getting different advice from different people. She wrote that the office felt cramped could they arrange it. So that people had more space than perhaps more privacy. Cathy, more the executive director at echoes was listening, and she and her colleagues began responding to the suggestions of people like Bala, some of the things she actually said to you were some of the things we focused on the most one of them was creating order here is how she put it. But the truth is we became more organized in our morning routine, which then trickled down to the clients every morning, we do what we call the morning meeting with clients and that morning, meaning informs clients as to what they can expect that day. It's also a welcoming meeting is you'll remember pallet talked about putting a smile on our faces and being more, frankly, more customer service oriented, and that's part of that morning meeting of the welcoming of of everyone thanking them for their patients telling them where they can go for questions, and and directing them to who they to me, frankly in case they have complaints. These were all keys of what Palo shared with us customer service. More order and not making people wait as long within the limitations of the space available Kathy more enter colleagues who are known as navigators have tried to address conditions that might have seemed impossible to improve. When Paula enter fellow clients mentioned the well first of all the privacy part. She's right on target. It about. And so we've tried to make some privacy by putting up those dividers in the waiting area. So the navigators have a private place, but the navigators are still next to another navigator so Powis, right? We need more space. So that we can space people out or get people offices. But we don't were not able to do that yet. It's hard dream. Okay. Echoes is not exactly a dream. Come true. But the organization has seen an helped nearly three times as many people this year as it saw in twenty seventeen and Kathy more feels that responding to the suggestions of clients. Like, Paula, John is at least partly responsible for that Paula. Thanks kathy's. Right. Because every time I come here. This my say Hello. You know, like, I'm part of the family. You know, when you come to edges, you know, United's change it when you come United strange that treats you like family, you become family when you come over and over you become a family. So yes, I believe so the mission of a Pitney community health outreach services is to help people access health, educational and social services bureaucracy language issues the difficulty many of the clients face in just getting to the office all these challenges can be frustrating. But by asking their clients how they can improve delivery of their services and by listening to their responses echoes has built a better system. The proof is in the way, those served have told their friends and neighbors about how well it is gone echoes. And that the people there will listen to suggestions. And sometimes those suggestions have come in for. Normally as complaints, Kathy. More recalls have clients used to all get the same bag of groceries. It included five cans of salmon or five cans of tuna or five cans of chicken. I remember one day someone came and said, I don't like chicken. I really like salmon can't I have salmon. So it was feedback. But it wasn't necessarily on this survey. Okay. But it was clear feedback clear enough. So that the folks packing, the groceries got clued into the fact that they were dealing with individuals with food preferences and the preferences of some of those individuals led to an expansion of the pantry there was feedback from our clients and volunteers to by the way who wanted to have a food fair here at echoes where we could provide fresh fruit. So on the first Saturday of the month. We have this mood fair. The food truck comes we have things like corn dairy. We've had meat. All sorts of fruits and vegetables, and we hand out almost fifty to sixty pounds of two two hundred families on a Saturday morning all because somebody or perhaps several somebody's wondered if all that good stuff might be added to the menu more evidence that if you're in the business of trying to help people it's a good idea to ask those people what they need. You've been listening to a podcast by Stanford social innovation review, a part of the center on philanthropy and civil society at Stanford University for podcasts articles and other content about innovating for social change. Please visit our website at 'Society dot org. Follow us on Twitter or like us on Facebook. I'm Eric ni. And thank you for listening.

Paula Paul John Kathy William and flora Hewlett foun Eric ni Stanford Texas Stanford University Del Fuego Columbia Ecuador managing editor publisher Guatemala Twitter Harris County Houston Paulo Pitney Facebook
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

07:56 min | 1 year ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Hi, I'm Eric ni. Managing editor of Stanford social innovation review which aims to inform and inspire leaders of social change. Learn more at SSI dot org. And I'm might Voss publisher of Stanford social innovation review. This podcast is part of our power of feedback series produced for SSI are with the support of the William and flora Hewlett foundation. Levels essay and Oland Artie visa victory. LS? revels thirty eight from Oakland, California. He's been out of prison since may twenty seventeen he spent almost all of the previous fifteen years, incarcerated and California. Arizona and Mississippi he did not commit crimes in all three states. Never know what the administration's thinking at the time, but I will say they don't want you to become too comfortable in one spot. And so a gospel twenty years at one prison, we're going to allow you to speak five six years here. Time to move on Shannon, characterizes his younger self as an angry man, some of the anger perhaps resulted from his apprehension and conviction. The first time for causing quote, great bodily injury the second for second degree robbery though. He was moved from prison to prison state to state, Shannon, manage to remake himself he earned three assoc-. Hits degrees and learned enough about computers to graduate from student status and become a teaching assistant while still incarcerated in that role. He began learning about how important it was for a teacher to consult with his or her students regarding the best ways to learn. My teacher always always asked us for what we could do to make this program better took suggestions. And we'll make a whole new program in a prison that might sound like a subversive idea ask the inmates. You're trying to help for suggestions about how to help them more effectively. Shannon was fortunate to have an instructor who saw the benefits of including his students in the process of designing and reforming the curriculum. Shannon himself was encouraged to identify the most challenging parts of the computer courses and design ways to help the inmates less students having trouble a lot of other mates that I was dealing with wherever senior population. And so they kind of didn't really know. Stable was going on. And so I was able to say, hey, let's break it down into much simpler time, and so they were really appreciate that Shannon, became increasingly convinced that feedback from the folks he was helping had multiple benefits and having learned how well cooperative partnership can work in. The course he was helping to teach while he was incarcerated Shannon brought that approach home. I was released made two thousand seventeen where their particular obstacles that you faced when you return to Oakland. I started doing my job research. I started doing all myself. I had a couple of us. But every time I got into an interview we got to a certain question, and there was always a temperature trying and I assume that question is to you have a criminal record. Correct. Shannon sought help at the center for employment opportunity. He told the counselors there. He'd take anything they had he just wanted to be able to support himself and as he put it. Not be a hindrance on others. So the CEO the center for point opportunities found me a job in San Francisco. I community housing partnership, which is a nonprofit organization in which I still work to this day. So I started off as genuine too much to the job. I received a text from CEO, and they asked me a couple of general questions Channa knew from experience that inmates often came out of prison with expired driver's licenses. You wanna help them he thought show them how to get a new license? So they can drive to the job. You're going to help them find at the time. Shannon. Didn't immediately realize how powerful that particular bit of feedback would be I didn't know that. It was a big deal there. I did find that out to one of the workers by the name of Nate called me one day and wanted to speak with regards to the feedback. He explained to me how quick six words turn into this big thing he said that he couldn't keep them on the shelf. It was like every time a new class came in all the handbooks and practice tests relieving, maybe somebody at the center should have thought of providing help to clients who'd require a licensed. But the fact that the suggestion came from somebody who knew firsthand what the centers clients needed emphasizes that power of feedback. The lesson wasn't lost on Shannon rebels. It allowed me to be I witness at the actual power of it for my little suggested to where it's at now. Shannon has advanced from janitor resident service counselor for community housing partnership building and San Francisco with fifty residents who are transitioning from homelessness to independence. He says he's leveled up and he carries with him the lessons about feedback that he began learning as a teachers assistant when he was still incarcerated and so often quoted reading listening and ex my residents that I worked for to provide me feed that what do you guys like to do or what can I do improve the program for you? And I came up with the flyer that I gave. And just told them. Hey, take two to three minutes. Jot down a few suggestions, and I'm going to incorporate your suggestions to better overall program for you guys one of the benefits of that process was ice cream Sundays on Sundays. Another one was better grooming at the suggestion of one of the residents, Shannon found barber who'd come by their place set a generator and provide outdoor haircuts. I was staying for the fact that they finally had someone listening to their ideas and equipment money what they want Shannon has built the process of seeking feedback and implementing the resident suggestions into the routine of his job, he hosts regular meetings dedicated to collecting those suggestions, and then he brings them up stairs. And I'm able to open up with my supervisor and manager. Like, hey, this is what I did. This is what my residents are asking for this is what I can do right now according to policies, but I would like to be able to do more. So kind of wakes up to upper management. It's a good thing. That's happening to my position. It's a good thing. That's happening to the positions of everybody involved and part of the explanation for this. Good thing is that Shannon RAV for victory. E LS has continued to seek feedback from the people he's helping and to provide it to the people supervising him. The theory is simple. Don't assume, you know, what's best for people. Even if you've been in the position, they're in give them the opportunity to let you know how to help them and trust their suggestions. You've been listening to a podcast by Stanford social innovation review part of the center on philanthropy and civil society at Stanford University for more podcasts articles and other content about innovating for social change. Please visit our website at SSI dot org. Follow us on Twitter or like on Facebook. I'm Eric ni. And thank you for listening.

Shannon RAV William and flora Hewlett foun Eric ni Oakland California Stanford San Francisco Oland Artie Stanford University Managing editor publisher robbery teaching assistant Arizona CEO E LS Twitter Stable Mississippi Nate
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

13:05 min | 2 years ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Hi, I'm Eric ni. Managing editor of Stanford. Social innovation view which aims to inform and inspire leaders of social change. Learn more at SSI are dot org. The non-profit color change was formed after Hurricane Katrina use online resources in the fight for the rights of black communities in America since then color of change has grown into the nation's largest online, racial Justice organization with more than one point four million. Members were shod Robinson, president of color of change spoke at our two thousand eighteen nonprofit management institute conference about the nature of political and cultural power and the importance of continually assessing the nonprofit sector's efforts to bring about change Robinson says we have to continue to challenge and ask ourselves. What are we winning? How are we doing? It is fantastic to be with you are I want to start off with a story about social movements. It was two thousand and ten and I was the senior director of programs and advocacy at glad the game lesbian alliance. You can Steph ommission as they were known at the time and glad I oversaw all of the organizations programmatic work from the work in Hollywood to shift perceptions about LGBT people to the work in the news industry to challenging what types of words and terminology the AP style guide would allow so much of that work so much of that work around advancing LGBT equality, particularly the culture change were is oftentimes talked about as a model, and we oftentimes hear these conversations and the nonprofit space about models. Something was disrupted for me back in two thousand and ten when I was asked by the State Department to take on a contract and go to Serbia and to work with LGBT activists who were at the time trying to. Have a pride celebration. There was a whole lot of political context behind the scenes around the e EU in the United States wanting Serbia to be part of the EU, and that they needed to prove that folks could have freedom of assembly, whether they be ethnic minorities women LGBT folks in part of this pride celebration was proving that that folks could sort of gather and celebrate in the face of attacks and violence, and that the government would protect in allow for freedom of assembly, and I decided I'd never been to Serbia, and my mom was like why are you going to Serbia? This doesn't make any sense. Like just because someone asked you to go someplace. But you know, it was like a trip, and so I went and I packed up. And did as much studying as I could about Serbia. I was not an expert, but I wasn't expert on the context of LGBT advocacy changed. So I packed all the information about how we were engaging in the media how we were training spokespeople. How we were dealing with issues of religious acidy, and culture, and and and went off to Serbia and that night after got there and took a nap and went and met with some a set of activists, and I sat down, and I could see that they were instantly disappointed when I walked in the door. And I wasn't sure why they were disappointed at first. I wasn't like I was like is it because I'm black is it because I'm laid if I missed some sort of like interaction and they were disappointed by my age. But I I started talking about the work that we were doing at glad and I also. Talked about some of the work that our colleague organizations were doing at the time in LGBT movement in about ten fifteen minutes in after they lab me to politely, so talk, they stopped me. And they said this is all interesting, but we weren't really interested in stories of the LGBT movement. We've been reading stories about Ella Baker and buyer rust in and we're actually very interested in the black civil rights movement as a model for how we do our work. We're interested in whether or not we have enough buses or enough bathrooms. We're interested if we have the right sort of political and cultural ask that's what we've been studying and that is. What we would like to know more about. My understanding of that is academic. It is based off of stories and lots of conversation with people I've gotten to know through my work. But it was certainly not a personal journey is someone that was born in the late seventies. I say all that to say that how we model what we think about models. What we think about advocacy, not just here in the United States. But around the world is incredibly complicated. But as we've grown, this nonprofit infrastructure in our country as we've grown philanthropic, infrastructure and our country. I think we have to continue to challenge ask ourselves about. What are we winning? What are we advancing are the structures that we've set up truly allowing us to translate the hopes aspirations and dreams of the people that we serve into the real world change that they actually deserve. Or are we setting? Institutions for perpetuity. Are we setting up institutions because we don't believe we can win. Are we setting up structures in needs that rely on themselves over and over again metrics over and over again, hiring new staff over and over again, growing our institutions for the sake of growing over and over again, these are complicated questions, and I'm not here to answer them for you. I just believe that these are the questions we have to be asking ourselves when the folks were marching and Selma. When the folks were sitting in at lunch counters, they weren't thinking about the ten year strategic plan of their organizations, and whether or not they're going to have funding for the next capital campaign. They were thinking about how do we make Justice real for the people that are that we actually serve the how do we in a very concrete way advance the idea that democracy should work for all of us. And so I wanted to start off with that story because as I go through and talk about some of the work. We're doing at color of change. What does it mean to grow a twenty first century civil rights organization rooted in not trying to be a model based off of something else? But thinking about innovation very, clearly I love palm trees, and if you can kind of tell from my accent. I I'm a New Yorker, and I love central park and just because I love palm trees, and there's a lot of trees in central park. Does not mean that a palm tree will grow and central park. And so even as I talk about some of our work. I am not trying to say that it is a direct model that you can overlay on every other problem or every other community with all of these problems in all these challenges. We have to be thinking about both technical and adaptive measures to be able to innovate and move our agenda. About thirteen years ago right around this time in the aftermath of flood Hurricane Katrina. That was caused by bad decision makers that turned into a life altering disaster. By those same bad decision makers color of change with founded how many people remember those images of black people on their roofs begging for the government to do something and literally left to die. For so many of us Katrina illustrated things that we already knew about geographic segregation generational poverty. The impacts of so many ways that we've underinvested in education and systems like Justice and quality. But at the heart of Katrina. No one was nervous about disappointing. Black people government corporations media were not nervous government was attacking maligning and in criminalising, those who are most vulnerable corporations where fleecing and figuring out how they could carve up the Gulf Gulf Coast and media was telling a story that literally talked about people who had built the city of New Orleans as descendants of slaves as refugees because no one was nervous. And in those moments while I fundamentally love research, and we do research color of change a research report that illustrates all the facts in the figures alone that has all the data points that we had to the people is not going to solve a problem. Like that often times what we do in the courtrooms. Won't solve that problem. If we have an issue of power because we don't have what it takes to actually implement even if we win. Our friends out here in the valley might be able to create incredible technology that in those moments do not actually change the fact that folks are not nervous research in law and technology are all important, and I'm not undermining that, but we can't research our way or legal our way or or code our way or even nonprofit executive direct our way out of problems like that. And so a color of change we have built that infrastructure in the beginning of our time it color of change. We were really just a response vehicle through online technology and really taking a lot of cues from organizations that were using emails and using petitions, and in that moment, we were giving people the ability to make a collective voice together. Every single day were hit with all sorts of information from the radio to the television to the newspaper. And the internet and that information can inspire activate make us annoyed upset, but if we don't do something in that moment, we oftentimes go back to doing what we were doing before. And so it color of change in these early days, we were responsible fighting for voting rights for Katrina survivors, who have been displaced making sure they could vote channeling energy and frustrations of everyday people whether they were in Seattle or Kalamazoo or Austin or Miami and giving people a collective way to engage. So that while people were watching what was happening or watching challenging situations. They weren't just giving to the Red Cross, but they were also working for systemic change as well. And while we were doing that we recognize that we had to do more. And so we started to build what we thought about was countable accountability vehicle not just sort of building the energy over that time to channel those voices. But starting to think more strategically about who are targets recognizing that some of the stuff that we were dealing with with part of the larger culture, and if we were going to challenge, folks like Glenn Beck, and Lou Dobbs and an advocate and push against what they were doing on the air. Air. Maybe direct target was in a media company that could care less about black, folks. But maybe it was the corporations that were sponsoring those shows, and maybe we could develop a strategy by using the internet, recognizing the models that came before us around holding institutions accountable in leveraging buying power, but leveraging the new technology and the new tools to think differently about how we could supercharge that. So we had a strategy of respond and then building that energy. And then over time we started to think very clearly about what does it mean to actually move that energy to systemic change? So that we're not just in response mode or build mode, but we're finding those systemic pivots along the way. So we're responding to moments and we're building energy. And then we're finding those pivots where we can translate that energy translate that power to actually start shifting laws or longer term practices. Maybe not just getting someone fired but changing. Standards and practices. Maybe not getting someone to apologize but changing systems of how how things work inside of places of power. And that was really part of how we start to think about developing a twenty first century model that could be leveraged to create real change that could be leveraged to create Justice right now color of change is a movement of one point four million black

Serbia Hurricane Katrina Katrina United States Robinson EU Stanford Eric ni Managing editor America Ella Baker State Department Steph ommission president senior director Red Cross Selma Hollywood
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

05:27 min | 2 years ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Now too. Risha? So she can talk about color of change. And when we were coordinating about our conversation here on stage. The idea was to try now to look at a less. Dark conversation because some of the work that she has championed at color of change had enormous success. And what I hope you'll be able to tell us how you've deployed some of these digital tools and opportunities in a way that's contributed to the success. You've had so that we can have a conversation about the upside. And not just the downside. Absolutely. Thank you so much. It's always wonderful to be back at Stanford. How many folks have heard of color of change? Oh my God. Okay. I'm always shocked a little bit so color change was founded about thirteen years ago. And the aftermath of her Hurricane Katrina. We're now the largest online racial Justice organization in the country. With close to one point five million members nationwide. These are folks that take online action mostly sometimes off-line action to achieve real world change for black people. And we measure ourselves by meaningful real world change tangible. We're world change for black people. But back in two thousand five our founders van Jones who's on CNN, occasionally and James Rucker. Who's a Stanford alum were like many people in the country. Watching the television news watching the footage of Hurricane Katrina New Orleans seen black people stranded on their rooftops watching government officials Pat themselves on the back for a job. Well done. And listening to media corporations. Call black people looters as they went to go look for supply survive and what they saw in. That moment was an absence of black political power. What they saw was that. No one was nervous about disappointing. Black people. And that lack of nervousness that lack of fear. Was a direct indication of a lack of real political power. So they're pulling together some ideas, and they decided to send out an Email to about a thousand of their friends and the subject line read Connie was right Konya west had just gone on a national broadcast and said sort of impromptu that George Bush didn't care about black people. And so they sent out this Email to a thousand of their friends with the subject line Connie was right? And in the Email, they went onto a unpack all the ways in which black people had been failed by institutions in this moment. And they asked people to take a simple action by clicking on this petition. They would be joining a twenty-first-century civil rights organization that was focused on building row political power for black folks. They sent out t shirts of the people that sign them with the slogan. Conde was right on them. You can't wear them like anywhere anymore because he's only been right like one maybe two times. Since then. But you could our point they were trying to take political moments that people were engaging with those sort of water cooler talk moments giving people language to unpack the realities of the situation, and hopefully giving people something from to do in that moment. And the realization and asking folks to join color of change was that we needed to build an independent infrastructure for strategic black response. And so that's what we've been doing where a black led organization we exist in the progressive world. I think we exist in an interesting intersection in that we leverage all of the new media tools that we've talked about that create that are dangerous in some respects. And we also worked to hold those companies accountable. And I think there are a couple of examples coming up of that. But we fundamentally believe that no real political change in this country has happened in the absence of black people, and that when black people when all working class people when and so that's the framework that we that we come from an embody. We think about power and a few ways, and we think about leveraging technology NFU ways, the first two steps of model require responding and building we have to build enough pressure to we have to respond to specific moments. We have to build enough pressure to an impact specific situations. We have to build enough pressure to hold decision makers accountable and impact a wide landscape. And so a lot of the work that we've done in our early days at color of change has been around holding media more countable to black people. All of these men once had very successful television shows, they no

Hurricane Katrina Connie Conde Stanford van Jones James Rucker CNN George Bush Pat thirteen years
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

04:37 min | 2 years ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Hi, I'm Eric. Knee managing editor of Stanford social innovation review which aims to inform and inspire leaders of social change. Learn more at SSI dot org. The interaction between digital technology and democracy is complex offering both enormous potential and peril editor two thousand eighteen frontiers of social innovation conference robberies a Marcon, Laura Andriessen faculty co director of Stanford PACS digs into the implications. For the social sector in conversation with Kelly born a program manager at the William and flora Hewlett foundations, Madison initiative and a racial hatch. A managing director of campaigns at color of change. Good morning, everybody. It's a real pleasure to have you here at Stanford University. And I want to introduce the panel that's going to kick off the frontiers conference this year by saying just a few words at the start about how I'd like to orient your attention to something which is obvious. If you just pay attention to the news these days, and that has to do with the way that I like to think about the interaction between digital technology and democracy, or if you prefer digital technology and social innovation the framework, which I think works for me that I want to urge upon you as well is the idea that there is so much about what digital technology digital tools and digital platforms organizing by thinking first digitally offers as promise to those of us working on the frontiers of social change and innovation. There's enormous potential. That these tools and platforms. Afford us in ways that old style organizing old style change innovation were less potent less powerful at the same time, simply by pension taint attention to the news, you know, that there's also great peril in the way that digital tools and flat forms can sometimes bring about ill intentionally or unintentionally through malicious actors or through simply indifferent or unaware actors more. Generally, it's a basic truism that digital technology as a general force is having an enormous enormous impact on so much of our personal private and professional lives. So that's the frame promise and peril that I want to orient you towards the beginning panel. And we've got to fantastic people who are going to serve in discussion to orient us and precious are thinking forward a bit. I want to introduce. Kelly born Kelly is a program manager at the Hewlett foundation, and she's managing the Madison initiative there a set of investments at the Hewlett foundation that are designed to look for the ways that philanthropy can help rejuvenate and restore some of the integrity of democratic institutions. And then Secondly, a Risha hatch who is managing director at color of change and social movement organization here in California and the bay area well Kelly, why don't you come and join me here on stage. So. Here's the promise. This is remarkably just from two thousand sixteen. Collection of essays from technologists and scholars about how machines are reshaping civil society and democracy itself. And then this is the title of an article from a colleague of ours here at Stanford Nate personally presser in the law school last year in the journal democracy. We'll democracy Ken democracy survived the internet. This suggests you the the dual and manichean possibility of technology another way to think about this. This comes from Nate slides the various ways in which we want to try to think about how the internet or digital technology poses a distinctive type of threat something different from the past. There are various things that are merely differences by degree the ways in which digital technology has fragmented or disintermediated the media or informational landscape. Now, of course, that's nothing new, but technology makes all of us producers of speech and content in ways that were much more difficult in the past. The speed of information and the difficulty of correction, you all know that lie travels across the internet at light speed,

Kelly managing director managing editor Stanford Nate Stanford Hewlett foundation Stanford University Ken democracy flora Hewlett foundations program manager Stanford PACS Eric Laura Andriessen editor director Madison California
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

06:35 min | 2 years ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Is there another question else? I mean, I've plenty of questions to to ask. But I really want to give you to the opportunity. Hi, thank you so much. My name is Ray smell Lima director of policy for a humanitarian NGO based in Somalia so conflict fragile setting. I'm really glad to some of the early definition of a in terms of replacing some things, and I think there is a at least a setting that. I am in most of my workers most of the colleagues and peers who I work with on the frontline who worked for local NGOs are dying for reasons around going into places where roller people are in. And so if there's one job I could replace it would be their job. So that it doesn't actually cost us. Their lives are young bright people. Sometimes fused future luminaries of a country. That is so needed some some some that needs so much of the leaders of these guys represent. So is there air I for some of the areas where conflict settings or happening where there's protracted crisis where there's less need of a machine that cleans your house, but really need machines that can replace a life that could be lost. Yeah. That's that's a really good question. So again, I'm more a basic science technologist, which means most of our work is a little of quite far into the future rather than current application, but in the field of robotics, and a lot of remote technology. There are people definitely looking at these great example for replacement actually make sense, right? Not disaster relief is another is another area where we want to take human lives out of harm's way. We Stanford robot is a professor who Somma Qatif beauty diver robot. Who that goes deep under the ocean where humans really shouldn't be there because it's too dangerous to to deep into the water. So this whole idea of building technology or rope. Especially robotic send. Enter technology that can insinuations work on dangers and and sit. Context that that is not good for human is there. There is research going on is a deployable today to be a perfect level. I think it's still in the basic science research. Research phase. But. No, please. Keep an eye out on. Potential application. There's also telling medicine, and it's a different case from what you're talking about. But you could see different aspect. People are thinking about these technologies. Is there a question that you? Just linking the sorry. Kelly Hutchinson from university of Melbourne Australia. There's a linking point from the previous session on the female workforce in in informal and voluble labor markets in a stray Leah we've got an aging population. We've got a caring the Caras workforce. There the underpaid workers, the female and they've got precarious employment. But when I work in Victorian government, and we were looking at the future of work and raising this question, how do we make this transition? I'm interested to understand how you know. You're much hotter on the signs day. But that value that the value of work. And the value of paying people a livable wage also connects to that basic income theme that we've seen. How do we as people working in this space, enhance what we can do and bring people along with us because as you say, it's either the distortion view of the world's gonna wind or this utopian view that this is going to solve everything and we're the practitioners and the people trying to bridge days to divides. Yes. So quick question. I I didn't catch your name. But that sentiment is so shared every time. I I traveled globally and talk to people who care about AI. And you're right. I'm I don't pretend I have the answers, especially when it comes to economics policy. I'm not an expert, but what I really want to advocate, and now was part of my New York Times op-ed is that. Governments corporations academia have a collective responsibility to start the research and studies of these policies implications impacts now what I worry about is that if we're not putting resource or put it this way, there's trillions of dollars billions of dollars going to develop technology that makes money, but there's more to that. There should be way more resource going to the studies and research about these critical policy issues human nature's and technologies that related to these issues that can help solve these issues. I really think that. Globally. We need to have more stepping-up of companies, universities and governments putting resource in the tension in this. And again, I don't pretend at all. I have unsearched to those. But banning of you do and with the right resource and dialogue and all this. We can we can crack this problem, or at least put together solutions to crack these problems, but we've got to get our act together globally together to do this. Thank you so much parties. Call for action again address to all of us. Thank you. Thank you. You've been listening to a podcast by Stanford social innovation review, a part of the center on philanthropy and civil society at Stanford University for more podcasts articles and other content about innovating for social change. Please visit our website at SSI dot org. Follow us on Twitter or like us on Facebook. I'm Eric ni. And thank you for listening.

Stanford University Somalia Lima Ray Leah Twitter Somma Qatif New York Times director Facebook Eric ni Kelly Hutchinson professor AI university of Melbourne Austra
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

04:32 min | 2 years ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Technologists and thought leaders in the space of diversity and inclusion and I'm happy to talk more about that. But that that Google has been collaborating with us along with other companies as well, that's where I want to have next because I know that deeply care of of making all sorta. Bringing work inclusion to attack careers. How can we think of a I as as something we leverage to? To to bring more inclusion or how can we actually make a I more female or not colorblind? Yes. So that's a great question. So a few years ago literally happened to me one day I woke up and thinking that around the world of a I we have two seemingly disconnected crisis. And I woke up thinking that there's actually a deep connection between these two crisis. So one crisis the talk of terminators coming next door is that I got knows where it's going. But but it's such a powerful technology. What if it turns evil, and you laugh about it? But plenty of people talk like that and the second highs is a crisis. I live day to day is the lack of diversity we already locked versity in stem in. CS is only worse and about four or five years ago. I woke up a realize there's a deep convection between these two prizes potentially which is really worthy people behind technology. That's really the connection. So if we believe that the technology makers and leaders are people that carry the kind of value, we care, we will have less fear about this technology becoming terminators but in order to to bringing the kind of values that we cared into the technology. We should look at the people. We who are developing this technology if that that group of people the technologist represent a narrow slice of humanity. It is a problem, and it will have a much harder time representing who we are collectively and carrying the values. We collectively care. So this is why I started talking to my colleagues, and my students about this as we know I will change the world. The real question is who is going to change. I and with that realization we wanted to experiment a new way of of bringing an education to students high-schoolers because we believe high school is the age where students are thinking for the first time who am I? And what do I mean to the world and world concretely? What's my college? Major and this is the right age to capture their sense of responsibility as was their imagination. So we experimented a Stanford. Summer camp, where we opened a we we took a number of high school girls, ninth grade girls, and we put together an AI curriculum. That's human centered. We won the technology to have a mission. So give them a very rigorous technical curriculum. But their hands on research projects in the summer. Cam is deeply human centered, for example, if they're interested in a particular technology or natural language processing it's looking word documents while then we spend it as a project to look at Twitter data in natural disaster time and to predict the need for for help. If they're interested in comer technology, commit or vision, we spend it in a hospital setting and to. Doctors. Predict

Google Stanford Twitter Cam five years one day
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

09:41 min | 2 years ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"I before I actually go to that hard. Let me ask the question. What is our to fischel about a I? So the word artificial intelligence like I said is coined by professor John McCarthy, and that was to. To really. Trying to understand a very fundamental question for the early pioneers in computer science, which is can machines think can we build intelligent machines, and humans are very good at introspection than looking at ourselves where we think about building machines that are intelligent. We never totally think about who are intelligent beings in the universe and ourselves are intelligent beings. So would night came to stem for virtually professor Jomar because they passed the way. So I never had a chance to ask him in person. Why did you call this field artificial intelligence, but I would have imagined that intelligence is a term for human and even some animals and in order to differentiate that the machine tellers from biological intelligence, the word artificial was put together, but that is. My own hypothesis. I don't know what was his thought process. Thank you human centered approaches to a I they are at the core of your work here at Stanford on campus. But also at Google at tell us a little bit more. What is behind this? This this explicit focus. Let's call it human centered AI rather than just yes. So part of this whole development of human center was summarized in the New York Times op-ed, I published about a month and half ago. And it's kind of accumulation of what I've been thinking about where is going for for the next for the future. Because clearly the past sixty years has as a field we've developed ourselves. We've we've begun to make a big difference in real life. But where? Our next face. So we think about human centered or I advocate to think about was entered the three important. Elements or pillars of however or focus areas. However, we call it the first part of human center AI is actually the core technology itself is as much as there's a lot of euphoria of the credibility of machines machines are in general still pretty dumb compared to Huma. So there's a famous saying in one thousand nine hundred seventy s by expert, laughing that's saying itself still reflects today's state of being a it goes like this the definition of today's is a computer that can make a perfect chest move while the room is on fire. So you can swap the word chest to go or whatever specific task you will do that's data driven. But the bottom line is a lacks the contextual awareness holistic understanding the nuance and the Alon of complexity of human intelligence, and I think that's where the next phase of core. Technology ought to be taking to consideration is human cognition, human psychology, brain size human behavior to really improve. Capability which brings us to the second focus area or pillar of Huber's centered. I is what is this technology four. When we talk about. I today there's a lot of controversy but one important risk. We face is job displacement. You know, as we ultimately machines, how do we grapple with the fact that it's changing the landscape of labor, and I think there is a model of social issues, but from the technology itself there should be that important recognition that instead of the word replacement. We should focus on the word enhancement. There's so much technology can do to augment people and enhance people. I personally at stead for work a lot in healthcare talking about aging society, we have a project with the senior holding in San Francisco, but whether we're talking about healthcare or education or manufacturing agriculture government. Every aspect of where this technology can be applied. I think there is a chance for this technology to be assistive of humans. So we're at Stanford. I like to advocate a human centered approach to application and development of a technology that focus on the word, you Hansman ornament augmentation rather than pure replacement which brings us to the third and last, but at least. Important topic is I- social and human impact. This field is no longer just a niche computer science field. And we need to recognize the from the immediate impact to the future impact of technology as powerful as a fact, we don't have enough understanding in research is social impact whether it's jobs ethics decision making organization laws and education healthcare privacy security, so many aspects aspects of our society in human lives might be impacted by and it's Gordon to recognize that and fund research and studies and efforts addressing these issues. So these are the three pillars of human centered approach. Thank you fake how much of this third, especially the third pillar is we've. In in your work at Google. I mentioned it you are to cease chief scientists for Google cloud and Google has also tried to pioneer the the way they think about being we've in the the work of a foundation directly into what they're doing with two Google dot org to what extent can we think of the word that you were doing there as twenty-first-century version of what we previously called corporate social responsibility. Is there a way to to weave in your third pillar in the work you directly due for Google? So those are good cushion. So first of all I most about co Google evolving been there for a year. And I'm still learn the industry world myself, a not very familiar with that big eighty thousand people company yet. As a technologist. I try as much as I can. So I'm not a major decision maker in many many aspects, as you know, it's a huge gigantic carrier ship, right? So. For example. A lot of our work is to listen to the industry needs in transforming the digital technology, and the gives me a very nice perspective of the pain points of of the traditional industry that are going through transformation. I love healthcare as an example, we listen to the pain point of health care and. Try to deliver technology that helps them to whether it's too short manage their decision making process help to improve decision-making process, or or or help efficiency or whatever it is. That to me is a human centered approach we care about the bias issue machine. Learning Google has not under me, but has a research team working on basic sized research of bias emission earning. My team collaborate with them and try to bring that perspective to any technology. We deliver to customers. I also not wary. My Google week collaborate with Google dot org through my nonprofit organization AI for all which was established a year ago as a. As a nonprofit focusing on education of next generation, AI technologists

Google AI Stanford professor John McCarthy New York Times San Francisco Jomar Huber Gordon sixty years
"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

Stanford Social Innovation Review

15:00 min | 2 years ago

"stanford" Discussed on Stanford Social Innovation Review

"Hi, I'm Eric ni. Managing editor of Stanford social innovation review which aims to inform and inspire leaders of social change. Learn more at SSI dot org. Emerging technologies like biotech and artificial intelligence have the potential to transform so many of the systems that make up the world around us at our two thousand eighteen frontiers of social innovation conference, Catherine Milligan who directs the Schwab foundation for social entrepreneurship spoke with a few savvy social entrepreneurs who are harnessing these tools for social impact right now. Milligan speaks with Keller Rinaldo CEO co-founder of zip line, which is using drones to live or blood and medicines to remote parts of the world. Kristen groups Richmond revolution foods, which is using technology to increase access to fresh healthy food in underserved communities and David Risher CEO and co founder of world reader, a global nonprofit that provides people in the developing world with free access to digital books via e readers and mobile phones. I am. Without further ado, delighted to be joined on stage by three of the social partners in the schwa- foundation's global community, Chris Richmond's of revolution. Foods Keller Rinaldo of zip line and David Risher of world reader, welcome. I thought I would start this panel with a confession. More in the Luddite camp than I am in the tech savvy guru camp. And so when I started preparing for the session, I was momentarily stricken with imposter syndrome. But then I came across something that you said Keller about bringing up Aguirre's mind to an issue and not being afraid to ask questions. And so I thought I would turn that into an advantage by putting all the less tech savvy among us in the audience at ease. You're in very good company. And you don't my goal here with the conversation that we're going to have this morning is to really strip away all of the impenetrable language and intimidating jargon. Just have a really acceptable informal conversation. So the title of the session is shorthand for the fourth industrial revolution. That's a book by professor Klaus, Schwab, the founder and executive chairman of the World Economic Forum and the co founder with his wife Hilda at the foundation for social entrepreneurship in that book just to get folks really quickly on the same page with that term in what we mean, he argues that quote, we face both the opportunities and the challenges of a range of powerful emerging technologies from artificial intelligence to biotechnologies to advance materials and quantum computing that will drive radical shifts in the way, we live fourth industrial revolution technologies are not merely incremental advances on today's digital technologies, but are truly disruptive up ending our existing ways of sensing calculating organizing acting and delivering over time. They will transform the systems we take for granted today from the way. Produce and transport goods and services to the way, we communicate collaborate and experience the world around us, unquote. So we're going to impact that in about fifty seven minutes easy task. So look my first question to all of you. That sounds so big and overwhelming, it's hard to know, how to wrap your mind around that. So let's start with mindsets. And I'm not going to ask you where these technologies will be in five years, and what are your predictions? I think you know, the reality is that. It's impossible, but still as leaders of organizations making major strategic planning decisions, you know. How are you reading interpreting the trend lines of the four I r and how is that informing your decision making so whoever? Yeah, I can. So the way we think about it is that the future is weird. And especially in a in a in a world where technology is moving faster than it has in the past. Like you mentioned like predicting trend lines. We don't even try. Because what I mean by the future is weird. Is that looking five years ahead things seem so strange like we don't even believe certain things are going to work, and then they end up working like, you know, five years ago ten years ago, most people in global public health thought, the idea of cellphones exploding across Africa was outrageous today, it's like universal and today most people think that the idea of artificial intelligence or robotic starting first in Africa. They think that idea is outrageous, and we'll be showing a little bit is that it's not that outrageous. So I guess for us like it's not so much about predicting. But rather understanding that the future is so weird that we can't really predict it, but it will be very different than where we are today. So if if we just view it as like if our actions are predicting that things will generally be the same five years from now, then we will not be successful because we'll be fundamentally wrong. Whereas if we're willing to suspend disbelief and try new things like radical new things and test them and see if they work and understand that doing that. Inherently means we'll be taking risk than some of the things that we do end up working. And that's kind of the whole point of what we do. Well, I'll add I'll try and then as the founder of revolution foods, and I think I would have originally thought I would have fallen in the same camp as you described Catherine, which is how much are we really going to use technology to change a food system and make healthy fresh affordable clean food available throughout the US, primarily and underserved communities and schools to drive health outcomes and academic outcomes. And I think when Kitson I founded red foods a decade over a decade ago. I don't think that we honestly thought about technology as a huge lever to do that. And now we do every day. And we also I think our humble enough to realize that we don't know exactly how that's gonna look in three years five years ten years. But when it comes to designing, and I'll talk more about this but designing our meal, so that they're not just healthy. But kids, love them and. Lethem? So they have a huge impact and technology related to that. When we think about producing and distributing. It comes into play for us in a pretty big way at this point. So I'll talk more about it. But you know, that's it's it's a part of everything we do know and David hoses affecting your strategic decisions. So we have kind of interesting way of thinking about this. I think which is we look a lot at what changes fast and to your point Keller. It's easy to say easy to predict a lot will continue to change. But we also like to look at what isn't going to change, and what's going to be very durable over the long term. And if you look at the kind of friction between those two I think maybe that's where some of the most interesting insight can happen, for example, fairly sure that reading which is our world is not going to become less important over time. And and no one's going to wake up one morning and say, gosh, I wish you know, fewer kids knew how to read or you know, or we would teach kids. To read later in life because that somehow mix it's like that doesn't make any sense at all. So some things you can predict with certainty reading we'll matter eating will matter, by the way. That's another thing. We can predict what. Hi, sir. Socializing connecting people will matter. Those are things that won't change now technology that will change, but even within technology. It will get cheaper. It will get more. Ubiquitous it more get more powerful. It will get more personalized. So I think to a certain extent if you can if you can sort of contrast what, you know won't change versus some other things that will change, but even in some maybe some predictable ways. That's maybe how you can start to form a framework around experimentation, do the most interesting work. Definitely. Well, so now, let's take opportunity to dive into examples and really give everyone in the audience a clear picture of what you're actually doing. And Chris I'd love to start with you. I'm sure many folks here are familiar with revolution foods in your model. But can you explain a little bit about how you are creating systems change with a whole other constellation of actors in the system. So our really key question. We asked ourselves when we were kicking off which was a little over a decade ago. At Berkeley, actually was you know, how do we create systems change in in food? We realize that the quality of food that our students we started in schools and are still really heavily providing healthy food in schools. But we were asking ourselves how do we dramatically change? The quality of food that students are receiving every day. We have a very small amount of money to to work with. But we believe there was a way to do it. And so we really bought built built the company brick by brick and thought about how do we create meals breakfast lunch snack and supper every single day? So it's amazing over you guys may may not know this. But over fifty percent of every family every child in the US eats at least one meal a day at school at this point and many eat two to three particularly in the communities that revolution foods is serving. So there's a tremendous opportunity for impact. But we knew we had a huge challenge ahead of us. And so we really thought about how to make how to create a supply chain from scratch to create the first all-natural clean label supply chain there just wasn't one available for creating these meals that we were serving into schools, and then we thought about. How do we design foods that kids are going to love? And so now, I'm sitting up here not only as an entrepreneur, but as a mom with two little boys, and this is a topic that relates to everyone out there who struggles with that every day. You know, how do I how do I serve my kids healthy food? But also food that's gonna come home eaten from their lunchbox. And that I know is going to that we know is going to nourish them every day. And this is where I think this conversation gets really interesting because working within a tiny. Tiny financial limit to do. This requires really thinking about how to leverage for us now technology in terms of creating these meals at scale at a price point, that's affordable to have the highest level of impact. So the couple of topics. I wanted to hit one is just engagement respecting consumer base design. So we now serve over two and a half million meals a week across thirty cities in two thousand schools, and we take it very very seriously that we are only designing the meals that our students in communities feel is respectful to them, and again, cultural relevance is a huge part of that. So we're out gathering data every single day from our students and processing data and saying, okay. What are those menu options and meal formats that will deliver not only health but also delight right because we want to build a community. We want to be. Lifelong healthy eaters. So that's one area. That's that's really important to us. The other piece that I would say is a. A place where we are thinking hard about what kind of technology. We can utilize is in creating access to fresh in. What would have traditionally been called food desert? So how do we think about packaging technology and shelf-life technology that enables us to bring fresh meals into communities that haven't had fresh food access every day. And that requires less drops more volume, you really have to cost optimize everything you're doing. So that's a big big part of our work and then finally distribution. So thinking about when you're delivering thirty thirty. Southie sufferers day to fifty YMCA's our boys and girls clubs around a community. That has not traditionally been a an economically viable thing to do. So how can we utilize different technologies again too? To help make that kind of delivery financially viable, so that all students and all youth will have access to these meals in after school settings as well. But those are couple of things I wanted to hit quickly. A thank you so much for that. Million meals a week. I'm sliding through these and I can talk more about. As well. I think is such an important element to the Keller in Davos you. It was quite a lying, you know, sort of if if drones can take lives drones and also be used to save lives. So why don't you share with us a little bit about how you and the entire team zip line are doing that. So zip line is building autonomous delivery networks to deliver medicine and two parts of the world did typically don't have access to medicine today. And we as a team design, the the onyx the aircraft the distribution center. And then we operated as a service, you can couldn't think of us like a twenty first century version of ups, and we work directly with governments and ministries of health to basically provide universal access to health care at a national scale. So what that looks like today in Rwanda, we're contracted by the ministry of health to serve twenty one hospitals today in the country. We're delivering about twenty five percent of the national blood supply of Rwanda using Thomas aircr. Raft today, and we'll be at about fifty percent in late June. So it's expanding really really quickly. And and what we're currently undergoing today in two thousand eighteen is actually we just added. So just to give you a sense for what we're actually looking at here the Z in the middle of the map is the distribution center that we're operating from from that distribution center, we can cover about sixty percent of the country. We just finished construction of a second distribution center that you can see now in the eastern half of the country. And that means that by the end of twenty eighteen and we're also expanding from blood to about one hundred and fifty different medical products. So that means that by the end of twenty eighteen Rwanda will be the first country in the world to provide universal access to health care any medical product delivered in fifteen minutes or less to all million of its citizens. I'm just saying

Keller us Catherine Milligan Rwanda Chris Richmond David Risher co founder founder Keller Rinaldo Africa Schwab foundation Keller Rinaldo CEO Richmond Eric ni schwa- foundation Managing editor Schwab David