7 Burst results for "stacey lebron"

"stacey lebron" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

The Community Cats Podcast

01:43 min | 9 months ago

"stacey lebron" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

"Tuned in podcast writing. Let's go welcome to the community. Cats podcast I am your host Stacey Lebron. I've been involved helping homeless scouts for over twenty years with the Merrimack River Feline. Rescue Society. The goal of this podcast is to expose you to amazing. People improving the lives of cats. I hope these interviews will help you learn how you can turn your passion for cats into action today. I'm thrilled that we're speaking with arden. More Arden is the pet health and safety coach. She happily wears many callers in the world. She's a radio show host author Professional Speaker Editor Media Consultant Dr Calve Behavior Consultant and Master pet first aid instructor ardent. I'd like to welcome you to the show. Hey big paws up stacey. I've thrilled you're with us today. It's so wonderful to have you a fellow podcasters so first and foremost before we jump into all of the other questions from one podcast or to another. Please share with us. The podcast that you have. And what's it like being podcast well? The show was called. Oh behave it is on the pet life radio network and I've been doing this for eleven years so I'm one of the first pet podcasters. We are fortunate that we have over half a million listeners. So they're not all my relatives. Va and somebody named Oprah for the last two years has selected the O. Behave show as one of her top. Three favorite pet podcast. You know what stacy. I'm still waiting for a car. There's been no car lower prices. You don't get a car but we'll give you accolades eight so if you just go to pet life radio DOT COM like your show. People can.

instructor Stacey Lebron Merrimack River Feline Rescue Society Consultant Va Editor
"stacey lebron" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

The Community Cats Podcast

02:51 min | 10 months ago

"stacey lebron" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

"The you tuned in minicabs podcast writing. Let's go welcome to the community cats. Podcast I'm your host Stacey Lebron. I've been involved helping homeless cats for over twenty years with the Merrimack River Feline Rescue Society. The goal of this podcast is to expose you to amazing. People were improving the lives of cats. I hope these interviews will help you learn how you can turn your passion for cats into action today. We're speaking with Elaine Spencer and Melanie Gardner. Elaine is a lifelong animal. Welfare advocate and in particular a devoted cat enthusiast for many years career and travel obligations did not allow much time for hands on involvement other than volunteering for a local pet adoption group. However in the last year and a half things have been quite different. In the summer of two thousand eighteen. She became a member of T. town. Pnr An all volunteer nonprofit dedicated to resolving the feline overpopulation crisis in Tulsa Oklahoma. Since then she served on the board of directors and gotten involved just about all aspects of the trap neuter return operations. She is the lead support for the grant writing efforts and she partners with another team member. Melanie Gardner to provide. It support this past. Year has been a whirlwind of activities including grant writing trapping attending conferences presenting classes on cat socialization participating in fundraising events and implementing software applications in our free time. Elaine volunteers for a local rescue in adoption group and is often. Fostering any number of cats and kittens much to the Chagrin of her twelve year. Old Cat. Palley who is also currently leading an effort to getting a ban on declined. Cats passed in the city of Tulsa. Ordinances Melanie is vice. President and a board member for T- town tr whose mission is to resolve the feline overpopulation crisis in Tulsa Oklahoma through spay and neuter of community cats utilizing humane trap neuter return protocols since two thousand and fifteen t town are has fixed three thousand seven hundred fifty five cats with a goal breaking year of one thousand three hundred seventy seven cats in two thousand nineteen thanks to the tireless work of an all volunteer team generous donors and dedicated clinics five years ago. Melanie was inspired by the work of tiny kittens in British Columbia Canada to find out whether tr might be the best way for her to make the greatest personal contribution toward addressing cat overpopulation. The answer was and remains today a resounding yes in addition to a fulltime career as an it analyst and systems engineer. Melanie dedicates her. Free time to all things cats most often helping people who started out as complete strangers evolved into friendships with tr. It is her passionate quest to help cats and the people who help them Melanie's involvement in Tian are compasses..

Melanie Gardner Tulsa Elaine Spencer Merrimack River Feline Rescue Oklahoma Stacey Lebron T. town Elaine T- town Palley analyst British Columbia Canada President Tian systems engineer
"stacey lebron" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"stacey lebron" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Tip I was hoping you can give, people is why should they not be relocated community cats what's the concern there so with regards to. Relocation it's really done as a very much of a last option I did run a barn relocation program for quite a few years and you really have to take a solid four. To, six week period. To basically re home those cats meaning in a contained environment so they would have to be in a stall, or attack room, for a, substantial period of time and then it's really pretty risky whether they sort of stick and I don't know people. At Really having a caps stick to that, specific area is very challenging and there's a range of different statistics between fifty and. Seventy, five percent of cap staying but it's you know. I hear more fifty percent. Like out with six cats you, end up, with three that end. Up staying past six months and. Then the others sort of disappear. Off, into the wilderness or whatever so it's really really really a last option and I highly encourage doing it? With set groups colonies? That are already bonded take, like one cat from one place one cap from another and. Say hey let's throw him in a play pen together for four, weeks and think that they're going to be a happy family but say you have a mom. With her three kids and the kids, are all older feral kittens and they all get transported as a group that would be a more. Successful placement well there's also a term I heard the vacuum effect you know what I'm talking Oh yeah yeah okay so explain that to our listeners so if you say I've got ten. Cats in my backyard and I can't stay on them and I want to get rid. Of them, and blah, blah blah so you've got that scenario that person traps. Those ten caps and they go wherever they go and then inevitably, to fifteen more cats will show up who are not spayed or neutered. Who are much, more, obnoxious and probably do much more damage in your backyard because you have, been opened up an opportunity. For cats that are in other neighboring, areas to move into that section, where, there are available food sources even if you're not feeding those cats they're getting food from somewhere in that general area. So they're getting it from my neighbor they're getting it, from dumpster somewhere and they're going to move, into the vacuum effect disorder this leveling off of things and even mother nature really. Works, to fight that vacuum effect when we were getting. Near the end of our Hi I'm with a we only had a few cats that we still hadn't trapped in the newburyport, waterfront when we had pregnant cats and, they had their kittens we were having litters of. Nine to eleven kittens because my gosh. Was working hard to try and repopulate what we had basically taken away wow and these. Cats that are intact especially, the males they're yellow leaning boy they're making your whole house area smell so nice with their love urine right Yeah it really is, unfortunate you know, anyone who has been. Around an unnumbered male cat yes they have great cheeks but other than, that You know we really don't need them doing what they do that's, right so on that note we're going to take a quick commercial break we've just talked about p. which is one of my favorite topics but seriously we're gonna find out some more things on how you can help community. Cats and perhaps stay. In your pajamas and. Attend, the online cat convention. That Stacey LeBron is the brains behind right after this commercial? Break, so sit and stay, we'll be right back Time Red-carpet Gore's albeit we'll be back in a flash right after.

Stacey LeBron Gore fifty percent five percent six months six week
"stacey lebron" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"stacey lebron" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"News is next but first the weather channel forecast hours with lots of sunshine high tops out about eighty two pretty nice afternoon into tonight clear skies sixty two for a low for your sunday also looks pretty nice sunshine eighty eight monday maybe a few clouds but still a good sun with high of ninety two from the weather channel i'm craig ross wls am eight ninety another update in thirty minutes colorado based boeing seven forty seven four hundred supertanker has been deployed to california to help fight wildfires that have destroyed dozens of buildings and caused at least one death in galena california the holiday fire left some areas resembling awards out american tourists trapped in a hotel in haiti as the country's suspended a fuel price hike after widespread violence broke out across the capital stacey lebron born is staying at a port au prince hotel the demonstrators attacked situation right now any security plan to unfortified the perimeter amd evacuated meeting patricia become again one child has died and at least three other people have been critically injured after an apartment fire in kansas city kansas today when this is told the kansas city star the fire began with an explosion that shook nearby buildings i'm barbara kusak left lane remains blocked on the dan ryan express lane's inbound before thirty i expect stop and go traffic at the time and of course just pack your patience good afternoon good evening to time outbound edens up to lake cook fifty back in sixteen the kennedy between the airport and.

california haiti stacey lebron patricia kansas kansas city barbara kusak craig ross colorado galena lake cook thirty minutes
"stacey lebron" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

The Community Cats Podcast

01:49 min | 4 years ago

"stacey lebron" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

"The. You tune into the community cats podcast ready. Let's cal. Welcome to the community cats podcast. I am your host. Stacey lebron. I have been involved helping homeless cats for over twenty years with the Merrimack river feline rescue society. The goal of this podcast is to expose you to amazing people who are improving the lives of cats. I hope these interviews will help you learn how you can turn your passion for cats into action today. We are speaking with Khalil Sakakini Khalil a relationship coach. And also an animal communicator practitioner Khalil I want to welcome you to the show. To be here. So how did you get started working with animals? Well, it was always indeed love for animals respectful. There were the beauty is brought into the world the ministry of the resistance, and the sense that they were allies creatures, and then we had a burn lovely every beautiful. Black cat, Justin big shoot. The kind of creative energy that made the world better place and develop a deep relationship to him when he passed it was a very complex passing the same time. His spirit was just incredibly awesome, any of the people angel moral picture of him in their room when their heart said, Dr after dark, I I was launched into a real confusing vortex and was casting about for ways of dealing with her. Hart volunteered. Gives a catchall ter- Goto angel.

Khalil Sakakini Khalil Stacey lebron Merrimack river Justin big Hart twenty years
"stacey lebron" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

The Community Cats Podcast

10:23 min | 4 years ago

"stacey lebron" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

"The. You turned into the community cats podcast ready. Let's cal. Welcome to the committee cats podcast. I your host Stacey LeBron. I have been involved helping homeless cats for over twenty years with the Merrimack river feline rescue society. The goal of this podcast is to expose you to amazing people who are improving the lives of cats. I hope these interviews will help you learn how you can turn your passion for cats into action today. We are speaking with Esther Mekla Esther is the founder and president of Marion's dream her. Areas of expertise include grass roots, organizing leadership development information networking and the implementation of projects and programs to end the cat and dog surplus as part of Marion's dream Esther co produced the video throwaways, and it Spanish-language equivalent wretched Sada's addressing the overpopulation of cats and dogs in nineteen ninety. She founded spe USA originally a program of Marion's dream, spe USA is now. A program of the north shore animal league America operating a toll free hotline with two full-time phone counselors to help callers, find low cost high quality spay neuter services in their areas Esther has spoken at an organized seminars and conferences in the US and overseas, she has assisted with the startup of hundreds of affordable spay programs and clinics both fixed site and mobile throughout the United States. Thanks to Esther spe USA model and interest in sharing replication programs have begun and other nations, including spe Panama, spe Costa Rica, and the national dissecting network in Australia for her work. Esther won the Geraldine r dodge award for humane ethics in action in nineteen ninety-five Esther received her bachelor's degree from Bates college spending her junior year in Geneva, Switzerland studying with psychologist Jean-Pierre J, her masters of education, and sixty degrees from the university of Rochester. And education. Esther welcome to the show. Thank you. Stacey thanks for having me. So I was just wondering you have a fantastic resume been in the business for a long time. How did you find your passion for community cats? Well, this started when I was living in Connecticut. I lived near Bridgeport, Connecticut, which is a large troubled city of about one hundred fifty thousand and I went to the shelter couple of times. And I remember seeing on those big male cats, you know, the big head and very serene demeanor. I called him Buddha. And he was so wonderful. I couldn't take him I self, but I asked the people to please hold him. And I would try to find a home for this very special fellow. And I remember how hard it was. I tried everyone. I knew and I kept going back one day Buddha. Just wasn't there anymore. And I know he didn't get adopted. He was just gone, and I'll never know the full story, but it really upset me. Profoundly such wonderful creature would end up there. And I just realized that we have to prevent. The bursts of all these cats I began to see just how hard it is to get good homes for these animals, and that's the day spe say was born. I've felt that if this catch up when born and if there weren't such surplus they all have a better shot at a good life. So what I did is far as actually goes as I went to my vet, Dr Arnold Brown. And I asked him if he would give a discount to people I referred to him. Then he said, yeah, I'll do that. And then, of course, came to me that this could work with other vets too. And that's how it started back in nineteen ninety with Dr Arnold Brown. I think he gave fifty percent off or people I refer to him for staying their cats or dogs. I worked in my basement by myself, and I just did outreach to a lot of places. I just figured if it's going to work at Bridgeport, Connecticut, why wouldn't it work elsewhere, gradually build up all fifty states in each state. They were referrals and my work for three years or so was just to find good referrals in all fifty states. And then get a toll free line. So anyone could reach me. That's where it started. So initially. You saw that first cat, and you realize that the reason that he was out. There was probably because someone had abandoned him because your program focused on the owned cats. So when you first started out, you were focused on providing affordable spay neuter opportunities for owned cats, could you share with us your process for coming to that conclusion as to why that would be a beneficial thing to do. Well, the reason there are so many cats out on the streets as that they've lost their homes too, many pets for the number of good permanent homes, and it seemed like that was the place to start to just prevent the bursts in the first place. So we provided an easy way for people to get their cats fixed. I think many of these community casts than are on the streets, either they or their mothers or fathers were put out on the street. But if they hadn't been in the first place if they had had good permanent home, they wouldn't have been at risk, shall we say? So then you started spe USA and you operate it out of your house. How many years did you run it from your house and Connecticut, he was three years? It was a nineteen ninety. Three in may that Susan Eastleigh wrote an article for cat fancy magazine called serving animals, and when that issue came out, I have phone records show that we had twenty three thousand calls that month. So the phone's ringing day and night. I could hear it up in my bedroom. Little the night is just ringing all the time. And I knew it was way beyond what I would be able to provide the need was enormous. And that's when I looked to find outside support and you found that north shore animal league. Yes. That's correct. John Stevenson thought that might really be a good fit with them that they would have the program, and I would run it and it worked out very, well they provided to phone counselors, and they computerized database, and we're very supportive of making the program grow having conferences, both national and regional conferences. So it really began to take off in a much better way when we had a staff there and the liaisons were referring people to private practices initially. And then. The humane alliance clinic started launching than they would also refer people to the mobile clinics or the humane alliance or the stationary clinics. Basically, they refer people anywhere they could get access to low-cost neuter. I would assume that's true as actually true from the beginning the first few were private vets. But I soon found out that way to find a Ford Ables who services was to call shelters or clinics in cities where they already existed so right from the get-go we provided information on any of those options. And then at point in time, you decided it would be good to also than splinter off and really have some statewide dedicated initiative St. wanna tell me a bit about that. Sure. The way that came about was as the years went on it became almost unmanageable. There were so many new programs developing within the states and some other programs folding, you know, some of the small ones or veterinaries raised their prices too high. And we couldn't keep them on the list. I began to see that really country with three hundred fifty million people was really too large. For one single person to manage to keep track of in an accurate way. And it made sense then to sink about it in terms of states other words, if you live in Massachusetts, you pretty well know what's going on in Massachusetts. So I began to see that this country is so big that it was very tough to keep things accurate and up to date without having on the ground. People grassroots people in the states. Feeding the information keeping track of the information for their states. That's so that's how that began to come about. I'd say towards two thousand ten two thousand eight that's when that began to become really clear to me that or one tiny office could not handle all of that keeping updated. So that's how that came about. And this is through the United space alliance. Yes. That's what Volve what happened was towards two thousand ten towards the end of my work period. There people became very interested in meeting and sharing their ideas sharing their problems and their solutions. And that's was really the Genesis of United States. Lions. And then since I have retired. There are more and more people developing state programs and just very recently less than a year ago. They filed to have five one c three of their own and just about two weeks ago got their first director, and I would say when I look at the map on the websites about two-thirds the country is covered at this point in time about thirty of them. So we still have about twenty to go, and it's very tough to find just the right fit. You know, you have to find a person who's very interested in leadership and who's willing and able to do it. You have to have a an organization at stable that would be the fiscal agent for the program, and in some states, do very difficult to find just that right person and used different models. I mean, some have been large organizations that run adoption centers and have large spay neuter clinics. And then there are other organizations that may have a smaller budget don't run really sort of the bricks and mortar programs that act more like just the referral than network. Working really focusing on getting the right people connected together to be able to make the greatest impact in the state. That's perfectly put Moore's flexible on that. We just wanna make sure that whoever it is has a successor in mind as succession plan, you know, has really thought it's through. So that these programs have a good shelf life that they're going to go on as long as they're needed. And now, let's take a moment to listen to a few words from our sponsors ready to make a big difference for cats in your community. We've got an exciting opportunity that can jump start your efforts. The community cats podcast has launched community cats grants when you qualify for this innovative program, you'll gain valuable knowledge about how to raise funds for your spay neuter efforts plus will match the funds you raise up two thousand dollars. Doubling your -bility to make a difference for cats fundraising doesn't have to be scary. We'll be with you every step of the way check it out. You can find all of the details on the community cats podcast website under our education menu. Let's join forces to make the world a better place for community cats. So I wanna turn our conversation towards Deatrich Spain neuter, you have a campaign called fixed

Esther Mekla Esther spe USA Connecticut founder and president United States Esther spe USA north shore animal league Amer Stacey LeBron Bridgeport Marion spe Panama Merrimack river Dr Arnold Brown Esther co Massachusetts Sada United space alliance Costa Rica Bates college special fellow
"stacey lebron" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

The Community Cats Podcast

12:48 min | 4 years ago

"stacey lebron" Discussed on The Community Cats Podcast

"The. You turned into the community cats podcast ready. Let's cal. Welcome to the community cats podcast. I Amir hosts Stacey LeBron I have been involved helping homeless cats for over twenty years with the Merrimack river feline rescue society. The goal of this podcast is to expose you to amazing people who are improving the lives of cats. I hope these interviews will help you learn how you can turn your passion for cats into action today. We are speaking with Ashleigh Davis Ashley joined the Scituate animal shelter staff in February two thousand thirteen and in two thousand and sixteen. She was promoted to shelter director. Ashley responsible for overseeing the day to day running of the shelter, and coordinating the care of all shelter animals. Ashley is a graduate of Westfield state university with a double major in biology and environmental science, a native of east Freetown, Massachusetts, Ashley began working with a local group at the age of thirteen trapping neutering and releasing feral cats and today, we get to hear the rest of the story. Ashley. To the show. Thank you for having me. Can you expand a little bit and tell us how you got started with community cats. So when I was about thirteen years old I was riding horses at a barn southeastern Massachusetts. In the buyer was pretty overrun with cats and kittens over forty cats in numerous kittens, I didn't even end up keeping track. So I ended up calling around to different shelters giant figure out. What would somebody do in a situation like this who can come out and help and I ended up finding a all on to your organization called habitat for cats. They're located in New Bedford mass, and they were all volunteer organization that only did drought new to return. So with their help, they basically said will cover the cost of the spay neuter, but you're gonna have to figure out how you're going to transport the cats post-care them, but they'll cover the cost. So I was lucky enough that my dad is actually doing animal pest control. So he had plenty of traps for me to use in kinda showed me the ropes. On how to trap and then I kinda just got started in every weekend. That was kinda my hobby. I would go to the barn. And after my writing lesson would drop the cats as many as I could and then get them fixed the following day. And then I would post-care them in a shed in my backyard, actually, so I was lucky to have my parents support because they were they definitely they definitely supported that. It was almost an addiction when I was younger in actually for quite a few years that was that was kind of my hobby when I found two really fun through that whole site. I ended up dropping around forty three cats. I think it was. And then I would foster the litters of kittens until they're ready to get adopted. So I ended up getting going from fostering and trapping to the trying to go through the adoption process and find them homes as well. So I assume you trapped that whole colony. Yup. So I ended up getting all of them. I can't remember how long that ended up taking me. But it seemed like it took half the year. Year if not the whole year to do all of them through that process. I learned a ton of hard lessons. It was really tough, for instance, to get the the folks to stop feeding the cat. So that I could trap the following day. And there was a lot of convincing when it came to letting me take the kittens and foster than with the mom cat. So that they could have the mom instead of people visiting the bar and taking them home into giving them away before they were old enough. So it was a lot lot of lessons learned through that fairest site. So what were the key takeaways doing that first project? So some of the key takeaways, I would have to say I remember learning to big lessons the hard way. And the first lesson was that if I were to find kitten, so I was finding litters of kittens either newborns or maybe even three week old kittens in the hayloft in my initial reaction was all my gosh. I just need to take these kittens home. I'll bod. Oh, feed them all to whatever I need to do to to make sure that they're okay. And I had that kind of thought that maybe these kittens were abandoned or the mom wasn't around. And I just didn't know how to get the mom too. So I ended up taking on way too many kittens all at the same time when I could have taking mom in the kittens at the same time. So my dad actually ended up teaching me a little trick that I still use today where I'll put the kittens whether they're a day old or three weeks old if soon as I can catch them in the cat carrier and unsaid the trap up next to it in cover the whole thing with sheet. So that the mom will go in the trap not just to get the the foods in the trap lake. She normally would but to see her kittens and get to our kittens. I could probably one of my biggest lessons is that. I now know you always wanna drop the mom if it's possible in not take on the burden of having. A lot of kittens bottle feed kitten center too young to eat on their own. So yet definitely learned the hard way taking way too many of them on at the same time. And then the second lesson was I was trapping the cats, but not looking to see if the mom cats, female cats were were milking are lactating if they had kittens out there. So sometimes what would happen is. I would maybe hold onto that mom cat for a couple of days and not realize she had kittens out there. And I learned the hard way one time when I had to keep a cat after it spe to get into -biotics to recover from a respiratory infection. And she was away from her kittens for over a week. And I felt I remember feeling so awful for not realizing that she had kittens out there and the now every time I catch cat, whether it's a male or female, I always lifted up to check to see are they lactating are the kittens up, and what's what what's my plan going to be? We all have lessons that we learn. You know, the learning curve can be pretty challenging what keeps you persisting. I think what keeps me persisting is every time I learned one of those lessons in it's it's been a lot of hard lessons. It would break my heart, and I'll get so upset with myself and think oh my gosh. I shouldn't be doing this. I just caused more harm than good. And then I have to kind of remind especially back, then I had to keep reminding myself if I didn't do that work than I'm I don't think anyone was going to do it. And you just keep learning. You keep learning the new keep spreading the word about what lessons you learned. So I still try and do that today where if I'm if I'm giving advice over the phone, I try and cover those main big lessons that I learned that I don't wanna have other people have to go through and learn the hard way. So can you tell me a little bit about what you are doing now and how you're impacting community cats. Sure. So now, I'm went from throughout my high school years in college years do. A lot of trap neuter return in foster care, and then and basically all volunteers that worked within those organizations in the end up kind of finding my dream job. In Scituate, where I get to be the director and decide where we spend our time, and I ended up going through the mentoring program and starting trap neuter return program in Scituate and was able to kinda take those lessons in turn them into a program. Kind of one of the biggest things that I'm working on right now is making sure that we have the resources to help people when they call about a stray cat community cats and giving them their own resources to use in order to BIC situation. So an example would be yesterday I had someone call and they are quite a ways away they were about forty five minutes away from the shelter in. They had a mom in kittens under their shed. And so we were able to help the same type of same type deal with habitat we can cover the cost. But we just don't have the resources to send somebody out there to to do the actual trapping. So luckily, the person feeding the mom cat and kittens they were up for it. They just needed the guidance. So I really kind of switched over from being in the trenches as some would say in running out to every call trapping my whole weekend for spe day to getting other people involved in just kind of guiding them over the phone and giving them the resources that they need to do it which in turn has allowed me to help more than I would on my own. So that's great. So you're trying to think of a business design that helps you work more efficiently. Ineffectively? Yeah, we sort of have going where it's more of a it's more of a hotline. So will will go through a sheet of questions with each caller. Do you know who's feeding these cats because if you're not feeding them we have to find who is feeding them. So that we can get them trapped. Are you willing to do the dropping in? Transportation doing defined somebody. You know, let's get your. Let's get the neighbors involved enormously by getting that small community involved were able to make sure that we're fixing the whole problem in not just not just one single mom and kittens, so we actually have little a little leaflets that will hand out to the neighbors. That says, you know, this is what we're working on where giant fix cats near neighborhood. This is why this is why it's important. Do you want to be involved too? You have any cats that need to get spayed or neutered keep in touch with us, and let us know how you can help. Or what your thoughts are? And that's been huge to make sure that the whole neighborhood knows when we're what we're working on and also in the future. If you don't see a cat with an ear tip. Or if you have an issue who to call. So you're shelters located in southeastern Massachusetts. You did the mentoring program with me a couple of years ago? Have you seen any changes in the population of community cats? So we were lucky. Easy to start off with an area that didn't have as high high amounts of community cats as maybe areas like I was coming from like New Bedford area. And it's been a change in mentality where in this area. There wasn't really they didn't really know who to turn to when it came to when it came to community cats. So they went from have having an issue, but we had no clue. No one really knew in Scituate that there was cats out there that really needed the help. So one of our biggest obstacles was actually kinda spreading the word and just saying, you know, we're actually here to help you if you need the help because as far as we knew there wasn't as many as we thought. So we actually went from thinking there wasn't as many to realizing gosh, there is actually more than we realize. It's great that we're getting started with this program because we have a ton of work to do because as that word spread that. There was help people kinda came forward and said, oh, yeah. I've got cats, and I have I need help. I just didn't. I had no clue that you were even there to offer it so what sort of outreach did you do in order to get the word out in the community. So we spread the word on social media. But I found that flyers were actually more more effective than anything else. A lot of people just said, oh, yeah. I just saw the flyer in Starbucks had no clue that you are offering free Spain new next week or that there was trapped you to return options in the area. So flyers social media. Just by word of mouth was huge. So just when people call in say, you know, I saw a cat my neighborhood. I don't know if it's somebody's owned indoor outdoor cat or it could be a stray cow or feral cat. I'm not sure what to do. Just by them learning. What options were available in what we offered in? Spreading the word through their neighborhood was huge in that we specifically targeted Barnes to make sure that they that Barnes in the area knew that if you had. Barn cats that you needed help with where here to offer free Spain Nuder just give us a call. And we'll make it as easy as possible to get the help that you need. And now, let's take a moment. Listen to a few words from our sponsors flashlight tag was fun when you're a kid, but no one wants to play hide and seek with their trap finder traps location quickly and safely even when you visit at night with the reveal wild application for Samsung galaxy HTC one Sony experience and other Android phones or go to tiny. You're L dot com. Forward slash reveal wild. So

Ashleigh Davis Ashley Massachusetts New Bedford director Scituate Scituate animal Merrimack river Westfield state university Stacey LeBron Freetown Barnes Starbucks Spain Spain Nuder Samsung Sony